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Sample records for adjuvant therapeutic agent

  1. Hair regrowth. Therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Price, V H

    1998-04-01

    Today there are new classes of hair growth promotors with proven efficacy. This article reviews the current state of the art agents for treatment of two of the most common forms of hair loss encountered in clinical practice, androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata. Current therapeutic strategies are based on recent advances in the understanding of disordered hair growth. Practical treatment protocols are presented.

  2. Herbal medicines as adjuvants for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Calway, Tyler; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, many patients, including cancer patients, concurrently take prescription drugs and herbal supplements. Co-administration of prescription medicines and herbal supplements may have negative outcomes via pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. However, multiple constituents in botanicals may also yield beneficial pharmacological activities. Botanicals could possess effective anticancer compounds that may be used as adjuvants to existing chemotherapy to improve efficacy and/or reduce drug-induced toxicity. Herbal medicines, such as ginseng, potentiated the effects of chemotherapeutic agents via synergistic activities, supported by cell cycle evaluations, apoptotic observations, and computer-based docking analysis. Since botanicals are nearly always administrated orally, the role of intestinal microbiota in metabolizing ginseng constituents is presented. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical utility of the botanicals in cancer chemoprevention.

  3. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  4. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ω-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization.

  5. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  6. Host modulation by therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Sekar, Santhosh; Murugan, Thamaraiselvan

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease susceptible group present advanced periodontal breakdown even though they achieve a high standard of oral hygiene. Various destructive enzymes and inflammatory mediators are involved in destruction. These are elevated in case of periodontal destruction. Host modulation aims at bringing these enzymes and mediators to normal level. Doxycycline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), bisphosphonates, nitrous oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11), omega-3 fatty acid, mouse anti-human interleukin-6 receptor antibody (MRA), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kb) inhibitors, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor antagonist (TNF-α) are some of the therapeutic agents that have host modulation properties. PMID:23066265

  7. Nucleic acids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids (TNAs) and its precursors are applied to treat several pathologies and infections. TNA-based therapy has different rationales and mechanisms and can be classified into three main groups: 1) Therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides; 2) Therapeutic oligonucleotides; and 3) Therapeutic polynucleotides. This review will focus in those TNAs that have reached clinical trials with anticancer and antiviral protocols, the two most common applications of TNAs. Although therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides that interfere with nucleic acid metabolism and DNA polymerization have been successfully used as anticancer and antiviral drugs, they often produce toxic secondary effects related to dosage and continuous use. The use of oligonucleotides such as ribozyme and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) showed promise as therapeutic moieties but faced several issues such as nuclease sensitivity, off-target effects and efficient delivery. Nevertheless, immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides and AS-ODNs represent the most successful group of therapeutic oligonucleotides in the clinic. A newer group of therapeutic oligonucleotides, the aptamers, is rapidly advancing towards early detection and treatment alternatives the have reached the commercial interest. Despite the very high in vitro efficiency of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) they present issues with intracellular target accessibility, specificity and delivery. DNA vaccines showed great promise, but they resulted in very poor responses in the clinic and further development is uncertain. Despite their many issues, the exquisite specificity and versatility of therapeutic oligonucleotides attracts a great deal of research and resources that will certainly convert them in the TNA of choice for treating cancer and viral diseases in the near future.

  8. Targeted agents for adjuvant therapy of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    de Gramont, Aimery; Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; Larsen, Annette K; Louvet, Christophe

    2006-12-01

    Adjuvant therapy for colorectal cancer consists primarily of combinations of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) (with infusional or bolus 5-FU) with oxaliplatin or oral capecitabine. The angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab have shown activity when combined with 5-FU/LV-based regimens as first-line treatment of advanced disease and are currently being evaluated as part of adjuvant therapy in colon cancer. Bevacizumab is being evaluated in combination with FOLFOX4 (5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin), FOLFOX6, or XELOX (capecitabine/oxaliplatin) in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C08 trial, the AVANT (AVastin adjuvANT) trial, and the Intergroup Rectal Adjuvant trial. Cetuximab is being evaluated in combination with FOLFOX4 and FOLFOX6 in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) N0147 trial and the Pan European Trials in Adjuvant Colon Cancer (PETTAC) 8 trial.

  9. The role of targeted agents in adjuvant therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen

    2005-07-01

    The recent survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-small cell lung cancer provides optimism for the future success of targeted therapy in this setting. It is important that we begin to explore molecularly targeted agents in the adjuvant arena, but how best to accomplish this in the face of these new findings presents a challenge. Criteria for selecting promising targeted therapies and optimal trial designs to evaluate them expeditiously in the adjuvant setting are clearly needed.

  10. Exosome removal as a therapeutic adjuvant in cancer.

    PubMed

    Marleau, Annette M; Chen, Chien-Shing; Joyce, James A; Tullis, Richard H

    2012-06-27

    Exosome secretion is a notable feature of malignancy owing to the roles of these nanoparticles in cancer growth, immune suppression, tumor angiogenesis and therapeutic resistance. Exosomes are 30-100 nm membrane vesicles released by many cells types during normal physiological processes. Tumors aberrantly secrete large quantities of exosomes that transport oncoproteins and immune suppressive molecules to support tumor growth and metastasis. The role of exosomes in intercellular signaling is exemplified by human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) over-expressing breast cancer, where exosomes with the HER2 oncoprotein stimulate tumor growth and interfere with the activity of the therapeutic antibody Herceptin®. Since numerous observations from experimental model systems point toward an important clinical impact of exosomes in cancer, several pharmacological strategies have been proposed for targeting their malignant activities. We also propose a novel device strategy involving extracorporeal hemofiltration of exosomes from the entire circulatory system using an affinity plasmapheresis platform known as the Aethlon ADAPT™ (adaptive dialysis-like affinity platform technology) system, which would overcome the risks of toxicity and drug interactions posed by pharmacological approaches. This technology allows affinity agents, including exosome-binding lectins and antibodies, to be immobilized in the outer-capillary space of plasma filtration membranes that integrate into existing kidney dialysis systems. Device therapies that evolve from this platform allow rapid extracorporeal capture and selective retention of target particles < 200 nm from the entire circulatory system. This strategy is supported by clinical experience in hepatitis C virus-infected patients using an ADAPT™ device, the Hemopurifier®, to reduce the systemic load of virions having similar sizes and glycosylated surfaces as cancer exosomes. This review discusses the possible

  11. Model of Therapeutic Ultrasound Contrast Agent Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Targeted drug and gene delivery are rapidly emerging applications for ultrasound contrast agents since this could reduce potential deleterious side effects to healthy tissue and minimize the overall dose needed. Therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated microbubbles usually composed of a high molecular weight gas core and a highly viscous thick liquid shell. Development of new contrast agents requires a good understanding of the stability and breakup mechanisms of the liquid shell when subjected to ultrasonic acoustic waves. A novel numerical code, which enables one to investigate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents and the interaction between multiple agents and with nearby boundaries has been developed by coupling a Boundary Element Method solver and a finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver. We have applied the coupled code to examine shell breakup mechanisms for contrast agents near a solid wall. We found that the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location due to non-spherical deformations and that the contrast agent may break up due to local shell thinning and stretching as the non-spherical deformation is significant.

  12. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  13. Applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, various functional nanostructured materials with interesting optical, magnetic, mechanical and chemical properties have been extensively applied to biomedical areas including imaging, diagnosis and therapy. In therapeutics, most research has focused on the application of nanoparticles as potential delivery vehicles for drugs and genes, because nanoparticles in the size range of 2-100 nm can interact with biological systems at the molecular level, and allow targeted delivery and passage through biological barriers. Recent investigations have even revealed that several kinds of nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. Not only can they passively interact with cells, but they can also actively mediate molecular processes to regulate cell functions. This can be seen in the treatment of cancer via anti-angiogenic mechanisms as well as the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by effectively controlling oxidative stress. This review will present recent applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents in the treatment of disease.

  14. New therapeutic agents in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaeni; Park, Cheol Whee

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating diabetic nephropathy (DN) have mostly focused on interpreting the pathologic molecular mechanisms of DN, which may provide valuable tools for early diagnosis and prevention of disease onset and progression. Currently, there are few therapeutic drugs for DN, which mainly consist of antihypertensive and antiproteinuric measures that arise from strict renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inactivation. However, these traditional therapies are suboptimal and there is a clear, unmet need for treatments that offer effective schemes beyond glucose control. The complexity and heterogeneity of the DN entity, along with ambiguous renal endpoints that may deter accurate appraisal of new drug potency, contribute to a worsening of the situation. To address these issues, current research into original therapies to treat DN is focusing on the intrinsic renal pathways that intervene with intracellular signaling of anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and metabolic pathways. Mounting evidence in support of the favorable metabolic effects of these novel agents with respect to the renal aspects of DN supports the likelihood of systemic beneficial effects as well. Thus, when translated into clinical use, these novel agents would also address the comorbid factors associated with diabetes, such as obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review will provide a discussion of the promising and effective therapeutic agents for the management of DN. PMID:28049280

  15. Nicotine: abused substance and therapeutic agent.

    PubMed Central

    Le Houezec, J

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco dependence is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Nicotine is the main alkaloid in tobacco and the addictive compound of tobacco. It can improve both mood and cognitive functioning; these positive effects are strong reinforcements for smokers and contribute to their addiction. Opposite results also have been reported, however, and the effects of nicotine remain controversial. Recent epidemiological and empirical studies have indicated that smoking or nicotine or both may have protective effects against certain diseases. These findings have suggested that nicotine may be used as a therapeutic agent. However, because a variety of nicotinic cholinergic receptors are present in the brain, new agonist compounds may prove to be more effective than nicotine for therapeutic purposes. Studies are reviewed and the suggestion made that nicotine may prove useful as a tool to help us understand normal and pathological brain functioning. PMID:9549250

  16. Therapeutic neuroprotective agents for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Zhu, Haining; Li, Wei; Bowser, Robert; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal chronic neurodegenerative disease whose hallmark is proteinaceous, ubiquitinated, cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons and surrounding cells. Multiple mechanisms proposed as responsible for ALS pathogenesis include dysfunction of protein degradation, glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. It is therefore essential to gain a better understanding of the underlying disease etiology and search for neuroprotective agents that might delay disease onset, slow progression, prolong survival, and ultimately reduce the burden of disease. Because riluzole, the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment, prolongs the ALS patient’s life by only 3 months, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. In this review, we focus on studies of various small pharmacological compounds targeting the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of ALS and discuss their impact on disease progression. PMID:23864030

  17. Emerging therapeutic agents for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cornelio, Daniela B; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2009-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. The highest incidences occur in the developing world, where, in most countries, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80-95% of women with early stage cancer and 60% of locoregionally advanced cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. The current cytotoxic treatment options for advanced and metastatic cancer demonstrate modest results, with response rates of maximum 30% and overall survival of less than 10 months. Given this limited degree of success with conventional therapies, interest has increased in other therapeutic alternatives. In this way, targeted agents are emerging as potential candidates for improving survival in cervical cancer patients. In this review we highlight the main current therapeutic strategies for cervical cancer and summarize the most relevant patents from the latest five years. Special attention was given to patents with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  18. Therapeutic potential of chalcones as cardiovascular agents.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death affecting 17.3 million people across the globe and are estimated to affect 23.3 million people by year 2030. In recent years, about 7.3 million people died due to coronary heart disease, 9.4 million deaths due to high blood pressure and 6.2 million due to stroke, where obesity and atherosclerotic progression remain the chief pathological factors. The search for newer and better cardiovascular agents is the foremost need to manage cardiac patient population across the world. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential candidates to inhibit various cardiovascular, hematological and anti-obesity targets like angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), pancreatic lipase (PL), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), calcium (Ca(2+))/potassium (K(+)) channel, COX-1, TXA2 and TXB2. In this review, a comprehensive study of chalcones, their therapeutic targets, structure activity relationships (SARs), mechanisms of actions (MOAs) have been discussed. Chemically diverse chalcone scaffolds, their derivatives including structural manipulation of both aryl rings, replacement with heteroaryl scaffold(s) and hybridization through conjugation with other pharmacologically active scaffold have been highlighted. Chalcones which showed promising activity and have a well-defined MOAs, SARs must be considered as prototype for the design and development of potential anti-hypertensive, anti-anginal, anti-arrhythmic and cardioprotective agents. With the knowledge of these molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective chalcone derivatives as potential cardiovascular agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Overseas nurses--effective therapeutic agents?

    PubMed

    Shanley, E

    1980-09-01

    Factors affecting the effectiveness of overseas people employed as psychiatric nurses are discussed. Basic cultural influences, especially different value systems between the immigrant and the host population, are seen as unlikely to be greatly altered by the environment in which the immigrant nurses find themselves. In fact a greater divergence would seem more likely to occur. The different experiences of immigrant nurses compared with nurses recruited in Britain are considered under the following headings: expectations of the immigrants on entering nursing, their contact with the host culture, the reaction of the indigenous population to the immigrant, language difficulties, and the insecurity of employment. The conclusion drawn is that the cultural differences, recruitment methods, the immigrants' experiences in employment and lack of contact with the culture of the indigenous population (apart from their deviant members) are likely to adversely affect his/her ability to function as a therapeutic agent. This is particularly important where the form of treatment is based on the social model.

  20. Glycosaminoglycans from marine sources as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Valcarcel, Jesus; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo I; Reis, Rui L; Vázquez, José Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in marine animals are different to those of terrestrial organisms, mainly in terms of molecular weight and sulfation. The therapeutic properties of GAGs are related to their ability to interact with proteins, which is very much influenced by sulfation position and patterns. Since currently GAGs cannot be chemically synthesized, they are sourced from natural products, with high intra- but also inter-species variability, in terms of chain length, disaccharide composition and sulfation pattern. Consequently, sulfated GAGs are the most interesting molecules in the marine environment and constitute the focus of the present review. In particular, chondroitin sulfate (CS) appears as the most promising compound. CS-E chains [GlcA-GalNAc(4S,6S)] extracted from squid possess antiviral and anti-metastatic activities and seem to impart signalling properties and improve the mechanical performance of cartilage engineering constructs; Squid CS-E and octopus CS-K [GlcA(3S)-GalNAc(4S)], dermatan sulfate (DS) from sea squirts [-iK units, IdoA(3S)-GalNAc(4S)] and sea urchins [-iE units, IdoA-GalNAc(4S,6S)] and hybrids CS/DS from sharks (-B/iB [GlcA/IdoA(2S)-GalNAc(4S)], -D/iD [GlcA/IdoA(2S)-GalNAc(6S)] and -E/iE units [GlcA/IdoA-GalNAc(4S,6S)]) promote neurite outgrowth and could be valuable materials for nerve regeneration. Also displaying antiviral and anti-metastatic properties, a rare CS with fucosylated branches isolated from sea cucumbers is an anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory agent. In this same line, marine heparin extracted from shrimp and sea squirt has proven anti-inflammatory properties, with the added advantage of decreased risk of bleeding because of its low anticoagulant activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioactive peroxides as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2008-02-01

    Present review describes research on more than 280 natural anticancer agents isolated from terrestrial and marine sources and synthetic biologically active peroxides. Intensive searches for new classes of pharmacologically potent agents produced by terrestrial and marine organisms have resulted in the discovery of dozens of compounds possessing high cytotoxic, antibacterial, antimalarial, and other activities as an important source of leads for drug discovery.

  2. Antioxidants as Therapeutic Agents for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K.; Jampana, Sarat C.; Weinman, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly associated with a number of liver diseases and is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hemochromatosis and Wilson’s disease. Antioxidant therapy has thus been considered to have the possibility of beneficial effects in the management of these liver diseases. In spite of this promise, antioxidants have produced mixed results in a number of clinical trials of efficacy. This review summarizes the results of clinical trials of antioxidants as sole or adjuvant therapy of chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease and NASH. Overall, the most promising results to date are for vitamin E therapy of NASH but some encouraging results have been obtained with antioxidant therapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis as well. In spite of evidence for small reductions of serum ALT, there is as yet no convincing evidence that antioxidant therapy itself is beneficial to patients with chronic hepatitis C. Problems such as small sample size, short follow up duration, inadequate end points, failure to demonstrate tissue delivery and antioxidant efficacy, and heterogeneous nature of the “antioxidant” compounds used have complicated interpretation of results of the clinical studies. These limitations and their implications for future trial design are discussed. PMID:22093324

  3. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  4. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  5. Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

    1987-07-01

    An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

  6. Calcium antagonists: A new class of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Gunawan, Antonius; Massumi, Ali; Hall, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    A new class of therapeutic agents, sharing inhibition of the slow calcium channel, will soon be available to the American patient. Selective action of these agents upon the atrioventricular node, the smooth muscle of coronary and peripheral arteries, and the contractility of cardiac muscle opens new vistas in cardiovascular pharmacology. Early release of these agents by the Federal Drug Administration for general use is urged, based upon the already wide and successful experience in the European and South American continents. PMID:15216199

  7. Novel therapeutic agents for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gescuk, Bryan D; Davis, John C

    2002-09-01

    The last significant breakthrough in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was the use of cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone in the treatment of lupus nephritis. Recent advances in immunology, oncology, and endocrinology have resulted in many potential therapies for SLE. These therapies include new immunosuppressants, biologic medications, tolerizing agents, immunoablation techniques, and hormonal medications. Each of these approaches will be discussed in this review. Some therapies are currently in use in clinical rheumatology practice (mycophenolate mofetil) and others are entering phase I trials (anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody). While some of these new therapies target specific inflammatory mechanisms in SLE (anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody), others work by nonspecific inhibition of the immune system (immunoablation).

  8. Therapeutic Effects of PADRE-BAFF Autovaccine on Rat Adjuvant Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-dong; Xue, Xiao-chang; Gao, Mei-li; Wang, Xian-feng; Shu, Zhen; Mu, Nan; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zeng-lu; Hao, Qiang; Li, Wei-na; Li, Meng; Zhang, Cun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ying-qi

    2014-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a cytokine of tumor necrosis factor family mainly produced by monocytes and dendritic cells. BAFF can regulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of B lymphocytes by binding with BAFF-R on B cell membrane. Accumulating evidences showed that BAFF played crucial roles and was overexpressed in various autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This suggests that BAFF may be a therapeutic target for these diseases. In the present study, we developed a BAFF therapeutic vaccine by coupling a T helper cell epitope AKFVAAWTLKAA (PADRE) to the N terminus of BAFF extracellular domains (PADRE-BAFF) and expressed this fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purified vaccine can induce high titer of neutralizing BAFF antibodies and ameliorate the syndrome of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Our data indicated that the BAFF autovaccine may be a useful candidate for the treatment of some autoimmune diseases associated with high level of BAFF. PMID:24791002

  9. Therapeutic effect of melittin on a rat model of chronic prostatitis induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Cai, Liang

    2017-06-01

    The present study was aimed to establish a model of chronic prostatitis in rat with the use of intraprostatic injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant, and to examine the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of melittin on the newly-developed chronic prostatic pain model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the prostate. Twelve days after model rats of the treatment group were injected melittin into the prostate, while those of the control group received sterile saline injection. The nociceptive effects of CFA were evaluated by using a behavior approach (i.e. mechanical pain threshold measurement) on the day of CFA injection and 6, 12, and 18days after CFA injection. After the in-live study was done, the prostate was collected for histological examination of inflammatory cell infiltration. Levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in prostate and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal cord were determined using immunohistochemistry. Rats of the sham control group received intraprostatic injection of sterile saline and were studied using the same methods RESULTS: Intraprostatic CFA injection induced local allodynia that lasted over at least 2 weeks. The pain behavior of rat was associated with increases in inflammatory cell infiltration into the prostate. Levels of COX-2 in prostate and GFAP in spinal cord were also elevated. Treatment with melittin significantly raised pain threshold, decreased inflammatory infiltrates, and suppressed COX-2 and GFAP expression. Intraprostatic injection of CFA induced neurogenic prostatitis and prostatic pain. The established model will be useful to the study of CP/CPPS pathogenesis. Melittin demonstrated profound anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects on the chronic prostatic pain model, suggesting melittin may hold promise as a novel therapeutic for treatment of CP/CPPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiotoxicity of the Anticancer Therapeutic Agent Bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Nowis, Dominika; Mączewski, Michał; Mackiewicz, Urszula; Kujawa, Marek; Ratajska, Anna; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M.; Malinowska, Monika; Bil, Jacek; Salwa, Paweł; Bugajski, Marek; Wójcik, Cezary; Siński, Maciej; Abramczyk, Piotr; Winiarska, Magdalena; Dąbrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Duszyński, Jerzy; Jakóbisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    Recent case reports provided alarming signals that treatment with bortezomib might be associated with cardiac events. In all reported cases, patients experiencing cardiac problems were previously or concomitantly treated with other chemotherapeutics including cardiotoxic anthracyclines. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish which components of the therapeutic regimens contribute to cardiotoxicity. Here, we addressed the influence of bortezomib on cardiac function in rats that were not treated with other drugs. Rats were treated with bortezomib at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Echocardiography, histopathology, and electron microscopy were used to evaluate cardiac function and structural changes. Respiration of the rat heart mitochondria was measured polarographically. Cell culture experiments were used to determine the influence of bortezomib on cardiomyocyte survival, contractility, Ca2+ fluxes, induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and autophagy. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment leads to left ventricular contractile dysfunction manifested by a significant drop in left ventricle ejection fraction. Dramatic ultrastructural abnormalities of cardiomyocytes, especially within mitochondria, were accompanied by decreased ATP synthesis and decreased cardiomyocyte contractility. Monitoring of cardiac function in bortezomib-treated patients should be implemented to evaluate how frequently cardiotoxicity develops especially in patients with pre-existing cardiac conditions, as well as when using additional cardiotoxic drugs. PMID:20519734

  11. Chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic potential of pomegranate (Punica granatum) for human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Deuk; Mehta, Rajendra; Yu, Weiping; Neeman, Ishak; Livney, Talia; Amichay, Akiva; Poirier, Donald; Nicholls, Paul; Kirby, Andrew; Jiang, Wenguo; Mansel, Robert; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Rabi, Thangaiyan; Kaplan, Boris; Lansky, Ephraim

    2002-02-01

    Fresh organically grown pomegranates (Punica granatum L.) of the Wonderful cultivar were processed into three components: fermented juice, aqueous pericarp extract and cold-pressed or supercritical CO2-extracted seed oil. Exposure to additional solvents yielded polyphenol-rich fractions ('polyphenols') from each of the three components. Their actions, and of the crude whole oil and crude fermented and unfermented juice concentrate, were assessed in vitro for possible chemopreventive or adjuvant therapeutic potential in human breast cancer. The ability to effect a blockade of endogenous active estrogen biosynthesis was shown by polyphenols from fermented juice, pericarp, and oil, which inhibited aromatase activity by 60-80%. Fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols, and whole seed oil, inhibited 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 from 34 to 79%, at concentrations ranging from 100 to 1,000 microg/ml according to seed oil > fermented juice polyphenols > pericarp polyphenols. In a yeast estrogen screen (YES) lyophilized fresh pomegranate juice effected a 55% inhibition of the estrogenic activity of 17-beta-estradiol; whereas the lyophilized juice by itself displayed only minimal estrogenic action. Inhibition of cell lines by fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols was according to estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) > estrogen-independent (MB-MDA-231) > normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). In both MCF-7 and MB-MDA-231 cells, fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols consistently showed about twice the anti-proliferative effect as fresh pomegranate juice polyphenols. Pomegranate seed oil effected 90% inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 at 100 microg/ml medium, 75% inhibition of invasion of MCF-7 across a Matrigel membrane at 10 microg/ml, and 54% apoptosis in MDA-MB-435 estrogen receptor negative metastatic human breast cancer cells at 50 microg/ml. In a murine mammary gland organ culture, fermented juice polyphenols effected 47% inhibition of cancerous

  12. An overview of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Raymond P; Young, Howard A; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2009-12-01

    Cytokine-based therapies have the potential to provide novel treatments for cancer, autoimmune diseases, and many types of infectious disease. However, to date, the full clinical potential of cytokines as drugs has been limited by a number of factors. To discuss these limitations and explore ways to overcome them, the FDA partnered with the New York Academy of Sciences in March 2009 to host a two-day forum to discuss more effective ways to harness the clinical potential of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents. The first day was focused primarily on the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. The second day focused largely on the use of cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. This issue of the Annals includes more than a dozen papers that summarize much of the information that was presented during this very informative two-day conference.

  13. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis, I: Oral agents.

    PubMed

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2004-07-01

    Given the prevalence of herpes labialis, effective therapy has the potential to affect the lives of many and presents a challenge for clinicians. Over the last several years, most of the focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. Recently, however, several studies have been published examining the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Several therapeutic agents, both prescription and over-the-counter, are available for controlling and managing the disease. In this series of articles, we review oral and topical therapeutic agents that are available in the treatment of herpes labialis and its associated symptoms. This article will review oral treatment options.

  14. A virtual therapeutic environment with user projective agents.

    PubMed

    Ookita, S Y; Tokuda, H

    2001-02-01

    Today, we see the Internet as more than just an information infrastructure, but a socializing place and a safe outlet of inner feelings. Many personalities develop aside from real world life due to its anonymous environment. Virtual world interactions are bringing about new psychological illnesses ranging from netaddiction to technostress, as well as online personality disorders and conflicts in multiple identities that exist in the virtual world. Presently, there are no standard therapy models for the virtual environment. There are very few therapeutic environments, or tools especially made for virtual therapeutic environments. The goal of our research is to provide the therapy model and middleware tools for psychologists to use in virtual therapeutic environments. We propose the Cyber Therapy Model, and Projective Agents, a tool used in the therapeutic environment. To evaluate the effectiveness of the tool, we created a prototype system, called the Virtual Group Counseling System, which is a therapeutic environment that allows the user to participate in group counseling through the eyes of their Projective Agent. Projective Agents inherit the user's personality traits. During the virtual group counseling, the user's Projective Agent interacts and collaborates to recover and increase their psychological growth. The prototype system provides a simulation environment where psychologists can adjust the parameters and customize their own simulation environment. The model and tool is a first attempt toward simulating online personalities that may exist only online, and provide data for observation.

  15. Immune adjuvants as critical guides directing immunity triggered by therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil; Tartour, Eric; Michalek, Jaroslav; Stathopoulos, Apostolos; Dobrovolskienė, Neringa T; Strioga, Marius M

    2014-04-01

    Tumor growth is controlled by natural antitumor immune responses alone or by augmented immune reactivity resulting from different forms of immunotherapy, which has demonstrated clinical benefit in numerous studies, although the overall percentage of patients with durable clinical responses remains limited. This is attributed to the heterogeneity of the disease, the inclusion of late-stage patients with no other treatment options and advanced tumor-associated immunosuppression, which may be consolidated by certain types of chemotherapy. Despite variable responsiveness to distinct types of immunotherapy, therapeutic cancer vaccination has shown meaningful efficacy for a variety of cancers. A key step during cancer vaccination involves the appropriate modeling of the functional state of dendritic cells (DCs) capable of co-delivering four critical signals for proper instruction of tumor antigen-specific T cells. However, the education of DCs, either directly in situ, or ex vivo by various complex procedures, lacks standardization. Also, it is questioned whether ex vivo-prepared DC vaccines are superior to in situ-administered adjuvant-guided vaccines, although both approaches have shown success. Evaluation of these variables is further complicated by a lack of consensus in evaluating vaccination clinical study end points. We discuss the role of signals needed for the preparation of classic in situ and modern ex vivo DC vaccines capable of proper reprogramming of antitumor immune responses in patients with cancer.

  16. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  17. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis).

  18. Antioxidant Micronutrients: Therapeutic Counter Measures for Chemical Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-08-2-0007 1 Mar 2010 - 28 Feb 2011Annual01-03-2011 Antioxidant Micronutrients : Therapeutic Counter Measures for Chemical...Agents Kedar Prasad, Ph.D. Premier Micronutrient Corporation Novato, CA 94949 The results of the first phase of HD study suggested that exposure to

  19. Recent Advances on Inorganic Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Chengyao; Cheng, Jing; Yuan, Zhiqin

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely investigated as therapeutic agents for cancer treatments in biomedical fields due to their unique physical/chemical properties, versatile synthetic strategies, easy surface functionalization and excellent biocompatibility. This review focuses on the discussion of several types of inorganic nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutic agents, including gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Several cancer therapy techniques are briefly introduced at the beginning. Emphasis is placed on how these inorganic nanoparticles can provide enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment through site-specific accumulation, targeted drug delivery and stimulated drug release, with elaborations on several examples to highlight the respective strategies adopted. Finally, a brief summary and future challenges are included. PMID:27898016

  20. Small molecules as therapeutic agents for inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Matalonga, Leslie; Gort, Laura; Ribes, Antonia

    2017-03-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) remain without effective treatment mainly due to the incapacity of conventional therapeutic approaches to target the neurological symptomatology and to ameliorate the multisystemic involvement frequently observed in these patients. However, in recent years, the therapeutic use of small molecules has emerged as a promising approach for treating this heterogeneous group of disorders. In this review, we focus on the use of therapeutically active small molecules to treat IEM, including readthrough agents, pharmacological chaperones, proteostasis regulators, substrate inhibitors, and autophagy inducers. The small molecules reviewed herein act at different cellular levels, and this knowledge provides new tools to set up innovative treatment approaches for particular IEM. We review the molecular mechanism underlying therapeutic properties of small molecules, methodologies used to screen for these compounds, and their applicability in preclinical and clinical practice.

  1. Novel therapeutic agents in clinical development for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Conventional immunosuppressive therapies have radically transformed patient survival in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their use is associated with considerable toxicity and a substantial proportion of patients remain refractory to treatment. A more comprehensive understanding of the complexity of SLE immunopathogenesis has evolved over the past decade and has led to the testing of several biologic agents in clinical trials. There is a clear need for new therapeutic agents that overcome these issues, and biologic agents offer exciting prospects as future SLE therapies. An array of promising new therapies are currently emerging or are under development including B-cell depletion therapies, agents targeting B-cell survival factors, blockade of T-cell co-stimulation and anti-cytokine therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies against interleukin-6 and interferon-α. PMID:23642011

  2. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  3. Vaccinia virus, a promising new therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Yaghchi, Chadwan; Zhang, Zhongxian; Alusi, Ghassan; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Wang, Yaohe

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients signifies a need for radically new therapeutic strategies. Tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses have emerged as attractive therapeutic candidates for cancer treatment due to their inherent ability to specifically target and lyse tumor cells as well as induce antitumor effects by multiple action mechanisms. Vaccinia virus has several inherent features that make it particularly suitable for use as an oncolytic agent. In this review, we will discuss the potential of vaccinia virus in the management of pancreatic cancer in light of our increased understanding of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in the disease process as well as our extending knowledge in the biology of vaccinia virus.

  4. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  5. Activities of Therapeutic Agents and Myristamidopropyl Dimethylamine against Acanthamoeba Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kilvington, Simon; Hughes, Reanne; Byas, James; Dart, John

    2002-01-01

    The activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) against Acanthamoeba strains recalcitrant to medical therapy were studied. MAPD minimum cysticidal concentrations were 6.25 to 25 μg/ml; 10 to 30 μg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill after 6 h, and 50 and 100 μg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill within 2 and 1 h, respectively. PMID:12019127

  6. Activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine against Acanthamoeba isolates.

    PubMed

    Kilvington, Simon; Hughes, Reanne; Byas, James; Dart, John

    2002-06-01

    The activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) against Acanthamoeba strains recalcitrant to medical therapy were studied. MAPD minimum cysticidal concentrations were 6.25 to 25 microg/ml; 10 to 30 microg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill after 6 h, and 50 and 100 microg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill within 2 and 1 h, respectively.

  7. Aptamer Oligonucleotides: Novel Potential Therapeutic Agents in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Xiaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid oligonucleotides generated in vitro based on affinity for certain target molecules by a process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. Aptamers can bind their target molecules with high specificity and selectivity by means of structure compatibility, stacking of aromatic rings, electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonding. With several advantages over monoclonal antibodies and other conventional small-molecule therapeutics, such as high specificity and affinity, negligible batch to batch variation, flexible modification and stability, lack of toxicity and low immunogenicity, aptamers are becoming promising novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the development of aptamers as potential therapeutics for autoimmune diseases, including diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  8. Therapeutic interventions in sepsis: current and anticipated pharmacological agents

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Prashant; Rao, G Madhava; Pandey, Gitu; Sharma, Shweta; Mittapelly, Naresh; Shegokar, Ranjita; Mishra, Prabhat Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterized by a multisystem response to a pathogenic assault due to underlying infection that involves a combination of interconnected biochemical, cellular and organ–organ interactive networks. After the withdrawal of recombinant human-activated protein C (rAPC), researchers and physicians have continued to search for new therapeutic approaches and targets against sepsis, effective in both hypo- and hyperinflammatory states. Currently, statins are being evaluated as a viable option in clinical trials. Many agents that have shown favourable results in experimental sepsis are not clinically effective or have not been clinically evaluated. Apart from developing new therapeutic molecules, there is great scope for for developing a variety of drug delivery strategies, such as nanoparticulate carriers and phospholipid-based systems. These nanoparticulate carriers neutralize intracorporeal LPS as well as deliver therapeutic agents to targeted tissues and subcellular locations. Here, we review and critically discuss the present status and new experimental and clinical approaches for therapeutic intervention in sepsis. PMID:24977655

  9. Phytocannabinoids as novel therapeutic agents in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Williams, Claire M; Whalley, Benjamin J; Stephens, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The Cannabis sativa herb contains over 100 phytocannabinoid (pCB) compounds and has been used for thousands of years for both recreational and medicinal purposes. In the past two decades, characterisation of the body's endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid, eCB) system (ECS) has highlighted activation of central CB(1) receptors by the major pCB, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) as the primary mediator of the psychoactive, hyperphagic and some of the potentially therapeutic properties of ingested cannabis. Whilst Δ(9)-THC is the most prevalent and widely studied pCB, it is also the predominant psychotropic component of cannabis, a property that likely limits its widespread therapeutic use as an isolated agent. In this regard, research focus has recently widened to include other pCBs including cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), some of which show potential as therapeutic agents in preclinical models of CNS disease. Moreover, it is becoming evident that these non-Δ(9)-THC pCBs act at a wide range of pharmacological targets, not solely limited to CB receptors. Disorders that could be targeted include epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders and the central modulation of feeding behaviour. Here, we review pCB effects in preclinical models of CNS disease and, where available, clinical trial data that support therapeutic effects. Such developments may soon yield the first non-Δ(9)-THC pCB-based medicines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel therapeutic agents in the management of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak A; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2017-09-01

    This review aims to highlight the novel therapeutic agents in the management of brain metastases which are in various stages of clinical development. We review the results from recent clinical trials, publications and presentations at recent national and international conferences. Several new systemic treatment options for brain metastases are in early or advanced clinical trials. These drugs have good intracranial and extracranial activities. As lung cancer, breast cancer, and melanoma are the three most common causes of brain metastases, most agents in clinical development are focused on these tumor types. Several of these therapies are small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies against the tyrosine kinase receptors. Another exciting development in brain metastases management is the use of immunotherapy agents. The anti-CTLA-4 and\\or anti-PD-1 antibodies have shown promising intracranial activity in melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases. Contemporary clinical trials have shown encouraging intracranial activity of newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against tyrosine kinase receptors and immunotherapy agents in select group of patients with brain metastases. Further studies are needed to develop therapeutic strategies, in order to improve survival in patients with brain metastases.

  11. Bioengineering of noncoding RNAs for research agents and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pui Yan; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of functional small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, in the control of human cellular processes has opened new avenues to develop RNA-based therapies for various diseases including viral infections and cancers. However, studying ncRNA functions and developing RNA-based therapeutics relies on access to large quantities of affordable ncRNA agents. Currently, synthetic RNAs account for the major source of agents for RNA research and development, yet carry artificial modifications on the ribose ring and phosphate backbone in sharp contrast to posttranscriptional modifications present on the nucleobases or unmodified natural RNA molecules produced within cells. Therefore, large efforts have been made in recent years to develop recombinant RNA techniques to cost-effectively produce biological RNA agents that may better capture the structure, function, and safety properties of natural RNAs. In this article, we summarize and compare current in vitro and in vivo methods for the production of RNA agents including chemical synthesis, in vitro transcription, and bioengineering approaches. We highlight the latest recombinant RNA approaches using transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and optimal ncRNA scaffold (OnRS), and discuss the applications of bioengineered ncRNA agents (BERAs) that should facilitate RNA research and development.

  12. [Visceral leishmaniasis: clinical sensitivity and resistance to various therapeutic agents].

    PubMed

    Janvier, F; Morillon, M; Olliaro, P

    2008-02-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is present in 61 countries but 90% of the 500,000 new cases that arise annually occur in five countries, i.e., India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sudan, and Brazil. Annual mortality is approximately 59000 cases. Agents based on pentavalent antimony have been the mainstay of treatment for the last 60 years. In recent years, however, clinical resistance to these agents has been reported especially in the state of Bihar in India. Pentamidine and amphotericin B were introduced in the 1950s and 1960s. More recent additions to the therapeutic arsenal include liposomal amphotericin B, miltefosine, and paromomycin. Among these recent molecules, miltefosine, i.e., the only oral agent, appears most vulnerable because it involves long-term treatment and has a long half-life. The main therapeutic problems now being encountered are the emergence of acquired resistance to antimonials, the high cost of treatment, and failure of therapy in immunocompromised patients mainly due to concurrent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. For eradication initiatives such as the one aimed at eliminating leishmaniasis on the Indian subcontinent, the appearance of drug resistance increases the risk associated to parasite infection and, as for malaria, tuberculosis and HIV infection, raises fears that the problems in the implementation of public health policies will lead to highly refractory forms.

  13. Endocrine therapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: selecting the best agents, the timing and duration of treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Jie; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2016-06-01

    Hormone receptor (HR) positive breast cancers represent the vast majority of breast cancers. Adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is highly effective and appropriate for nearly all women with HR positive tumors. Adjuvant tamoxifen (TAM) is a major endocrine treatment option, which has been found to be effective in both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients. Considerable evidence has been accrued of a benefit for ovarian ablation or suppression (OA/S) in premenopausal patients, for aromatase inhibitors (AIS) in postmenopausal patients, for the longer duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy and for the clinical utility of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Clinical practice guidelines should keep changing with developing evidence-based practice guidelines pertaining to breast cancer care. The present publication conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature addressing the use of endocrine therapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy for HR positive breast cancer, focusing on selecting the best agents for both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients, as well as the optimal duration of such treatment.

  14. Efficacy and safety of probiotics as adjuvant agents for Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LV, ZHIFA; WANG, BEN; ZHOU, XIAOJIANG; WANG, FUCAI; XIE, YONG; ZHENG, HUILIE; LV, NONGHUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether probiotics could help to improve the eradication rates and reduce the side effects associated with anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment, and to investigate the optimal time and duration of probiotic administration during the treatment, thus providing clinical practice guidelines for eradication success worldwide. By searching Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Science Citation Index, all the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics as adjuvant agents of anti-H. pylori standard triple-therapy regimens with placebo or no treatment were selected. Statistical analysis was performed with the Comprehensive Meta Analysis Software. Subgroup, meta-regression and sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Twenty-one RCTs involving a total of 3,814 participants met the inclusion criteria. The pooled eradication rates of the probiotic group were 80.3% (1,709/2,128) by intention-to-treat (ITT) and 83.8% (1,709/2,039) by pro-protocol analyses; the pooled relative risk (RR) by ITT for probiotic supplementation versus treatment without probiotics was 1.12 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06–1.19]. A reduced risk of overall H. pylori therapy-related adverse effects was also found with probiotic supplementation (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40–0.91). The subgroup analyses showed that probiotic supplementation prior and subsequent to the treatment regimen both improved eradication rates for H. pylori infection. Furthermore, probiotic treatment lasting >2 weeks and including Lactobacillus or multiple probiotic strains significantly enhanced the efficacy. In conclusion, supplementation with probiotics for H. pylori eradication may be effective in increasing eradication rates and decreasing therapy-related side effects. Probiotic administration prior or subsequent to therapy and for a duration of >2 weeks may increase the eradication efficacy. PMID:25667617

  15. Vaccinia virus, a promising new therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yaghchi, Chadwan Al; Zhang, Zhongxian; Alusi, Ghassan; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Wang, Yaohe

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients signifies a need for radically new therapeutic strategies. Tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses have emerged as attractive therapeutic candidates for cancer treatment due to their inherent ability to specifically target and lyse tumor cells as well as induce antitumor effects by multiple action mechanisms. Vaccinia virus has several inherent features that make it particularly suitable for use as an oncolytic agent. In this review, we will discuss the potential of vaccinia virus in the management of pancreatic cancer in light of our increased understanding of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in the disease process as well as our extending knowledge in the biology of vaccinia virus. PMID:26595180

  16. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  17. Therapeutic agents and herbs in topical application for acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Kanlayavattanakul, M; Lourith, N

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris suppresses an individual's self-confidence by causing distress with regard to physical appearance, which affects a significant number of individuals during puberty and is delineated by adolescence. Several treatments have been introduced to decrease the aesthetic and psychological problems caused by acne. The topical application of therapeutic agents has been found to be more feasible than hormonal treatment and laser therapy. The ingredients in topical acne treatments, particularly herbs and naturally derived compounds, have received considerable interest as they have fewer adverse effects than synthetic agents. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Novel prospects of statins as therapeutic agents in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; Ciaglia, Elena; D'Alessandro, Alba; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Statins are well known competitive inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase enzyme (HMG-CoA reductase), thus traditionally used as cholesterol-lowering agents. In recent years, more and more effects of statins have been revealed. Nowadays alterations of lipid metabolism have been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. Consequently, much attention has been directed toward the potential of statins as therapeutic agents in the oncological field. Accumulated in vitro and in vivo clinical evidence point out the role of statins in a variety of human malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and anti-tumor immune response. Herein, we summarize and discuss, in light of the most recent observations, the anti-tumor effects of statins, underpinning the detailed mode of action and looking for their true significance in cancer prevention and treatment, to determine if and in which case statin repositioning could be really justified for neoplastic diseases.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies as Prophylactic and Therapeutic Agents Against Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Clayton, April M

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that is responsible for considerable epidemics worldwide and recently emerged in the Americas in 2013. CHIKV may cause long-lasting arthralgia after acute infection. With currently no licensed vaccines or antivirals, the design of effective therapies to prevent or treat CHIKV infection is of utmost importance and will be facilitated by increased understanding of the dynamics of chikungunya. In this article, monoclonal antibodies against CHIKV as viable prophylactic and therapeutic agents will be discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. D-Peptides as Recognition Molecules and Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Li, Xue; Xie, Zuoxu; Xie, Cao; Zhan, Changyou; Hu, Xuefeng; Shen, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Su, Bingxia; Wang, Jing; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-08-01

    Over recent years, D-peptides have attracted increasing attention. D-peptides increase enzymatic stability, prolong the plasma half-life, improve oral bioavailability, and enhance binding activity and specificity with receptor or target proteins, in comparison with the corresponding L-peptide. Therefore, D-peptides are considered to have potential as recognition molecules and therapeutic agents. This review focuses on the design and application of D-peptides with biological activity. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Metformin as an Adjuvant Drug against Pediatric Sarcomas: Hypoxia Limits Therapeutic Effects of the Drug

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Cecilia; Capristo, Mariantonietta; Manara, Maria Cristina; Mancarella, Caterina; Landuzzi, Lorena; Belfiore, Antonino; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Metformin, a well-known insulin-sensitizer commonly used for type 2 diabetes therapy, has recently emerged as potentially very attractive drug also in oncology. It is cheap, it is relatively safe and many reports have indicated effects in cancer prevention and therapy. These desirable features are particularly interesting for pediatric sarcomas, a group of rare tumors that have been shown to be dependent on IGF and insulin system for pathogenesis and progression. Metformin exerts anti-mitogenic activity in several cancer histotypes through several molecular mechanisms. In this paper, we analyzed its effects against osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, the three most common pediatric sarcomas. Despite in vitro metformin gave remarkable antiproliferative and chemosensitizing effects both in sensitive and chemoresistant cells, its efficacy was not confirmed against Ewing sarcoma xenografts neither as single agent nor in combination with vincristine. This discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo effects may be due to hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors. We provide evidences that in hypoxia conditions metformin was not able to activate AMPK and inhibit mTOR signaling, which likely prevents the inhibitory effects of metformin on tumor growth. Thus, although metformin may be considered a useful complement of conventional chemotherapy in normoxia, its therapeutic value in highly hypoxic tumors may be more limited. The impact of hypoxia should be considered when novel therapies are planned for pediatric sarcomas. PMID:24391834

  2. Optometrist prescribing of therapeutic agents: findings of the AESOP survey.

    PubMed

    Mason, Anne; Mason, James

    2002-05-01

    Throughout the USA and in some parts of Australia and Canada, licensed optometrists may prescribe therapeutic agents for certain eye conditions. However, this role is not currently available to European optometrists. The extension of prescribing rights to new professional groups was the subject of a UK government-commissioned review, which cited optometrists as potential candidates. A recent literature review found limited evidence to assess the appropriateness of eye care delivered by different health care providers. To inform the UK decision, we therefore conducted a national postal survey to explore how optometric practice might change with the introduction of therapeutic prescribing. The Anonymous Enquiry of the Scope for Optometrist Prescribing (AESOP), was sent to a random 10% sample of registered optometrists. Over 80% of respondents indicated that optometrists should be able to train as therapeutic prescribers. Most respondents were willing to undergo training, periodic re-accreditation and continuing education, as well to participate in simple professional audit of their prescribing. Respondents anticipated that referrals to general practitioners (GPs) would be reduced by nearly 40% and to ophthalmologists via a GP by nearly 20%. Optometrist participation could increase patient access to therapeutic ocular care by between 29% and 50%. Authorising UK optometrists to prescribe therapeutically for eye diseases would appear to make good use of their existing skills and improve patient access to eye care, while relieving pressures upon other healthcare providers. Tentative economic analysis suggests that the introduction of independent optometrist prescribing may be cost neutral. However, adequate comparative research on the performance of optometrists as prescribers is needed and the issue of reimbursement will require careful consideration.

  3. Surface-engineered nanomaterials as X-ray absorbing adjuvant agents for Auger-mediated chemo-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Tsai, De-Hao; Hackley, Vincent A.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    We report a prototype approach to formulate gold nanoparticle-based X-ray absorbing agents through surface-engineering of a cisplatin pharmacophore with modified polyacrylate. The resulting agents exhibit both chemo-therapeutic potency to cancer cells and Auger-mediated secondary electron emission, showing great potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of chemo-radiation.We report a prototype approach to formulate gold nanoparticle-based X-ray absorbing agents through surface-engineering of a cisplatin pharmacophore with modified polyacrylate. The resulting agents exhibit both chemo-therapeutic potency to cancer cells and Auger-mediated secondary electron emission, showing great potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of chemo-radiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedure. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00333g

  4. Scorpion Toxin Polyptides as Therapeutic Agents: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Bhavya, Janardhan; Francois, Niyonzima N; More, Veena S; More, Sunil S

    2016-01-01

    Scorpions are distributed throughout the world and numerous biological molecules are found in their venom most importantly peptide toxins. These toxins modulate the ion channels either by blocking the pore of the channel or by altering the voltage gating. Molecules which block the pores have been useful in deciphering the structure of the ion channels. Many scorpion toxins have already been used for probing the voltage gated sodium channels and studying their activation and inactivation processes. The specialty of scorpion toxins is to discriminate between vertebrate and invertebrate channels which have led them to applications as pharmacological tools. Most of the scorpion toxin polypeptides were isolated, characterized and were shown to possess vital properties useful in the field of medicine. For instance, they show therapeutic properties such as antimicrobial activity, anticancer activity, used to treat autoimmune diseases and cardiovascular effects. Although the scorpion toxins exhibited good therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo, no one has reached the market with success up to date. In this mini-review, the scorpion polypeptides, their interactions with ion channels and their uses as therapeutic agents are discussed.

  5. Visual perceptions induced by intravitreous injections of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Charalampidou, S; Nolan, J; Ormonde, G O; Beatty, S

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct a questionnaire-based survey of subjective visual perceptions induced by intravitreous (IVT) injections of therapeutic agents. Patients and methods Patients undergoing an IVT injection of ranibizumab, pegaptanib sodium, or triamcinolone acetonide were administered a questionnaire in the immediate post-injection period and at 2 weeks of follow-up. Results In the immediate post-injection period (75 IVT injections, 75 eyes, 75 patients), lights and floaters were reported after 20 (27%) and 24 (32%) IVT injections, respectively. In comparison, at the 2-week follow-up, the incidence of reported lights (11; 15%) was similar (P>0.05), but the incidence of reported floaters was higher (48; 64% P=0.00). Subgroup analysis for various injection subgroups (no previous injection vsprevious injection(s) in the study eye; injections in study eyes with good VA (logarithm of minimal angle of resolution [logMAR] ≤0.3) vsmoderate VA (0.7 0.3) vspoor VA (logMAR ≥0.7); injections according to pharmacological agent (ranibizumab vspegaptanib vstriamcinolone acetonide); injections in study eyes with choroidal neovascularization (of various causes) vsstudy eyes with macular edema (of various causes); and injections in phakic vspseudophakic eyes) did not reveal any statistically significant associations. Visual perceptions experienced following 15% of IVT injections gave cause for concern to the patient (mean visual analog scale score (±SD): 4.5 (±1.7)), and in 64% of cases, the patients believed that preoperative counseling would have averted the concern. Conclusions Lights and floaters are frequent visual perceptions following IVT injections of therapeutic agents. They can give rise to concern that could be alleviated with preinjection counseling. PMID:21274011

  6. Therapeutic potential of HMGB1-targeting agents in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Zhu, Shu; Zhou, Rongrong; Li, Wei; Sama, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis refers to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting from a microbial infection. The inflammatory response is partly mediated by innate immune cells (such as macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils), which not only ingest and eliminate invading pathogens but also initiate an inflammatory response upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The prevailing theories of sepsis as a dysregulated inflammatory response, as manifested by excessive release of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), are supported by extensive studies employing animal models of sepsis. Here we review emerging evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis, and discuss the therapeutic potential of several HMGB1-targeting agents (including neutralising antibodies and steroid-like tanshinones) in experimental sepsis. PMID:18980707

  7. Cotinine: a potential new therapeutic agent against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Valentina; Zeitlin, Ross

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco smoking has been correlated with a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This negative correlation has been attributed to nicotine's properties. However, the undesired side-effects of nicotine and the absence of clear evidence of positive effects of this drug on the cognitive abilities of AD patients have decreased the enthusiasm for its therapeutic use. In this review, we discuss evidence showing that cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, has many of the beneficial effects but none of the negative side-effects of its precursor. Cotinine has been shown to be neuroprotective, to improve memory in primates as well as to prevent memory loss, and to lower amyloid-beta (Aβ)) burden in AD mice. In AD, cotinine's positive effect on memory is associated with the inhibition of Aβ aggregation, the stimulation of pro-survival factors such as Akt, and the inhibition of pro-apoptotic factors such as glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Because stimulation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) positively modulates these factors and memory, the involvement of these receptors in cotinine's effects are discussed. Because of its beneficial effects on brain function, good safety profile, and nonaddictive properties, cotinine may represent a new therapeutic agent against AD.

  8. Tackling obesity: new therapeutic agents for assisted weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Karam, JG; McFarlane, SI

    2010-01-01

    The pandemic of overweight and obesity continues to rise in an alarming rate in western countries and around the globe representing a major public health challenge in desperate need for new strategies tackling obesity. In the United States nearly two thirds of the population is overweight or obese. Worldwide the number of persons who are overweight or obese exceeded 1.6 billion. These rising figures have been clearly associated with increased morbidity and mortality. For example, in the Framingham study, the risk of death increases with each additional pound of weight gain even in the relatively younger population between 30 and 42 years of age. Overweight and obesity are also associated with increased co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease as well as certain types of cancer. In this review we discuss the epidemic of obesity, highlighting the pathophysiologic mechanisms of weight gain. We also provide an overview of the assessment of overweight and obese individuals discussing possible secondary causes of obesity. In a detailed section we discuss the currently approved therapeutic interventions for obesity highlighting their mechanisms of action and evidence of their efficacy and safety as provided in clinical trials. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic interventions that are in various stages of development with a special section on the weight loss effects of anti-diabetic medications. These agents are particularly attractive options for our growing population of obese diabetic individuals. PMID:21437080

  9. Wasp Venom Toxins as a Potential Therapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Dongol, Yashad; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapara L; Shrestha, Rakesh K; Aryal, Gopi

    2016-01-01

    It is high time now to discover novel drugs due to the increasing rate of drug resistance by the pathogen organisms and target cells as well as the dependence or tolerance of the body towards the drug. As it is obvious that significant numbers of the modern day pharmaceuticals are derived from natural products, it is equally astonishing to accept that venoms of various origins have therapeutic potentials. Wasp venoms are also a rich source of therapeutically important toxins which includes short cationic peptides, kinins, polyamines and polyDNA viruses, to name a few indentified. Wasp venom cationic peptides, namely mastoparan and its analogs, show a very important potency as an antimicrobial and anticancer agents of the future. They have proven to be the better candidates due to their lesser toxic effects and higher selectivity upon chemical modification and charge optimization. They also have superiority over the conventional chemical drugs as the target cells very rarely develop resistance against them because these peptides primarily imparts its effect through biophysical interaction with the target cell membrane which is dependent upon the net charge of the peptide, its hydrophobicity and anionicity and fluidity of the target cell membranes. Besides, the other components of wasp venom such as kinins, polyamines and polyDNA viruses show various pharmacological promise in the treatment of pain, inflammatory disease, and neurodegenerative diseases such as epilepsy and aversion.

  10. Receptor mimicry as novel therapeutic treatment for biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The specter of intentional release of pathogenic microbes and their toxins is a real threat. This article reviews the literature on adhesins of biothreat agents, their interactions with oligosaccharides and the potential for anti-adhesion compounds as an alternative to conventional therapeutics. The minimal binding structure of ricin has been well characterised and offers the best candidate for successful anti-adhesion therapy based on the Galβ1-4GlcNAc structure. The botulinum toxin serotypes A-F bind to a low number of gangliosides (GT1b, GQ1b, GD1a and GD1b) hence it should be possible to determine the minimal structure for binding. The minimal disaccharide sequence of GalNAcβ1-4Gal found in the gangliosides asialo-GM1 and asialo-GM2 is required for adhesion for many respiratory pathogens. Although a number of adhesins have been identified in bacterial biothreat agents such as Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Brucella species and Burkholderia pseudomallei, specific information regarding their in vivo expression during pneumonic infection is lacking. Limited oligosaccharide inhibition studies indicate the potential of GalNAcβ1-4Gal, GalNAcβ-3Gal and the hydrophobic compound, para-nitrophenol as starting points for the rational design of generic anti-adhesion compounds. A cocktail of multivalent oligosaccharides based on the minimal binding structures of identified adhesins would offer the best candidates for anti-adhesion therapy.

  11. Recombinant mumps virus as a cancer therapeutic agent

    PubMed Central

    Ammayappan, Arun; Russell, Stephen J; Federspiel, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Mumps virus belongs to the family of Paramyxoviridae and has the potential to be an oncolytic agent. Mumps virus Urabe strain had been tested in the clinical setting as a treatment for human cancer four decades ago in Japan. These clinical studies demonstrated that mumps virus could be a promising cancer therapeutic agent that showed significant antitumor activity against various types of cancers. Since oncolytic virotherapy was not in the limelight until the beginning of the 21st century, the interest to pursue mumps virus for cancer treatment slowly faded away. Recent success stories of oncolytic clinical trials prompted us to resurrect the mumps virus and to explore its potential for cancer treatment. We have obtained the Urabe strain of mumps virus from Osaka University, Japan, which was used in the earlier human clinical trials. In this report we describe the development of a reverse genetics system from a major isolate of this Urabe strain mumps virus stock, and the construction and characterization of several recombinant mumps viruses with additional transgenes. We present initial data demonstrating these recombinant mumps viruses have oncolytic activity against tumor cell lines in vitro and some efficacy in preliminary pilot animal tumor models. PMID:27556105

  12. Microtubule-Stabilizing Agents as Potential Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brunden, Kurt R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Smith, Amos B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Ballatore, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs)1, cytoskeletal elements found in all mammalian cells, play a significant role in cell structure and in cell division. They are especially critical in the proper functioning of post-mitotic central nervous system neurons, where MTs serve as the structures on which key cellular constituents are trafficked in axonal projections. MTs are stabilized in axons by the MT-associated protein tau, and in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and Parkinson’s disease, tau function appears to be compromised due to the protein dissociating from MTs and depositing into insoluble inclusions referred to as neurofibrillary tangles. This loss of tau function is believed to result in alterations of MT structure and function, resulting in aberrant axonal transport that likely contributes to the neurodegenerative process. There is also evidence of axonal transport deficiencies in other neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington’s disease, which may result, at least in part, from MT alterations. Accordingly, a possible therapeutic strategy for such neurodegenerative conditions is to treat with MT-stabilizing agents, such as those that have been used in the treatment of cancer. Here, we review evidence of axonal transport and MT deficiencies in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and summarize the various classes of known MT-stabilizing agents. Finally, we highlight the growing evidence that small molecule MT-stabilizing agents provide benefit in animal models of neurodegenerative disease and discuss the desired features of such molecules for the treatment of these central nervous system disorders. PMID:24433963

  13. Microtubule-stabilizing agents as potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Amos B; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Ballatore, Carlo

    2014-09-15

    Microtubules (MTs), cytoskeletal elements found in all mammalian cells, play a significant role in cell structure and in cell division. They are especially critical in the proper functioning of post-mitotic central nervous system neurons, where MTs serve as the structures on which key cellular constituents are trafficked in axonal projections. MTs are stabilized in axons by the MT-associated protein tau, and in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and Parkinson's disease, tau function appears to be compromised due to the protein dissociating from MTs and depositing into insoluble inclusions referred to as neurofibrillary tangles. This loss of tau function is believed to result in alterations of MT structure and function, resulting in aberrant axonal transport that likely contributes to the neurodegenerative process. There is also evidence of axonal transport deficiencies in other neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease, which may result, at least in part, from MT alterations. Accordingly, a possible therapeutic strategy for such neurodegenerative conditions is to treat with MT-stabilizing agents, such as those that have been used in the treatment of cancer. Here, we review evidence of axonal transport and MT deficiencies in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and summarize the various classes of known MT-stabilizing agents. Finally, we highlight the growing evidence that small molecule MT-stabilizing agents provide benefit in animal models of neurodegenerative disease and discuss the desired features of such molecules for the treatment of these central nervous system disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  15. Review of therapeutic options for adjuvant treatment of focal seizures in epilepsy: focus on lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Juan Luis; Ojeda, Joaquín; Corredera, Enrique; Ruiz Giménez, Jesús

    2011-12-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions worldwide, with an age-adjusted incidence of approximately 50 per 100,000 persons per year in developed countries. Antiepileptic therapy can result in long-term remission in 60-70% of patients, but many patients will require combination treatment to achieve optimal seizure control, as monotherapy is ineffective at controlling seizures in 30-53% of patients. Despite the increase in available treatment options, patient outcomes have not improved significantly and there is still a need for more effective therapies. Drugs used in the treatment of focal-onset seizures are a diverse range of compounds, and in most cases their mechanism of action is unknown or poorly defined. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of the newer adjuvant antiepileptic therapies that may improve outcomes in patients unresponsive to monotherapy, including clobazam, vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, zonisamide and eslicarbazepine, with focus on lacosamide. Lacosamide has been shown to exert its anticonvulsant effects predominantly by enhancement of the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is indicated for use as adjuvant treatment of focal-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy, and there is some evidence that it may also be of use in patients with status epilepticus and cancer patients with epilepsy. The efficacy of lacosamide has been assessed in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, all of which have shown lacosamide to be effective at reducing seizure frequency and increasing 50% responder rates in patients with focal-onset seizures. Long-term lacosamide treatment is generally well tolerated and is not associated with significant drug interactions; the availability of an intravenous form of the drug also makes it particularly useful for a broad range of patients.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of cancer stem cell vaccines in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangyang; Lu, Lin; Xia, Yang; Chen, Xin; Chang, Alfred E.; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Hurt, Elaine; Owen, John; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Dai, Fu; Bao, Yangyi; Wang, Yi; Whitfield, Joel; Xia, Jian-chuan; Huang, Shiang; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies aimed at targeting cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be most efficacious if deployed in the adjuvant setting. In this study, we offer preclinical evidence this is the case for a CSC-DC vaccine as tested in murine models of SCC7 squamous cell cancer and D5 melanoma. Vaccination of mice with an ALDHhigh SCC7 CSC-DC vaccine after surgical excision of established SCC7 tumors reduced local tumor relapse and prolonged host survival. This effect was augmented significantly by simultaneous administration of anti-PD-L1, an immune checkpoint inhibitor. In the minimal disease setting of D5 melanoma, treatment of mice with ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccination inhibited primary tumor growth, reduced spontaneous lung metastases and increased host survival. In this setting, CCR10 and its ligands were downregulated on ALDHhigh D5 CSCs and in lung tissues respectively after vaccination with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC. RNAi-mediated attenuation of CCR10 blocked tumor cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. T cells harvested from mice vaccinated with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC selectively killed ALDHhigh D5 CSCs, with additional evidence of humoral immunological engagement and a reduction in ALDHhigh cells in residual tumors. Overall, our results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccines in the adjuvant setting to more effectively limit local tumor recurrence and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, as compared with traditional DC vaccines, with increased host survival further accentuated by simultaneous PD-L1 blockade. PMID:27325649

  17. Therapeutic effects of TACI-Ig on rat with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Chang, Y; Wu, Y; Zhang, L; Yan, S; Xie, G; Qin, Q; Jin, J; Wang, W; Fang, J; Wei, W

    2011-02-01

    Transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor-immunoglobulin (TACI-Ig) is a human fusion protein that binds and neutralizes both B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), a cytokine shown to be a key regulator of B cell maturation, proliferation and survival, and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). Rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) is an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is mainly dependent on T cells and neutrophil-mediated cytokine production. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of TACI-Ig on rat AA. Rat AA was induced by intradermal injection of 0·1 ml complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). TACI-Ig (0·7, 2·1 and 6·3 mg/kg), recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-α receptor (rhTNFR) : Fc (2·8 mg/kg) and IgG-Fc (6·3 mg/kg) were administered subcutaneously every other day from days 16 to 34 after immunization. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis global assessment and swollen joint count (SJC). The ankle joint and spleen were harvested for histopathological examination. Spleen index and thymus index were calculated. The levels of BLyS, interleukin (IL)-17, interferon (IFN)-γ, IgG1, IgG2a and IgM in AA rat spleen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Administration of TACI-Ig significantly reduced the arthritis global assessment and SJC, decreased spleen index and ameliorated histopathological manifestations of rat AA. Suppressing the levels of BLyS, IL-17, IFN-γ and Ig in AA rat spleen were observed after administration of TACI-Ig. These results showed that TACI-Ig significantly inhibited the degree of rat AA, and the inhibitory effects might be associated with its ability to reduce BLyS, proinflammatory cytokines and Ig levels in spleen. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Astaxanthin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.

    2011-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin. PMID:21556169

  19. Thalidomide-derived immunomodulatory drugs as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Galustian, Christine; Labarthe, Marie-Christine; Bartlett, J Blake; Dalgleish, Angus G

    2004-12-01

    Thalidomide, a drug originally used to treat morning sickness, was removed from the market place in the early 1960s after it was found to cause serious congenital birth defects. However, thalidomide has recently been investigated in a new light following its activity in a number of chronic diseases. Moreover, like thalidomide itself, its second-generation immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) analogues have been shown to act as powerful anticancer agents and are clearly active in the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma. These new drugs, in particular the second-generation IMiDs, lenalidomide (CC-5013, REVLIMID; Celgene Corp., NJ, USA) and CC-4047 (ACTIMID; Celgene Corp.), offer improvements over thalidomide (a first-generation IMiD) in terms of efficacy and safety in human studies. The key to the therapeutic potential of IMiDs lies in the fact that the drugs have multiple mechanisms of action, which may produce both anti-inflammatory and antitumour effects. These effects are probably contextual, depending both on the cell type and the stimulus involved. Mechanisms associated with IMiD activity include TNF-alpha-inhibitory, T cell costimulatory and antiangiogenic activities. Studies of the mechanisms of action of these drugs are ongoing and will facilitate the continued development of this class of compound in a number of diseases.

  20. Astaxanthin: a potential therapeutic agent in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2011-03-21

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin.

  1. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) as a Therapeutic Agent for Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Cobos, Enrique José; Tejada, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; González-Cano, Rafael; Cendán, Cruz Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that blocks voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). VGSCs play a critical role in neuronal function under both physiological and pathological conditions. TTX has been extensively used to functionally characterize VGSCs, which can be classified as TTX-sensitive or TTX-resistant channels according to their sensitivity to this toxin. Alterations in the expression and/or function of some specific TTX-sensitive VGSCs have been implicated in a number of chronic pain conditions. The administration of TTX at doses below those that interfere with the generation and conduction of action potentials in normal (non-injured) nerves has been used in humans and experimental animals under different pain conditions. These data indicate a role for TTX as a potential therapeutic agent for pain. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting a potential analgesic role for TTX. In addition, the contribution of specific TTX-sensitive VGSCs to pain is reviewed. PMID:22412801

  2. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  3. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSNs) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What's more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and in vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating the NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis.

  4. Enzymosomes with surface-exposed superoxide dismutase: in vivo behaviour and therapeutic activity in a model of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria Manuela; Boerman, Otto C; Laverman, Peter; Corvo, Maria Luísa; Storm, Gert; Cruz, Maria Eugénia Meirinhos

    2007-02-12

    Acylated Superoxide Dismutase (Ac-SOD) enzymosomes, liposomal enzymatic systems expressing catalytic activity in the intact form, were previously characterized. The main scope of the present work was to investigate the biological behaviour of Ac-SOD inserted in the lipid bilayer of liposomes, in comparison with SOD located in the aqueous compartment of liposomes. Two types of liposomes were used: conventional liposomes presenting an unmodified external surface and long circulating liposomes coated with poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG). Liposomal formulations of Ac-SOD and SOD were prepared and labelled with indium-111 and their in vivo fate compared. Data obtained led us to the conclusion that, for liposomes coated with PEG the in vivo fate was not influenced by the insertion of Ac-SOD in the lipid bilayers. The potential therapeutic effect of Ac-SOD enzymosomes was compared with SOD liposomes in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. A faster anti-inflammatory effect was observed for Ac-SOD enzymosomes by monitoring the volume of the inflamed paws. The present results allowed us to conclude that Ac-SOD enzymosomes are nano-carriers combining the advantages of expressing enzymatic activity in intact form and thus being able to exert therapeutic effect even before liposomes disruption, as well as acting as a sustained release of the enzyme.

  5. Testing a Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapeutic versus Placebo Shoulder Strapping as an Adjuvant Intervention Early after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Appel, Caroline; Perry, Lin; Jones, Fiona

    2015-06-01

    This study tested a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapeutic versus placebo shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention early after stroke. Despite widespread use, there is little evidence of the efficacy or acceptability of shoulder strapping to improve arm function in patients with shoulder paresis following stroke. This study tested a protocol designed to trial shoulder strapping as an adjuvant therapy in patients with shoulder paresis after stroke and tested its acceptability for patients and clinical staff. A multiple-method design comprised one quantitative randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and two qualitative exploratory investigations entailing patient interviews and staff surveys. Seventeen sub-acute stroke patients with shoulder paresis were recruited in London stroke service settings between November 2007 and December 2009. Outcomes from a 4-week therapeutic strapping protocol were compared with those of placebo strapping as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation. Minimal adverse events and greater improvement in arm function (Action Research Arm Test) were seen with therapeutic compared with placebo strapping (effect size 0.34). Patients and staff found the strapping acceptable with minimal adverse effects. This study provided data for sample size calculation and demonstrated a workable research protocol to investigate the efficacy of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention to routine rehabilitation for stroke patients. Small-scale findings continue to flag the importance of investigating this topic. The protocol is recommended for a definitive trial of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention.

  6. Therapeutic effects of gel ointments containing tranilast nanoparticles on paw edema in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    Tranilast (TL), an antiallergic agent, has been clinically used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, although its clinical use has been limited by its poor solubility in water, photodegradation and systemic side effects. In this study, we prepared a gel ointment containing TL nanoparticles (TLnano gel ointment), and investigated its usefulness. In addition, we demonstrated the preventive effects of the TLnano gel ointment on inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats. The TLnano gel ointment was prepared using Bead Smash 12 (a bead mill) and additives including sodium docusate, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, methylcellulose and Carbopol 934; the mean particle diameter of the TL nanoparticles was 71.0±25.4 nm. In in vitro skin penetration experiments, the amount of penetrated TL, the penetration rate (Jc) and the penetration coefficient through the skin (Kp) of the TLnano gel ointment were significantly higher than those of a gel ointment containing TL microparticles (TLmicro gel ointment; particle diameter 50.5±26.3 µm). The TL concentrations in the skin tissue and plasma of rats receiving the TLnano gel ointment were also higher than in rats receiving the TLmicro gel ointment. In addition, the application of the TLnano gel ointment attenuated the increase in paw edema of the hind feet of AA rats in comparison with AA rats treated with the TLmicro gel ointment. These results suggest that TL nanoparticles can be applied to the formulation of a transdermal system, and that a transdermal formulation using TL nanoparticles might be a delivery option for the clinical treatment of RA.

  7. Agents for treatment of overactive bladder: a therapeutic class review

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a medical syndrome defined by symptoms of urgency, with or without urge urinary incontinence (any involuntary loss of urine), usually with frequency and nocturia. Although anticholinergic agents have been the first-line treatment for OAB for many years, the efficacious pharmacologic management of this condition has been compromised by concerns regarding tolerability. Flavoxate was the first anticholinergic and antispasmodic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat symptoms of OAB but is not routinely used today since newer agents are more effective. The more recent drugs, oxybutynin and tolterodine, have appeared to be equally efficacious in treating the symptoms of OAB in clinical trials; however, tolterodine has proven to be better tolerated with fewer adverse effects. In 2004, the FDA approved the three newest agents for the class: darifenacin, solifenacin, and trospium. Compared with oxybutynin and tolterodine, these agents have a more favorable side effect profile, which can enhance tolerability and patient compliance. Side effects are reduced in part because of the drugs' greater tissue selectivity for inhibiting the bladder muscle contraction over other anticholinergic receptors in the body. In recent clinical trials, darifenacin, solifenacin, and trospium have shown superiority to placebo and efficacy comparable to that of oxybutynin and tolterodine. PMID:17637888

  8. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro-mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  9. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  10. Current therapeutic agents and anesthetic considerations for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyoseok

    2012-09-01

    As the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continues to increase worldwide, more diabetic patients will be presented for surgery and anesthesia. This increase of DM is a consequence of the rise in new patients of type 2 DM, and is likely attributable to rapid economic development, improved living standards, aging population, obesity, and lack of exercise. The primary goal of management in DM is to delay, or prevent the macro- and microvascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. More understanding of the pathophysiology of DM has contributed to the advance of new pharmacological approaches. In addition to the conventional therapy for DM, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), and insulin analogues are currently available effective hypoglycemic agents for the management of the patients with DM in the perioperative period and also consider the adverse effects of newly introduced agents that need more clinical observations.

  11. 78 FR 77471 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License for: Convection Enhanced Delivery of a Therapeutic Agent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... therapeutic substances by MRI or CT that have been administered to tissue using convection enhanced delivery...-1992/0). The tracer is a molecule, detectable by MRI or CT, which functions as a surrogate for the... macromolecular MRI contrast agents such as chelated Gd(III). These macromolecular imaging agents have clearance...

  12. Folates as adjuvants to anticancer agents: Chemical rationale and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, Peter V; Gustavsson, Bengt; Johnston, Patrick; Lindberg, Per; Moser, Rudolf; Odin, Elisabeth; Peters, Godefridus J; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Folates have been used with cytotoxic agents for decades and today they are used in hundreds of thousands of patients annually. Folate metabolism is complex. In the treatment of cancer with 5-fluorouracil, the administration of folates mechanistically leads to the formation of [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, and the increased concentration of this molecule leads to stabilization of the ternary complex comprising thymidylate synthase, 2'-deoxy-uridine-5'-monophosphate, and [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. The latter is the only natural folate that can bind directly in the ternary complex, with other folates requiring metabolic activation. Modulation of thymidylate synthase activity became central in the study of folate/cytotoxic combinations and, despite wide use, research into the folate component was neglected, leaving important questions unanswered. This article revisits the mechanisms of action of folates and evaluates commercially available folate derivatives in the light of current research. Better genomic insight and availability of new analytical techniques and stable folate compounds may open new avenues of research and therapy, ultimately bringing increased clinical benefit to patients.

  13. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect.

  14. Metformin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Recurrent Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Vasudevan, Anita; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Levi, Edi; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties. However, most of the studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of metformin have been on primary cancer. No information is available whether metformin could be effectively used for recurrent cancer, specifically colorectal cancer (CRC) that affects up to 50% of patients treated by conventional chemotherapies. Although the reasons for recurrence are not fully understood, it is thought to be due to re-emergence of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs). Therefore, development of non-toxic treatment strategies targeting CSCs would be of significant therapeutic benefit. In the current investigation, we have examined the effectiveness of metformin, in combination with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FuOx), the mainstay of colon cancer therapeutics, on survival of chemo-resistant colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in CSCs/CSLCs. Our data show that metformin acts synergistically with FuOx to (a) induce cell death in chemo resistant (CR) HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells, (b) inhibit colonospheres formation and (c) enhance colonospheres disintegration. In vitro cell culture studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment inhibits migration of CR colon cancer cells. These changes were associated with increased miRNA 145 and reduction in miRNA 21. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was also down-regulated indicating its pivotal role in regulating the growth of CR colon cancer cells. Data from SCID mice xenograft model of CR HCT-116 and CR HT-29 cells show that the combination of metformin and FuOX is highly effective in inhibiting the growth of colon tumors as evidenced by ∼50% inhibition in growth following 5 weeks of combination treatment, when compared with the vehicle treated controls. Our current data suggest that metformin together with conventional chemotherapy could be an effective treatment

  15. Melatonin and Nitrones As Potential Therapeutic Agents for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alejandro; Ramos, Eva; Patiño, Paloma; Oset-Gasque, Maria J.; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a disease of aging affecting millions of people worldwide, and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) is the only treatment approved. However, r-tPA has a low therapeutic window and secondary effects which limit its beneficial outcome, urging thus the search for new more efficient therapies. Among them, neuroprotection based on melatonin or nitrones, as free radical traps, have arisen as drug candidates due to their strong antioxidant power. In this Perspective article, an update on the specific results of the melatonin and several new nitrones are presented. PMID:27932976

  16. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Equihua, Ana C.; De La Herrán-Arita, Alberto K.; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects. Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g., impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:24416019

  18. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Equihua, Ana C; De La Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-12-25

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects. Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g., impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  19. New therapeutic agents for diabetes mellitus: implications for anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Lee, Stephanie L; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    Multiple hormones and transmitter systems contribute to glucose homeostasis and the control of metabolism. Recently, the gastrointestinal peptide hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 and amylin have been shown to significantly contribute to this complex physiology. These advances provide the foundation for new treatments for diabetes mellitus. Therapies based on glucagon-like peptide 1 and amylin have now been introduced into clinical practice. Rimonabant, the selective endocannabinoid receptor antagonist, had been used in European countries for the treatment of obesity; it has recently been withdrawn for this indication. This drug exhibited therapeutic benefits for metabolic variables and for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Anesthesia providers caring for patients with diabetes mellitus will need to understand the implications of these new therapies in perioperative settings, particularly with respect to side effects and interactions.

  20. Resveratrol as a Therapeutic Agent for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Tan, Meng-Shan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, but there is no effective therapy till now. The pathogenic mechanisms of AD are considerably complex, including Aβ accumulation, tau protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Exactly, resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine and many plants, is indicated to show the neuroprotective effect on mechanisms mostly above. Recent years, there are numerous researches about resveratrol acting on AD in many models, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of resveratrol are limited by its pool bioavailability; therefore researchers have been trying a variety of methods to improve the efficiency. This review summarizes the recent studies in cell cultures and animal models, mainly discusses the molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of resveratrol, and thus investigates the therapeutic potential in AD. PMID:25525597

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Hydrazones as Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Sharma, Neha; Saini, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazones are a special class of organic compounds in the Schiff base family. Hydrazones constitute a versatile compound of organic class having basic structure (R1R2C=NNR3R4). The active centers of hydrazone, that is, carbon and nitrogen, are mainly responsible for the physical and chemical properties of the hydrazones and, due to the reactivity toward electrophiles and nucleophiles, hydrazones are used for the synthesis of organic compound such as heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities. Hydrazones and their derivatives are known to exhibit a wide range of interesting biological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiplatelet, cardioprotective, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antitubercular, trypanocidal, anti-HIV, and so forth. The present review summarizes the efficiency of hydrazones as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25383223

  2. Ag+ complexes as potential therapeutic agents in medicine and pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Hecel, Aleksandra; Kolkowska, Paulina; Krzywoszynska, Karolina; Szebesczyk, Agnieszka; Rowinska-Zyrek, Magdalena; Kozlowski, Henryk

    2017-09-20

    Silver is a non-essential element, with promising antimicrobial and anticancer properties. This work is a detailed summary of the newest findings on the bioinorganic chemistry of silver, with a special focus on the applications of Ag+ complexes and nanoparticles. The coordination chemistry of silver is given a reasonable amount of attention, summarizing the most common silver binding sites and giving examples of such binding motifs in biologically important proteins. Possible applications of this metal and its complexes in medicine, in particular as antibacterial and antifungal agents and in cancer therapy is discussed in detail. The most recent data on silver nanoparticles are also summarized. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Emerging Category of Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mahlapuu, Margit; Håkansson, Joakim; Ringstad, Lovisa; Björn, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides, are short and generally positively charged peptides found in a wide variety of life forms from microorganisms to humans. Most AMPs have the ability to kill microbial pathogens directly, whereas others act indirectly by modulating the host defense systems. Against a background of rapidly increasing resistance development to conventional antibiotics all over the world, efforts to bring AMPs into clinical use are accelerating. Several AMPs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as novel anti-infectives, but also as new pharmacological agents to modulate the immune response, promote wound healing, and prevent post-surgical adhesions. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological role, classification, and mode of action of AMPs, discuss the opportunities and challenges to develop these peptides for clinical applications, and review the innovative formulation strategies for application of AMPs. PMID:28083516

  4. Influence of site on the therapeutic ratio of adjuvant radiotherapy in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to improve the therapeutic ratio by increasing local control while minimizing morbidity. Most efforts in trying to improve this ratio have focused on the sequencing of RT and surgery, with little attention to the potential influence of the tumor site. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of tumor site on local control and complications in a group of patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity treated at a single institution with postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: Between July 1982 and December 2000, 369 adult patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity were treated with limb-sparing surgery and postoperative RT. Patients who underwent surgery or RT outside our institution were excluded. The tumor site was the upper extremity (UE) in 103 (28%) and the lower extremity (LE) in 266 (72%). The tumor was {<=}5 cm in 98 patients (27%), and the microscopic margins were positive in 44 (12%). Of the 369 patients, 104 (28%) underwent postoperative external beam RT (EBRT), 233 (63%) postoperative brachytherapy (BRT), and 32 underwent a combination (9%); 325 (88%) received a 'conventional' radiation dose, defined as 60-70 Gy for EBRT, 45 Gy for BRT, and 45-50 Gy plus 15-20 Gy for EBRT plus BRT. Complications were assessed in terms of wound complications requiring repeat surgery, fracture, joint stiffness, edema, and Grade 3 or worse peripheral nerve damage. Results: The UE and LE groups were balanced with regard to age, depth, margin status, and type of RT (EBRT vs. BRT {+-} EBRT). However, more patients in the UE group had tumors {<=}5 cm and more received a conventional radiation dose (p = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). With a median follow-up of 50 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control, distant relapse-free survival, and overall survival for the whole population was 82% (95

  5. Neurotrophic Keratopathy: Therapeutic Approach Using a Novel Matrix Regenerating Agent.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Marta; Marques, Sara; Quadrado Gil, João; Campos, Joana; Ramos, Paula; Rosa, Andreia Martins; Quadrado, Maria João; Murta, Joaquim Neto

    2017-09-14

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a new matrix-regenerating agent (RGTA), Cacicol(®), a polymer that mimics heparan sulfates bound to extracellular matrix proteins, avoiding its proteolysis, to treat neurotrophic keratopathy (NK). Uncontrolled prospective clinical study performed between January 2014 and May 2016. Twenty-five patients (25 eyes) with corneal neurotrophic ulcers, nonresponsive to at least 2 weeks of conservative therapy, were treated with Cacicol, instilled once/twice a week. During follow-up, slit-lamp examination, anterior segment photography, fluorescein-dye testing, and best-corrected visual acuity were analyzed. Ulcer evolution was evaluated using image analysis software (ImageJ(®)) and healing defined as decrease of the corneal ulcer area. An independent observer measured ulcer area. All patients had complete corneal healing within an average of 4.13 ± 2.32 weeks. Mean ulcer area decreased significantly (P = 0.001) from 16.51% ± 18.56% (1st day) to 8.68% ± 11.25% at the 7th day and to 4.73% ± 10.75% at the 14th day. Compared with day 1, mean ulcer area decreased 60.24% after 7 days (P = 0.001), 54.92% after 14 days (P = 0.059), and 83.00% after 21 days (P = 0.003). Two cases of recurrence (8.0%) were registered. No systemic or local side effects were noticed. The new regenerating agent, Cacicol, represents an effective and safe therapy to treat NK.

  6. Investigation of Stilbenoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Rotavirus Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Judith M; Medina-Bolivar, Fabricio; Defrates, Katelyn; Hambleton, Emily; Hurlburt, Megan E; Fang, Lingling; Yang, Tianhong; Nopo-Olazabal, Luis; Atwill, Richard L; Ghai, Pooja; Parr, Rebecca D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infections cause severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccines are available but cost prohibitive for many countries and only reduce severe symptoms. Vaccinated infants continue to shed infectious particles, and studies show decreased efficacy of the RV vaccines in tropical and subtropical countries where they are needed most. Continuing surveillance for new RV strains, assessment of vaccine efficacy, and development of cost effective antiviral drugs remain an important aspect of RV studies. This study was to determine the efficacy of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory stilbenoids to inhibit RV replication. Peanut (A. hypogaea) hairy root cultures were induced to produce stilbenoids, which were purified by high performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC) and analyzed by HPLC. HT29.f8 cells were infected with RV in the presence stilbenoids. Cell viability counts showed no cytotoxic effects on HT29.f8 cells. Viral infectivity titers were calculated and comparatively assessed to determine the effects of stilbenoid treatments. Two stilbenoids, trans-arachidin-1 and trans-arachidin-3, show a significant decrease in RV infectivity titers. Western blot analyses performed on the infected cell lysates complemented the infectivity titrations and indicated a significant decrease in viral replication. These studies show the therapeutic potential of the stilbenoids against RV replication.

  7. Indian herbal medicines: possible potent therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Brijesh; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Nath Paul, Bhola; Narayan Saxena, Prabhu; Kumar Das, Siddharth

    2007-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and is mainly characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage leading to chronic polyarthritis and joint distortion. Although the exact pathogenesis of the disease has yet not been elucidated, however, studies suggest that cellular proliferation of synoviocytes result in pannus formation which damages the cartilage and bone. Recent reports also support the role of free radicals in its pathogenesis. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Alternative medicine provides another approach for treatment of RA and currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a novel drug. There is a dire need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential and adverse effects, if any, of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. In this review we have tried to explore various Indian ancient Ayurvedic, Unani and Tibbi, as also some Chinese and Korean, herbals for their potential to treat RA.

  8. Indian Herbal Medicines: Possible Potent Therapeutic Agents for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Brijesh; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Nath Paul, Bhola; Narayan Saxena, Prabhu; Kumar Das, Siddharth

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and is mainly characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage leading to chronic polyarthritis and joint distortion. Although the exact pathogenesis of the disease has yet not been elucidated, however, studies suggest that cellular proliferation of synoviocytes result in pannus formation which damages the cartilage and bone. Recent reports also support the role of free radicals in its pathogenesis. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Alternative medicine provides another approach for treatment of RA and currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a novel drug. There is a dire need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential and adverse effects, if any, of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. In this review we have tried to explore various Indian ancient Ayurvedic, Unani and Tibbi, as also some Chinese and Korean, herbals for their potential to treat RA. PMID:18392103

  9. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey's antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey's clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims. PMID:25386217

  10. Molecular imaging agents: impact on diagnosis and therapeutics in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Marc E.; Contino, Gianmarco; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging has become a crucial tool in oncology throughout the course of disease detection and management and is an integral part of clinical trials. Anatomic and functional imaging led the way, providing valuable information used in the diagnosis of disease, including data regarding the size and location of the tumor and on physiologic processes such as blood flow and perfusion. As understanding of cancer pathogenesis has advanced through the identification of genetic, biochemical, and cellular alterations in evolving tumors, emphasis has been made on developing methods to detect and serially monitor such alterations. This class of approaches is referred to as molecular imaging. Molecular imaging offers the potential for increasingly sensitive and specific visualization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. These approaches have become established as essential tools for cancer research, early cancer detection and staging and monitoring and predicting response to targeted therapies. Here, we will discuss recent advances in the development of molecular imaging agents and their implementation in basic cancer research as well as in more rationalized approaches to cancer care. PMID:20633310

  11. Therapeutic strategies with oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 against oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Ferdous, Tarannum; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer has been recognized as a tumor with low sensitivity to anticancer agents. However, introduction of S-1, an oral cancer agent is improving treatment outcome for patients with oral cancer. In addition, S-1, as a main drug for oral cancer treatment in Japan can be easily available for outpatients. In fact, S-1 exerts high therapeutic effects with acceptable side effects. Moreover, combined chemotherapy with S-1 shows higher efficacy than S-1 alone, and combined chemo-radiotherapy with S-1 exerts remarkable therapeutic effects. Furthermore, we should consider the combined therapy of S-1 and molecular targeting agents right now as these combinations were reportedly useful for oral cancer treatment. Here, we describe our findings related to S-1 that were obtained experimentally and clinically, and favorable therapeutic strategies with S-1 against oral cancer with bibliographic considerations.

  12. Nanoparticles as conjugated delivery agents for therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroski, Megan Elizabeth

    This dissertation explores the use of nanoparticles as conjugated delivery agents. Chapter 1 is a general introduction. Chapter 2 discusses the delivery by a nanoparticle platform provides a method to manipulate gene activation, by taking advantage of the high surface area of a nanoparticle and the ability to selectively couple a desired biological moiety to the NP surface. The nanoparticle based transfection approach functions by controlled release of gene regulatory elements from a 6 nm AuNP (gold nanoparticle) surface. The endosomal release of the regulatory elements from the nanoparticle surface results in endogenous protein knockdown simultaneously with exogenous protein expression for the first 48 h. The use of fluorescent proteins as the endogenous and exogenous signals for protein expression enables the efficiency of co-delivery of siRNA (small interfering RNA) for GFP (green fluorescent protein) knockdown and a dsRed-express linearized plasmid for induction to be optically analyzed in CRL-2794, a human kidney cell line expressing an unstable green fluorescent protein. Delivery of the bimodal nanoparticle in cationic liposomes results in 20% GFP knockdown within 24 h of delivery and continues exhibiting knockdown for up to 48 h for the bimodal agent. Simultaneous dsRed expression is observed to initiate within the same time frame with expression levels reaching 34% after 25 days although cells have divided approximately 20 times, implying daughter cell transfection has occurred. Fluorescence cell sorting results in a stable colony, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis. The simultaneous delivery of siRNA and linearized plasmid DNA on the surface of a single nanocrystal provides a unique method for definitive genetic control within a single cell and leads to a very efficient cell transfection protocol. In Chapter 3, we wanted to understand the NP complex within the cell, and to look at the dynamics of release utilizing nanometal surface energy transfer as

  13. Regorafenib as a potential adjuvant chemotherapy agent in disseminated small colon cancer: Drug selection outcome of a novel screening system using nanoimprinting 3-dimensional culture with HCT116-RFP cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Aoyama, Hironori; Adachi, Naoya; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-04-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy following primary surgical treatment is suggested to be beneficial in eradicating invisible disseminated small tumors in colon cancer; however, an effective drug remains to be developed. Recently, we reported a novel drug screening system using a nanoimprinting 3-dimensional (3D) culture that creates multicellular spheroids, which simulate in vivo conditions and, thereby, predict effective drugs in vivo. This study aimed to perform drug selection using our recently developed 3D culture system in a human colon cancer HCT116 cell line stably expressing red fluorescent protein (HCT116-RFP), to determine the most effective agent in a selection of clinically used antitumor agents for colon cancer. In addition, we confirmed the efficacy of the selected drug regorafenib, in vivo using a mouse model of disseminated small tumors. HCT116-RFP cells were cultured using a nanoimprinting 3D culture and in vitro drug selection was performed with 8 clinically used drugs [bevacizumab, capecitabine, cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan, oxaliplatin, panitumumab and regorafenib]. An in vivo study was performed in mice bearing HCT116-RFP intraperitoneally disseminated small tumors using 3'-[18F]-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine-positron emission tomography and fluorescence microscopy imaging to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Regorafenib was determined to be the most effective drug in the 3D culture, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo, compared to the untreated control and 5-FU-treated group. The drug 5-FU is commonly used in colon cancer treatment and was used as a reference. Our results demonstrate that regorafenib is a potentially efficacious adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of disseminated small colon cancer and, therefore, warrants further preclinical and clinical studies.

  14. Combining the ER-stress inducing agents bortezomib and fenretinide as a novel therapeutic strategy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David S.; Martin, Shaun; Armstrong, Jane L.; Flockhart, Ross; Tonison, Joge J.; Simpson, Dominic G.; Birch-Machin, Mark A.; Redfern, Christopher P.F.; Lovat, Penny E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Single agent chemotherapy is largely the treatment of choice for systemic therapy of metastatic melanoma but survival rates are low and novel adjuvant and systemic therapies are urgently required. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a potential therapeutic target and two relatively new drugs, fenretinide and bortezomib (Velcade®), each acting via different cellular mechanisms, induce ER stress leading to apoptosis in melanoma cells. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that apoptosis of melanoma cells may be increased by combining clinically-achievable concentrations of fenretinide and bortezomib. Experimental Design Three human melanoma cell lines were used to assess changes in viability and the induction of apoptosis in response to fenretinide, bortezomib, or both drugs together. A subcutaneous xenograft model was used to test responses in vivo. Results Fenretinide and bortezomib synergistically decreased viability and increased apoptosis in all three melanoma lines at clinically-achievable concentrations. This was also reflected by increased expression of GADD153, a marker of ER stress-induced apoptosis. In vivo, fenretinide in combination with bortezomib gave a marked reduction in xenograft tumor volume and increase in apoptosis compared with fenretinide or bortezomib alone. The cell cycle stage of tumor cells in vivo were similar to that predicted from the effects of each drug or the combination in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that fenretinide and bortezomib, both of which are available in clinical formulation, warrant clinical evaluation as a combination therapy for metastatic melanoma. PMID:19228725

  15. Combining the endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents bortezomib and fenretinide as a novel therapeutic strategy for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hill, David S; Martin, Shaun; Armstrong, Jane L; Flockhart, Ross; Tonison, Joge J; Simpson, Dominic G; Birch-Machin, Mark A; Redfern, Christopher P F; Lovat, Penny E

    2009-02-15

    Single-agent chemotherapy is largely the treatment of choice for systemic therapy of metastatic melanoma, but survival rates are low, and novel adjuvant and systemic therapies are urgently required. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a potential therapeutic target, and two relatively new drugs, fenretinide and bortezomib (Velcade), each acting via different cellular mechanisms, induce ER stress leading to apoptosis in melanoma cells. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that apoptosis of melanoma cells may be increased by combining clinically achievable concentrations of fenretinide and bortezomib. Three human melanoma cell lines were used to assess changes in viability and the induction of apoptosis in response to fenretinide, bortezomib, or both drugs together. A s.c. xenograft model was used to test responses in vivo. Fenretinide and bortezomib synergistically decreased viability and increased apoptosis in all three melanoma lines at clinically achievable concentrations. This was also reflected by increased expression of GADD153, a marker of ER stress-induced apoptosis. In vivo, fenretinide in combination with bortezomib gave a marked reduction in xenograft tumor volume and an increase in apoptosis compared with fenretinide or bortezomib alone. The cell cycle stage of tumor cells in vivo were similar to that predicted from the effects of each drug or the combination in vitro. These results suggest that fenretinide and bortezomib, both of which are available in clinical formulation, warrant clinical evaluation as a combination therapy for metastatic melanoma.

  16. Bottlenecks in Development of Retinal Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Butler, Mark C.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents for therapeutic purposes is an immense challenge in modern biology. Established technologies used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein: antisense, ribozyme, RNAi, all conditionally depend upon an initial, critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to a target RNA. In this review we address the nature of the bottlenecks, emphasizing the biocomplexity of target RNA structure, that currently limit PTGS therapeutic development. We briefly review existing and emerging technologies designed to release these constraints to realize the potential of PTGS agents in gene based therapies. PMID:17976683

  17. Multirate delivery of multiple therapeutic agents from metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    McKinlay, Alistair C.; Allan, Phoebe K.; Renouf, Catherine L.; Duncan, Morven J.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Warrender, Stewart J.; Dawson, Daniel; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Gil, Barbara; Marszalek, Bartosz; Düren, Tina; Williams, Jennifer J.; Charrier, Cedric; Mercer, Derry K.; Teat, Simon J.; Morris, Russell E.

    2014-12-01

    The highly porous nature of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers great potential for the delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we show that highly porous metal-organic frameworks can be used to deliver multiple therapeutic agents—a biologically active gas, an antibiotic drug molecule, and an active metal ion—simultaneously but at different rates. The possibilities offered by delivery of multiple agents with different mechanisms of action and, in particular, variable timescales may allow new therapy approaches. Here, we show that the loaded MOFs are highly active against various strains of bacteria.

  18. Multirate delivery of multiple therapeutic agents from metal-organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    McKinlay, Alistair C.; Allan, Phoebe K.; Renouf, Catherine L.; ...

    2014-12-01

    The highly porous nature of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers great potential for the delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we show that highly porous metal-organic frameworks can be used to deliver multiple therapeutic agents—a biologically active gas, an antibiotic drug molecule, and an active metal ion—simultaneously but at different rates. The possibilities offered by delivery of multiple agents with different mechanisms of action and, in particular, variable timescales may allow new therapy approaches. Here, we show that the loaded MOFs are highly active against various strains of bacteria.

  19. A Vaxfectin(®)-adjuvanted HSV-2 plasmid DNA vaccine is effective for prophylactic and therapeutic use in the guinea pig model of genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Veselenak, Ronald L; Shlapobersky, Mark; Pyles, Richard B; Wei, Qun; Sullivan, Sean M; Bourne, Nigel

    2012-11-19

    Here we describe studies in the guinea pig model of genital herpes to evaluate a novel plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the HSV-2 glycoprotein D and UL46 and UL47 genes encoding tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP 13/14 (gD2/UL46/UL47), formulated with a cationic lipid-based adjuvant Vaxfectin(®). Prophylactic immunization with Vaxfectin(®)-gD2/UL46/UL47 significantly reduced viral replication in the genital tract, provided complete protection against both primary and recurrent genital skin disease following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, and significantly reduced latent HSV-2 DNA in the dorsal root ganglia compared to controls. We also examined the impact of therapeutic immunization of HSV-2 infected animals. Here, Vaxfectin(®)-gD2/UL46/UL47 immunization significantly reduced both the frequency of recurrent disease and viral shedding into the genital tract compared to controls. This novel adjuvanted pDNA vaccine has demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in the guinea pig model of genital herpes and warrants further development.

  20. Glycans in pathogenic bacteria--potential for targeted covalent therapeutics and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Tra, Van N; Dube, Danielle H

    2014-05-11

    A substantial obstacle to the existing treatment of bacterial diseases is the lack of specific probes that can be used to diagnose and treat pathogenic bacteria in a selective manner while leaving the microbiome largely intact. To tackle this problem, there is an urgent need to develop pathogen-specific therapeutics and diagnostics. Here, we describe recent evidence that indicates distinctive glycans found exclusively on pathogenic bacteria could form the basis of targeted therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. In particular, we highlight the use of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to covalently deliver therapeutics and imaging agents to bacterial glycans.

  1. Impact of Absorption and Transport on Intelligent Therapeutics and Nano-scale Delivery of Protein Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peppas, Nicholas A.; Carr, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    The combination of materials design and advances in nanotechnology has led to the development of new therapeutic protein delivery systems. The pulmonary, nasal, buccal and other routes have been investigated as delivery options for protein therapy, but none result in improved patient compliances and patient quality of life as the oral route. For the oral administration of these new systems, an understanding of protein transport is essential because of the dynamic nature of the gastrointestinal tract and the barriers to transport that exist. Models have been developed to describe the transport between the gastrointestinal lumen and the bloodstream, and laboratory techniques like cell culture provide a means to investigate the absorption and transport of many therapeutic agents. Biomaterials, including stimuli-sensitive complexation hydrogels, have been investigated as promising carriers for oral delivery. However, the need to develop models that accurately predict protein blood concentration as a function of the material structure and properties still exists. PMID:20161384

  2. 77 FR 62521 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer and T- cell Lymphoma AGENCY: National... metastatic breast cancer, or ii) incorporating a p53 isoform antisense oligonucleotide as a single biologic... of a p53 Isoform in Regenerative Medicine, Aging and Cancer'' . The patent rights in these...

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of different antidotal mixtures against poisoning with GF-agent in mice.

    PubMed

    Bartosová, Lucie; Kunesová, Gabriela; Kuca, Kamil; Vachek, Josef

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of cyclohexyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GF-agent; cyclosarin) and therapeutic efficacy of four oximes (trimedoxime, methoxime, obidoxime and HI-6) in combination with atropine or benactyzine (BNZ) was studied in mice. The oxime therapy combined with anticholinergic drug was administered intramusculary (i.m.) 1 or 2 min after i.m. GF-agent challenge. All the drugs were applied in dose of 20% of LD50. Obidoxime and trimedoxime that were combined with atropine were less effective than methoxime and HI-6 in combination with BNZ when applied 2 minutes after GF-agent poisoning. When the drugs were administered 1 min after GF-agent challenge already, in case of methoxime, the faster application of therapy resulted in significantly higher protective ratio, while for obidoxime the therapeutic effectivity did not depend significantly on the seasonableness of therapeutic intervention. The present findings show that all four combinations of oxime with anticholinergic drug decrease the GF-agent toxicity more than twofold regardless of the time of treatment administration.

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  5. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  6. ATM regulates 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A; Clarke, Ian D; Barszczyk, Mark S; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-10-01

    Alkylating agents are a first-line therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed, increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using an siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular, the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. Inhibition of ATM and MPG-mediated BER cooperate to sensitize tumor cells to alkylating agents, impairing tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with no toxicity to normal cells, providing an ideal therapeutic window. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Therapeutic usefulness of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with Tegafur-Uracil (UFT) in patients with breast cancer: focus on the results of clinical studies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, the history of postoperative chemotherapy for breast cancer started with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), launched in the 1980s. Currently, oral fluoropyrimidine-based regimens indicated for the treatment of breast cancer in Japan include tegafur plus uracil (UFT); tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil (TS-1); doxifluridine; and capecitabine. In particular, UFT represents an important option for long-term treatment because of minimal adverse events and the potential for long-term maintenance of effective plasma concentrations of 5-FU to inhibit micrometastasis after surgery. Therefore, various clinical studies of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with UFT have been conducted in patients with completely resected tumors. Recent studies have shown that UFT prolongs survival after tumor resection in patients with gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and lung cancer. In patients with breast cancer, large clinical trials of UFT-based postoperative chemotherapy conducted in Japan have shown that UFT is useful for the treatment of intermediate-risk patients with no lymph node metastasis. This paper reviews the results of clinical studies of UFT conducted in Japan to assess the therapeutic usefulness of this oral 5-FU. The types of patients most likely to benefit from UFT are discussed on the basis of currently available evidence and a global consensus of treatment recommendations. The optimal timing of endocrine therapy and strategies for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with UFT in patients with breast cancer are also discussed.

  8. Additive Intraocular Pressure-Lowering Effects of Ripasudil with Glaucoma Therapeutic Agents in Rabbits and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Masayuki; Isobe, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yuto; Mizuno, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Ripasudil hydrochloride hydrate (K-115), a specific Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, is developed for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Topical administration of ripasudil decreases intraocular pressure (IOP) by increasing conventional outflow through the trabeculae to Schlemm's canal, which is different from existing agents that suppress aqueous humor production or promote uveoscleral outflow. In this study, we demonstrated that ripasudil significantly lowered IOP in combined regimens with other glaucoma therapeutic agents in rabbits and monkeys. Ripasudil showed additional effects on maximum IOP lowering or prolonged the duration of IOP-lowering effects with combined administration of timolol, nipradilol, brimonidine, brinzolamide, latanoprost, latanoprost/timolol fixed combination, and dorzolamide/timolol fixed combination. These results indicate that facilitation of conventional outflow by ripasudil provides additive IOP-lowering effect with other classes of antiglaucoma agents. Ripasudil is expected to have substantial utility in combined regimens with existing agents for glaucoma treatment. PMID:28540083

  9. Efficacy and safety of single agent or combination adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colon cancer: a Canadian cancer institute experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christina A K; Spratlin, Jennifer L; Armstrong, Dawn E; Ghosh, Sunita; Mulder, Karen E

    2014-09-01

    The pattern of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) use, toxicity profile, and survival benefit in elderly patients with colon cancer (CC) is unclear. We sought to (1) determine whether patients ≥ 65 years with stage III CC were offered single-agent or combination AC, (2) evaluate the reason for selecting single-agent versus combination AC, (3) evaluate the toxicity profile of single-agent and combination AC in the elderly, and (4) determine whether a survival benefit exists for elderly patients receiving combination AC. A retrospective analysis of records of patients ≥ 65 years diagnosed with stage III CC from 2004 to 2010 was performed to identify baseline characteristics, AC protocols, toxicity, dose intensity, and survival. Two hundred sixty-eight patients ≥ 65 years were diagnosed and treated with AC from 2004 to 2010. Of these patients, 178 were treated with single-agent AC and 90 were treated with combination AC. The most common reasons for choosing single-agent AC were patient preference, comorbidities, and lack of drug coverage. For each year over 65 years, the odds of receiving combination over single-agent AC decreased by 22%. There were more dose delays, dose reductions, and early chemotherapy discontinuation in the combination AC group because of hematologic toxicity. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 73% in patients who received single-agent AC compared with 84% in those who received combination AC. There was no difference in cancer-related deaths between the groups. In elderly patients treated with AC for stage III CC, single-agent AC is used more frequently than combination AC, based on age, comorbidities, and patient choice. Toxicity with combination AC in elderly patients is high. No survival benefit was seen with combination AC over single-agent AC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Radiohalogenated PET and Therapeutic Agents for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven P; Drzezga, Alexander; Neumaier, Bernd; Dietlein, Markus; Gorin, Michael A; Zalutsky, Michael R; Pomper, Martin G

    2016-10-01

    Radiohalogenated agents are often the first line of pursuit in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals-whether antibodies, peptides, or small molecules-because of their ease of synthesis, lack of substantial steric perturbation of the original affinity agent (in some cases, providing enhanced affinity), and capacity to be transformed into therapeutics (in some cases, with a mere switch of an isotope). They often provide proof of a principle before optimization for pharmacokinetics or generation of radiometallated agents, when the latter are necessary. In particular, (18)F has been well integrated into normal clinical work flow in the form of (18)F-FDG for oncologic imaging, with reliable daily production and distribution to sites for immediate use, without the need for on-site preparation. Here we discuss radiohalogenated versions of imaging and therapeutic agents targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA); these were among the first such agents to be synthesized and used clinically. PSMA is highly expressed on prostate cancer epithelial cells and is currently being extensively investigated around the world as a target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Additionally, the presence of PSMA on nonprostate tumor neovasculature has opened the possibility of PSMA-targeted molecules as generalizable cancer imaging and therapy agents. We focus on (18)F-labeled agents for PET, as they begin to redefine-along with the corresponding (68)Ga-labeled agents discussed elsewhere in this supplement to The Journal of Nuclear Medicine-the management of prostate cancer across a variety of clinical contexts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Variables and Strategies in Development of Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.; Sheflin, Lowell G.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Abdelmaksoud, Heba E.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents such as ribozymes, RNAi and antisense have substantial potential for gene therapy of human retinal degenerations. These technologies are used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein. The disease target mRNA may be a mutant mRNA causing an autosomal dominant retinal degeneration or a normal mRNA that is overexpressed in certain diseases. All PTGS technologies depend upon the initial critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to the target RNA. This event requires that the PTGS agent is in a conformational state able to support hybridization and that the target have a large and accessible single-stranded platform to allow rapid annealing, although such platforms are rare. We address the biocomplexity that currently limits PTGS therapeutic development with particular emphasis on biophysical variables that influence cellular performance. We address the different strategies that can be used for development of PTGS agents intended for therapeutic translation. These issues apply generally to the development of PTGS agents for retinal, ocular, or systemic diseases. This review should assist the interested reader to rapidly appreciate critical variables in PTGS development and facilitate initial design and testing of such agents against new targets of clinical interest. PMID:21785698

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology.

    PubMed

    Ashbee, H Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Richardson, Malcolm D; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W

    2014-05-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents.

  13. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology

    PubMed Central

    Ashbee, H. Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents. PMID:24379304

  14. Cell targeting peptides as smart ligands for targeting of therapeutic or diagnostic agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mousavizadeh, Ali; Jabbari, Ali; Akrami, Mohammad; Bardania, Hassan

    2017-07-13

    Cell targeting peptides (CTP) are small peptides which have high affinity and specificity to a cell or tissue targets. They are typically identified by using phage display and chemical synthetic peptide library methods. CTPs have attracted considerable attention as a new class of ligands to delivery specifically therapeutic and diagnostic agents, because of the fact they have several advantages including easy synthesis, smaller physical sizes, lower immunogenicity and cytotoxicity and their simple and better conjugation to nano-carriers and therapeutic or diagnostic agents compared to conventional antibodies. In this systematic review, we will focus on the basic concepts concerning the use of cell-targeting peptides (CTPs), following the approaches of selecting them from peptide libraries. We discuss several developed strategies for cell-specific delivery of different cargos by CTPs, which are designed for drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Delivery of therapeutic agents by nanoparticles made of grapefruit-derived lipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Mu, Jingyao; Deng, Zhong-Bin; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Baomei; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Although the use of nanotechnology for the delivery of a wide range of medical treatments has potential to reduce adverse effects associated with drug therapy, tissue-specific delivery remains challenging. Here we show that nanoparticles made of grapefruit-derived lipids, which we call grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNVs), can transport chemotherapeutic agents, siRNA, DNA expression vectors and proteins to different types of cells. We demonstrate the in vivo targeting specificity of GNVs by co-delivering therapeutic agents with folic acid, which in turn leads to significantly increasing targeting efficiency to cells expressing folate receptors. The therapeutic potential of GNVs was further demonstrated by enhancing the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumor growth in two tumor animal models. GNVs are less toxic than nanoparticles made of synthetic lipids and, when injected intravenously into pregnant mice, do not pass the placental barrier, suggesting they may be a useful tool for drug delivery. PMID:23695661

  16. Derivatives of human complement component C3 for therapeutic complement depletion: a novel class of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Fritzinger, David C; Hew, Brian E; Lee, June Q; Newhouse, James; Alam, Maqsudul; Ciallella, John R; Bowers, Mallory; Gorsuch, William B; Guikema, Benjamin J; Stahl, Gregory L; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    To obtain proteins with the complement-depleting activity of Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), but with less immunogenicity, we have prepared human C3/CVF hybrid proteins, in which the C-terminus of the alpha-chain of human C3 is exchanged with homologous regions of the C-terminus of the beta-chain of CVF. We show that these hybrid proteins are able to deplete complement, both in vitro and in vivo. One hybrid protein, HC3-1496, is shown to be effective in reducing complement-mediated damage in two disease models in mice, collagen-induced arthritis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Human C3/CVF hybrid proteins represent a novel class ofbiologicals as potential therapeutic agents in many diseases where complement is involved in the pathogenesis.

  17. Degrasyn-like Symmetrical Compounds: Possible Therapeutic Agents for Multiple Myeloma (MM-I)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Schuber, Paul T.; Pal, Ashutosh; Ying, Yunming; Han, Dongmei; Gao, Liwei; Wang, Shimei; Levitzki, Alexander; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Talpaz, Moshe; Young, Matthew; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; Bornmann, William. G.

    2014-01-01

    A series of degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds have been designed, synthesized, and screened against B cell malignancy (multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma) cell lines. The lead compounds T5165804 and CP2005 showed higher nanomolar potency against these tumor cells in comparison to degrasyn and inhibited Usp9x activity in vitro and in intact cells. These observations suggest that this new class of compounds holds promise as cancer therapeutic agents PMID:24457091

  18. Degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds: possible therapeutic agents for multiple myeloma (MM-I).

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David S; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A; Schuber, Paul T; Pal, Ashutosh; Ying, Yunming; Han, Dongmei; Gao, Liwei; Wang, Shimei; Levitzki, Alexander; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Talpaz, Moshe; Young, Matthew; Showalter, Hollis D; Donato, Nicholas J; Bornmann, William G

    2014-02-15

    A series of degrasyn-like symmetrical compounds have been designed, synthesized, and screened against B cell malignancy (multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma) cell lines. The lead compounds T5165804 and CP2005 showed higher nanomolar potency against these tumor cells in comparison to degrasyn and inhibited Usp9x activity in vitro and in intact cells. These observations suggest that this new class of compounds holds promise as cancer therapeutic agents.

  19. Experimental Study of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Mediated Heat Transfer for Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razansky, D.; Adam, D. R.; Einziger, P. D.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCA) have been recently suggested as efficient enhancers of ultrasonic power deposition in tissue. The ultrasonic energy absorption by UCA, considered as disadvantageous in diagnostic imaging, might be valuable in therapeutic applications such as targeted hyperthermia or ablation treatments. The current study, based on theoretical predictions, was designed to experimentally measure the dissipation and heating effects of encapsulated UCA (Optison™) in a well-controlled and calibrated environment.

  20. Efficacy of Several Therapeutic Agents in a Murine Model of Dry Eye Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Servet; Kulualp, Kadri

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we used 56 female BALB/c mice with induced dry eye syndrome to evaluate the therapeutic effects of formal saline (FS), sodium hyaluronate (SH), diclofenac sodium (DS), olopatadine (OP), retinoic acid (RA), fluoromethanole (FML), cyclosporine A (CsA), and doxycycline hyclate (DH). All subjects were kept in an evaporative ‘dry eye cabinet’ for the assessment of blink rate, tear production, tear break-up time, and impression cytology prior to (baseline) and during weeks 2, 4, and 6 of the study. The right eyes of all subjects were treated topically with 5 µL of the test agent twice daily during weeks 2 through 6. Impression cytology and tear break-up time differed between time points in all groups and differed between groups at weeks 4 and 6. Blink rate differed by time point only in the FS, FML, and DH groups. Tear production according to the phenol red cotton thread test differed by time point for all groups except RA, CsA, and DH and differed between groups only at week 6. Among the compounds tested in the present study, DS and CsA were the most effective therapeutic agents in our mouse model of dry eye syndrome; these agents likely exert their therapeutic effect through their antiinflammatory activity. PMID:27053565

  1. Huperzine A, a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, D L; Tang, X C; He, X C

    2000-03-01

    HupA is a potent, reversible and selective inhibitor of AChE with a rapid absorption and penetration into the brain in animal tests. It exhibits memory-enhancing activities in animal and clinical trials. Compared to tacrine and donepezil, HupA possesses a longer duration of action and higher therapeutic index, and the peripheral cholinergic side effects are minimal at therapeutic doses. This review article deals with a comprehensive survey of the progress in chemical and pharmacological studies of HupA including the isolation and structure elucidation, pharmacological actions, total synthesis, SAR studies and the future development of HupA. Recently, it has been reported that HupA could reduce neuronal cell death caused by glutamate. The dual bio-activities of HupA would further enhance its value and potentiality as the therapeutic agent for Alzheimer s disease.

  2. Microtubule-targeting agents in oncology and therapeutic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Herbert H; Yeo, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, microtubules are present both in interphase and dividing cells. In the latter, microtubules forming the mitotic spindle are highly dynamic and exquisitely sensitive to therapeutic inhibitors. Developed to alter microtubule function, microtubule-binding agents have been proven to be highly active as an anticancer treatment. Significant development of microtubule-binding agents has taken place in recent years, with newer anti-tubulin agents now showing novel properties of enhanced tumor specificity, reduced neurotoxicity, and insensitivity to chemoresistance mechanisms. Hepatocellular carcinoma remains one of the most difficult cancers to treat, with chemotherapies being relatively ineffective. There is now evidence to suggest that microtubule-binding agents may be effective in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially when used in combination with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Preclinical models have suggested that the latter may be able to overcome resistance to microtubule binding agents. In this review article, recent developments of novel microtubule binding agents and their relevance to the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma will be discussed. PMID:24790457

  3. MAD (Multi-Agent-Delivery) Nanolayer: Delivering Multiple Therapeutics from Hierarchical Assembled Surface Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Su; Smith, Renée C.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    We present the hydrolytically degradable polymeric multilayer films that can co-deliver multiple therapeutics of differing chemical characteristics (charged biomacromolecules and neutral hydrophobic small molecules) from a surface. This multi-agent-delivery (MAD) nanolayer system integrates the hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester) as a structural component to control the degradation of the multilayers to release active therapeutic macromolecules, as well as hydrophobic drugs imbedded within amphiphilic block copolymer micellar carriers within layer-by-layer (LbL) films, which would otherwise be difficult to include within the multilayers. By varying the anionic therapeutic agents (heparin and dextran sulfate) within the multilayer, we examine how different structural components can be used to control the release kinetics of multiple therapeutics from MAD nanolayers. Controlled release profiles and the in vitro efficacy of the MAD nanolayers in suppressing the growth of human smooth muscle cell lines were evaluated. The dual delivery of a charged macromolecular heparin and a small hydrophobic drug, paclitaxel, is found to be synergistic and beneficial toward effective therapeutic activity. Furthermore, we compared the classical dipping method we employed here with an automated spray-LbL technique. Spray-LbL significantly facilitates film processing time while preserving the characteristic release profiles of the MAD nanolayers. With the highly versatile and tunable nature of LbL assembly, we anticipate that MAD nanolayers can provide a unique platform for delivering multiple therapeutics from macromolecular to small molecules with distinct release profiles for applications in biological and biomedical surface coatings. PMID:19630389

  4. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC POLY(L-GLUTAMIC ACID)-BASED CANCER THERAPEUTIC AND IMAGING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern polymer chemistry has led to the generation of a number of biocompatible synthetic polymers have been increasingly studied as efficient carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Synthetic biocompatible polymers have been used to improve the efficacy of both small-molecular-weight therapeutics and imaging agents. Furthermore, multiple targeted anticancer agents and/or imaging reporters can be attached to a single polymer chain, allowing multifunctional and/or multimodality therapy and molecular imaging. Having both an anticancer drug and an imaging reporter in a single polymer chain allows noninvasive real-time visualization of the pharmacokinetics of polymeric drug delivery systems, which can uncover and explain the complicated mechanisms of in vivo drug delivery and their correlation to pharmacodynamics. This review examines use of the synthetic biocompatible polymer poly(L-glutamic acid) (PG) as an efficient carrier of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. This review will summarize and update our recent research on use of PG as a platform for drug delivery and molecular imaging, including recent clinical findings with respect to PG-paclitaxel (PG-TXL); the combination of PG-TXL with radiotherapy; mechanisms of action of PG-TXL; and noninvasive visualization of in vivo delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and multimodality imaging. PMID:21303613

  5. In Vitro Susceptibility of Pathogenic Naegleria and Acanthamoeba Species to a Variety of Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Duma, Richard J.; Finley, Ruth

    1976-01-01

    Six pathogenic strains of Naegleria fowleri, two of Acanthamoeba castellanii, and three of Acanthamoeba polyphaga were tested in vitro for susceptibility to a variety of potentially useful therapeutic agents. Minimal motility inhibitory concentrations and minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by a technique of subculturing pure clones of amoebae in plastic tissue culture chamber slides containing liquid axenic media and serially diluted drug, incubating at 30°C for Acanthamoeba and at 37°C for Naegleria, and observing on an inverted microscope at 6 h for inhibition of motility and at 24 and 48 h for inhibition of growth. Drug concentrations were selected on the basis of fluid levels achievable in humans. Amphotericin B, clotrimazole, and miconazole were the most effective drugs against Naegleria, whereas polymyxin B sulfate and pentamidine isethionate were somewhat effective against pathogenic Acanthamoeba. Our results suggest that amphotericin B is the most effective agent against Naegleria, but few agents are effective against Acanthamoeba. Images PMID:984777

  6. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. Materials and Methods 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. Results The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0–100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7

  7. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen; Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0-100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7.57, p=0.041). There was a significantly

  8. Old and new adjuvants.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amy S; Marrack, Philippa

    2017-07-19

    Adjuvants have been deliberately added to vaccines since the 1920's when alum was discovered to boost antibody responses, leading to better protection. The first adjuvants were discovered by accident and were used in the safer but less immunogenic subunit vaccines, supposedly by providing an antigen depot to extend antigen presentation. Since that time, much has been discovered about how these adjuvants impact cells at the tissue site to activate innate immune responses, mobilize dendritic cells and drive adaptive immunity. New approaches to vaccine construction for infectious diseases that have so far not been well addressed by conventional vaccines often attempt to induce antibodies, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) CTLs. The discovery of pattern recognition receptors and ligands that drive desired T cell responses has led to development of novel adjuvant strategies using immunomodulatory agents to direct appropriate immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  10. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  11. Mechanisms of action and therapeutic efficacies of the lipophilic antimycobacterial agents clofazimine and bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Cholo, Moloko C; Mothiba, Maborwa T; Fourie, Bernard; Anderson, Ronald

    2017-02-01

    Drug-resistant (DR)-TB is the major challenge confronting the global TB control programme, necessitating treatment with second-line anti-TB drugs, often with limited therapeutic efficacy. This scenario has resulted in the inclusion of Group 5 antibiotics in various therapeutic regimens, two of which promise to impact significantly on the outcome of the therapy of DR-TB. These are the 're-purposed' riminophenazine, clofazimine, and the recently approved diarylquinoline, bedaquiline. Although they differ structurally, both of these lipophilic agents possess cationic amphiphilic properties that enable them to target and inactivate essential ion transporters in the outer membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the case of bedaquiline, the primary target is the key respiratory chain enzyme F1/F0-ATPase, whereas clofazimine is less selective, apparently inhibiting several targets, which may underpin the extremely low level of resistance to this agent. This review is focused on similarities and differences between clofazimine and bedaquiline, specifically in respect of molecular mechanisms of antimycobacterial action, targeting of quiescent and metabolically active organisms, therapeutic efficacy in the clinical setting of DR-TB, resistance mechanisms, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and adverse events.

  12. Perspectives on Phytochemicals as Antibacterial Agents: An Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Savita; Kumar, Manish; Phougat, Neetu; Chaudhary, Renu; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable advancements in the development of antimicrobial agents, incidents of epidemics due to multi drug resistance in microorganisms have created a massive hazard to mankind. Due to increased resistance against conventional antibiotics, researchers and pharmaceutical industries are more concerned about novel therapeutic agents for the prevention of bacterial infections. Enormous wealth of traditional system of medicine gains importance in health therapies over again. With ancient credentials of potent medicinal plants, various herbal remedies came forward for the management of bacterial infections. The Ayurvedic approach facilitates the development of new therapeutic agents due to structural and functional diversity among phytochemicals. The abundance and diversity is responsible for the characterization of new lead structures from medicinal plants. Industrial interest has increased due to recent research advancements viz. synergistic and high-throughput screening approach for the evaluation of vast variety of phytochemicals. The review certainly emphasizes on the traditional medicines as alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. The review briefly describes mode of action of various antibiotics and resistance mechanisms. This review focuses on the chemical diversity and various mechanisms of action of phytochemicals against bacterial pathogens.

  13. [Triazole antifungal agents: practice guidelines of therapeutic drug monitoring and perspectives in treatment optimization].

    PubMed

    Scodavolpe, Simon; Quaranta, Sylvie; Lacarelle, Bruno; Solas, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal triazole agents (fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole and posaconazole) are widely used for the management of invasive fungal infections (IFI). These drugs are indicated both for the prophylaxis and treatment of IFI, particularly in candidiasis and aspergillosis, major cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients. Due to a large interindividual pharmacokinetic variability leading to sub-therapeutic or toxic concentrations and to concentration-efficacy and/or -toxicity relationships, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal triazole is fully justified. This review provides an overview of literature based data that confirm the usefulness of such TDM and its level of evidence as well as the practical guidelines for its implementation. In addition, we discuss the interest of new tools to improve the clinical management of IFI, such as genotyping tests optimizing initial voriconazole dosing regimen or the development of a new solid oral tablet of posaconazole improving its bioavailability and limiting absorption disorders.

  14. Core-shell-type magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites for bioimaging and therapeutic agent delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Gu, Hongchen

    2015-01-21

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomedicine offer great opportunities for the development of nanoscaled theranostic platforms. Among various multifunctional nanocarriers, magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites (M-MSNs) attract prominent research interest for their outstanding properties and potential biomedical applications. This Research News article highlights recent progress in the design of core-shell-type M-MSNs for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. First, an overview of synthetic strategies for three representative core-shell-type M-MSNs with different morphologies and structures is presented. Then, the diagnostic functions of M-MSNs is illustrated for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. Next, magnetic targeted delivery and stimuli-responsive release of drugs, and effective package of DNA/siRNA inside mesopores using M-MSNs as therapeutic agent carriers are discussed. The article concludes with some important challenges that need to be overcome for further practical applications of M-MSNs in nanomedicine.

  15. Immunomodulation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria: experiments in nature and their conflicting implications for potential therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, Anne EP; John, Chandy C

    2013-01-01

    Effective Plasmodium falciparum immunity requires a precisely timed and balanced response of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune regulators. These responses begin with innate immune effectors and are modulated over the course of an infection and between episodes to limit inflammation. To date, there are no effective immunomodulatory therapies for severe malaria. Some of the most potent immunomodulators are naturally occurring infections, including helminthic and chronic viral infections. This review examines malaria coinfection with these organisms, and their impact on malaria morbidity and immune responses. Overall, there is compelling evidence to suggest that chronic coinfections can modulate deleterious malaria-specific immune responses, suggesting that therapeutic agents may be effective if utilized early in infection. Examination of the mechanisms of these effects may serve as a platform to identify more targeted and effective malaria immunomodulatory therapeutics. PMID:23241191

  16. [Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer?].

    PubMed

    Hupe, M C; Kramer, M W; Kuczyk, M A; Merseburger, A S

    2015-05-01

    Advanced urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is associated with a high metastatic potential. Life expectancy for metastatic patients is poor and rarely exceeds more than one year without further therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can decrease the tumour burden while reducing the risk of death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been discussed controversially. Patients with lymph node-positive metastases seem to benefit the most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In selected patients, metastasectomy can prolong survival. In metastastic patients, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin has become the new standard regimen due to a lower toxicity in comparison to the combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC). For second-line treatment, vinflunine is the only approved therapeutic agent.

  17. Real-time, aptamer-based tracking of circulating therapeutic agents in living animals

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, B. Scott; Hoggarth, David A.; Maliniak, Dan; Ploense, Kyle; White, Ryan J.; Woodward, Nick; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Bonham, Andrew J.; Eisenstein, Michael; Kippin, Tod; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Soh, H. Tom

    2014-01-01

    A sensor capable of continuously measuring specific molecules in the bloodstream in vivo would give clinicians a valuable window into patients’ health and their response to therapeutics. Such technology would enable truly personalized medicine, wherein therapeutic agents could be tailored with optimal doses for each patient to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. Unfortunately, continuous, real-time measurement is currently only possible for a handful of targets, such as glucose, lactose, and oxygen, and the few existing platforms for continuous measurement are not generalizable for the monitoring of other analytes, such as small-molecule therapeutics. In response, we have developed a real-time biosensor capable of continuously tracking a wide range of circulating drugs in living subjects. Our microfluidic electrochemical detector for in vivo continuous monitoring (MEDIC) requires no exogenous reagents, operates at room temperature, and can be reconfigured to measure different target molecules by exchanging probes in a modular manner. To demonstrate the system's versatility, we measured therapeutic in vivo concentrations of doxorubicin (a chemotherapeutic) and kanamycin (an antibiotic) in live rats and in human whole blood for several hours with high sensitivity and specificity at sub-minute temporal resolution. Importantly, we show that MEDIC can also obtain pharmacokineticparameters for individual animals in real-time. Accordingly, just as continuous glucose monitoring technology is currently revolutionizing diabetes care, we believe MEDIC could be a powerful enabler for personalized medicine by ensuring delivery of optimal drug doses for individual patients based on direct detection of physiological parameters. PMID:24285484

  18. Is there potential for therapeutic drug monitoring of biologic agents in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Bastida, Carla; Ruíz, Virginia; Pascal, Mariona; Yagüe, Jordi; Sanmartí, Raimon; Soy, Dolors

    2016-12-19

    The use of biologics has significantly changed the management of rheumatoid arthritis over the last decade, becoming the cornerstone treatment for many patients. The current therapeutic arsenal consists of just under 10 biologic agents, with four different mechanisms of action. Several studies have demonstrated a large interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, which translates to unpredictability in clinical response among individuals. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biologic agents approved for rheumatoid arthritis. The literature relating to their concentration-effect relationship and the use of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling to optimize drug regimens is analysed. Due to the scarcity and complexity of these studies, the current dosing strategy is based on clinical indexes/aspects. In general, dose individualization for biologics should be implemented increasingly in clinical practice as there is a direct benefit for treated rheumatoid arthritis patients. Moreover, there is an indirect benefit in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  19. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  20. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  1. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  2. AβPP-selective BACE inhibitors (ASBI): novel class of therapeutic agents for alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Olivier; Spilman, Patricia; Zhang, Qiang; Libeu, Clare P; Poksay, Karen; Gorostiza, Olivia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Bredesen, Dale E; John, Varghese

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach was used to identify AβPP-selective BACE inhibitors (ASBI) and to evaluate their in vivo ability to modulate AβPP processing selectively. We identified a bioflavonoid nutritional supplement as a molecular lead that acts as an ASBI in cell models, and show that increasing brain levels of this bioflavonoid through a pro-drug approach leads to reduction of Aβ42 in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. ASBIs represent a novel class of candidate therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Liposome Formulation of Fullerene-Based Molecular Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Fullerene medicine is a new but rapidly growing research subject. Fullerene has a number of desired structural, physical and chemical properties to be adapted for biological use including antioxidants, anti-aging, anti-inflammation, photodynamic therapy, drug delivery, and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. Chemical functionalization of fullerenes has led to several interesting compounds with very promising preclinical efficacy, pharmacokinetic and safety data. However, there is no clinical evaluation or human use except in fullerene-based cosmetic products for human skincare. This article summarizes recent advances in liposome formulation of fullerenes for the use in therapeutics and molecular imaging. PMID:24300561

  4. Rapid, Cell-Based Toxicity Screen of Potentially Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kolniak, Tiffany A.; Sullivan, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents such as antisense, ribozymes and RNA interference (RNAi) have great potential as therapeutics for a variety of eye diseases including retinal and macular degenerations, glaucoma, corneal degenerations, inflammatory and viral conditions. Despite their great potential and over thirty years of academic and corporate research only a single PTGS agent is currently approved for human therapy for a single disease. Substantial challenges exist to achieving both efficacious and safe PTGS agents. Efficacy, as measured in specific target mRNA and protein knockdown, depends upon a number of complex factors including the identification of rare regions of target mRNA accessibility, cellular colocalization of the PTGS agent in sufficient concentration with the target mRNA, and stability of the PTGS agent in the target cells in which it is delivered or expressed. Safety is commonly measured by lack of cytotoxicity or other deleterious cellular responses in cells in which the PTGS agent is delivered or expressed. To relieve major bottlenecks in RNA drug discovery novel, efficient, inexpensive, and rapid tools are needed to facilitate lead identification of the most efficacious PTGS agent, rational optimization of efficacy of the lead agent, and lead agent safety determinations. We have developed a technological platform using cell culture expression systems that permits lead identification and efficacy optimization of PTGS agents against arbitrary disease target mRNAs under relatively high throughput conditions. Here, we extend the technology platform to include PTGS safety determinations in cultured human cells that are expected to represent the common cellular housekeeping microenvironment. We developed a high throughput screening (HTS) cytotoxicity assay in 96-well plate format based around the SYTOX Green dye which is excluded from healthy viable cells and becomes substantially fluorescent only after entering cells and binding

  5. Silibinin, Dexamethasone, and Doxycycline as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Treating Vesicant-Inflicted Ocular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B; Enzenauer, Robert W; Petrash, J Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 µg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. PMID:22841772

  6. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 μg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ► Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ► This NM model is a cost effective

  7. Refractory heparin induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) treated with therapeutic plasma exchange and rituximab as adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Schell, Amy M; Petras, Melissa; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Ornstein, Deborah L

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of refractory heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) with prolonged thrombocytopenia and multiple thrombotic complications that failed to improve despite aggressive treatment. A 60 year old female with a prior history of venous thromboembolism was admitted with an acute pulmonary embolism, and developed HITT after several days on heparin therapy. She suffered multiple complications including bilateral venous limb gangrene, acute renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenia, leading us to use multimodality therapy including therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) and rituximab immunosuppression. The patient had transient improvements in her thrombocytopenia with TPE, and rituximab was added in an attempt to reduce antibody production. She eventually required bilateral limb amputation, and only after removal of the gangrenous limbs did her platelet count show sustained improvement. We discuss the possible contribution of infection to her prolonged course.

  8. Prospects on Strategies for Therapeutically Targeting Oncogenic Regulatory Factors by Small-Molecule Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chih-Chien; Salunke, Santosh B.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Although the Human Genome Project has raised much hope for the identification of druggable genetic targets for cancer and other diseases, this genetic target-based approach has not improved productivity in drug discovery over the traditional approach. Analyses of known human target proteins of currently marketed drugs reveal that these drugs target only a limited number of proteins as compared to the whole proteome. In contrast to genome-based targets, mechanistic targets are derived from empirical research, at cellular or molecular levels, in disease models and/or in patients, thereby enabling the exploration of a greater number of druggable targets beyond the genome and epigenome. The paradigm shift has made a tremendous headway in developing new therapeutic agents targeting different clinically relevant mechanisms/pathways in cancer cells. In this Prospects article, we provide an overview of potential drug targets related to the following four emerging areas: (1) tumor metabolism (the Warburg effect), (2) dysregulated protein turnover (E3 ubiquitin ligases), (3) protein–protein interactions, and (4) unique DNA high-order structures and protein–DNA interactions. Nonetheless, considering the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneities that characterize cancer cells, the development of drug resistance in cancer cells by adapting signaling circuitry to take advantage of redundant pathways or feedback/crosstalk systems is possible. This “phenotypic adaptation” underlies the rationale of using therapeutic combinations of these targeted agents with cytotoxic drugs. PMID:24166934

  9. Novel agents and new therapeutic approaches for treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ria, Roberto; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the therapeutic strategies and the drugs actually in development for the management of myeloma patients. Multiple myeloma is caused by the expansion of monoclonal plasma cells and secretion of M-protein (immunoglobulins, Bence Jones protein and free light chains). Multiple myeloma still remains an incurable disease with a high incidence rate in the elderly, despite the introduction of several new therapeutic agents (bortezomib, lenalidomide and thalidomide) which have changed its natural history. The high heterogeneity of this disease leads to large differences in clinical responses to treatments. Thus, the choice of the best treatment is a difficult issue. However, the introduction of new drugs has made it possible to achieve high response rates and good quality responses with long-term disease control. Interactions between tumor cells and their bone marrow microenvironment play a pivotal role in the development, maintenance, and progression of myeloma, inducing also drug resistance. These knowledges have improved treatment options, leading to the approval of new drugs which not only target the malignant cell itself, but also its microenvironment. These agents are in preclinical/early clinical evaluation and they appear to further improve disease control, but their use is still not approved outside of clinical trials. PMID:25332907

  10. Intratumoral infusion of fluid: estimation of hydraulic conductivity and implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Y.; Brekken, C.; Netti, P. A.; Baxter, L. T.; Jain, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new technique to measure in vivo tumour tissue fluid transport parameters (hydraulic conductivity and compliance) that influence the systemic and intratumoral delivery of therapeutic agents. An infusion needle approximating a point source was constructed to produce a radially symmetrical fluid source in the centre of human tumours in immunodeficient mice. At constant flow, the pressure gradient generated in the tumour by the infusion of fluid (Evans blue-albumin in saline) was measured as a function of the radial position with micropipettes connected to a servo-null system. To evaluate whether the fluid infused was reabsorbed by blood vessels, infusions were also performed after circulatory arrest. In the colon adenocarcinoma LS174T with a spherically symmetrical distribution of Evans blue-albumin, the median hydraulic conductivity in vivo and after circulatory arrest at a flow rate of 0.1 microl min(-1) was, respectively, 1.7x10(-7) and 2.3x10(-7) cm2 mmHg(-1) s. Compliance estimates were 35 microl mmHg(-1) in vivo, and 100 microl mmHg(-1) after circulatory arrest. In the sarcoma HSTS 26T, hydraulic conductivity and compliance were not calculated because of the asymmetric distribution of the fluid infused. The technique will be helpful in identifying strategies to improve the intratumoral and systemic delivery of gene targeting vectors and other therapeutic agents. Images Figure 2 PMID:9836476

  11. Platinum-based inhibitors of amyloid-β as therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnham, Kevin J.; Kenche, Vijaya B.; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Smith, David P.; Tew, Deborah J.; Liu, Xiang; Perez, Keyla; Cranston, Greg A.; Johanssen, Timothy J.; Volitakis, Irene; Bush, Ashley I.; Masters, Colin L.; White, Anthony R.; Smith, Jeffrey P.; Cherny, Robert A.; Cappai, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Amelyoid-β peptide (Aβ) is a major causative agent responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ contains a high affinity metal binding site that modulates peptide aggregation and toxicity. Therefore, identifying molecules targeting this site represents a valid therapeutic strategy. To test this hypothesis, a range of L-PtCl2 (L = 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives) complexes were examined and shown to bind to Aβ, inhibit neurotoxicity and rescue Aβ-induced synaptotoxicity in mouse hippocampal slices. Coordination of the complexes to Aβ altered the chemical properties of the peptide inhibiting amyloid formation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In comparison, the classic anticancer drug cisplatin did not affect any of the biochemical and cellular effects of Aβ. This implies that the planar aromatic 1,10-phenanthroline ligands L confer some specificity for Aβ onto the platinum complexes. The potent effect of the L-PtCl2 complexes identifies this class of compounds as therapeutic agents for AD. PMID:18463291

  12. Effect of Hypobaric Hypoxia on Cognitive Functions and Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MUTHURAJU, Sangu; PATI, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000–5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  13. Insights into the antimicrobial properties of hepcidins: advantages and drawbacks as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lisa; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Batoni, Giovanna; Tavanti, Arianna

    2015-04-10

    The increasing frequency of multi-drug resistant microorganisms has driven research into alternative therapeutic strategies. In this respect, natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hold much promise as candidates for the development of novel antibiotics. However, AMPs have some intrinsic drawbacks, such as partial degradation by host proteases or inhibition by host body fluid composition, potential toxicity, and high production costs. This review focuses on the hepcidins, which are peptides produced by the human liver with a known role in iron homeostasis, as well by numerous other organisms (including fish, reptiles, other mammals), and their potential as antibacterial and antifungal agents. Interestingly, the antimicrobial properties of human hepcidins are enhanced at acidic pH, rendering these peptides appealing for the design of new drugs targeting infections that occur in body areas with acidic physiological pH. This review not only considers current research on the direct killing activity of these peptides, but evaluates the potential application of these molecules as coating agents preventing biofilm formation and critically assesses technical obstacles preventing their therapeutic application.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor-21 as a therapeutic agent for metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Shanafelt, Armen B

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 is a unique member of the FGF family, with several molecular characteristics that differ from classical FGFs and exhibiting a pharmacologic profile that includes a variety of metabolic responses in vitro and when tested in vivo in animal models. FGF21 represents a novel and attractive therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes mellitus, because of its ability to modulate disease phenotype in preclinical settings without inducing any apparent adverse effects. Although FGF21 was discovered relatively recently, the understanding of its biology and therapeutic utility is rapidly evolving. A number of key metabolically linked molecules and pathways have been suggested to be involved in the mechanism of action of FGF21, depending on the specific target tissue/organ. Further research into these mechanisms should lead to important advances in the understanding of FGF21 biology and pave the way for novel therapeutic strategies. The specifics of FGF21 activities both in cell culture and in vivo, its potential as a target for diabetes, and insights into the molecular mechanisms of FGF21 metabolic actions will be discussed in this review.

  15. Emerging Roles of microRNAs in Ischemic Stroke: As Possible Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil; Winlow, William; Farbood, Yaghoob; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi; Farzaneh, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability worldwide. The consequences of stroke injuries are profound and persistent, causing in considerable burden to both the individual patient and society. Current treatments for ischemic stroke injuries have proved inadequate, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenously expressed RNA molecules that function to inhibit mRNA translation and have key roles in the pathophysiological processes contributing to ischemic stroke injuries. Potential therapeutic areas to compensate these pathogenic processes include promoting angiogenesis, neurogenesis and neuroprotection. Several miRNAs, and their target genes, are recognized to be involved in these recoveries and repair mechanisms. The capacity of miRNAs to simultaneously regulate several target genes underlies their unique importance in ischemic stroke therapeutics. In this Review, we focus on the role of miRNAs as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as promising therapeutic agents in cerebral ischemic stroke.

  16. Emerging Roles of microRNAs in Ischemic Stroke: As Possible Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil; Winlow, William; Farbood, Yaghoob; Moghaddam, Hadi Fathi; Farzaneh, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability worldwide. The consequences of stroke injuries are profound and persistent, causing in considerable burden to both the individual patient and society. Current treatments for ischemic stroke injuries have proved inadequate, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenously expressed RNA molecules that function to inhibit mRNA translation and have key roles in the pathophysiological processes contributing to ischemic stroke injuries. Potential therapeutic areas to compensate these pathogenic processes include promoting angiogenesis, neurogenesis and neuroprotection. Several miRNAs, and their target genes, are recognized to be involved in these recoveries and repair mechanisms. The capacity of miRNAs to simultaneously regulate several target genes underlies their unique importance in ischemic stroke therapeutics. In this Review, we focus on the role of miRNAs as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as promising therapeutic agents in cerebral ischemic stroke. PMID:28480877

  17. L-Ferritin targets breast cancer stem cells and delivers therapeutic and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Ruiu, Roberto; Cadenazzi, Marta; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSC) have the unique biological properties necessary for tumor maintenance and spreading, and function as a reservoir for the relapse and metastatic evolution of the disease by virtue of their resistance to radio- and chemo-therapies. Thus, the efficacy of a therapeutic approach relies on its ability to effectively target and deplete CSC. In this study, we show that CSC-enriched tumorspheres from breast cancer cell lines display an increased L-Ferritin uptake capability compared to their monolayer counterparts as a consequence of the upregulation of the L-Ferritin receptor SCARA5. L-Ferritin internalization was exploited for the simultaneous delivery of Curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A, both entrapped in the L-Ferritin cavity. This theranostic system was able to impair viability and self-renewal of tumorspheres in vitro and to induce the regression of established tumors in mice. In conclusion, here we show that Curcumin-loaded L-Ferritin has a strong therapeutic potential due to the specific targeting of CSC and the improved Curcumin bioavailability, opening up the possibility of its use in a clinical setting. PMID:27579532

  18. Cosmetic Preservatives as Therapeutic Corneal and Scleral Tissue Cross-Linking Agents

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Natasha; Kim, MiJung; Cao, Kerry; Shimizu, Yukari; Kim, Su-Young; Takaoka, Anna; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Previously, aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) have been studied as a means to chemically induce tissue cross-linking (TXL) of cornea and sclera. There are a number of related and possibly more potent agents, known as formaldehyde releasers (FARs), that are in commercial use as preservatives in cosmetics and other personal care products. The present study was undertaken in order to screen such compounds for potential clinical utility as therapeutic TXL agents. Methods. A chemical registry of 62 FARs was created from a literature review and included characteristics relevant to TXL such as molecular weight, carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, toxicity, hydrophobicity, and commercial availability. From this registry, five compounds [diazolidinyl urea (DAU), imidazolidinyl urea (IMU), sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), DMDM hydantoin (DMDM), 5-Ethyl-3,7-dioxa-1-azabicyclo [3.3.0] octane (OCT)] were selected for efficacy screening using two independent systems, an ex vivo rabbit corneal cross-linking simulation setup and incubation of cut scleral tissue pieces. Treatments were conducted at pH 7.4 or 8.5 for 30 minutes. Efficacy was evaluated using thermal denaturation temperature (Tm), and cell toxicity was studied using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. Cross-linking effects in the five selected FARs were pH and concentration dependent. Overall, the Tm shifts were in agreement with both cornea and sclera. By comparison with BNAs previously reported upon, the FARs identified in this study were significantly more potent but with similar or better cytotoxicity. Conclusions. The FARs, a class of compounds well known to the cosmetic industry, may have utility as therapeutic TXL agents. The compounds studied thus far show promise and will be further tested. PMID:25634979

  19. Cosmetic preservatives as therapeutic corneal and scleral tissue cross-linking agents.

    PubMed

    Babar, Natasha; Kim, MiJung; Cao, Kerry; Shimizu, Yukari; Kim, Su-Young; Takaoka, Anna; Trokel, Stephen L; Paik, David C

    2015-01-29

    Previously, aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) have been studied as a means to chemically induce tissue cross-linking (TXL) of cornea and sclera. There are a number of related and possibly more potent agents, known as formaldehyde releasers (FARs), that are in commercial use as preservatives in cosmetics and other personal care products. The present study was undertaken in order to screen such compounds for potential clinical utility as therapeutic TXL agents. A chemical registry of 62 FARs was created from a literature review and included characteristics relevant to TXL such as molecular weight, carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, toxicity, hydrophobicity, and commercial availability. From this registry, five compounds [diazolidinyl urea (DAU), imidazolidinyl urea (IMU), sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), DMDM hydantoin (DMDM), 5-Ethyl-3,7-dioxa-1-azabicyclo [3.3.0] octane (OCT)] were selected for efficacy screening using two independent systems, an ex vivo rabbit corneal cross-linking simulation setup and incubation of cut scleral tissue pieces. Treatments were conducted at pH 7.4 or 8.5 for 30 minutes. Efficacy was evaluated using thermal denaturation temperature (Tm), and cell toxicity was studied using the trypan blue exclusion method. Cross-linking effects in the five selected FARs were pH and concentration dependent. Overall, the Tm shifts were in agreement with both cornea and sclera. By comparison with BNAs previously reported upon, the FARs identified in this study were significantly more potent but with similar or better cytotoxicity. The FARs, a class of compounds well known to the cosmetic industry, may have utility as therapeutic TXL agents. The compounds studied thus far show promise and will be further tested. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  20. Mantle cell lymphoma in the era of precision medicine-diagnosis, biomarkers and therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Arati A.; Goy, Andre; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Attia, Christen; Oton, Lucia; Taruvai, Varun; Costales, Mark; Lin, Yu-Ting; Pecora, Andrew; Suh, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of clinical agents for treating Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL), treatment of MCL remains a challenge due to complexity and frequent relapse associated with MCL. The incorporation of conventional and novel diagnostic approaches such as genomic sequencing have helped improve understanding of the pathogenesis of MCL, and have led to development of specific agents targeting signaling pathways that have recently been shown to be involved in MCL. In this review, we first provide a general overview of MCL and then discuss about the role of biomarkers in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment for MCL. We attempt to discuss major biomarkers for MCL and highlight published and ongoing clinical trials in an effort to evaluate the dominant signaling pathways as drugable targets for treating MCL so as to determine the potential combination of drugs for both untreated and relapse/refractory cases. Our analysis indicates that incorporation of biomarkers is crucial for patient stratification and improve diagnosis and predictability of disease outcome thus help us in designing future precision therapies. The evidence indicates that a combination of conventional chemotherapeutic agents and novel drugs designed to target specific dysregulated signaling pathways can provide the effective therapeutic options for both untreated and relapse/refractory MCL. PMID:27119356

  1. THIOCYANATE: A potentially useful therapeutic agent with host defense and antioxidant properties✩

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Joshua D.; Day, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN) functions in host defense as part of the secreted lactoperoxidase (LPO) microbicidal pathway. SCN is the preferred substrate for LPO-driven catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) forming hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). HOSCN is selectively generated by many peroxidase enzymes that can utilize SCN including: eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), gastric peroxidase (GPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO), salivary peroxidase (SPO), and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes generate HOSCN through a two-electron halogenation reaction. HOSCN is a potent microbicidal agent that kills or nullifies invading pathogens but is better tolerated by host tissue. Some controversy exists as to whether physiologic levels of HOSCN are non-toxic to host tissue, but the disagreement appears to be based on results of enzymatic generation (yielding moderate steady-state exposure) versus direct high level acute exposure in mammalian cell lines. This apparent duality is also true of other endogenous oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and relates to the difference between physiologically relevant oxidant production versus supra-physiologic bolus dosing approaches. SCN has antioxidant properties that include the ability to protect cells against oxidizing agents such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and repair protein chloramines. SCN is an important endogenous molecule that has the potential to interact in complex and elegant ways with its host environment and foreign organisms. SCN’s diverse properties as both host defense and antioxidant agent make it a potentially useful therapeutic. PMID:22968041

  2. Therapeutic potential of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 antagonists as multifunctional agents.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ohashi, Nami; Masuno, Hiroyuki; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Hiramatsu, Kenichi; Araki, Takanobu; Ueda, Satoshi; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 possesses multiple critical functions in normal and pathologic physiology. CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that transduces signals of its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1). The interaction between CXCL12 and CXCR4 plays an important role in the migration of progenitors during embryologic development of the cardiovascular, hemopoietic, central nervous systems, and so on. This interaction is also known to be involved in several intractable disease processes, including HIV infection, cancer cell metastasis, leukemia cell progression, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and pulmonary fibrosis. It is conjectured that this interaction may be a critical therapeutic target in all of these diseases, and several CXCR4 antagonists have been proposed as potential drugs. Fourteen-mer peptides, T140 and its analogues, were previously developed in our laboratory as specific CXCR4 antagonists that were identified as HIV-entry inhibitors, anti-cancer-metastatic agents, anti-chronic lymphocytic/acute lymphoblastic leukemia agents, and anti-RA agents. Cyclic pentapeptides, such as FC131 [cyclo(D-Tyr-Arg-Arg-L-3-(2-naphthyl)alanine-Gly)], were also previously found as CXCR4 antagonist leads based on pharmacophores of T140. This review article describes the elucidation of multiple functions of CXCR4 antagonists and the development of a number of low-molecular weight CXCR4 antagonists involving FC131 analogues and other compounds with different scaffolds including linear-type structures.

  3. Nanoencapsulation of DMSA monoester for better therapeutic efficacy of the chelating agent against arsenic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Abhishek; Mathur, Rashi; Samim, Mohammed; Lomash, Vinay; Kushwaha, Pramod; Pathak, Uma; Babbar, Anil Kumar; Flora, Swaran Jeet Singh; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Kaushik, Mahabir Parshad

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals remains a widespread occupational and environmental problem in world. Chelation therapy is a mainstream treatment used to treat heavy metal poisoning. This paper describes the synthesis, characterization and therapeutic evaluation of monoisoamyl 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA)-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles as a detoxifying agent for arsenic poisoning. Polymeric nanoparticles entrapping the DMSA monoester, which can evade the reticulo-endothelial system and have a long circulation time in the blood, were prepared. Particle characterization was carried out by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of MiADMSA-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles (nano- MiADMSA; 50 mg/kg orally for 5 days) and comparison drawn with bulk MiADMSA. Swiss albino mice exposed to sodium arsenite for 4 weeks were treated for 5 days to evaluate alterations in blood, brain, kidney and liver oxidative stress variables. The study also evaluated the histopathological changes in tissues and the chelating potential of the nanoformulation. Our results show that nano-MiADMSA have a narrow size distribution in the 50-nm range. We observed an enhanced chelating potential of nano-MiADMSA compared with bulk MiADMSA as evident in the reversal of biochemical changes indicative of oxidative stress and efficient removal of arsenic from the blood and tissues. Histopathological changes and urinary 8-OHdG levels also prove better therapeutic efficacy of the novel formulation for arsenic toxicity. The results from our study show better therapeutic efficacy of nano-MiADMSA in removing arsenic burden from the brain and liver.

  4. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  5. The non-psychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an orally effective therapeutic agent in rat chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Comelli, Francesca; Giagnoni, Gabriella; Colleoni, Mariapia

    2007-02-05

    Cannabidiol, the major psycho-inactive component of cannabis, has substantial anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. This study investigated its therapeutic potential on neuropathic (sciatic nerve chronic constriction) and inflammatory pain (complete Freund's adjuvant intraplantar injection) in rats. In both models, daily oral treatment with cannabidiol (2.5-20 mg/kg to neuropathic and 20 mg/kg to adjuvant-injected rats) from day 7 to day 14 after the injury, or intraplantar injection, reduced hyperalgesia to thermal and mechanical stimuli. In the neuropathic animals, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of cannabidiol (20 mg/kg) was prevented by the vanilloid antagonist capsazepine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not by cannabinoid receptor antagonists. Cannabidiol's activity was associated with a reduction in the content of several mediators, such as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), lipid peroxide and nitric oxide (NO), and in the over-activity of glutathione-related enzymes. Cannabidiol only reduced the over-expression of constitutive endothelial NO synthase (NOS), without significantly affecting the inducible form (iNOS) in inflamed paw tissues. Cannabidiol had no effect on neuronal and iNOS isoforms in injured sciatic nerve. The compound's efficacy on neuropathic pain was not accompanied by any reduction in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) content. The results indicate a potential for therapeutic use of cannabidiol in chronic painful states.

  6. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1997-01-01

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g. .sup.99m Tc or .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re) or late transition metals (e.g., .sup.105 Rh or .sup.109 Pd). The complexes with these metals .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re, .sup.99m Tc and .sup.109 Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  7. Isoxazole ring as a useful scaffold in a search for new therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Sysak, Angelika; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, Bożena

    2017-09-08

    Due to its relatively easy synthesis, isoxazole ring has been as an object of interest for chemists and pharmacologists from research groups all over the world. Its chemical modifications include both connection of isoxazole with other aromatic, heteroaromatic or non aromatic rings and substitution with different alkyl groups. Thanks to their usually low cytotoxicity, isoxazole derivatives are still popular scaffolds for the development of new agents with variable biological activities, such as antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anticonvulsant or anti-diabetic properties. This review discusses the chemical structure of recently developed isoxazole derivatives with regards to their activity and potential therapeutic use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of Some Unique Carbamate Derivatives bearing 2-Furoyl-1-piperazine as a Valuable Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Athar; Hussain, Ghulam; Rehman, Aziz Ur; Siddiqui, Zahra; Shah, Adnan Ali; Lodhi, Arif; Khan, Ali; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ain, Qurat Ul; Ahmad, Irshad; Malik, Rabia; Shahid, Muhammad; Mushtaq, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to synthesize different biologically active carbamate derivatives bearing 2-furoyl-1-piperazine and having modest toxicity. The synthesis was completed as a multiple sequence. The structural confirmation of all the synthesized compounds was obtained by EI-MS, IR and 1H-NMR spectral data. The enzyme inhibition and antibacterial potential of the synthesized compounds was evaluated. To find the utility of the prepared compounds as possible therapeutic agents their cytotoxicity was also checked. All the compounds were active against acetylcholinesterase enzyme, especially 12 and 14 showed very good inhibitory potential relative to Eserine, a reference standard. Almost all the compounds showed good activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  9. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer's disease: dietary polyphenols as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Darvesh, Altaf S; Carroll, Richard T; Bishayee, Anupam; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2010-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In recent years, antioxidants - especially those of dietary origin - have been suggested as possible agents useful for the prevention and treatment of AD. This article reviews the role of oxidative stress and the contribution of free radicals in the development of AD, and also discusses the use of antioxidants as a therapeutic strategy in the amelioration of this illness. The antioxidant potential of polyphenolic compounds obtained from dietary sources, such as anthocyanins from berries, catechins and theaflavins from tea, curcumin from turmeric, resveratrol from grapes and peanuts, the dihydrochalcones aspalathin and nothofagin from rooibos and the xanthone mangiferin from honeybush, are discussed in this review. The neuroprotective effects of these phytochemicals in preclinical models of AD are highlighted. Finally, innovative concepts, novel hypotheses, current challenges and future directions in the use of dietary polyphenols for the treatment of AD are discussed.

  10. Near Infrared Resonant Gold / Gold Sulfide Nanoparticles as a Photothermal Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Gobin, André M.; Watkins, Emily M.; Quevedo, Elizabeth; Colvin, Vicki L.; West, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The development and optimization of near-infrared (nIR) absorbing nanoparticles for use as photothermal cancer therapeutic agents has been ongoing. We have previously reported on larger layered gold / silica nanoshells (~140 nm) for combined therapy and imaging applications. This work exploits the properties of smaller gold / gold sulfide (GGS) nIR absorbing nanoparticles (~35–55 nm) that provide higher absorption (98% absorption & 2% scattering for GGS versus 70% absorption & 30% scattering for gold/silica nanoshells) as well as potentially better tumor penetration. In this work we demonstrate ability to ablate tumor cells in vitro, and efficacy for photothermal cancer therapy, where in an in vivo model we show significantly increased long-term, tumor-free survival. Further, enhanced circulation and bio-distribution is observed in vivo. This class of nIR absorbing nanoparticles has potential to improve upon photothermal tumor ablation for cancer therapy. PMID:20183810

  11. Tumor spheroid-based migration assays for evaluation of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Zimmermann, Miriam; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a key hallmark of malignant cells that contributes to the progression of cancers from a primary, localized mass to an invasive and/or metastatic phenotype. Traditional methods for the evaluation of tumor cell migration in vitro generally employ two-dimensional (2D), homogeneous cultures that do not take into account tumor heterogeneity, three-dimensional (3D) cell-cell contacts between tumor and/or host cells or interactions with extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a 3D tumor spheroid-based migration assay which more accurately reflects the solid tumor microenvironment and can accommodate both extracellular matrix and host cell interactions. It is a rapid and highly reproducible 96-well plate-based technique and we demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of therapeutic agents/drugs with anti-migratory properties.

  12. Avena sativa (Oat), a potential neutraceutical and therapeutic agent: an overview.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; De, Subrata; Belkheir, Asma

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present review article is to summarize the available information related to the availability, production, chemical composition, pharmacological activity, and traditional uses of Avena sativa to highlight its potential to contribute to human health. Oats are now cultivated worldwide and form an important dietary staple for the people in number of countries. Several varieties of oats are available. It is a rich source of protein, contains a number of important minerals, lipids, β-glucan, a mixed-linkage polysaccharide, which forms an important part of oat dietary fiber, and also contains various other phytoconstituents like avenanthramides, an indole alkaloid-gramine, flavonoids, flavonolignans, triterpenoid saponins, sterols, and tocols. Traditionally oats have been in use since long and are considered as stimulant, antispasmodic, antitumor, diuretic, and neurotonic. Oat possesses different pharmacological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, anticholesterolaemic, etc. A wide spectrum of biological activities indicates that oat is a potential therapeutic agent.

  13. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly. Deposition of amyloid beta plaque and associated neuroinflammation are the major hallmarks of AD. Whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated microglial cells contribute to neuronal loss, nuclear factor kappaB and apolipoprotein E participate in inflammatory process of AD. Current FDA approved drugs provide only symptomatic relief in AD. For broad spectrum of activity, some natural products are also being tested. Turmeric is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine in various regions of Asia. Curcumin, which is a yellow colored polyphenol compound present in turmeric, showed anti-inflammatory properties. Herein, we discuss the neurobiological and neuroinflammatory pathways of AD, evaluate different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents, including curcumin, for the treatment of AD.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Therapy Review: from classic therapeutic agents to modern nanotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Ana; Molpeceres, Jesús; Rijo, Patrícia; Reis, Catarina Pinto

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, with an extremely poor prognosis. This cancer is considered the 5th leading cause of cancer related death. The median survival after diagnosis is generally 2-8 months and five-year survival rate is less than 5%. In recent years, nanotechnology is emerging as a rising approach for drug delivery since it has opened up new landscapes in medicine through introduction of smart nanocarrier systems that can selectively deliver the therapeutic agent in a specific region and in appropriate levels, reducing the adverse side effects. This review covers the main delivery systems developed so far for anticancer drug delivery to the pancreas over a period of 20 years, from polymeric to lipidic-based nanosystems, with a particular emphasis on albumin as core material.

  15. Thymbra capitata essential oil as potential therapeutic agent against Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm-related infections.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniela; Gaspar, Carlos; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Lígia; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Cerca, Nuno

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Thymbra capitata essential oil and its main compound, carvacrol, against Gardnerella vaginalis grown planktonically and as biofilms, and its effect of vaginal lactobacilli. Minimal inhibitory concentration, minimal lethal concentration determination and flow cytometry analysis were used to assess the antibacterial effect against planktonic cells. Antibiofilm activity was measured through quantification of biomass and visualization of biofilm structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy. T. capitata essential oil and carvacrol exhibited a potent antibacterial activity against G. vaginalis cells. Antibiofilm activity was more evident with the essential oil than carvacrol. Furthermore, vaginal lactobacilli were significantly more tolerant to the essential oil. T. capitata essential oil stands up as a promising therapeutic agent against G. vaginalis biofilm-related infections.

  16. Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cancer: current status and future implications

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological importance of cannabinoids has been in study for several years. Cannabinoids comprise of (a) the active compounds of the Cannabis sativa plant, (b) endogenous as well as (c) synthetic cannabinoids. Though cannabinoids are clinically used for anti-palliative effects, recent studies open a promising possibility as anti-cancer agents. They have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro as well as in vivo in different cancer models. Cannabinoids regulate key cell signaling pathways that are involved in cell survival, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, etc. There is more focus on CB1 and CB2, the two cannabinoid receptors which are activated by most of the cannabinoids. In this review article, we will focus on a broad range of cannabinoids, their receptor dependent and receptor independent functional roles against various cancer types with respect to growth, metastasis, energy metabolism, immune environment, stemness and future perspectives in exploring new possible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25115386

  17. Novel enterobactin analogues as potential therapeutic chelating agents: Synthesis, thermodynamic and antioxidant studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Jin, Bo; Shi, Zhaotao; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qiangqiang; Lei, Shan; Peng, Rufang

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel hexadentate enterobactin analogues, which contain three catechol chelating moieties attached to different molecular scaffolds with flexible alkyl chain lengths, were prepared. The solution thermodynamic stabilities of the complexes with uranyl, ferric(III), and zinc(II) ions were then investigated. The hexadentate ligands demonstrate effective binding ability to uranyl ion, and the average uranyl affinities are two orders of magnitude higher than 2,3-dihydroxy-N1,N4-bis[(1,2-hydroxypyridinone-6-carboxamide)ethyl]terephthalamide [TMA(2Li-1,2-HOPO)2] ligand with similar denticity. The high affinity of hexadentate ligands could be due to the presence of the flexible scaffold, which favors the geometric agreement between the ligand and the uranyl coordination preference. The hexadentate ligands also exhibit higher antiradical efficiency than butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These results provide a basis for further studies on the potential applications of hexadentate ligands as therapeutic chelating agents. PMID:27671769

  18. Novel enterobactin analogues as potential therapeutic chelating agents: Synthesis, thermodynamic and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingchun; Jin, Bo; Shi, Zhaotao; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qiangqiang; Lei, Shan; Peng, Rufang

    2016-09-01

    A series of novel hexadentate enterobactin analogues, which contain three catechol chelating moieties attached to different molecular scaffolds with flexible alkyl chain lengths, were prepared. The solution thermodynamic stabilities of the complexes with uranyl, ferric(III), and zinc(II) ions were then investigated. The hexadentate ligands demonstrate effective binding ability to uranyl ion, and the average uranyl affinities are two orders of magnitude higher than 2,3-dihydroxy-N1,N4-bis[(1,2-hydroxypyridinone-6-carboxamide)ethyl]terephthalamide [TMA(2Li-1,2-HOPO)2] ligand with similar denticity. The high affinity of hexadentate ligands could be due to the presence of the flexible scaffold, which favors the geometric agreement between the ligand and the uranyl coordination preference. The hexadentate ligands also exhibit higher antiradical efficiency than butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These results provide a basis for further studies on the potential applications of hexadentate ligands as therapeutic chelating agents.

  19. Lipid-based cochleates: a promising formulation platform for oral and parenteral delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ravi; Squillante, Emilio; Kim, Kwon H

    2007-01-01

    Cochleates are lipid-based supramolecular assemblies that display great potential as delivery systems for systemic delivery of drugs, including peptides, proteins, vaccines, oligonucleotides, and genes. This is mainly attributed to their high stability and biocompatibility and their ability to deliver both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs. Cochleates have a unique multilayered spiral structure, which is composed of a negatively charged phospholipid and a divalent cation, and can encapsulate diverse drug molecules of various shapes and sizes while minimizing toxicity associated with polymeric materials present in micro- and nanoparticle systems. This review describes current technological advances in the preparation methods, physicochemical characterization, and potential applications of cochleates as a drug delivery system for systemic delivery of various types of therapeutic agents.

  20. Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cancer: current status and future implications.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Bandana; Ravi, Janani; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2014-08-15

    The pharmacological importance of cannabinoids has been in study for several years. Cannabinoids comprise of (a) the active compounds of the Cannabis sativa plant, (b) endogenous as well as (c) synthetic cannabinoids. Though cannabinoids are clinically used for anti-palliative effects, recent studies open a promising possibility as anti-cancer agents. They have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro as well as in vivo in different cancer models. Cannabinoids regulate key cell signaling pathways that are involved in cell survival, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, etc. There is more focus on CB1 and CB2, the two cannabinoid receptors which are activated by most of the cannabinoids. In this review article, we will focus on a broad range of cannabinoids, their receptor dependent and receptor independent functional roles against various cancer types with respect to growth, metastasis, energy metabolism, immune environment, stemness and future perspectives in exploring new possible therapeutic opportunities.

  1. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A Four-Focus Area Therapeutic Development Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Zoey; Donovan, Micah G.; Branco, Gisele Morais; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Burd, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase – a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables, and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anticancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review, we explore the potential of quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a “four-focus area strategy” to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to (i) modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, (ii) affect transcription of relevant genes, (iii) regulate epigenetic processes, and (iv) develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects. PMID:27843913

  2. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A Four-Focus Area Therapeutic Development Strategy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Zoey; Donovan, Micah G; Branco, Gisele Morais; Limesand, Kirsten H; Burd, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase - a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables, and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anticancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review, we explore the potential of quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a "four-focus area strategy" to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to (i) modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, (ii) affect transcription of relevant genes, (iii) regulate epigenetic processes, and (iv) develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects.

  3. Natural potential therapeutic agents of neurodegenerative diseases from the traditional herbal medicine Chinese dragon's blood.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Ma, Zhongjun; Li, Mujie; Xing, Yachao; Hou, Yue

    2014-03-28

    Dragon's blood has been used as a famous traditional medicine since ancient times by many cultures. It is a deep red resin, obtained from more than 20 different species of four distinct genera. Red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis S.C. Chen, known as Chinese dragon's blood or Yunnan dragon's blood, has been shown to promote blood circulation, alleviate inflammation, and to treat stomach ulcers, diarrhea, diabetes, and bleeding. This study investigated an effective approach to identify natural therapeutic agents for neurodegeneration from herbal medicine. The dichloride extract and isolated effective constituents of Chinese dragon's blood showed quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) inducing activity and anti-inflammatory effect significantly, which are therapy targets of various neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple chromatography and spectra analysis were utilized to afford effective constituents. Then Hepa 1c1c7 and BV-2 cells were employed to assay their NQO1 inducing and anti-inflammatory activities, respectively. Bioactivities guided isolation afforded 21 effective constituents, including two new polymers cochinchinenene E (1), cochinchinenene F (2) and a new steroid dracaenol C (16). The main constituent 3 (weight percent 0.2%), 5 (weight percent 0.017%), 4 (weight percent 0.009%), 9 (weight percent 0.094%), 10 (weight percent 0.017%) and 8 (weight percent 0.006%) are responsible for the anti-inflammatory activities of Chinese dragon's blood. While, new compounds 1, 2 and known compounds 5, 11 showed good NQO1 inducing activities. The brief feature of the activities and structures was discussed accordingly. Overviewing the bioactivities and phytochemical study result, 4'-hydroxy-2,4-dimethoxydihydrochalcone (3) and pterostilbene (5) as effective constituents of Chinese dragon's blood, were found to be potential candidate therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ADVANCED MOLECULAR DESIGN OF BIOPOLYMERS FOR TRANSMUCOSAL AND INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS AND BIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Caldorera-Moore, Mary; Phillips, Margaret A.; Schoener, Cody; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogels have been instrumental in the development of polymeric systems for controlled release of therapeutic agents. These materials are attractive for transmucosal and intracellular drug delivery because of their facile synthesis, inherent biocompatibility, tunable physicochemical properties, and capacity to respond to various physiological stimuli. In this contribution, we outline a multifaceted hydrogel-based approach for expanding the range of therapeutics in oral formulations from classical small-molecule drugs to include proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. Through judicious materials selection and careful design of copolymer composition and molecular architecture, we can engineer systems capable of responding to distinct physiological cues, with tunable physicochemical properties that are optimized to load, protect, and deliver valuable macromolecular payloads to their intended site of action. These hydrogel carriers, including complexation hydrogels, tethered hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, nanoscale hydrogels, and hydrogels with decorated structures are investigated for their ability respond to changes in pH, to load and release insulin and fluorescein, and remain non-toxic to Caco-2 cells. Our results suggest these novel hydrogel networks have great potential for controlled delivery of proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. PMID:21699934

  5. Application of disposable bag bioreactors in tissue engineering and for the production of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Eibl, R; Eibl, D

    2009-01-01

    In order to increase process efficiency, many pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have introduced disposable bag technology over the last 10 years. Because this technology also greatly reduces the risk of cross-contamination, disposable bags are preferred in applications in which an absolute or improved process safety is a necessity, namely the production of functional tissue for implantation (tissue engineering), the production of human cells for the treatment of cancer and immune system diseases (cellular therapy), the production of viruses for gene therapies, the production of therapeutic proteins, and veterinary as well as human vaccines.Bioreactors with a pre-sterile cultivation bag made of plastic material are currently used in both development and manufacturing processes primarily operating with animal and human cells at small- and middle-volume scale. Because of their scalability, hydrodynamic expertise and the convincing results of oxygen transport efficiency studies, wave-mixed bioreactors are the most used, together with stirred bag bioreactors and static bags, which have the longest tradition.Starting with a general overview of disposable bag bioreactors and their main applications, this chapter summarizes the working principles and engineering aspects of bag bioreactors suitable for cell expansion, formation of functional tissue and production of therapeutic agents. Furthermore, results from selected cultivation studies are presented and discussed.

  6. Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) as a class of extraordinary promising therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria has a direct impact on global public health because of the reduced potency of existing antibiotics against pathogens. Hence, there is a pressing need for new drugs with different modes of action that can kill microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be regarded as an alternative tool for this purpose because they are proven to have therapeutic effects with broad-spectrum activities. There are some hurdles in using AMPs as clinical candidates such as toxicity, lack of stability and high budgets required for manufacturing. This can be overcome by developing shorter and more easily accessible AMPs, the so-called Short AntiMicrobial Peptides (SAMPs) that contain between two and ten amino acid residues. These are emerging as an attractive class of therapeutic agents with high potential for clinical use and possessing multifunctional activities. In this review we attempted to compile those SAMPs that have exhibited biological properties which are believed to hold promise for the future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Efficacy of probiotics as an adjuvant agent in eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection and associated side effects.

    PubMed

    Goli, Y Dasteh; Moniri, R

    2016-09-01

    The intestinal tract is a host to various types of bacteria that are essential to health. Interactions between intestinal bacteria, i.e. the normal microbiota of the host's intestine, have been a subject of intensive research, as they may influence disease cycles. Recent studies of selected probiotic species and their therapeutic benefits have suggested a potential efficacy in treatment of several gastrointestinal illnesses, including Helicobacter pylori infection. The increasing evidence from these clinical studies supports the promising role of probiotics in improving the treatment of H. pylori by increasing eradication rates as well as decreasing the adverse effects of current medication therapy. However, many unsolved questions remain which require high quality trials on specific probiotic strains in the future. The main part of this review will focus on the effects of supplementary probiotic products during standard triple H. pylori therapy.

  8. Usefulness of selective COX-2 inhibitors as therapeutic agents against canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Teruyoshi; Tamura, Dai; Asano, Ryuji

    2014-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme for converting arachidonic acids to prostanoids, which are known to be induced during inflammation and cancer initiation. Previously, it has been reported that COX inhibitors, such as aspirin, reduce the incidence of human colorectal cancer; therefore, it is widely believed that COX-2 is a potential therapeutic and chemoprevention target for several types of human cancer. However, whether selective COX-2 inhibitors have antitumor effects against canine mammary tumor cells remains unclear. In the present study, to elucidate the antitumor effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors against canine mammary tumors, we investigated the antitumor effects of meloxicam, etodolac and celecoxib using COX-2-expressing canine mammary tumor (CF33) cells. We analyzed the effects of selective COX-2 inhibitors on COX-2 protein expression levels in CF33 cells. Celecoxib (100 µM) was found to induce downregulation of COX-2 protein expression. We examined the effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors on CF33 cell proliferation. All the selective COX-2 inhibitors suppressed CF33 cell growth. Specifically, etodolac and celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation via a decrease in S-phase cells and an increase in G0/G1 arrest. We examined the apoptotic effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors on CF33 cells. Our data suggested that etodolac and celecoxib induced apoptosis in CF33 cells. In particular, celecoxib led to apoptosis mediated by the activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, including the upregulation of BAX expression, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression and activation of caspase-3/7. Furthermore, celecoxib increased the percentages of cells in both early apoptosis and late apoptosis. Our results revealed that celecoxib induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in CF33 cells. The data suggested that celecoxib is the most viable candidate as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of canine mammary tumors. Furthermore, our findings provide the first

  9. Is pimecrolimus cream (1%) an appropriate therapeutic agent for the treatment of external ear atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Beriat, Güçlü Kaan; Akmansu, Sefik Halit; Doğan, Cem; Taştan, Eren; Topal, Ferda; Sabuncuoğlu, Bizden

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, pimecrolimus 1% cream has been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of atopic dermatitis in patients when applied topically. In our study we compared the therapeutic effects of local 1% pimecrolimus to 1% hydrocortisone, and to a control group in a mouse model with atopic dermatitis in the external ear canals. Atopic dermatitis was created by application of Dinitrochlorobenzene in the external ear canals of mice. The development of atopic dermatitis was detected by clinical observation score and determination of total serum IgE levels. Pimecrolimus and hydrocortisone cream were topically applied to the external ear canal skin once a day for 14 days. There was no significant difference between the hydrocortisone and the pimecrolimus therapy groups, while there was a statistically significant difference between these 2 groups and the control group (p<0.05) Assessment of the clinical observation scoring carried out on the 14th day of therapy revealed that there was no difference between the hydrocortisone and pimecrolimus groups. Biopsies were taken on the 14th day following treatment. Tissue samples were histologically evaluated; contact dermatitis was observed microscopically in the control group, but in the therapy groups only minimal evidence of contact dermatitis was found. The results of our study reveal that the therapeutic efficacy of 1% pimecrolimus was equivalent to 1% hydrocortisone treatment in the artificially developed atopic dermatitis model in external ear canals of mice. These results clearly demonstrate that 1% pimecrolimus cream can be an effective alternative therapeutic agent in cases where steroid treatment proves to be insufficient or in cases where treatment must be discontinued due to its adverse effects.

  10. Is pimecrolimus cream (1%) an appropriate therapeutic agent for the treatment of external ear atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Beriat, Güçlü Kaan; Akmansu, Şefik Halit; Doğan, Cem; Taştan, Eren; Topal, Ferda; Sabuncuoğlu, Bizden

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In recent years, pimecrolimus 1% cream has been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of atopic dermatitis in patients when applied topically. Material/Methods In our study we compared the therapeutic effects of local 1% pimecrolimus to 1% hydrocortisone, and to a control group in a mouse model with atopic dermatitis in the external ear canals. Atopic dermatitis was created by application of Dinitrochlorobenzene in the external ear canals of mice. The development of atopic dermatitis was detected by clinical observation score and determination of total serum IgE levels. Pimecrolimus and hydrocortisone cream were topically applied to the external ear canal skin once a day for 14 days. Results There was no significant difference between the hydrocortisone and the pimecrolimus therapy groups, while there was a statistically significant difference between these 2 groups and the control group (p<0.05) Assessment of the clinical observation scoring carried out on the 14th day of therapy revealed that there was no difference between the hydrocortisone and pimecrolimus groups. Biopsies were taken on the 14th day following treatment. Tissue samples were histologically evaluated; contact dermatitis was observed microscopically in the control group, but in the therapy groups only minimal evidence of contact dermatitis was found. Conclusions The results of our study reveal that the therapeutic efficacy of 1% pimecrolimus was equivalent to 1% hydrocortisone treatment in the artificially developed atopic dermatitis model in external ear canals of mice. These results clearly demonstrate that 1% pimecrolimus cream can be an effective alternative therapeutic agent in cases where steroid treatment proves to be insufficient or in cases where treatment must be discontinued due to its adverse effects. PMID:22460087

  11. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer’s. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. PMID:26762467

  12. [Therapeutic agents for disorders of bone and calcium metabolism. Osteoporotic fracture prevention by strontium ranelate].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2007-01-01

    Bone loss results in osteoporosis and increased susceptibility to bone fractures. Importantly, osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. With a constantly increasing aging population worldwide, early prevention of bone loss is essential for adequate control of this condition. Strontium ranelate, an oral treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis, is unique in its mode of action as it is the sole anti-osteoporotic agent that both decreases bone resorption and increases bone formation. Its efficacy to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures including those of the hip, in addition to its safety profile has been demonstrated in the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis (TROPOS) clinical studies over 3 years and recently confirmed over the long-term. Furthermore, a pre-planned analysis of a sub-group of patients aged 80 years and over demonstrated that, currently, strontium ranelate is the only anti-osteoporotic agent to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in this age group.

  13. Nano-Fenton Reactors as a New Class of Oxidative Stress Amplifying Anticancer Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeongsu; Han, Eunji; Yang, Wonseok; Cho, Wooram; Yoo, Wooyoung; Hwang, Junyeon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-03-09

    Cancer cells, compared to normal cells, are under oxidative stress associated with an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are more vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by ROS generating agents. Thus, manipulation of the ROS level provides a logical approach to kill cancer cells preferentially, without significant toxicity to normal cells, and great efforts have been dedicated to the development of strategies to induce cytotoxic oxidative stress for cancer treatment. Fenton reaction is an important biological reaction in which irons convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to highly toxic hydroxyl radicals that escalate ROS stress. Here, we report Fenton reaction-performing polymer (PolyCAFe) micelles as a new class of ROS-manipulating anticancer therapeutic agents. Amphiphilic PolyCAFe incorporates H2O2-generating benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde and iron-containing compounds in its backbone and self-assembles to form micelles that serve as Nano-Fenton reactors to generate cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals, killing cancer cells preferentially. When intravenously injected, PolyCAFe micelles could accumulate in tumors preferentially to remarkably suppress tumor growth, without toxicity to normal tissues. This study demonstrates the tremendous translatable potential of Nano-Fenton reactors as a new class of anticancer drugs.

  14. Natural Phenolic Compounds as Therapeutic and Preventive Agents for Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahito; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that diets rich in phenolic compounds may have preventive effects on the development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the effects of natural phenolic compounds, such as myricetin (Myr), rosmarinic acid (RA), ferulic acid (FA), curcumin (Cur) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) on the aggregation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), using in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral Aβ amyloidosis. The in vitro studies revealed that these phenolic compounds efficiently inhibit oligomerization as well as fibril formation of Aβ through differential binding, whilst reducing Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic and neuronal toxicity. Furthermore, a transgenic mouse model fed orally with such phenolic compounds showed significant reduction of soluble Aβ oligomers as well as of insoluble Aβ deposition in the brain. These data, together with an updated review of the literature, indicate that natural phenolic compounds have anti-amyloidogenic effects on Aβ in addition to well-known anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, hence suggesting their potential as therapeutic and/or preventive agents for cerebral Aβ amyloidosis, including AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Well-designed clinical trials or preventive interventions with natural phenolic compounds are necessary to establish their efficacy as disease-modifying agents.

  15. Delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to tumor using pHLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjali; Moshnikova, Anna; Rossi, Bethany; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    We are developing a novel technology for selective delivery of imaging probes and membrane-impermeable molecules to cancer cells. It is based on action of water-soluble membrane peptide, pHLIP^ (pH [Low] Insertion Peptide), which has ability to insert and fold in cellular membrane at slightly acidic environment, which is a characteristic for various pathological states including cancer. The insertion of the peptide is unidirectional: C-terminus moves inside the cell across membrane, while N-terminus flags outside. Thus pHLIP possess dual delivery capability. Imaging agents (fluorescent, PET, SPECT or MRI) could be attached to the N-terminus of the peptide to mark tumor mass and tumor margins with high precision. At the same time, therapeutic molecules attached to the C-inserting end, could be moved across membrane to reach cytoplasmic target. Among translocated molecules are synthetic cyclic peptides, gene regulation agent (peptide nucleic acid) and phalla- and amanita toxins with hydrophobicity tuned by attachment of fatty acids for optimum delivery. Currently we have family of pHLIP peptides for various applications. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  16. Triplet repeat RNA structure and its role as pathogenic agent and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wojciechowska, Marzena; Fiszer, Agnieszka; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    This review presents detailed information about the structure of triplet repeat RNA and addresses the simple sequence repeats of normal and expanded lengths in the context of the physiological and pathogenic roles played in human cells. First, we discuss the occurrence and frequency of various trinucleotide repeats in transcripts and classify them according to the propensity to form RNA structures of different architectures and stabilities. We show that repeats capable of forming hairpin structures are overrepresented in exons, which implies that they may have important functions. We further describe long triplet repeat RNA as a pathogenic agent by presenting human neurological diseases caused by triplet repeat expansions in which mutant RNA gains a toxic function. Prominent examples of these diseases include myotonic dystrophy type 1 and fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome, which are triggered by mutant CUG and CGG repeats, respectively. In addition, we discuss RNA-mediated pathogenesis in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, in which expanded CAG repeats may act as an auxiliary toxic agent. Finally, triplet repeat RNA is presented as a therapeutic target. We describe various concepts and approaches aimed at the selective inhibition of mutant transcript activity in experimental therapies developed for repeat-associated diseases. PMID:21908410

  17. Theranostic Au cubic nano-aggregates as potential photoacoustic contrast and photothermal therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juan; Zhu, Xianglong; Li, Hui; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Huang, Guoming; Huang, Dengtong; Liu, Gang; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional nanostructures combining diagnosis and therapy modalities into one entity have drawn much attention in the biomedical applications. Herein, we report a simple and cost-effective method to synthesize a novel cubic Au nano-aggregates structure with edge-length of 80 nm (Au-80 CNAs), which display strong near-infrared (NIR) absorption, excellent water-solubility, good photothermal stability, and high biocompatibility. Under 808 nm laser irradiation for 5 min, the temperature of the solution containing Au-80 CNAs (100 μg/mL) increased by ~38 °C. The in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that Au-80 CNAs could act as both photothermal therapeutic (PTT) agents and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contrast agents, indicating that the only one nano-entity of Au-80 CNAs shows great potentials for theranostic applications. Moreover, this facile and cost-effective synthetic method provides a new strategy to prepare stable Au nanomaterials with excellent optical properties for biomedical applications.

  18. Exploring DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Tse-Dinh, Y-C

    2007-03-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes needed to overcome topological problems encountered during DNA replication, transcription, recombination and maintenance of genomic stability. They have proved to be valuable targets for therapy, in part because some anti-topoisomerase agents act as poisons. Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (type IIA topoisomerases) are targets of fluoroquinolones while human topoisomerase I (a type IB topoisomerase) and topoisomerase II are targets of various anticancer drugs. Bacterial type IA topoisomerase share little sequence homology to type IB or type IIA topoisomerases, but all topoisomerases have the potential of having the covalent phosphotyrosine DNA cleavage intermediate trapped by drug action. Recent studies have demonstrated that stabilization of the covalent complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I and cleaved DNA can lead to bacterial cell death, supporting bacterial topoisomerase I as a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. For current antibacterial therapy, the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens has become a major public health concern, and efforts are directed towards identifying novel inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases that are not affected by fluoroquinolone resistant mutations on the gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. For anti-viral therapy, poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases; these enzymes differ in drug sensitivity from human topoisomerase I. To confront potential threat of small pox as a weapon in terrorist attacks, vaccinia virus topoisomerase I has been targeted for discovery of anti-viral agents. These new developments of DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents being reviewed here represent excellent opportunities for drug discovery in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  19. Effects of Potential Therapeutic Agents on Copper Accumulations in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Luxama, Juan D.; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for organisms, but when in excess, copper’s redox potential enhances oxyradical formation and increases cellular oxidative stress. Copper is a major pollutant in Jamaica Bay and other aquatic areas. Bivalves are filter feeders that accumulate heavy metals and other pollutants from their environment. Previously it was determined that seed from the bivalve Crassostrea virginica, transplanted from an oyster farm to Jamaica Bay readily accumulated copper and other pollutants into their tissues. In the present study we utilized Atomic Absorption Spectrometry to measure the uptake of copper into C. virginica gill in the presence and absence of three potential copper -blocking agents: diltiazem, lanthanum, and p-aminosalicyclic acid. Diltiazem and lanthanum are known calcium-channel blockers and p-aminosalicylic acid is an anti-infammarory agent with possible metal chelating properties. We also used the DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry staining technique to confirm that copper was entering gill cells. Our result showed that diltiazem and p-aminosalicyclic acid reduced copper accumulations in the gill, while lanthanum did not. DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry showed enhanced cellular copper staining in copper-treated samples and further demonstrated that diltiazem was able to reduce copper uptake. The accumulation of copper into oyster gill and its potential toxic effects could be of physiological significance to the growth and long term health of oysters and other marine animals living in a copper polluted environment. Identifying agents that block cellular copper uptake will further the understanding of metal transport mechanisms and may be beneficial in the therapeutic treatment of copper toxicity in humans. PMID:21841975

  20. Formulation and acoustic studies of a new phase-shift agent for diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paul S; Luois, Samantha; Dayton, Paul A; Matsunaga, Terry O

    2011-09-06

    Recent efforts in the area of acoustic droplet vaporization with the objective of designing extravascular ultrasound contrast agents has led to the development of stabilized, lipid-encapsulated nanodroplets of the highly volatile compound decafluorobutane (DFB). We developed two methods of generating DFB droplets, the first of which involves condensing DFB gas (boiling point from -1.1 to -2 °C) followed by extrusion with a lipid formulation in HEPES buffer. Acoustic droplet vaporization of micrometer-sized lipid-coated droplets at diagnostic ultrasound frequencies and mechanical indices were confirmed optically. In our second formulation methodology, we demonstrate the formulation of submicrometer-sized lipid-coated nanodroplets based upon condensation of preformed microbubbles containing DFB. The droplets are routinely in the 200-300 nm range and yield microbubbles on the order of 1-5 μm once vaporized, consistent with ideal gas law expansion predictions. The simple and effective nature of this methodology allows for the development of a variety of different formulations that can be used for imaging, drug and gene delivery, and therapy. This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate both a method of generating ADV agents by microbubble condensation and formulation of primarily submicrometer droplets of decafluorobutane that remain stable at physiological temperatures. Finally, activation of DFB nanodroplets is demonstrated using pressures within the FDA guidelines for diagnostic imaging, which may minimize the potential for bioeffects in humans. This methodology offers a new means of developing extravascular contrast agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Timing and Characteristics of Cumulative Evidence Available on Novel Therapeutic Agents Receiving Food and Drug Administration Accelerated Approval.

    PubMed

    Naci, Huseyin; Wouters, Olivier J; Gupta, Radhika; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-06-01

    Policy Points: Randomized trials-the gold standard of evaluating effectiveness-constitute a small minority of existing evidence on agents given accelerated approval. One-third of randomized trials are in therapeutic areas outside of FDA approval and less than half evaluate the therapeutic benefits of these agents but use them instead as common backbone treatments. Agents receiving accelerated approval are often tested concurrently in several therapeutic areas. For most agents, no substantial time lag is apparent between the average start dates of randomized trials evaluating their effectiveness and those using them as part of background therapies. There appears to be a tendency for therapeutic agents receiving accelerated approval to quickly become an integral component of standard treatment, despite potential shortcomings in their evidence base. Therapeutic agents treating serious conditions are eligible for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accelerated approval. The clinical evidence accrued on agents receiving accelerated approval has not been systematically evaluated. Our objective was to assess the timing and characteristics of available studies. We first identified clinical studies of novel therapeutic agents receiving accelerated approval. We then (1) categorized those studies as randomized or nonrandomized, (2) explored whether they evaluated the FDA-approved indications, and (3) documented the available treatment comparisons. We also meta-analyzed the difference in start times between randomized studies that (1) did or did not evaluate approved indications and (2) were or were not designed to evaluate the agent's effectiveness. In total, 37 novel therapeutic agents received accelerated approval between 2000 and 2013. Our search of ClinicalTrials.gov identified 7,757 studies, which included 1,258,315 participants. Only one-third of identified studies were randomized controlled trials. Of 1,631 randomized trials with advanced recruitment status, 906 were

  2. Comparison of Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide Versus Single-Agent Paclitaxel As Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer in Women With 0 to 3 Positive Axillary Nodes: CALGB 40101 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Lawrence N.; Berry, Donald A.; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Becker, Heather P.; Perez, Edith A.; O'Regan, Ruth; Martino, Silvana; Shapiro, Charles L.; Schneider, Charles J.; Kimmick, Gretchen; Burstein, Harold J.; Norton, Larry; Muss, Hyman; Hudis, Clifford A.; Winer, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimal adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer balances efficacy and toxicity. We sought to determine whether single-agent paclitaxel (T) was inferior to doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC), when each was administered for four or six cycles of therapy, and whether it offered less toxicity. Patients and Methods Patients with operable breast cancer with 0 to 3 positive nodes were enrolled onto the study to address the noninferiority of single-agent T to AC, defined as the one-sided 95% upper-bound CI (UCB) of hazard ratio (HR) of T versus AC less than 1.30 for the primary end point of relapse-free survival (RFS). As a 2 × 2 factorial design, duration of therapy was also addressed and was previously reported. Results With 3,871 patients enrolled onto the trial, a median follow-up period of 6.1 years, and 437 RFS events, we achieved an HR of 1.26 (one sided 95% UCB, 1.48; favoring AC does not allow a conclusion of noninferiority of T with AC; UCB > 1.3). With 266 patient deaths, the HR for overall survival (OS) was 1.27 favoring AC (UCB, 1.56). The estimated absolute advantage of AC at 5 years is 3% for RFS (91 v 88%) and 1% for OS (95 v 94%). All nine treatment-related deaths were patients receiving AC and are included in the analyses of both RFS and OS. Hematologic toxicity was more common in patients treated with AC, and neuropathy was more common in patients treated with T. Conclusion This trial did not show noninferiority of T to AC, a conclusion that is unlikely to change with additional events and follow-up. T was less toxic than AC. PMID:24934787

  3. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Nutraceuticals as therapeutic agents in osteoarthritis. The role of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and collagen hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Deal, C L; Moskowitz, R W

    1999-05-01

    There are a sufficient number of short-term studies with these agents suggesting efficacy equal to that seen in the symptomatic treatment of OA using NSAIDs. Two recent meta-analyses by McAlindon and colleagues and Towheed et al reviewed clinical trials of glucosamine and chondroitin in the treatment of osteoarthritis. The study by McAlindon and co-workers included all double-blind placebo-controlled trials of greater than 4 weeks' duration, testing oral or parenteral glucosamine or chondroitin for treatment of hip or knee osteoarthritis. Thirteen trials (six with glucosamine, seven with chondroitin) met eligibility criteria. The authors used global pain score or the Lequesne index in the index joint as the primary outcome measure and considered the trial positive if improvement in the treatment group was equal to or greater than 25% compared with the placebo group, and was significant (P < or = .05). All 13 studies reviewed were classified as positive, demonstrating large effects, compared with placebo (39.5% [S.D. 21.9] for glucosamine, 40.2% [S.D. 6.4] for chondroitin). The authors concluded that clinical trials of these two agents showed substantial benefit in the treatment of osteoarthritis but provided insufficient information about study design and conduct to allow definitive evaluation. Towheed and colleagues reviewed nine randomized, controlled trials of glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis. In seven of the randomized controlled trials, in which they compared glucosamine with placebo, glucosamine was always superior. In two randomized controlled trials comparing glucosamine to ibuprofen, glucosamine was superior in one and equivalent in one. Methodologic problems, including lack of standardized case definition of osteoarthritis and lack of standardized outcome assessment led the authors to conclude that further studies are needed to determine if route of administration is important and whether the therapeutic effect is site specific. A meta-analysis of

  5. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  6. Current therapeutic paradigms in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Quick, Allison; Patel, Disha; Hadziahmetovic, Mersiha; Chakravarti, Arnab; Mehta, Minesh

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal adult primary brain tumor. Median survival rates range from 12-15 months. The current standard of care for GBM has evolved from resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy to resection, concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiation, and additional adjuvant chemotherapy. The expression of specific molecular biomarkers, especially O-6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) status, may determine the response of the tumor to treatment, and helps in identifying the magnitude of benefit from this regimen. By identifying further biological subtypes of GBM at the molecular level, specific targeted therapies could be developed and used in the future for more individualized therapeutic regimens. This article will review the current therapies for GBM and the investigation of new molecular and targeted therapies, such as EGFR inhibitors, mTOR/PI3Kinase inhibitors, and anti-angiogenesis agents.

  7. Novel therapeutic strategies using hypomethylating agents in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2014-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic neoplasm with high rates of leukemic transformation. MDS had been an intractable disease for which the mainstream of therapeutic approach was best supportive care. Recently, however, treatment of hematological malignancies has benefited from advances in molecular targeted drug discovery such as the revolutionary drug imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, and from the reappraisal of forgotten drugs such as thalidomide for multiple myeloma. Two azanucleotide drugs, azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine, were created as anti-neoplastic drugs in the 1960s with little success. In the 1980s, they were reassessed as hypomethylating agents (HMAs), and the introduction of low-dose schedules of them has shown dramatic effects in the delay of leukemic evolution for high-risk MDS. AZA was approved in Japan in March 2011 and has become a standard drug of choice in the treatment of high-risk MDS. Its position as a treatment for low-risk MDS remains to be established. Only half of patients with high-risk MDS can gain benefit from AZA. For example, those with complex karyotypes experience only a limited extension in survival. In addition, AZA resistance develops sooner or later. To achieve a more sustained disease control of high-risk MDS, the combined use of HMAs with other therapeutic approaches will be inevitable. Clinical trials of histone deacetylase inhibitors, lenalidomide, thrombopoietin agonists, or anticancer drugs in combination with HMAs are ongoing. In addition, HMAs are being used as a bridging therapy prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) and the salvage therapy of relapsed disease after AHSCT. Thus, HMAs will continue to be key drugs for the management of MDS.

  8. [Weighing use and safety of therapeutic agents and feed additives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    van der Wal, P

    1982-02-01

    (1) The pros and cons of using feed additives and therapeutic agents may be successfully weighed in the light of carefully considered consumer requirements. (2) The socio-economic interests of the producer and the welfare of the animal will also determine the response of the production apparatus to consumer requirements. (3) Consumption of the current amounts of products of animal origin and maintenance of price and quality will only be feasible in the event of rational large-scale production in which constituents used in nutrition, prophylaxis and therapeutics are highly important factors. (4) Using these ingredients should be preceded by accurate evaluation of their use and safety. Testing facilities, conduct of studies and reporting should be such as to make the results nationally and internationally acceptable to all those concerned. (5) In deciding whether feed constituents are acceptable in view of the established use and safety, compliance will have to be sought with those standards which are accepted in other fields of society. Measures which result in raising the price of food without actually helping to reduce the risks to the safety of man, animals and environment, are likely to be rejected by any well-informed consumer who is aware of the facts. (6) For accurate weighing of use and safety at a national level, possibilities are hardly adequate in Europe. Decisions reached within the framework of the European Community, also tuned to U.S.A.- conditions are rightly encouraged. A centrally managed professionally staffed and equipped test system in the European Community would appear to be indispensable.

  9. Kinase inhibitors of the IGF-1R as a potential therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Shinji; Fujishiro, Maki; Yoshida, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Hirai, Takuya; Miyashita, Tomoko; Ikeda, Keigo; Yamaji, Ken; Takamori, Kenji; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Sekigawa, Iwao; Tamura, Naoto

    2017-08-01

    We have previously shown that the inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a potential therapeutic strategy against rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CTGF consists of four distinct modules, including the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP). In serum, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) bind IGFBPs, interact with the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1 R), and regulate anabolic effects and bone metabolism. We investigated the correlation between IGF-1 and the pathogenesis of RA, and the inhibitory effect on osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis of the small molecular weight kinase inhibitor of the IGF-1 R, NVP-AEW541, against pathogenesis of RA in vitro. Cell proliferation was evaluated by cell count and immunoblotting. The expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 R was evaluated by RT-PCR. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, a bone resorption assay, and osteoclast-specific enzyme production. Angiogenesis was evaluated by a tube formation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The proliferation of MH7A cells was found to be inhibited in the presence of NVP-AEW541, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt was downregulated in MH7A cells. IGF-1 and IGF-1 R mRNA expression levels were upregulated during formation of M-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast formation. Moreover, osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in the presence of NVP-AEW541. The formation of the tubular network was enhanced by IGF-1, and this effect was neutralized by NVP-ARE541. Our findings suggest that NVP-AEW541 may be utilized as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of RA.

  10. Dietary Supplement 4-Methylumbelliferone: An Effective Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Agent for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Travis J.; Lopez, Luis E.; Lokeshwar, Soum D.; Ortiz, Nicolas; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Jordan, Andre; Hoye, Kelly; Altman, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevention and treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) by a nontoxic agent can improve outcome, while maintaining quality of life. 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) is a dietary supplement that inhibits hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis. We evaluated the chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of 4-MU. Methods: TRAMP mice (7–28 per group) were gavaged with 4-MU (450mg/kg/day) in a stage-specific treatment design (8–28, 12–28, 22–28 weeks). Efficacy of 4-MU (200–450mg/kg/day) was also evaluated in the PC3-ML/Luc+ intracardiac injection and DU145 subcutaneous models. PCa cells and tissues were analyzed for HA and Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt signaling and apoptosis effectors. HA add-back and myristoylated Akt (mAkt) overexpression studies evaluated the mechanism of action of 4-MU. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t test or Tukey’s multiple comparison test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: While vehicle-treated transgenic adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAMP) mice developed prostate tumors and metastases at 28 weeks, both were abrogated in treatment groups, without serum/organ toxicity or weight loss; no tumors developed at one year, even after stopping the treatment at 28 weeks. 4-MU did not alter the transgene or neuroendocrine marker expression but downregulated HA levels. However, 4-MU decreased microvessel density and proliferative index (P < .0001,). 4-MU completely prevented/inhibited skeletal metastasis in the PC3-ML/Luc+ model and DU145-tumor growth (85–90% inhibition, P = .002). 4-MU also statistically significantly downregulated HA receptors, PI-3K/CD44 complex and activity, Akt signaling, and β-catenin levels/activation, but upregulated GSK-3 function, E-cadherin, and apoptosis effectors (P < .001); HA addition or mAkt overexpression rescued these effects. Conclusion: 4-MU is an effective nontoxic, oral chemopreventive, and therapeutic agent that

  11. Image-guided robotic delivery system for precise placement of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Cleary, K; Freedman, M; Clifford, M; Lindisch, D; Onda, S; Jiang, L

    2001-07-06

    The effectiveness of conventional solid tumor treatment is limited by the systemic toxicity and lack of specificity of chemotherapeutic agents. Present treatment modalities are frequently insufficient to eliminate competent cancer cells without exceeding the limits of toxicity to normal tissue. The coming generation of cancer therapeutics depends on the precise targeting and sustained release of antitumor agents to overcome these limitations. We are developing an image-guided, robotic system for precise intratumoral placement of anticancer drugs and sustained release devices to advance this new treatment paradigm. The robotic system will use intraoperatively obtained computed tomographic (CT) images from a mobile CT scanner for guidance. The concept is to track patient anatomy and localize instruments using currently available optical tracking technology. Tracking will also be used to register patient anatomy with the images. The physician can then use the registered image to select an appropriate tumor target and entry location and to plan the instrument path. This path will then be transmitted to the robot, which orients and drives the instrument to the desired target under physician control. Achievement of the target is confirmed via intraoperative CT. This system will provide instrument guidance that is precise, direct, and controllable. Error due to poor target visualization and hand unsteadiness should be reduced greatly. The basic components of the system (robot, mobile CT, tracking) have been demonstrated in our laboratory, and the integration of the components is in progress. In future work, we plan to fuse preoperative PET imaging with intraoperative CT to allow functional as well as anatomic image guidance.

  12. The synthetic retinoid ST1926 as a novel therapeutic agent in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Basma, Hussein; Ghayad, Sandra E; Rammal, Ghina; Mancinelli, Angelo; Harajly, Mohammad; Ghamloush, Farah; Dweik, Loai; El-Eit, Rabab; Zalzali, Hassan; Rabeh, Wissam; Pisano, Claudio; Darwiche, Nadine; Saab, Raya

    2016-03-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma in children. Despite multiple attempts at intensifying chemotherapeutic approaches to treatment, only moderate improvements in survival have been made for patients with advanced disease. Retinoic acid is a differentiation agent that has shown some antitumor efficacy in RMS cells in vitro; however, the effects are of low magnitude. E-3-(4'-hydroxyl-3'-adamantylbiphenyl-4-yl) acrylic acid (ST1926) is a novel orally available synthetic atypical retinoid, shown to have more potent activity than retinoic acid in several types of cancer cells. We used in vitro and in vivo models of RMS to explore the efficacy of ST1926 as a possible therapeutic agent in this sarcoma. We found that ST1926 reduced RMS cell viability in all tested alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) RMS cell lines, at readily achievable micromolar concentrations in mice. ST1926 induced an early DNA damage response (DDR), which led to increase in apoptosis, in addition to S-phase cell cycle arrest and a reduction in protein levels of the cell cycle kinase CDK1. Effects were irrespective of TP53 mutational status. Interestingly, in ARMS cells, ST1926 treatment decreased PAX3-FOXO1 fusion oncoprotein levels, and this suppression occurred at a post-transcriptional level. In vivo, ST1926 was effective in inhibiting growth of ARMS and ERMS xenografts, and induced a prominent DDR. We conclude that ST1926 has preclinical efficacy against RMS, and should be further developed in this disease in clinical trials. © 2015 UICC.

  13. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  14. Have adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitors lost their shine?

    PubMed Central

    Sabari, Joshua K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite broad advances in molecularly targeted therapies, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in approximately 17% of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the US population. The remarkable efficacy of small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this unique subset of patients has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to lung cancer. The success of these agents in the metastatic setting leads to the logical question of what role these drugs may have in the adjuvant setting for patients with earlier stage disease. RADIANT, an international randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III study in patients with completely resected stage IB to IIIA NSLC whose tumors expressed EGFR by IHC and EGFR amplification by FISH, attempted to answer the question of whether erlotinib would improve disease free survival and overall survival in the adjuvant setting. While RADIANT does not conclude for or against adjuvant use of EGFR-TKIs, all data points towards benefit in a selected population. As clinicians, we must continue to enroll to potentially practice changing therapeutic neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy studies internationally. PMID:27568486

  15. Opioid and adjuvant analgesics: compared and contrasted.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ilyas Ahmed; Walsh, Declan; Brito-Dellan, Norman

    2011-08-01

    AAs (1-2 days). Rotation among opioids is a useful therapeutic strategy to improve analgesic response or minimize toxicity. Most AAs are unsuitable for rescue dosing because of their pharmacological characteristics. The mu agonist side effect profile is similar among the different opioid agents, regardless of the route of administration. The appropriate use of AAs will reduce opioid-related side effects. No apparent tolerance to analgesia develops with AAs. Abrupt discontinuation of an opioid after chronic repeated use for more than a few days will cause a withdrawal syndrome of variable severity. Adjuvant analgesics are an essential tool in cancer pain.

  16. Low molecular weight compounds with transition metals as free radical scavengers and novel therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Andrea; Failli, Paola; Valtancoli, Barbara; Bani, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Molecules able to modulate the levels of endogenous free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), are of pivotal interest for pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences because of their potential therapeutic relevance. In fact, ROS and NO, which are normal products of cell metabolism, may play a dual beneficial/deleterious role, depending on local concentration and mode of generation. As such, they have been identified as key pathogenic factors for many inflammatory, vascular dysfunctional and degenerative disorders, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and ageing. Therefore, the identification and characterization of novel antioxidant/free radical scavenger molecules may expand the current therapeutic implements for the treatment and prevention of the above diseases. In this perspective, low molecular weight complexes of transition metals with organic scaffolds are viewed and investigated as promising pharmaceutical agents. These complexes take advantage of the known principles of inorganic chemistry, i.e. the ability of transition metals, Fe(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Ru(II), to bind to and react with NO and/or ROS, to counterbalance excessive endogenous free radical generation in biological systems. Among NO scavengers, representative examples are iron complexes with dithiocarbamates or ruthenium compounds with polyamine-polycarboxylate scaffolds; on the other hand, manganese-based molecules appear effective as ROS scavengers. Of note, Mn(II)-containing molecules, currently under study as ROS scavengers, have major functional similarities to Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), a Mn-containing enzyme acting as potent endogenous anti-oxidant. In this article, we briefly summarize the state-of-the-art concerning the chemical and biological properties of transition metal ion complexes with low molecular weight synthetic ligands as ROS/NO scavengers provided with

  17. Development of RNAi technology for targeted therapy--a track of siRNA based agents to RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinjian; Zhang, Chunling; Liang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) was intensively studied in the past decades due to its potential in therapy of diseases. The target specificity and universal treatment spectrum endowed siRNA advantages over traditional small molecules and protein drugs. However, barriers exist in the blood circulation system and the diseased tissues blocked the actualization of RNAi effect, which raised function versatility requirements to siRNA therapeutic agents. Appropriate functionalization of siRNAs is necessary to break through these barriers and target diseased tissues in local or systemic targeted application. In this review, we summarized that barriers exist in the delivery process and popular functionalized technologies for siRNA such as chemical modification and physical encapsulation. Preclinical targeted siRNA delivery and the current status of siRNA based RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial were reviewed and finally the future of siRNA delivery was proposed. The valuable experience from the siRNA agent delivery study and the RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial paved ways for practical RNAi therapeutics to emerge early.

  18. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1997-02-11

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds are derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g., {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) or late transition metals (e.g., {sup 105}Rh or {sup 109}Pd). The complexes with these metals {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 109}Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  19. The nitric oxide prodrug JS-K and its structural analogues as cancer therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Maciag, Anna E; Saavedra, Joseph E; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) prodrugs of the diazeniumdiolate class are routinely used as reliable sources of nitric oxide in chemical and biological laboratory settings. O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates, which are derivatized forms of ionic diazeniumdiolates, have been found to show potent anti-proliferative activity in a variety of cancer cells, presumably through the effects of NO. One important member of this class of diazeniumdiolates, O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K), has shown promise as a novel cancer therapeutic agent in a number of animal models. This review describes the developments in chemical and biochemical characterization and structure-activity relationship of JS-K and its analogues. In addition, some molecular mechanistic insights into the observed anti-proliferative activity of JS-K are discussed. Finally, a structural motif is presented for O(2)-(aryl) diazeniumdiolate nitric oxide prodrugs that show potency comparable with that of JS-K.

  20. The pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF): an important potential therapeutic agent for infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Yanru; Guo, Zhihui; Xie, Yide; Zhou, Yakuan; Jiang, Chenghong; Chen, Xiaosong

    2017-04-01

    In previous studies, the expression and the role of proangiogenic factors in infantile hemangiomas have been well studied. However, the role of angiogenic inhibitors has been revealed rarely. The expression of PEDF, as the strongest and safe endogenous inhibitor, is still unrecognized until the current study. In order to investigate the expression and significance of the pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in the proliferating and regressing phases of infantile hemangiomas, the expression of PEDF, VEGF, Ki-67, and CD34 protein in hemangioma tissues was examined with immunohistochemical polymer HRP method in 42 cases during the proliferative phase, 40 cases during the regressing phase, and 11 cases of non-involuting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs). Meanwhile, the mRNA expression of these factors was detected with quantitative realtime RT-PCR. We found the protein and mRNA expression of PEDF in regressing phase was significantly higher than those in proliferative phase and NICHs (P < 0.001), while the protein and mRNA expression of VEGF were much lower (P < 0.001). The microvessel density (MVD), Ki-67 changes, and the expression of PEDF and VEGF were found significantly correlated. These results indicated that the reduction of VEGF and increase in PEDF are causative to the evolution of infantile hemangioma. PEDF may play a key role in the spontaneous regression of infantile hemangioma and may become an important potential therapeutic agent for infantile hemangioma.

  1. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors as Potent Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Because the current therapies only lead to temporary, limited improvement and have severe side effects, new approaches to treat PD need to be developed. To discover new targets for potential therapeutic intervention, a chemical genetic approach involving the use of small molecules as pharmacological tools has been implemented. First, a screening of an in-house chemical library on a well-established cellular model of PD was done followed by a detailed pharmacological analysis of the hits. Here, we report the results found for the small heterocyclic derivative called SC001, which after different enzymatic assays was revealed to be a new glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor with IC50 = 3.38 ± 0.08 μM. To confirm that GSK-3 could be a good target for PD, the evaluation of a set of structurally diverse GSK-3 inhibitors as neuroprotective agents for PD was performed. Results show that inhibitors of GSK-3 have neuroprotective effects in vitro representing a new pharmacological option for the disease-modifying treatment of PD. Furthermore, we show that SC001 is able to cross the blood–brain barrier, protects dopaminergic neurons, and reduces microglia activation in in vivo models of Parkinson disease, being a good candidate for further drug development. PMID:23421686

  2. STATINS MORE THAN CHOLESTEROL LOWERING AGENTS IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE: THEIR PLEIOTROPIC FUNCTIONS AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Eugenio; Domenico, Fabio Di; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative ad nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. PMID:24231510

  3. Viral and other cell-penetrating peptides as vectors of therapeutic agents in medicine.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Przysiecka, Łucja; Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Warowicka, Alicja; Musidlak, Oskar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Efficient delivery of heterologous molecules for treatment of cells is a great challenge in modern medicine and pharmacology. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) may improve efficient delivery of a wide range of macromolecular cargos, including plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, drugs, nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers, and anticancer drugs. In this paper, we present the history of CPPs' discovery with special attention drawn to sequences of viral origin. We also describe different CPP families with regard to their physicochemical properties and numerous mechanisms of CPP cell uptake by direct penetration and endocytotic pathways. A detailed description is focused on formation of carrier-cargo complexes, which are needed for practical use of CPPs in medicine and biotechnology. Examples of successful application of CPPs in treatment of human diseases are also presented, including decreased tumor growth and induction of cancer cell death. Finally, we review modern design approaches to novel CPPs and prediction of their activity. To sum up, the current review presents a thorough and up-to-date knowledge of CPPs and may be a valuable source of information for researchers in pharmacology designing new therapeutic agents.

  4. Statins more than cholesterol lowering agents in Alzheimer disease: their pleiotropic functions as potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Di Domenico, Fabio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-04-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative and nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethosomes: versatile vesicular carriers for efficient transdermal delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vikas; Golhani, Dilip; Shukla, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Delivery across skin is attractive due to its easy accessibility. However, drug delivery across skin is still a challenge in biomedical sciences. Over the past few decades, various successful novel devices and techniques have emerged to optimize drug delivery across skin whose obstructing behavior constricts entry of most of the therapeutic agents. Inability of various conventional vesicular formulations, e.g. liposomes to pass through the tapered (>30 nm) intercellular channels of stratum corneum, rendered invention of some lipid based vesicular carrier systems such as ethosomes which consist of phospholipid, ethanol and water. Ethosomes are non-invasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. In spite of their sophistication in conceptuality, they are exemplified by easiness in their preparation, safety and efficacy - a combination that can highly inflate their application. This review attempts to describe all aspects of ethosomes including roles and upshots of different excipients, various methods of preparation and characterizations, research reports on various drug deliveries, patent reports and future prospects.

  6. Statin derivatives as therapeutic agents for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Miller, Dannah R; Martinez, October; Wakefield, C Brent; Hsieh, Kuan-Chan; Simha, M Vijaya; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Ting; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2016-12-01

    Despite recent advances in modern medicine, castration-resistant prostate cancer remains an incurable disease. Subpopulations of prostate cancer cells develop castration-resistance by obtaining the complete steroidogenic ability to synthesize androgens from cholesterol. Statin derivatives, such as simvastatin, inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and may reduce prostate cancer incidence as well as progression to advanced, metastatic phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate novel simvastatin-related molecules SVA, AM1, and AM2 suppress the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cell lines including androgen receptor-positive LNCaP C-81 and VCaP as well as androgen receptor-negative PC-3 and DU145. This is achieved through inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration as well as induction of S-phase cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. While the compounds effectively block androgen receptor signaling, their mechanism of inhibition also includes suppression of the AKT pathway, in part, through disruption of the plasma membrane. SVA also possess an added effect on cell growth inhibition when combined with docetaxel. In summary, of the compounds studied, SVA is the most potent inhibitor of prostate cancer cell tumorigenicity, demonstrating its potential as a promising therapeutic agent for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  7. Are retinoids potential therapeutic agents in disorders of social cognition including autism?

    PubMed

    Ebstein, Richard P; Mankuta, David; Yirmiya, Nurit; Malavasi, Fabio

    2011-06-06

    Increasing evidence suggests that the nonapeptide, oxytocin (OT), helps shape social and affiliative behaviors not only in lower mammals but also in humans. Recently, an essential mediator of brain OT release has been discovered, ADP-ribosyl cyclase and/or CD38. We have subsequently shown that polymorphisms across the CD38 gene are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Notably, CD38 expression in lymphoblastoid cells (LBC) is reduced in cell lines derived from ASD subjects compared to parental cell lines. Intriguingly, a correlation was observed between CD38 expression and measures of social function in ASD. Finally, we have shown that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a known inducer of CD38 transcription, can rescue low CD38 expressing LBC lines derived from ASD subjects and restore normal levels of transcription of this ectoenzyme providing 'proof of principle' in a peripheral model that retinoids are potential therapeutic agents in ASD. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents for cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Sui; Lei, Jie-Ping; Wei, Guo-Qing; Chen, Hui; Ma, Chao-Ying; Jiang, He-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Context Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the only mammalian enzyme to catalyse the synthesis of fatty acid. The expression level of FAS is related to cancer progression, aggressiveness and metastasis. In recent years, research on natural FAS inhibitors with significant bioactivities and low side effects has increasingly become a new trend. Herein, we present recent research progress on natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents. Objective This paper is a mini overview of the typical natural FAS inhibitors and their possible mechanism of action in the past 10 years (2004-2014). Method The information was collected and compiled through major databases including Web of Science, PubMed, and CNKI. Results Many natural products induce cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting FAS expression, with fewer side effects than synthetic inhibitors. Conclusion Natural FAS inhibitors are widely distributed in plants (especially in herbs and foods). Some natural products (mainly phenolics) possessing potent biological activities and stable structures are available as lead compounds to synthesise promising FAS inhibitors.

  9. Methylselenocysteine - a Promising Antiangiogenic Agent for Overcoming Drug Delivery Barriers in Solid Malignancies for Therapeutic Synergy with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arup

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite progress, chemotherapeutic response in solid malignancies has remained limited. While initial results of the use of antiangiogenic agents in combination chemotherapy indicated an enhanced therapeutic response, recent data indicates that the surviving cancer is not only able to surmount therapy, but is actually able to adapt a more aggressive metastatic phenotype. Thus, selecting an antiangiogenic agent that is less likely to lead to tumor resurgence is a key to future therapeutic success of antiangiogenic agents, in a combinatorial setting. Areas covered Against the broad spectrum of currently used antiangiogenic agents in the clinic, the putative benefits of the use of organo selenium (Se) compounds, such as methylselenocysteine (MSC), are discussed in this reiew. Expert opinion MSC, being part of the mammalian physiology, is a well tolerated, versatile and economical antiangiogenic agent. It down regulates multiple key upstream tumor survival markers, and enhances tumor drug delivery, at a given systemic dose of an anticancer agent, while protecting normal tissue from cytotoxic adverse effects. Further clinical trials, especially in poorly differentiated cancers, are warranted. PMID:21473705

  10. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for human breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototype of the newly developed, second-generation, hybrid polar compounds. It is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with high potency for inducing cell differentiation of cultured murine erythroleukemia cells. Studies with SAHA have primarily been performed with hematopoietic tumor cells. Here we extent these studies with SAHA to human breast cancer cell lines in an attempt to find better therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435, as well as normal cells, including the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, and fibroblasts, were treated with SAHA. Cells assayed for cell survival by using trypan blue exclusion assay, colony formation assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. The effects of SAHA on cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins were examined by Western blots analysis. The identification of additional target genes was carried out by differential display (DD) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: SAHA inhibited clonogenic growth of MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These cells were more sensitive to SAHA-mediated cytotoxic effects than normal breast epithelial cells and fibroblasts. The cytotoxic effects of SAHA on breast cancer cells were manifested by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. The pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, blocked SAHA-induced cell death, DNA laddering, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of caspases in SAHA-mediated apoptosis. In addition, SAHA modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins. For example, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were induced, and retinoblastoma protein pRb was hypophosphorylated. Moreover, SAHA induced several genes associated with differentiation and/ or growth inhibition. These genes encode gelsolin

  11. Adjuvant effect of Japanese herbal medicines on the mucosal type 1 immune responses to human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 in mice immunized orally with Lactobacillus-based therapeutic HPV vaccine in a synergistic manner.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ayumi; Kawana, Kei; Yokoyama, Terufumi; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Kojima, Satoko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Kozuma, Shiro

    2012-08-03

    The Japanese herbal medicines, Juzen-taiho-to (JTT) and Hochu-ekki-to (HET), have been shown to enhance humoral immune responses to vaccine antigen when used as adjuvants for prophylactic vaccines. However, their adjuvant effect on mucosal cellular immune responses remains unstudied. The precursor lesion of cervical cancer, high-grade CIN that expresses HPV E7 oncoprotein ubiquitously is a target for HPV therapeutic vaccines that elicit mucosal E7-specific type 1 T cell responses. We have demonstrated that oral immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing HPV16 E7 (LacE7) is more effective in eliciting mucosal E7-specific IFNγ-producing cells than subcutaneous or intramuscular antigen delivery. Here we report the synergistic effect of an oral Lactobacillus-based vaccine and Japanese herbal medicines on mucosal immune responses. Oral immunization of mice with LacE7 plus either a Japanese herbal medicine (JTT or HET) or a mucosal adjuvant, heated-labile enterotoxin T subunit (LTB), promotes systemic E7-specific type 1 T cell responses but not mucosal responses. Administration of LacE7 plus either Japanese herbal medicine and LTB enhanced mucosal E7-specific type 1 T cell response to levels approximately 3-fold higher than those after administration of LacE7 alone. Furthermore, secretion of IFNγ and IL-2 into the intestinal lumen was observed after oral administration of LacE7 and was enhanced considerably by the addition of Japanese herbal medicines and LTB. Our data indicated that Japanese herbal medicines, in synergy with Lactobacillus and LTB, enhance the mucosal type 1 immune responses to orally immunized antigen. Japanese herbal medicines may be excellent adjuvants for oral Lactobacillus-based vaccines and oral immunization of LacE7, HET and LTB may have the potential to elicit extremely high E7-specific mucosal cytotoxic immune response to HPV-associated neoplastic lesions.

  12. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  13. Interactions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder therapeutic agents with the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Yan; Gibson, Bryan B.; DeVane, C. Lindsay; Markowitz, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the potential interactions of the drug transporter P-glycoprotein with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) therapeutic agents atomoxetine — and the individual isomers of methylphenidate, amphetamine, and modafinil utilizing established in vitro assay. An initial ATPase assay indicated that both d- and l-methylphenidate have weak affinity for P-glycoprotein. The intracellular accumulation of P-glycoprotein substrates doxorubicin and rhodamine123 in the P-glycoprotein overexpressing cell line LLC-PK1/MDR1 was determined to evaluate potential inhibitory effects on P-glycoprotein. The results demonstrated that all compounds, except both modafinil isomers, significantly increased doxorubicin and rhodamine123 accumulation in LLC-PK1/MDR1 cells at higher concentrations. To investigate the P-glycoprotein substrate properties, the intracellular concentrations of the tested compounds in LLC-PK1/MDR1 and P-glycoprotein negative LLC-PK1 cells were measured in the presence and absence of the P-glycoprotein inhibitor PSC833. The results indicate that the accumulation of d-methylphenidate in LLC-PK1 cells was 32.0% higher than in LLC-PK1/MDR1 cells. Additionally, coadministration of PSC833 leads to 52.9% and 45.6% increases in d-modafinil and l-modafinil accumulation, respectively, in LLC-PK1/MDR1 cells. Further studies demonstrated that l-modafinil transport across LLC-PK1/MDR1 cell monolayers in the basolateral-to-apical (B–A) direction was significantly higher than in the apical-to-basolateral (A–B) direction. PSC833 treatment significantly decreased the transport of l-modafinil in B–A direction. In conclusion, our results suggest that all tested agents with the exception of modafinil isomers are relatively weak P-glycoprotein inhibitors. Furthermore, P-glycoprotein may play a minor role in the transport of d-methylphenidate, d-modafinil, and l-modafinil. PMID:17963743

  14. Evaluation of flaxseed formulation as a potential therapeutic agent in mitigation of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonali; Katare, Charu

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are an increasing health problem all over the world. The search for natural hypolipidemic agents that can be used besides the synthetic drugs is still in its experimental stage. Plant seeds, particularly flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum), which is a rich source of n-3 fatty acids, lignans and phenolic compounds, have also received increasing attention for their potential role in preventing lipid disorders. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential of flaxseeds in dyslipidemia. The study included 50 dyslipidemic subjects selected by purposive random sampling and were divided into two groups, a control and an experimental group. Both the groups were prescribed similar dietary guidelines. Subjects in the experimental group received 30 g of roasted flaxseed powder for 3 months. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, and blood lipid profile were estimated before the study and after completion of the study. Flaxseed supplementation resulted in a remarkable improvement in anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and lipid profile in the experimental group. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) of the experimental group were significantly reduced (p < 0.01). A lowering of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) was also recorded in the dyslipidemic subjects. Concomitantly, a highly significant reduction (p < 0.01) in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) levels, with simultaneous elevation (p < 0.01) in high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels was observed. Improvement in lipid levels resulted in reduction of atherogenic indices. The supplementation of roasted flaxseed powder for 3 months improved the BMI, blood pressure, and lipid profile of dyslipidemic subjects, thus exhibiting cardio protective effect.

  15. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2017-08-31

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  16. The impact of DeltaG on the oral bioavailability of low bioavailable therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Salama, Noha N; Fasano, Alessio; Thakar, Manjusha; Eddington, Natalie D

    2005-01-01

    Low oral bioavailability continues to drive research toward identifying novel approaches to enhance drug delivery. Over the past few years, emphasis on the use of absorption enhancers has been overwhelming despite their major adverse effects. Zonula occludens toxin (Zot) was recently established as a safe and effective absorption enhancer, reversibly opening the tight junctions for hydrophilic markers and hydrophobic drugs across the small intestine and the blood brain barrier. DeltaG, the biologically active fragment of Zot, was isolated and shown to increase the in vitro transport and in vivo absorption of paracellular markers. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of DeltaG on the oral bioavailability of low bioavailable therapeutic agents. Jugular vein cannulated Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive the following treatments intraduodenally (ID): [(3)H]cyclosporin A, [(3)H]ritonavir, [(3)H]saquinavir, or [(3)H]acyclovir at (120 microCi/kg) alone, with protease inhibitors (PIs), or with DeltaG (720 microg/kg)/PI. Serial blood samples were collected, and plasma was analyzed for radioactivity. After ID administration with DeltaG/PI, C(max) significantly (p < 0.05) increased over a range of 197 to 5700%, whereas area under the plasma concentration time curve displayed significant increases extending over a range of 123.8 to 4990.3% for the investigated drugs. DeltaG significantly increased the in vivo oral absorption of some low bioavailable drugs in the presence of PI. This study suggests that DeltaG-mediated tight junction modulation, combined with metabolic protection, may be used to enhance the low oral bioavailability of certain drugs when administered concurrently.

  17. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction syndrome in senior dogs.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Gary

    2005-03-01

    With increasing age, dogs develop a form of neurodegenerative disease which has many similarities to age related cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in humans. A decline in learning and memory can be demonstrated in dogs beginning as young as 7 years of age using a variety of neuropsychological tests. However, clinical cases of cognitive dysfunction syndrome are seldom identified until the age of 11 years or older. This is likely due to the fact that the owners are relying on clinical observations such as house-soiling, sleep-wake cycles and disorientation, rather than tests of learning and memory. On the other hand, dogs that are trained to more exacting tasks such as guide dogs for the visually impaired, or bomb detection and agility trained dogs might be noticed to have a decline in performance at a much earlier age. Through the use of standardized neuropsychological testing protocols, a number of drugs, natural products and supplement formulations have been developed for use in dogs with cognitive dysfunction and, in some cases clinical trials have validated their efficacy. Furthermore, the testing of products currently licensed and in the pipeline for the treatment of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's in humans, may provide additional therapeutic agents for the treatment of senior dogs, as well as provide insight as to the potential for the efficacy of these compounds in humans. This review will examine those products that are now marketed along with some that might be considered for use in senior dogs with cognitive dysfunction as well as the research that has been used to validate the efficacy (or lack thereof) of these compounds.

  18. Targeted delivery of cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Huang, Jiwei; Tweedle, Michael F.; Schmidt, Carl; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2010-02-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of tumor boundaries and intraoperative detection of therapeutic margins are important oncologic principles for minimal recurrence rates and improved long-term outcomes. However, many existing cancer imaging tools are based on preoperative image acquisition and do not provide real-time intraoperative information that supports critical decision-making in the operating room. Method: Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microbubbles (MBs) and nanobubbles (NBs) were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method. The MB and NB surfaces were conjugated with CC49 antibody to target TAG-72 antigen, a human glycoprotein complex expressed in many epithelial-derived cancers. Multiple imaging agents were encapsulated in MBs and NBs for multimodal imaging. Both one-step and multi-step cancer targeting strategies were explored. Active MBs/NBs were also fabricated for therapeutic margin assessment in cancer ablation therapies. Results: The multimodal contrast agents and the cancer-targeting strategies were tested on tissue simulating phantoms, LS174 colon cancer cell cultures, and cancer xenograft nude mice. Concurrent multimodal imaging was demonstrated using fluorescence and ultrasound imaging modalities. Technical feasibility of using active MBs and portable imaging tools such as ultrasound for intraoperative therapeutic margin assessment was demonstrated in a biological tissue model. Conclusion: The cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents described in this paper have the potential for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  19. Feasibility of adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus carboplatin followed by single-agent maintenance therapy with S-1 for completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer: results of the Setouchi Lung Cancer Group Study 1001.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Norihito; Sonobe, Makoto; Okabe, Kazunori; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Kataoka, Masafumi; Yamashita, Motohiro; Nakata, Masao; Kataoka, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Soh, Junichi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Matsuo, Keitaro; Sakamoto, Junichi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    This multicenter study evaluated the feasibility of novel adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus carboplatin followed by single-agent, long-term maintenance with S-1 in patients with completely resected stage II-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients received four cycles of S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day for 2 weeks, followed by 2 weeks rest) plus carboplatin (area under the curve 5, day 1) followed by S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week rest). Patients unable to continue S-1 plus carboplatin because of severe toxicity converted to single-agent S-1 maintenance. The duration of adjuvant chemotherapy was 10 months in both situations. The primary endpoint was feasibility, defined as the proportion of patients who completed four cycles of S-1 plus carboplatin and single-agent S-1 maintenance for 10 months. The treatment completion rate was determined; treatment was considered feasible if the lower 90% confidence interval (CI) was ≥50%. Eighty-nine patients were enrolled, of whom 87 were eligible and assessable. Seventy-eight patients (89.7%) completed four cycles of S-1 plus carboplatin and 55 (63.2%) completed the following S-1 maintenance therapy for a total of 10 months. The treatment completion rate was 63.2% (90% CI, 54.4-71.2%), indicating feasibility. There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (13.8%), thrombocytopenia (11.5%), and anorexia (4.6%). The 2-year relapse-free survival rate was 59.8%. We concluded that adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus carboplatin followed by single-agent maintenance therapy with S-1 is feasible and tolerable in patients with completely resected NSCLC. UMIN000005041.

  20. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair.

  1. Anticonvulsants for Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures: The Influence of the Therapeutic Dose of Atropine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Published in Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 320(1), 154-161, 2007. 14...ANSI Std. Z39.18 0022 -3565/07/3201-154-16 1 THE ,JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY AN[) ExPERIMENTA, THERAPEUTICS Vol. :120, No 1 U S Government work not...Therapeutic Dose of Atropine Tsung-Ming Shih, Tami C. Rowland, and John H. McDonough Pharmacology Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical

  2. Migraine Preventive Treatment and Its Influence on the Change in Therapeutic Intensity with Disease-Specific Abortive Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-09

    the headache allowing a return to normal function. Despite availability of effective abortive medication, several problems with this treatment have...Working Title: MIGRAINE PREVENTIVE TREATMENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE CHANGE IN THERAPEUTIC INTENSITY WITH DISEASE-SPECIFIC ABORTIVE AGENTS ABSTRACT...Objective: To (1) examine prescribing patterns of migraine-specific abortive medication among new users and non-users of migraine preventive therapy

  3. Evaluation of (1-Sarcosine, 8-Isoleucine) Angiotensin II as a Therapeutic Agent for OLEIC Acid-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    experiment. The direct REFERENCES effect of the drug on cardiac function is uncertain. 1. Ogihara T, Yamamoto T, Kumahara Y : Clinical applications These...study we 13. Ogihara T, Hata T, Mikami 1t, Nakamuru M, Maruyama A, Mandai T, Kumahara Y : Sodium depletion and blood pressurefound no depressive...circulation when 1974 2. ()gihara T, Yamamoto T, Kumahara Y : Angiotensin blockade used as a therapeutic agent for ARDS. (letter). Lancet 1:219, 1974

  4. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; McDougall, Steven R.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2014-01-01

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but leads to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the

  5. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response

  6. Intramuscular Temperature Rises With Topical Analgesics Used as Coupling Agents During Therapeutic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Measom, Gary J.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Nature's Chemist as an ultrasound coupling agent with the effectiveness of another topical analgesic (Biofreeze), Aquasonic 100, and a sham treatment in producing intramuscular (IM) temperature increase during a typical therapeutic ultrasound treatment. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups (n = 10 in each group). Groups 1 through 3 received continuous ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2 for 10 minutes at a frequency of 3 MHz over the posterior calf. Group 4 received a sham treatment. In group 1, we used Aquasonic 100 alone; in group 2, we used a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of Biofreeze and Aquasonic 100; in group 3, we used a 1:1 mixture of Nature's Chemist and Aquasonic 100; and in group 4, we used a 1:1 mixture of Aquasonic 100 and Nature's Chemist. In all groups, IM temperature was recorded during the treatment and for 15 minutes posttreatment. We used a modified visual analogue scale to measure each subject's perception of heat at the treatment area during and after treatment. Subjects: Forty college students (age, 22.5 ± 2.0 years; height, 175.5 ± 8.0 cm; weight, 71.6 ± 13.1 kg; calf skinfold thickness, 17.8 ± 7.2 mm) volunteered to become subjects. Measurements: The IM temperature was recorded at 15-second intervals for 25 minutes at 1 cm below the subcutaneous fat with a thermocouple. Differences were analyzed within and among groups at the beginning of the treatment (T0), the end of the treatment (T10), and 15 minutes posttreatment (T25). Results: The IM temperature increases in groups 1 through 3 were significantly different from those in group 4 (sham), but they were not significantly different from each other. Temperatures increased in group 1 (Aquasonic 100) by 7.47° ± 1.8°C, in group 2 (Biofreeze and Aquasonic 100) by 6.52° ± 1.6°C, and in group 3 (Nature's Chemist and Aquasonic 100) by 6.99° ± 1.1°C. Temperatures decreased in group 4 (sham) by 0.56° ± 0.3°C. There were no

  7. A new photothermal therapeutic agent: core-free nanostructured Au x Ag1-x dendrites.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chih-Chia; Hwu, Jih-Ru; Su, Wu-Chou; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    A new class of Au(x)Ag(1-x) nanostructures with dendrite morphology and a hollow interior were synthesized by using a replacement reaction between Ag dendrites and an aqueous solution of HAuCl(4). The Ag nanostructured dendrites were generated by the reaction of AgNO(3) with ascorbic acid in a methanol/water system. The dendrites resemble a coral shape and are built up of many stems with an asymmetric arrangement. Each stem is approximately 400 nm in length and 65 nm in diameter. The bimetallic composition of Au(x)Ag(1-x) can be tuned by the addition of different amounts of HAuCl(4) to the Ag dendritic solution. The hollowing process resulted in tubular structures with a wall thickness of 10.5 nm in Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) dendrites. The UV/Vis spectra indicate that the strongest NIR absorption among the resulting hollow Au(x)Ag(1-x) dendrites was in Au(0.3)Ag(0.7). The MTT assay was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxicity of Ag dendrites, hollow Au(0.06)Ag(0.94) and Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) dendrites, and Au nanorods. It was found that hollow Au(0.06)Ag(0.94) and Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) dendrites exhibited good biocompatibility, while both Ag dendrites and Au nanorods showed dose-dependent toxicity. Because of absorption in the NIR region, hollow Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) dendrites were used as photothermal absorbers for destroying A549 lung cancer cells. Their photothermal performance was compared to that of Au nanorod photothermal therapeutic agents. As a result, the particle concentration and laser power required for efficient cancer cell damage were significantly reduced for hollow Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) dendrites relative to those used for Au nanorods. The hollow Au(0.3)Ag(0.7) nanostructured dendrites show potential in photothermolysis for killing cancer cells.

  8. Nicotinic acid (niacin) receptor agonists: will they be useful therapeutic agents?

    PubMed

    Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2007-12-03

    niacin receptor agonists as therapeutic agents. Several niacin receptor agonists have been developed and patented, but their clinical effects have not been described. Future research is needed to determine whether niacin receptor agonists will demonstrate all the beneficial properties of nicotinic acid on atherosclerosis and without significant adverse effects.

  9. The emerging role of nitrite as an endogenous modulator and therapeutic agent of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Tota, B; Quintieri, A M; Angelone, T

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the circulating anion nitrite (NO2-), the largest physiological reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) in the body, has revealed itself as a signalling molecule mediating numerous biological responses. Since it was estimated that as much as 70% of plasma nitrite originates from nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), mainly in the endothelium by endothelial NOS, nitrite is considered an index of NOSs activity. Exogenous sources, principally environmental pollutants and intake of vegetables, also contribute to this NO reserve. In mammalian blood, nitrite, present at nanomolar concentrations, can be reduced to bioactive NO along a physiological oxygen and pH gradient either non-enzymatically (acidic disproportionation) or by a number of enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase, NOS, mitochondrial cytochromes and deoxygenated haemoglobin and myoglobin. The various NO-dependent nitrite-induced biological responses include hypoxic vasodilation, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, cytoprotection following ischemia/reperfusion, and regulation of protein and gene expression. Since NO is a major paracrine-autocrine cardiovascular modulator and nitrite acts mainly as an endocrine store of NO, it is not surprising that NO2 - exerts important cardiovascular actions both under normal and physio-pathological conditions. In the interdisciplinary framework of the NO cycle concept, this review illustrates the actions exerted by nitrite on the cardiovascular system. Since the majority of the NO2 - -oriented studies focused on the systemic and regional control of blood flow both under physiological and ischemia/reperfusion conditions, we will firstly consider this issue. Secondly, the nitrite- induced effects on myocardial contractile and relaxation processes will be discussed, emphasizing the biomedical interest of nitrite as a new therapeutic agent. The importance of cardiac myoglobin as nitrite-reductase able to exert cardioprotection through a novel function, in addition to its

  10. Sequential hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer after adjuvant tamoxifen or anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Henderson, I Craig

    2003-01-01

    downregulates the ER protein and has no known agonist effects, is a promising therapeutic option that has shown efficacy in the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer. Other agents that may be used in the sequence include the steroidal AI exemestane and the progestin megestrol acetate. The widening range of adjuvant endocrine options therefore represents an opportunity to prolong patient benefits in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, and will require the further refinement of the optimal sequence of endocrine agents for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer.

  11. Potential use of biaromatic L-phenylalanyl derivatives as therapeutic agents in the treatment of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Votano, J R; Altman, J; Wilchek, M; Gorecki, M; Rich, A

    1984-01-01

    N-Phenylacetyl-L-phenylalanine (PAP) and L-phenylalanyl-3-aminopyridine ( PAPA ) are biaromatic agents with properties that make them suitable candidates for the development of a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PAP and PAPA are taken up by the erythrocyte to give intra-/extracellular concentration ratios of 2.2 and 1.5, respectively, after a 2-hr exposure period. The intracellular buildup of PAP and PAPA produces moderate decreases in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) of 6 and 10%, respectively, at 3 mM and a further decline in MCHC with increased concentration. Both PAP and PAPA increase the deoxy-Hb S solubility, CS. If the solubility in the absence of the agent is COS, PAP and PAPA have CS/COS values of 1.21 and 1.14 at 20 mM, respectively, compared with a value of 1.06 for L-phenylalanine itself. Filterability assays of partially dexygenated homozygous sickle cells shows an increase in cell flexibility of 7 to 16 times more than that of untreated cells when these agents are present at 3-6 mM. These results are largely due to the reduction in the Hb S polymer content of the treated cells. At 3 mM or less, both PAP and PAPA delay the onset of gelation in reversible sickle cells for time periods that are likely to be therapeutically useful. PMID:6587344

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antitubercular agents for disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis during intermittent haemodialysis and continuous venovenous haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Sin, J H; Elshaboury, R H; Hurtado, R M; Letourneau, A R; Gandhi, R G

    2017-09-11

    There is a lack of data regarding therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antitubercular agents in the setting of continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH). We describe TDM results of numerous antitubercular agents in a critically ill patient during CVVH and haemodialysis. A 49-year-old man was initiated on treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis. During hospital admission, the patient developed critical illness and required renal replacement therapy. TDM results and pharmacokinetic calculations showed adequate serum concentrations of rifampin, ethambutol and amikacin during CVVH and of rifampin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and levofloxacin during intermittent haemodialysis. The presence of critical illness and renal replacement therapy can induce pharmacokinetic changes that may warrant vigilant TDM to ensure optimal therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe TDM for several antitubercular agents during CVVH in a critically patient with disseminated M. tuberculosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular combo of photodynamic therapeutic agent silicon(iv) phthalocyanine and anticancer drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Changli; Guo, Zijian

    2009-02-28

    The combination of a red light PDT agent and a Pt(ii)-based chemotherapeutic drug at the molecular level maintains the intrinsic functions of each unit; the conjugated complexes exhibit remarkable photocytoxicity and demonstrate potential to serve as agents for DNA-targeting PDT as well as red light photochemotherapy.

  14. Effects of exogenous agents on brain development: stress, abuse and therapeutic compounds.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2011-10-01

    The range of exogenous agents likely to affect, generally detrimentally, the normal development of the brain and central nervous system defies estimation although the amount of accumulated evidence is enormous. The present review is limited to certain types of chemotherapeutic and "use-and-abuse" compounds and environmental agents, exemplified by anesthetic, antiepileptic, sleep-inducing and anxiolytic compounds, nicotine and alcohol, and stress as well as agents of infection; each of these agents have been investigated quite extensively and have been shown to contribute to the etiopathogenesis of serious neuropsychiatric disorders. To greater or lesser extent, all of the exogenous agents discussed in the present treatise have been investigated for their influence upon neurodevelopmental processes during the period of the brain growth spurt and during other phases uptill adulthood, thereby maintaining the notion of critical phases for the outcome of treatment whether prenatal, postnatal, or adolescent. Several of these agents have contributed to the developmental disruptions underlying structural and functional brain abnormalities that are observed in the symptom and biomarker profiles of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In each case, the effects of the exogenous agents upon the status of the affected brain, within defined parameters and conditions, is generally permanent and irreversible. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Therapeutic strategies in psoriasis patients with psoriatic arthritis: focus on new agents.

    PubMed

    Gan, Emily Yiping; Chong, Wei-Sheng; Tey, Hong Liang

    2013-08-01

    Psoriatic arthritis affects approximately 6-42 % of patients with psoriasis. It is useful for physicians or dermatologists managing psoriasis patients to be aware of how to concurrently manage the joint manifestations, as it is preferable and convenient to use a single agent in such patients. However, only certain therapies are effective for both. Systemic agents, which can be used for both skin and joint manifestations, include methotrexate and ciclosporin. For the group of biologic agents, the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors such as adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, golimumab and certolizumab are effective. Ustekinumab is a more recently developed agent belonging to the group of anti-IL-12p40 antibodies and has been shown to be efficacious. Newer drugs in the treatment armamentarium that have shown efficacy for both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis consist of the anti-IL-17 agent, secukinumab, and a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, apremilast. The other anti-IL-17 agents, ixekizumab and brodalumab, as well as the oral Jak inhibitor, tofacitinib, have very limited but promising data. This review paper provides a good overview of the agents that can be used for the concurrent management of skin and joint psoriasis.

  16. Ultrasound Delivery of an Anti-Aβ Therapeutic Agent to the Brain in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordão, Jessica F.; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A.; Chopra, Rajiv; McLaurin, JoAnne; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Plaques composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides represent a pathological hallmark in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Aβ oligomers are considered cytotoxic and several therapeutic approaches focus on reducing Aβ load in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. The efficacy of most anti-Aβ agents is significantly limited because they do not cross the blood-brain-barrier. Innovative technologies capable of enhancing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby allowing entry of therapeutic agents into the brain, show great promise in circumventing this problem. The application of low-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of an ultrasound contrast agent causes localized and transient permeability of the blood-brain barrier. We demonstrate the value of this technology for the delivery of anti-Aβ antibodies to the brain of TgCRND8 mice, a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease exhibiting Aβ plaques. BAM-10, an anti-Aβ antibody, was injected into the tail vein simultaneously with exposure to MRI-guided, low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) to one hemisphere of TgCNRD8 mice. Four hours after treatment, antibodies were detected at significant amounts only in the brain of mice receiving FUS in addition to BAM-10. This data provides a proof-of-concept that FUS allows anti-Aβ therapeutics to efficiently enter the brain and target Aβ plaques. Four days following a single treatment with BAM-10 and MRI-guided FUS, a significant decrease in the number of Aβ plaques on the side of the treated hemisphere was observed in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion low-intensity, focused ultrasound is effective in delivering Aβ antibodies to the brain. This technology has the potential to enhance current anti-Aβ treatments by allowing increased exposure of amyloid plaques to treatment agents.

  17. Developmental therapeutics in acute myelogenous leukemia: are there any new effective cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents out there?

    PubMed

    Mims, Alice; Stuart, Robert K

    2013-06-01

    Therapies for AML have remained mostly unchanged since the introduction of anthracyline- and cytarabine-based regimens in the 1970s. Though some changes have been made in the dosing of anthracylines, in the choice of consolidation regimens versus allogeneic stem cell transplant, and in supportive care, clinical outcomes remain poor for most patients. As we continue to strive for better treatment options to improve upon outcomes, different agents, both chemotherapeutic and targeted therapies, are being studied. Here we discuss new chemotherapeutic agents that show promise in recent clinical trials and attempt to answer the question if there are any new effective cytotoxic chemotherapy agents out there.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF THE DYNAMICS OF THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. PMID:20950929

  19. Potential of olive oil phenols as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against cancer: a review of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Puoci, Francesco; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Ruggiero, Carmen; Avena, Paola; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is a common component of Mediterranean dietary habits. Epidemiological studies have shown how the incidence of various diseases, including certain cancers, is relatively low in the Mediterranean basin compared to that of other European or North America countries. Current knowledge indicates that the phenolic fraction of olive oil has antitumor effects. In addition to the ability to be chemopreventive, with its high antioxidant activity, the antitumor effects of olive oil phenols (OO-phenols) has been studied because of their capacity to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in several tumor cell lines, by diverse mechanisms. This review will summarize and discuss the most recent relevant results on the antitumor effect of OO-phenols on leukemia tumor cells, colorectal carcinoma cells, and breast cancer (BC) cells. In particular, very recent data will be reported and discussed showing the molecular signaling pathways activated by OO-phenols in different histopathological BC cell types, suggesting the potential use of OO-phenols as adjuvant treatment against several subsets of BC. Data summarized here represent a good starting point for more extensive studies for better insight into the molecular mechanisms induced by OO-phenols and to increase the availability of chemopreventive or therapeutic drugs to fight cancer.

  20. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles with organo-bridged silsesquioxane framework as innovative platforms for bioimaging and therapeutic agent delivery.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Li, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Lin; Zhang, Xueji; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous silica material with organo-bridged silsesquioxane frameworks is a kind of synergistic combination of inorganic silica, mesopores and organics, resulting in some novel or enhanced physicochemical and biocompatible properties compared with conventional mesoporous silica materials with pure Si-O composition. With the rapid development of nanotechnology, monodispersed nanoscale periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMO NPs) and organo-bridged mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with various organic groups and structures have recently been synthesized from 100%, or less, bridged organosilica precursors, respectively. Since then, these materials have been employed as carrier platforms to construct bioimaging and/or therapeutic agent delivery nanosystems for nano-biomedical application, and they demonstrate some unique and/or enhanced properties and performances. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the controlled synthesis of PMO NPs and organo-bridged MSNs, physicochemical and biocompatible properties, and their nano-biomedical application as bioimaging agent and/or therapeutic agent delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidote control of aptamer therapeutics: the road to a safer class of drug agents.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, K M; Woodruff, R S; Becker, R C; Nimjee, S M; Sullenger, B A

    2012-08-01

    Aptamers, or nucleic acid ligands, have gained clinical interest over the past 20 years due to their unique characteristics, which are a combination of the best facets of small molecules and antibodies. The high binding affinity and specificity of aptamers allows for isolation of an artificial ligand for theoretically any therapeutic target of interest. Chemical manipulations of aptamers also allow for fine-tuning of their bioavailability, and antidote control greatly expands their clinical use. Here we review the various methods of antidote control of aptamer therapeutics--matched oligonucleotide antidotes and universal antidotes. We also describe the development, recent progress, and potential future therapeutic applications of these types of aptamer-antidote pairs.

  2. A High-Throughput Biophotonics Instrument to Screen for Novel Ocular Photosensitizing Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Mark C.; Itotia, Patrick N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. High-throughput techniques are needed to identify and optimize novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents with greater efficacy and to lower toxicity. Novel agents with the capacity to completely ablate pathologic angiogenesis could be of substantial utility in diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. An instrument and approach was developed based on light-emitting diode (LED) technology for high-throughput screening (HTS) of libraries of potential chemical and biological photosensitizing agents. Ninety-six-well LED arrays were generated at multiple wavelengths and under rigorous intensity control. Cell toxicity was measured in 96-well culture arrays with the nuclear dye SYTOX Green (Invitrogen-Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). Results. Rapid screening of photoactivatable chemicals or biological molecules has been realized in 96-well arrays of cultured human cells. This instrument can be used to identify new PDT agents that exert cell toxicity on presentation of light of the appropriate energy. The system is further demonstrated through determination of the dose dependence of model compounds having or lacking cellular phototoxicity. Killer Red (KR), a genetically encoded red fluorescent protein expressed from transfected plasmids, is examined as a potential cellular photosensitizing agent and offers unique opportunities as a cell-type–specific phototoxic protein. Conclusions. This instrument has the capacity to screen large chemical or biological libraries for rapid identification and optimization of potential novel phototoxic lead candidates. KR and its derivatives have unique potential in ocular gene therapy for pathologic angiogenesis or tumors. PMID:19834043

  3. A high-throughput biophotonics instrument to screen for novel ocular photosensitizing therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Butler, Mark C; Itotia, Patrick N; Sullivan, Jack M

    2010-05-01

    High-throughput techniques are needed to identify and optimize novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents with greater efficacy and to lower toxicity. Novel agents with the capacity to completely ablate pathologic angiogenesis could be of substantial utility in diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). An instrument and approach was developed based on light-emitting diode (LED) technology for high-throughput screening (HTS) of libraries of potential chemical and biological photosensitizing agents. Ninety-six-well LED arrays were generated at multiple wavelengths and under rigorous intensity control. Cell toxicity was measured in 96-well culture arrays with the nuclear dye SYTOX Green (Invitrogen-Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). Rapid screening of photoactivatable chemicals or biological molecules has been realized in 96-well arrays of cultured human cells. This instrument can be used to identify new PDT agents that exert cell toxicity on presentation of light of the appropriate energy. The system is further demonstrated through determination of the dose dependence of model compounds having or lacking cellular phototoxicity. Killer Red (KR), a genetically encoded red fluorescent protein expressed from transfected plasmids, is examined as a potential cellular photosensitizing agent and offers unique opportunities as a cell-type-specific phototoxic protein. This instrument has the capacity to screen large chemical or biological libraries for rapid identification and optimization of potential novel phototoxic lead candidates. KR and its derivatives have unique potential in ocular gene therapy for pathologic angiogenesis or tumors.

  4. Grapefruit-derived nanovectors use an activated leukocyte trafficking pathway to deliver therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Ren, Yi; Mu, Jingyao; Egilmez, Nejat; Zhuang, Xiaoyin; Deng, Zhongbin; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of cancer. Activated immune cells are intrinsically capable of homing to inflammatory sites. Using three inflammatory driven disease mouse models, we show that grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNVs) coated with inflammatory related receptor enriched membranes of activated leukocytes (IGNVs) are enhanced for homing to inflammatory tumor tissues. Blocking LFA-1 or CXCR1 and CXCR2 on the IGNVs significantly inhibits IGNV homing to the inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic potential of IGNVs was further demonstrated by enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect as shown by inhibition of tumor growth in two tumor models and inhibiting the inflammatory effects of DSS induced mouse colitis. The fact that IGNVs are capable of homing to inflammatory tissue and that there is an overexpression of chemokines in diseased human tissue provides the rationale for using IGNVs to more directed delivery of therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites and the use of IGNVs as personalized medicine for treatment of certain cancers. PMID:25883092

  5. C60 Fullerene as Promising Therapeutic Agent for the Prevention and Correction of Skeletal Muscle Functioning at Ischemic Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozdrenko, D. M.; Zavodovskyi, D. O.; Matvienko, T. Yu.; Zay, S. Yu.; Bogutska, K. I.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Ritter, U.; Scharff, P.

    2017-02-01

    The therapeutic effect of pristine C60 fullerene aqueous colloid solution (C60FAS) on the functioning of the rat soleus muscle at ischemic injury depending on the time of the general pathogenesis of muscular system and method of administration C60FAS in vivo was investigated. It was found that intravenous administration of C60FAS is the optimal for correction of speed macroparameters of contraction for ischemic muscle damage. At the same time, intramuscular administration of C60FAS shows pronounced protective effect in movements associated with the generation of maximum force responses or prolonged contractions, which increase the muscle fatigue level. Analysis of content concentration of creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes in the blood of experimental animals indicates directly that C60FAS may be a promising therapeutic agent for the prevention and correction of ischemic-damaged skeletal muscle function.

  6. Grapefruit-Derived Nanovectors Use an Activated Leukocyte Trafficking Pathway to Deliver Therapeutic Agents to Inflammatory Tumor Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilong; Ren, Yi; Mu, Jingyao; Egilmez, Nejat K; Zhuang, Xiaoyin; Deng, Zhongbin; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-06-15

    Inflammation is a hallmark of cancer. Activated immune cells are intrinsically capable of homing to inflammatory sites. Using three inflammatory-driven disease mouse models, we show that grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNV) coated with inflammatory-related receptor enriched membranes of activated leukocytes (IGNVs) are enhanced for homing to inflammatory tumor tissues. Blocking LFA-1 or CXCR1 and CXCR2 on the IGNVs significantly inhibits IGNV homing to the inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic potential of IGNVs was further demonstrated by enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect as shown by inhibition of tumor growth in two tumor models and inhibiting the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse colitis. The fact that IGNVs are capable of homing to inflammatory tissue and that chemokines are overexpressed in diseased human tissue provides the rationale for using IGNVs to more directly deliver therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites and the rationale for the use of IGNVs as treatment for certain cancers in personalized medicine.

  7. Nanoceria: a rare-earth nanoparticle as a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Giri, Shailendra; Karakoti, Ajay; Graham, Rondell P; Maguire, Jacie L; Reilly, Christopher M; Seal, Sudipta; Rattan, Ramandeep; Shridhar, Viji

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers among women in United Sates and the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. While most OvCa patients initially respond to surgical debulking and chemotherapy, 75% of patients later succumb to the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need to test novel therapeutic agents to counteract the high mortality rate associated with OvCa. In this context, we have developed and engineered Nanoceria (NCe), nanoparticles of cerium oxide, possessing anti-oxidant properties, to be used as a therapeutic agent in OvCa. We show for the first time that NCe significantly inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, attenuated growth factor (SDF1, HB-EGF, VEGF(165) and HGF) mediated cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, without affecting the cell proliferation. NCe treatment also inhibited VEGF(165) induced proliferation, capillary tube formation, activation of VEGFR2 and MMP2 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). NCe (0.1 mg/kg body weigh) treatment of A2780 ovarian cancer cells injected intra-peritoneally in nude mice showed significant reduction (p<0.002) in tumor growth accompanied by decreased tumor cell proliferation as evident from reduced tumor size and Ki67 staining. Accumulation of NCe was found in tumors isolated from treated group using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Reduction of the tumor mass was accompanied by attenuation of angiogenesis, as observed by reduced CD31 staining and specific apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that cerium oxide based NCe is a novel nanoparticle that can potentially be used as an anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

  8. Growth/differentiation factor-5: a candidate therapeutic agent for periodontal regeneration? A review of pre-clinical data.

    PubMed

    Moore, Yolanda R; Dickinson, Douglas P; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2010-03-01

    Therapeutic concepts involving the application of matrix, growth and differentiation factors have been advocated in support of periodontal wound healing/regeneration. Growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5), a member of the bone morphogenetic protein family, represents one such factor. The purpose of this review is to provide a background of the therapeutic effects of GDF-5 expressed in various musculoskeletal settings using small and large animal platforms. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all reports in the English language evaluating GDF-5 using the PubMed and Google search engines, and a manual search of the reference lists from the electronically retrieved reports. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts from a total of 69 reports, 22 of which were identified as pre-clinical (in vivo) evaluations of GDF-5. The full-length article of the 22 pre-clinical reports was then reviewed. Various applications including cranial and craniofacial bone formation, spine fusion, long bone fracture healing, cartilage, and tendon/ligament repair using a variety of small and large animal platforms evaluating GDF-5 as a therapeutic agent were identified. A majority of studies, using biomechanical, radiographic, and histological analysis, demonstrated significant dose-dependent effects of GDF-5. These include increased/enhanced local bone formation, fracture healing/repair, and cartilage and tendon/ligament formation. GDF-5 frequently was shown to accelerate wound maturation. Several studies demonstrated GDF-5 to be a realistic alternative to autograft bone. Studies using pre-clinical models and human histology suggest GDF-5 may also increase/enhance periodontal wound healing/regeneration. GDF-5 appears a promising therapeutic agent for periodontal wound healing/regeneration as GDF-5 supports/accelerates bone and tendon/ligament formation in several musculoskeletal settings including periodontal tissues.

  9. AβPP-Selective BACE Inhibitors (ASBI): Novel Class of Therapeutic Agents for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, Olivier; Spilman, Patricia; Zhang, Qiang; Libeu, Clare P.; Poksay, Karen; Gorostiza, Olivia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Bredesen, Dale E.; John, Varghese

    2014-01-01

    A systematic approach was used to identify AβPP-selective BACE inhibitors (ASBI) and to evaluate their in vivo ability to modulate AβPP processing selectively. We identified a bioflavonoid nutritional supplement as a molecular lead that acts as an ASBI in cell models, and show that increasing brain levels of this bioflavonoid through a pro-drug approach leads to reduction of Aβ42 in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. ASBIs represent a novel class of candidate therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23948888

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of the dynamics of therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-12-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Epigenetic Modulating Agents as a New Therapeutic Approach in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Van Riet, Ivan; Vanderkerken, Karin; De Bruyne, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy. Therefore, new targets and drugs are urgently needed to improve patient outcome. Epigenetic aberrations play a crucial role in development and progression in cancer, including MM. To target these aberrations, epigenetic modulating agents, such as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are under intense investigation in solid and hematological cancers. A clinical benefit of the use of these agents as single agents and in combination regimens has been suggested based on numerous studies in pre-clinical tumor models, including MM models. The mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood but appear to involve a combination of true epigenetic changes and cytotoxic actions. In addition, the interactions with the BM niche are also affected by epigenetic modulating agents that will further determine the in vivo efficacy and thus patient outcome. A better understanding of the molecular events underlying the anti-tumor activity of the epigenetic drugs will lead to more rational drug combinations. This review focuses on the involvement of epigenetic changes in MM pathogenesis and how the use of DNMTi and HDACi affect the myeloma tumor itself and its interactions with the microenvironment. PMID:24216985

  12. Novel compounds in the treatment of lung cancer: current and developing therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rudi; Chan, Pokman

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Though incremental advances have been made in the treatment of this devastating disease during the past decade, new therapies are urgently needed. Traditional cytotoxic agents have been combined with other modalities with improved survival for early-stage patients. Newer cytotoxic agents targeting the same or different mechanisms have been developed at different stages. Optimization of various chemotherapy regimens in different settings is one of the aims of current clinical trials. Some predictive biomarkers (eg, excision repair cross-complementing 1, ERCC1) and histotypes (eg, adenocarcinoma) are found to be associated with resistance/response to some cytotoxic drugs. Another notable advance is the addition of targeted therapy to lung cancer treatment. Targeted agents such as erlotinib and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical benefits and gained Food and Drug Administration approval for lung cancer. More agents targeting various signaling pathways critical to lung cancer are at different stages of development. Along with the effort of new targeted drug discovery, biomarkers such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutations have proven useful for patient selection, and more predictive biomarkers have been actively evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer. The paradigm of lung cancer treatment has shifted towards biomarker-based personalized medicine. PMID:27186107

  13. Circulatory therapeutics: use of antihypertensive agents and their effects on the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This review addresses the use of the different antihypertensive agents currently available and some in development, and their effects on the vasculature. The different classes of agents used in the treatment of hypertension, and the results of recent large clinical trials, dosing protocols and adverse effects are first briefly summarized. The consequences on blood vessels of the use of antihypertensive drugs and the differential effects on the biology of large and small arteries resulting in modulation of vascular remodelling and dysfunction in hypertensive patients are then described. Large elastic conduit arteries exhibit outward hypertrophic remodelling and increased stiffness, which contributes to raise systolic blood pressure and afterload on the heart. Small resistance arteries undergo eutrophic or hypertrophic inward remodelling, and impair tissue perfusion. By these mechanisms both large and small arteries may contribute to trigger cardiovascular events. Some antihypertensive agents correct these changes, which could contribute to improved outcome. The mechanisms that at the level of the vascular wall lead to remodelling and can be beneficially affected by antihypertensive agents will also be addressed. These include vasoconstriction, growth and inflammation. The molecular pathways contributing to growth and inflammation will be summarily described. Further identification of these signalling pathways should allow identification of novel targets leading to development of new and improved medications for the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20345850

  14. Circulatory therapeutics: use of antihypertensive agents and their effects on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2010-05-01

    This review addresses the use of the different antihypertensive agents currently available and some in development, and their effects on the vasculature. The different classes of agents used in the treatment of hypertension, and the results of recent large clinical trials, dosing protocols and adverse effects are first briefly summarized. The consequences on blood vessels of the use of antihypertensive drugs and the differential effects on the biology of large and small arteries resulting in modulation of vascular remodelling and dysfunction in hypertensive patients are then described. Large elastic conduit arteries exhibit outward hypertrophic remodelling and increased stiffness, which contributes to raise systolic blood pressure and afterload on the heart. Small resistance arteries undergo eutrophic or hypertrophic inward remodelling, and impair tissue perfusion. By these mechanisms both large and small arteries may contribute to trigger cardiovascular events. Some antihypertensive agents correct these changes, which could contribute to improved outcome. The mechanisms that at the level of the vascular wall lead to remodelling and can be beneficially affected by antihypertensive agents will also be addressed. These include vasoconstriction, growth and inflammation. The molecular pathways contributing to growth and inflammation will be summarily described. Further identification of these signalling pathways should allow identification of novel targets leading to development of new and improved medications for the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Phytochemical Modulators of Mitochondria: The Search for Chemopreventive Agents and Supportive Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Gawin, Malgorzata; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucially important for maintaining not only the energy homeostasis, but the proper cellular functions in a general sense. Impairment of mitochondrial functions is observed in a broad variety of pathological states such as neoplastic transformations and cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders and chronic inflammation. Currently, in parallel to the classical drug design approaches, there is an increasing interest in the screening for natural bioactive substances, mainly phytochemicals, in order to develop new therapeutic solutions for the mentioned pathologies. Dietary phytochemicals such as resveratrol, curcumin and sulforaphane are very well tolerated and can effectively complement classical pharmacological therapeutic regimens. In this paper we disscuss the effect of the chosen phytochemicals (e.g., resveratrol, curcumin, sulforaphane) on various aspects of mitochondrial biology, namely mitochondrial biogenesis, membrane potential and reactive oxygen species production, signaling to and from the nucleus and unfolded protein response. PMID:25192192

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide, the Next Potent Preventive and Therapeutic Agent in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Tang, Zhi-Han; Ren, Zhong; Qu, Shun-Lin; Liu, Mi-Hua; Liu, Lu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. It is physiologically generated by cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. H2S has been gaining increasing attention as an important endogenous signaling molecule because of its significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Substantial evidence shows that H2S is involved in aging by inhibiting free-radical reactions, activating SIRT1, and probably interacting with the age-related gene Klotho. Moreover, H2S has been shown to have therapeutic potential in age-associated diseases. This article provides an overview of the physiological functions and effects of H2S in aging and age-associated diseases, and proposes the potential health and therapeutic benefits of H2S. PMID:23297346

  17. Alternative matrices for therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressive agents using LC–MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Mwlod; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs used in solid organ transplants typically have narrow therapeutic windows and high intra- and intersubject variability. To ensure satisfactory exposure, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) plays a pivotal role in any successful posttransplant maintenance therapy. Currently, recommendations for optimum immunosuppressant concentrations are based on blood/plasma measurements. However, they introduce many disadvantages, including poor prediction of allograft survival and toxicity, a weak correlation with drug concentrations at the site of action and the invasive nature of the sample collection. Thus, alternative matrices have been investigated. This paper reviews tandem-mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) methods used for the quantification of immunosuppressant drugs utilizing nonconventional matrices, namely oral fluids, fingerprick blood and intracellular and intratissue sampling. The advantages, disadvantages and clinical application of such alternative mediums are discussed. Additionally, sample extraction techniques and basic chromatography information regarding these methods are presented in tabulated form. PMID:25966013

  18. Alternative matrices for therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressive agents using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Mwlod; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs used in solid organ transplants typically have narrow therapeutic windows and high intra- and intersubject variability. To ensure satisfactory exposure, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) plays a pivotal role in any successful posttransplant maintenance therapy. Currently, recommendations for optimum immunosuppressant concentrations are based on blood/plasma measurements. However, they introduce many disadvantages, including poor prediction of allograft survival and toxicity, a weak correlation with drug concentrations at the site of action and the invasive nature of the sample collection. Thus, alternative matrices have been investigated. This paper reviews tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods used for the quantification of immunosuppressant drugs utilizing nonconventional matrices, namely oral fluids, fingerprick blood and intracellular and intratissue sampling. The advantages, disadvantages and clinical application of such alternative mediums are discussed. Additionally, sample extraction techniques and basic chromatography information regarding these methods are presented in tabulated form.

  19. Uricases as therapeutic agents to treat refractory gout: Current states and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolan; Yuan, Yonghua; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of refractory gout remains a challenge on drug development. While pegloticase, a recombinant mammalian uricase modified with monomethoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) is effective in treating refractory gout, after continued treatment for three months biweekly at a therapeutic dose of 0.14 mg/kg body weight, it elicits an immune response against mPEG in nearly 20% of patients. For continued treatment of refractory gout PEGylated uricases at monthly therapeutic doses below 4 μg/kg body weight have promise. To formulate uricases to achieve monthly therapeutic regimens requires pharmacodynamics simulation and experimentation including: (a) molecular engineering of uricases based on rational design and evolution biotechnology in combination to improve their inherent catalytic efficiency, thermostability and selectivity for urate over xanthine and; (b) optimization of the number and distribution of accessible reactive amino acid residues in native uricases for site-specific PEGylation with PEG derivatives with lower of immunogenicity than mPEG to retain activity, minimize immunogenicity and enhance the pharmacokinetics of the PEGylated uricase. These issues are briefly reviewed as a means to stimulate the development of safer uricase formulations for continued treatment of refractory gout. PMID:22665944

  20. Supplemental substances derived from foods as adjunctive therapeutic agents for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and disorders.

    PubMed

    Bigford, Gregory E; Del Rossi, Gianluca

    2014-07-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders and diseases (NDDs) that are either chronically acquired or triggered by a singular detrimental event are a rapidly growing cause of disability and/or death. In recent times, there have been major advancements in our understanding of various neurodegenerative disease states that have revealed common pathologic features or mechanisms. The many mechanistic parallels discovered between various neurodegenerative diseases suggest that a single therapeutic approach may be used to treat multiple disease conditions. Of late, natural compounds and supplemental substances have become an increasingly attractive option to treat NDDs because there is growing evidence that these nutritional constituents have potential adjunctive therapeutic effects (be it protective or restorative) on various neurodegenerative diseases. Here we review relevant experimental and clinical data on supplemental substances (i.e., curcuminoids, rosmarinic acid, resveratrol, acetyl-L-carnitine, and ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids) that have demonstrated encouraging therapeutic effects on chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration resulting from acute adverse events, such as traumatic brain injury.

  1. Adjuvants are Key Factors for the Development of Future Vaccines: Lessons from the Finlay Adjuvant Platform

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Oliver; Romeu, Belkis; Cabrera, Osmir; González, Elizabeth; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Labrada, Alexis; Pérez, Rocmira; Reyes, Laura M.; Ramírez, Wendy; Sifontes, Sergio; Fernández, Nelson; Lastre, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against neglected diseases, especially those associated with poverty and social deprivation, is urgently needed. Modern vaccine technologies and a better understanding of the immune response have provided scientists with the tools for rational and safer design of subunit vaccines. Often, however, subunit vaccines do not elicit strong immune responses, highlighting the need to incorporate better adjuvants; this step therefore becomes a key factor for vaccine development. In this review we outline some key features of modern vaccinology that are linked with the development of better adjuvants. In line with the increased desire to obtain novel adjuvants for future vaccines, the Finlay Adjuvant Platform offers a novel approach for the development of new and effective adjuvants. The Finlay Adjuvants (AFs), AFPL (proteoliposome), and AFCo (cochleate), were initially designed for parenteral and mucosal applications, and constitute potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1 responses against several antigens. This review summarizes the status of the Finlay technology in producing promising adjuvants for unsolved-vaccine diseases including mucosal approaches and therapeutic vaccines. Ideas related to adjuvant classification, adjuvant selection, and their possible influence on innate recognition via multiple toll-like receptors are also discussed. PMID:24348475

  2. Adjuvants are Key Factors for the Development of Future Vaccines: Lessons from the Finlay Adjuvant Platform.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oliver; Romeu, Belkis; Cabrera, Osmir; González, Elizabeth; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Labrada, Alexis; Pérez, Rocmira; Reyes, Laura M; Ramírez, Wendy; Sifontes, Sergio; Fernández, Nelson; Lastre, Miriam

    2013-12-02

    The development of effective vaccines against neglected diseases, especially those associated with poverty and social deprivation, is urgently needed. Modern vaccine technologies and a better understanding of the immune response have provided scientists with the tools for rational and safer design of subunit vaccines. Often, however, subunit vaccines do not elicit strong immune responses, highlighting the need to incorporate better adjuvants; this step therefore becomes a key factor for vaccine development. In this review we outline some key features of modern vaccinology that are linked with the development of better adjuvants. In line with the increased desire to obtain novel adjuvants for future vaccines, the Finlay Adjuvant Platform offers a novel approach for the development of new and effective adjuvants. The Finlay Adjuvants (AFs), AFPL (proteoliposome), and AFCo (cochleate), were initially designed for parenteral and mucosal applications, and constitute potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1 responses against several antigens. This review summarizes the status of the Finlay technology in producing promising adjuvants for unsolved-vaccine diseases including mucosal approaches and therapeutic vaccines. Ideas related to adjuvant classification, adjuvant selection, and their possible influence on innate recognition via multiple toll-like receptors are also discussed.

  3. Possible Role of Common Spices as a Preventive and Therapeutic Agent for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mirmosayyeb, Omid; Tanhaei, Amirpouya; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Martins, Ralph N; Tanhaei, Mana; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali; Meamar, Rokhsareh

    2017-01-01

    For centuries, spices have been consumed as food additives or medicinal agents. However, there is increasing evidence indicating the plant-based foods in regular diet may lower the risk of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease. Spices, as one of the most commonly used plant-based food additives may provide more than just flavors, but as agents that may prevent or even halt neurodegenerative processes associated with aging. In this article, we review the role and application of five commonly used dietary spices including saffron turmeric, pepper family, zingiber, and cinnamon. Besides suppressing inflammatory pathways, these spices may act as antioxidant and inhibit acetyl cholinesterase and amyloid β aggregation. We summarized how spice-derived nutraceuticals mediate such different effects and what their molecular targets might be. Finally, some directions for future research are briefly discussed.

  4. Possible Role of Common Spices as a Preventive and Therapeutic Agent for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirmosayyeb, Omid; Tanhaei, Amirpouya; Sohrabi, Hamid R.; Martins, Ralph N.; Tanhaei, Mana; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali; Meamar, Rokhsareh

    2017-01-01

    For centuries, spices have been consumed as food additives or medicinal agents. However, there is increasing evidence indicating the plant-based foods in regular diet may lower the risk of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease. Spices, as one of the most commonly used plant-based food additives may provide more than just flavors, but as agents that may prevent or even halt neurodegenerative processes associated with aging. In this article, we review the role and application of five commonly used dietary spices including saffron turmeric, pepper family, zingiber, and cinnamon. Besides suppressing inflammatory pathways, these spices may act as antioxidant and inhibit acetyl cholinesterase and amyloid β aggregation. We summarized how spice-derived nutraceuticals mediate such different effects and what their molecular targets might be. Finally, some directions for future research are briefly discussed. PMID:28250905

  5. State-of-the-art therapeutic medical countermeasures for viral threat agents.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Aruna; Metz, Matthew; Stundick, Melissa; Larsen, Joseph C

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the perceived threat of biological agents being used against civilian populations. This has prompted an urgent need for the development and procurement of medical countermeasures (MCMs) against highly pathogenic viruses that can prevent morbidity and mortality from infections caused by these agents. To date, antiviral drug development has been largely focused on clinically prevalent chronic infections due to their commercial viability. This has left a huge gap in the drug development path for acute infections of biodefense importance. In this review, we discuss the antiviral research and development initiatives focusing specifically on poxviruses, filoviruses, and equine encephalitis viruses (EEV). We discuss the benefits and technical challenges in the current development strategies and the hurdles in the licensure path for MCMs against these highly pathogenic viruses under the FDA Animal Rule, and we provide recommendations for the path forward. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  6. Nanoscaled boron-containing delivery systems and therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-01-01

    Significant efforts have recently been made to develop nanoscaled boron-containing delivery systems for improving drug delivery in cancer therapy. On one hand, borate ester chemistry has shown importance in ligand-mediated tumor targeting owing to the recognition ability of boronic acid to polyol residues in cell membranes. In particular, the phenylboronic acid-functionalized nanocarriers for specific targeting to sialic acid groups which are overexpressed on tumor cells have made great achievements. On the other hand, nanoscaled boron neutron capture therapy agents show growing potential in efficiently transporting boron to tumor. The current review outlines the recent developments in the application of borate ester chemistry in tumor targeting by nanoparticles, then summarizes recent work on the development of boron-based nanomaterials as boron neutron capture therapy agents.

  7. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MÖHLER, HANS; PFIRMAN, ROLF W.; FREI, KARL

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti-oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  8. Insonation frequency selection may assist detection and therapeutic delivery of targeted ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Payne, Edward; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasound-targeted drug delivery relies on the unique nature of ultrasound contrast agents--they are microbubbles that respond strongly to ultrasound. Intravenously injected microbubbles are smaller than a blood cell. By increasing the ultrasound power, the bubbles can be ruptured at the targeted endothelial wall, locally releasing any molecules in the bubble shell. Furthermore, ultrasound-activated microbubbles are known to cause sonoporation--the process by which ultrasound drives molecules through cellular membranes. However, techniques are required to selectively detect and rupture only those microbubbles on target walls. Experiments are presented on the behaviour of microbubbles on walls. For accuracy, imaging measurements are made on model microbubbles larger than contrast agents. Bubble size was varied and the resonant frequency peak determined. Microbubbles on walls have a shifted frequency in good agreement with theory: a 20-25% downshift from the frequency when far from walls. Effects other than the presence of the wall account for less than 5% of the shift. Theory predicts the frequency downshift should be sustained for actual contrast-agent sized bubbles. The effect of real, compliant cell walls requires investigation. An appropriate downshift in the applied ultrasound frequency could selectively tune gene or drug delivery. To make this feasible, it may be necessary to manufacture monodispersed microbubbles.

  9. Lipopeptides as the Antifungal and Antibacterial Agents: Applications in Food Safety and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Khem Raj; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2015-01-01

    A lot of crops are destroyed by the phytopathogens such as fungi, bacteria, and yeast leading to economic losses to the farmers. Members of the Bacillus genus are considered as the factories for the production of biologically active molecules that are potential inhibitors of growth of phytopathogens. Plant diseases constitute an emerging threat to global food security. Many of the currently available antimicrobial agents for agriculture are highly toxic and nonbiodegradable and thus cause extended environmental pollution. Moreover, an increasing number of phytopathogens have developed resistance to antimicrobial agents. The lipopeptides have been tried as potent versatile weapons to deal with a variety of phytopathogens. All the three families of Bacillus lipopeptides, namely, Surfactins, Iturins and Fengycins, have been explored for their antagonistic activities towards a wide range of phytopathogens including bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Iturin and Fengycin have antifungal activities, while Surfactin has broad range of potent antibacterial activities and this has also been used as larvicidal agent. Interestingly, lipopeptides being the molecules of biological origin are environmentally acceptable. PMID:25632392

  10. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

  11. Targeted delivery of antibody-based therapeutic and imaging agents to CNS tumors: Crossing the blood-brain-barrier divide

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Li, Chunsheng; Pryma, Daniel A.; Brem, Steven; Coukos, George; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are inherently difficult to treat in large part due to the cellular blood-brain barriers (BBB) that limit the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor tissue from the systemic circulation. Virtually no large-molecules, including antibody-based proteins, can penetrate the BBB. With antibodies fast becoming attractive ligands for highly specific molecular targeting to tumor antigens, a variety of methods are being investigated to enhance the access of these agents to intracranial tumors for imaging or therapeutic applications. Areas covered This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and the vasculature in brain tumors, described as the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). Antibodies targeted to molecular markers of CNS tumors will be highlighted, and current strategies for enhancing the delivery of antibodies across these cellular barriers into the brain parenchyma to the tumor will be discussed. Non-invasive imaging approaches to assess BBB/BBTB permeability and/or antibody targeting will be presented as a means of guiding the optimal delivery of targeted agents to brain tumors. Expert Opinion Pre-clinical and clinical studies highlight the potential of several approaches in increasing brain tumor delivery across the blood-brain barrier divide. However, each carries its own risks and challenges. There is tremendous potential in using neuroimaging strategies to assist in understanding and defining the challenges to translating and optimizing molecularly-targeted antibody delivery to CNS tumors to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23751126

  12. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: Activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, Sarah R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. PMID:22977001

  13. The Effectiveness of Various Salacca Vinegars as Therapeutic Agent for Management of Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia on Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rukmi Putri, Widya Dwi; Puspitasari, Tiara; Kalsum, Umi; Dianawati, Dianawati

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potency of salacca vinegar made from various Indonesian salacca fruit extracts as therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia for STZ-induced diabetic rats. The rats were grouped into untreated rats, STZ-induced diabetic rats without treatment, and STZ-induced diabetic rats treated with Pondoh salacca vinegar, Swaru salacca vinegar, Gula Pasir salacca vinegar, Madu salacca vinegar, or Madura salacca vinegar. Parameter observed included blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and pancreas histopathology of the samples. The results demonstrated that all salacca vinegars were capable of reducing blood sugar (from 25.1 to 62%) and reducing LDL (from 9.5 to 14.8 mg/dL), TG (from 58.3 to 69.5 mg/dL), MDA (from 1.1 to 2.2 mg/dL), and TC (from 56.3 to 70.5 mg/dL) as well as increasing HDL blood sugar of STZ-induced diabetic Wistar rats (from 52.3 to 60 mg/dL). Various salacca vinegars were also capable of regenerating pancreatic cells. Nevertheless, the ability of Swaru salacca vinegar to manage hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia appeared to be superior to other salacca vinegars. Swaru salacca vinegar is a potential therapeutic agent to manage hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia of STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:28424779

  14. Poly-S-Nitrosated Albumin as a Safe and Effective Multifunctional Antitumor Agent: Characterization, Biochemistry and Possible Future Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Yu; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous molecule involved in multiple cellular functions. Inappropriate production of NO may lead to disease states. To date, pharmacologically active compounds that release NO within the body, such as organic nitrates, have been used as therapeutic agents, but their efficacy is significantly limited by unwanted side effects. Therefore, novel NO donors with better pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties are highly desirable. The S-nitrosothiol fraction in plasma is largely composed of endogenous S-nitrosated human serum albumin (Mono-SNO-HSA), and that is why we are testing whether this albumin form can be therapeutically useful. Recently, we developed SNO-HSA analogs such as SNO-HSA with many conjugated SNO groups (Poly-SNO-HSA) which were prepared using chemical modification. Unexpectedly, we found striking inverse effects between Poly-SNO-HSA and Mono-SNO-HSA. Despite the fact that Mono-SNO-HSA inhibits apoptosis, Poly-SNO-HSA possesses very strong proapoptotic effects against tumor cells. Furthermore, Poly-SNO-HSA can reduce or perhaps completely eliminate the multidrug resistance often developed by cancer cells. In this review, we forward the possibility that Poly-SNO-HSA can be used as a safe and effective multifunctional antitumor agent. PMID:24490156

  15. Vitamin B12: a tunable, long wavelength, light-responsive platform for launching therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Shell, Thomas A; Lawrence, David S

    2015-11-17

    Light-responsive agents offer the promise of targeted therapy, whose benefits include (i) prolonged action at the target site, (ii) overall reduced systemic dosage, (iii) reduced adverse effects, and (iv) localized delivery of multiple agents. Although photoactivated prodrugs have been reported, these species generally require short wavelengths (<450 nm) for activation. However, maximal tissue penetrance by light occurs within the "optical window of tissue" (600-900 nm), well beyond the wavelength range of most existing photocleavable functional groups. Furthermore, since multidrug therapy holds promise for the treatment of complex diseases, from cancer to neurological disorders, controlling the action of multiple drugs via wavelength modulation would take advantage of a property that is unique to light. However, discrimination between existing photoresponsive moieties has thus far proven to be limited. We have developed a vitamin B12/light-facilitated strategy for controlling drug action using red, far-red, and NIR light. The technology is based on a light-triggered reaction displayed by a subset of B12 derivatives: alkyl-cob(III)alamins suffer photohomolysis of the C-Co(III) bond. The C-Co(III) bond is weak (<30 kcal/mol), and therefore all wavelengths absorbed by the corrin ring (330-580 nm) induce photocleavage. In addition, by appending fluorophores to the corrin ring, long wavelength light (>600 nm) is readily captured and used to separate the Co-appended ligand (e.g., a drug) from B12. Consequently, it is now feasible to preassign the wavelength of homolysis by simply installing a fluorescent antenna with the desired photophysical properties. The wavelength malleability inherent within this strategy has been used to construct photoresponsive compounds that launch different drugs by simply modulating the wavelength of illumination. In addition, these phototherapeutics have been installed on the surface and interior of cells, such as erythrocytes or neural

  16. Adjuvant analgesics in cancer pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Raj; Jones, Stephanie

    2012-02-01

    Adjuvant analgesics (co-analgesics) are medications whose primary indication is the management of a medical condition with secondary effects of analgesia. Cancer pain is multifactorial and often involves inflammatory, nociceptive, and neuropathic pain subtypes. Adjuvant analgesics used in conjunction with opioids have been found to be beneficial in the management of many cancer pain syndromes; however, they are currently underutilized. Antidepressants, anticonvulsants, local anesthetics, topical agents, steroids, bisphosphonates, and calcitonin are all adjuvants which have been shown to be effective in the management of cancer pain syndromes. When utilizing analgesic adjuvants in the treatment of cancer pain, providers must take into account the particular side effect profile of the medication. Ideally, adjuvant analgesics will be initiated at lower dosages and escalated as tolerated until efficacy or adverse effects are encountered.

  17. Comparative assessment of PDE 4 and 7 inhibitors as therapeutic agents in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    González-García, C; Bravo, B; Ballester, A; Gómez-Pérez, R; Eguiluz, C; Redondo, M; Martínez, A; Gil, C; Ballester, S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PDE4 inhibition suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, side effects hinder PDE4 inhibitors clinical use. PDE7 inhibition might constitute an alternative therapeutic strategy, but few data about the anti-inflammatory potential of PDE7 inhibitors are currently available. We have used the EAE model to perform a comparative evaluation of PDE4 and PDE7 inhibition as strategies for MS treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Two PDE7 inhibitors, the sulfonamide derivative BRL50481 and the recently described quinazoline compound TC3.6, were assayed to modulate EAE in SJL mice, in comparison with the well-known PDE4 inhibitor Rolipram. We evaluated clinical signs, presence of inflammatory infiltrates in CNS and anti-inflammatory markers. We also analysed the effect of these inhibitors on the inflammatory profile of spleen cells in vitro. KEY RESULTS TC3.6 prevented EAE with efficacy similar to Rolipram, while BRL50481 had no effect on the disease. Differences between both PDE7 inhibitors are discussed. Data from Rolipram and TC3.6 showed that PDE4 and PDE7 inhibition work through both common and distinct pathways. Rolipram administration caused an increase in IL-10 and IL-27 expression which was not found after TC3.6 treatment. On the other hand, both inhibitors reduced IL-17 levels, prevented infiltration in CNS and increased the expression of the T regulator cell marker Foxp3. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results provide new information about the effects of Rolipram on EAE, underline PDE7 inhibition as a new therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases and show the value of TC3.6 to prevent EAE, with possible consequences for new therapeutic tools in MS. PMID:23869659

  18. Application of Disposable Bag Bioreactors in Tissue Engineering and for the Production of Therapeutic Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, R.; Eibl, D.

    In order to increase process efficiency, many pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have introduced disposable bag technology over the last 10 years. Because this technology also greatly reduces the risk of cross-contamination, disposable bags are preferred in applications in which an absolute or improved process safety is a necessity, namely the production of functional tissue for implantation (tissue engineering), the production of human cells for the treatment of cancer and immune system diseases (cellular therapy), the production of viruses for gene therapies, the production of therapeutic proteins, and veterinary as well as human vaccines.

  19. Bioprospecting the Curculigoside-Cinnamic Acid-Rich Fraction from Molineria latifolia Rhizome as a Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Der Jiun; Chan, Kim Wei; Sarega, Nadarajan; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-06-17

    Increasing evidence from both experimental and clinical studies depicts the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Specifically, disruption of homeostatic redox balance in accumulated body fat mass leads to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Strategies for the restoration of redox balance, potentially by exploring potent plant bioactives, have thus become the focus of therapeutic intervention. The present study aimed to bioprospect the potential use of the curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction from Molineria latifolia rhizome as an antioxidant therapeutic agent. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) isolated from M. latifolia rhizome methanolic extract (RME) contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds, particularly curculigoside and cinnamic acid. EAF demonstrated glycation inhibitory activities in both glucose- and fructose-mediated glycation models. In addition, in vitro chemical-based and cellular-based antioxidant assays showed that EAF exhibited high antioxidant activities and a protective effect against oxidative damage in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although the efficacies of individual phenolics differed depending on the structure and concentration, a correlational study revealed strong correlations between total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities. The results concluded that enriched phenolic contents in EAF (curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction) contributed to the overall better reactivity. Our data suggest that this bioactive-rich fraction warrants therapeutic potential against oxidative stress-related disorders.

  20. Adjuvant Treatment of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Nogueira, J. A.; Valero Arbizu, M.; Pérez Temprano, R.

    2013-01-01

    Melanomas represent 4% of all malignant tumors of the skin, yet account for 80% of deaths from skin cancer.While in the early stages patients can be successfully treated with surgical resection, metastatic melanoma prognosis is dismal. Several oncogenes have been identified in melanoma as BRAF, NRAS, c-Kit, and GNA11 GNAQ, each capable of activating MAPK pathway that increases cell proliferation and promotes angiogenesis, although NRAS and c-Kit also activate PI3 kinase pathway, including being more commonly BRAF activated oncogene. The treatment of choice for localised primary cutaneous melanoma is surgery plus lymphadenectomy if regional lymph nodes are involved. The justification for treatment in addition to surgery is based on the poor prognosis for high risk melanomas with a relapse index of 50–80%. Patients included in the high risk group should be assessed for adjuvant treatment with high doses of Interferon-α2b, as it is the only treatment shown to significantly improve disease free and possibly global survival. In the future we will have to analyze all these therapeutic possibilities on specific targets, probably associated with chemotherapy and/or interferon in the adjuvant treatment, if we want to change the natural history of melanomas. PMID:23476798

  1. Iyengar-Yoga Compared to Exercise as a Therapeutic Intervention during (Neo)adjuvant Therapy in Women with Stage I–III Breast Cancer: Health-Related Quality of Life, Mindfulness, Spirituality, Life Satisfaction, and Cancer-Related Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Lötzke, Désirée; Wiedemann, Florian; Rodrigues Recchia, Daniela; Ostermann, Thomas; Sattler, Daniel; Ettl, Johannes; Kiechle, Marion; Büssing, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to test the effects of yoga on health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, cancer-related fatigue, mindfulness, and spirituality compared to conventional therapeutic exercises during (neo)adjuvant cytotoxic and endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer. In a randomized controlled trial 92 women with breast cancer undergoing oncological treatment were randomly enrolled for a yoga intervention (YI) (n = 45) or for a physical exercise intervention (PEI) (n = 47). Measurements were obtained before (t0) and after the intervention (t1) as well as 3 months after finishing intervention (t2) using standardized questionnaires. Life satisfaction and fatigue improved under PEI (p < 0.05) but not under YI (t0 to t2). Regarding quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) a direct effect (t0 to t1; p < 0.001) of YI was found on role and emotional functioning, while under PEI only emotional functioning improved. Significant improvements (p < 0.001) were observed at both t1 and t2 also for symptom scales in both groups: dyspnea, appetite loss, constipation, and diarrhea. There was no significant difference between therapies for none of the analyzed variables neither for t1 nor for t2. During chemotherapy, yoga was not seen as more helpful than conventional therapeutic exercises. This does not argue against its use in the recovery phase. PMID:27019663

  2. Terpinen-4-ol: A Novel and Promising Therapeutic Agent for Human Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shiran; Pleban, Shlomo; Kazanov, Diana; Tirosh, Peter; Arber, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Background Terpinen-4-ol, a naturally occurring monoterpene is the main bioactive component of tea-tree oil and has been shown to have many biological activities. Aim To study the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and its mechanism of action in prostate and GI malignancies, alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and biological agents. Methods Terpinen-4-ol was administrated alone or combined with standard chemotherapy (Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Gemcitabine, Tarceva) and biological agent (Cetuximab). It was also combined with humanized anti-CD24 mAbs (was developed by us). Killing effects were measured qualitatively by light microscopy and quantitatively using the MTT and FACS analysis, following treatment of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric and prostate cancer cells. Terpinen-4-ol effect on tumor development was evaluated in xenograft model. Results Terpinen-4-ol induces a significant growth inhibition of colorectal, pancreatic, prostate and gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner (10–90% in 0.005–0.1%). Terpinen-4-ol and various anti-cancer agents (0.2μM oxaliplatin and 0.5μM fluorouracil) demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect (83% and 91%, respectively) on cancer cell proliferation. In KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, which are resistant to anti-EGFR therapy, combining of terpinen-4-ol with cetuximab (1 μM) resulted in impressive efficacy of 80–90% growth inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of terpinen-4-ol potentiate anti-CD24 mAb (150μg/ml)-induced growth inhibition (90%). Considerable reduction in tumor volume was seen following terpinen-4-ol (0.2%) treatment alone and with cetuximab (10mg/kg) (40% and 63%, respectively) as compare to the control group. Conclusion Terpinen-4-ol significantly enhances the effect of several chemotherapeutic and biological agents. The possible molecular mechanism for its activity involves induction of cell-death rendering this compound as a potential anti-cancer drug alone and in

  3. Terpinen-4-ol: A Novel and Promising Therapeutic Agent for Human Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Shiran; Pleban, Shlomo; Kazanov, Diana; Tirosh, Peter; Arber, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Terpinen-4-ol, a naturally occurring monoterpene is the main bioactive component of tea-tree oil and has been shown to have many biological activities. To study the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and its mechanism of action in prostate and GI malignancies, alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and biological agents. Terpinen-4-ol was administrated alone or combined with standard chemotherapy (Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Gemcitabine, Tarceva) and biological agent (Cetuximab). It was also combined with humanized anti-CD24 mAbs (was developed by us). Killing effects were measured qualitatively by light microscopy and quantitatively using the MTT and FACS analysis, following treatment of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric and prostate cancer cells. Terpinen-4-ol effect on tumor development was evaluated in xenograft model. Terpinen-4-ol induces a significant growth inhibition of colorectal, pancreatic, prostate and gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner (10-90% in 0.005-0.1%). Terpinen-4-ol and various anti-cancer agents (0.2μM oxaliplatin and 0.5μM fluorouracil) demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect (83% and 91%, respectively) on cancer cell proliferation. In KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, which are resistant to anti-EGFR therapy, combining of terpinen-4-ol with cetuximab (1 μM) resulted in impressive efficacy of 80-90% growth inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of terpinen-4-ol potentiate anti-CD24 mAb (150μg/ml)-induced growth inhibition (90%). Considerable reduction in tumor volume was seen following terpinen-4-ol (0.2%) treatment alone and with cetuximab (10mg/kg) (40% and 63%, respectively) as compare to the control group. Terpinen-4-ol significantly enhances the effect of several chemotherapeutic and biological agents. The possible molecular mechanism for its activity involves induction of cell-death rendering this compound as a potential anti-cancer drug alone and in combination in the treatment of numerous malignancies

  4. Therapeutic field trial of a macro- and microfilaricidal agent in canine filariasis*

    PubMed Central

    Friedheim, E. A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The discovery in 1973 of a synergistic effect of the arsenical compound F 151, a macrofilaricide, and the benzimidazole compound HOE 33258, a microfilaricide, led to the preparation of the reaction product of F 151 and HOE 33258 (in the proportion 1 mol to 2 mol, respectively), which was designated by the letter E. This compound E proved to be an effective macro- and microfilaricidal agent when administered subcutaneously in a single well-tolerated dose to dogs that were naturally infected with Dirofilaria immitis. PMID:4549202

  5. Hydrogen peroxide-activatable antioxidant prodrug as a targeted therapeutic agent for ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwon; Park, Seunggyu; Bae, Soochan; Jeong, Dahee; Park, Minhyung; Kang, Changsun; Yoo, Wooyoung; Samad, Mohammed A.; Ke, Qingen; Khang, Gilson; Kang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) causes oxidative stress and is the main culprit in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Suppression of oxidative stress is therefore critical in the treatment of I/R injury. Here, we report H2O2-activatable antioxidant prodrug (BRAP) that is capable of specifically targeting the site of oxidative stress and exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. BRAP with a self-immolative boronic ester protecting group was designed to scavenge H2O2 and release HBA (p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol) with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. BRAP exerted potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and H2O2-stimulated cells by suppressing the generation of ROS and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mouse models of hepatic I/R and cardiac I/R, BRAP exerted potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities due to the synergistic effects of H2O2-scavenging boronic esters and therapeutic HBA. In addition, administration of high doses of BRAP daily for 7 days showed no renal or hepatic function abnormalities. Therefore BRAP has tremendous therapeutic potential as H2O2-activatable antioxidant prodrug for the treatment of I/R injuries. PMID:26563741

  6. Novel Browning Agents, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Potentials of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Michael; Yadav, Hariom; Thakali, Keshari M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonshivering thermogenesis is the process of biological heat production in mammals and is primarily mediated by brown adipose tissue (BAT). Through ubiquitous expression of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) on the mitochondrial inner membrane, BAT displays uncoupling of fuel combustion and ATP production in order to dissipate energy as heat. Because of its crucial role in regulating energy homeostasis, ongoing exploration of BAT has emphasized its therapeutic potential in addressing the global epidemics of obesity and diabetes. The recent appreciation that adult humans possess functional BAT strengthens this prospect. Furthermore, it has been identified that there are both classical brown adipocytes residing in dedicated BAT depots and “beige” adipocytes residing in white adipose tissue depots that can acquire BAT-like characteristics in response to environmental cues. This review aims to provide a brief overview of BAT research and summarize recent findings concerning the physiological, cellular, and developmental characteristics of brown adipocytes. In addition, some key genetic, molecular, and pharmacologic targets of BAT/Beige cells that have been reported to have therapeutic potential to combat obesity will be discussed. PMID:28105413

  7. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPases as Novel Candidates for Therapeutic Agent Development

    PubMed Central

    Strehler, Emanuel E.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases (PMCAs) are highly regulated transporters responsible for Ca2+ extrusion from all eukaryotic cells. Different PMCA isoforms are implicated in various tasks of Ca2+ regulation including bulk Ca2+ transport and localized Ca2+ signaling in specific membrane microdomains. Accumulating evidence shows that loss, mutation or inappropriate expression of different PMCAs is associated with pathologies ranging from hypertension, low bone density and male infertility to hearing loss and cerebellar ataxia. Compared to Ca2+ influx channels, PMCAs have lagged far behind as targets for drug development, mainly due to the lack of detailed understanding of their structure and specific function. This is rapidly changing thanks to integrated efforts combining biochemical, structural, cellular and physiological studies suggesting that selective modulation of PMCA isoforms may be of therapeutic value in the management of different and complex diseases. Both structurally informed rational design and high-throughput small molecule library screenings are promising strategies that are expected to lead to specific and isoform-selective modulators of PMCA function. This short review will provide an overview of the diverse roles played by PMCA isoforms in different cells and tissues and their emerging involvement in pathophysiological processes, summarize recent progress in obtaining structural information on the PMCAs, and discuss current and future strategies to develop specific PMCA inhibitors and activators for potential therapeutic applications. PMID:23958189

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  9. Lactic Acid as a New Therapeutic Peeling Agent in the Treatment of Lifa Disease (Frictional Dermal Melanosis)

    PubMed Central

    Sharquie, Khalifa E; Al-Dhalimi, Muhsin A; Noaimi, Adil A; Al-Sultany, Hussein A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lifa disease (frictional dermal melanosis) is a common dermatological problem. Full strength lactic acid has been proved to be effective and safe peeling agent in the treatment of melasma. Objective: To assess the effectiveness and the safety of lactic acid chemical peeling in the treatment of lifa disease. Materials and Methods: This open label therapeutic trial was conducted in Department of Dermatology in Najaf and Baghdad Teaching Hospitals, from March 2007-October 2008. Full strength lactic acid (92%, pH 3.5) was used as a peeling agent. The treatment sessions were done every 2 weeks until the desired response was achieved (but not more than 6 sessions). The response to therapy was evaluated by objective and subjective methods. All patients were followed monthly for 3 months after the last treatment session. Results: 52 patients with typical clinical features of lifa disease were included. All patients were slim with prominent bones and low body mass index, and gave history of using the lifa (washing agent) during bathing. The number of sessions ranged from 2-6 sessions. The pigmentation was improved in all patients as revealed by objective and subjective methods, and this response was statistically highly significant. No significant side effects were recorded in all treated patients. The improvement has been sustained without any obvious relapse throughout the follow-up period. Conclusion: Lactic acid peel is a new, non-costly mode of therapy in treating dermal melanosis in patients with lifa disease. PMID:23248362

  10. Bypassing the blood-brain barrier: delivery of therapeutic agents by macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Kwon, Young Jik; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood brain tumor barrier (BBTB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) to cross the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer agents such as nanoparticles to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: The infiltration of Mo/Ma into brain tumor spheroids in vitro was determined using fluorescent stained Mo/Ma. Tumors were also established in the brains of inbred rats and ALA-PDT was given 18 days following tumor induction. The degredation of the BBTB and quantification of the number of infiltrating Mo/Ma was examined on histological sections from removed brains. Results & Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in locally opening the BBTB and inducing macrophage migration into the irradiated portions of brain tumors.

  11. Nonlinear behaviors of contrast agents relevant to diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junru; Pepe, Jason; Dewitt, William

    2003-04-01

    The nonlinear properties of an encapsulated microbubble of a contrast agent were studied theoretically and experimentally. A modified nonlinear differential equation (Herring equation) was used to describe the radial oscillation of the microbubble and solved numerically. It was found that the nonlinear resonance frequency, at which the peak radial oscillation amplitude occurs, was a decreasing function of the acoustic amplitude of a driving ultrasonic pulse. Optical images of the contrast agent microbubbles under various ultrasonic exposure conditions: 1. sham exposure; 2. 2-MHz spatial peak acoustic pressure = 200 kPa, I(SATA) = 260 mW/cm(2), duty cycle = 7.5%, repetition period = 0.0266 ms; 3. 0.5-MHz spatial peak acoustic pressure = 200 kPa, I(SATA) = 130 mW/cm(2), duty cycle = 7.5%, repetition period = 0.1067 ms; have also shown that the lower-frequency ultrasound (US) excitation (0.5 MHz) is more effective in disruption of the microbubbles due to acoustic inertial cavitation than the higher frequency US (2 MHz).

  12. The Potential Therapeutic Agent Mepacrine Protects Caco-2 Cells against Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin Action.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Hendricks, Matthew R; McClane, Bruce A

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) causes the diarrhea associated with a common bacterial food poisoning and many antibiotic-associated diarrhea cases. The severity of some CPE-mediated disease cases warrants the development of potential therapeutics. A previous study showed that the presence of mepacrine inhibited CPE-induced electrophysiology effects in artificial lipid bilayers lacking CPE receptors. However, that study did not assess whether mepacrine inactivates CPE or, instead, inhibits a step in CPE action. Furthermore, CPE action in host cells is complex, involving the toxin binding to receptors, receptor-bound CPE oligomerizing into a prepore on the membrane surface, and β-hairpins in the CPE prepore inserting into the membrane to form a pore that induces cell death. Therefore, the current study evaluated the ability of mepacrine to protect cells from CPE. This drug was found to reduce CPE-induced cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. This protection did not involve mepacrine inactivation of CPE, indicating that mepacrine affects one or more steps in CPE action. Western blotting then demonstrated that mepacrine decreases CPE pore levels in Caco-2 cells. This mepacrine-induced reduction in CPE pore levels did not involve CPE binding inhibition but rather an increase in CPE monomer dissociation due to mepacrine interactions with Caco-2 membranes. In addition, mepacrine was also shown to inhibit CPE pores when already present in Caco-2 cells. These in vitro studies, which identified two mepacrine-sensitive steps in CPE-induced cytotoxicity, add support to further testing of the therapeutic potential of mepacrine against CPE-mediated disease. IMPORTANCEClostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) causes the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of a common bacterial food poisoning and several nonfoodborne human GI diseases. A previous study showed that, via an undetermined mechanism, the presence of mepacrine blocks CPE-induced electrophysiologic activity in artificial

  13. Adjuvant and salvage therapy with leflunomide for recalcitrant cytomegalovirus infections in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: A case series.

    PubMed

    El Chaer, Firas; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Shah, Dimpy; Oliver, Nora; Wang, Emily; Jan, Anna; Doan, Vi; Tverdek, Frank; Tayar, Jean; Ariza-Heredia, Ella; Chemaly, Roy F

    2016-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is a clinically significant complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Alternative therapy for multidrug-resistant CMV is limited and often fails. Leflunomide has been used to treat resistant CMV infections, however, data on efficacy, safety, and guidance for therapeutic drug level monitoring are lacking. In this report, we describe 3 HCT recipients with multi-drug resistant CMV infections who received leflunomide as adjuvant and salvage therapy. The therapeutic effect of leflunomide as an anti-CMV agent based on virologic responses and therapeutic drug monitoring were evaluated.

  14. Developments in the rat adjuvant arthritis model and its use in therapeutic evaluation of novel non-invasive treatment by SOD in Transfersomes.

    PubMed

    Simões, S I; Delgado, T C; Lopes, R M; Jesus, S; Ferreira, A A; Morais, J A; Cruz, M E M; Corvo, M L; Martins, M B F

    2005-03-21

    The aim of this study was firstly to refine a rat model of arthritis, the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model, by studying the time course of the disease, introducing new evaluation methods such as haematological and biochemical parameters in order to identify the main stages of the disease. An optimisation of treatment schedule and evaluation criteria was developed. This refinement provided novel non-invasive anti-inflammatory treatment of the AA with SOD by using mixed lipid vesicles specially developed for transdermal delivery, Transfersomes (Tfs), this being the second major aim. The time course of AA includes a first stage: 1 day after the disease induction, the induced paw volume more than doubled and the paw circumference increased by approx. 50%. Two weeks later, another stage occurred where the disease shifted from the local arthritis form towards polyarthritis: an additional increase of volume and circumference of the induced and non-induced paws, occurred. The animals also started to loose weight around day 14 after the disease induction. Radiographic observable lesions increased correspondingly. Treatment of animals, started at day 1 after induction, by epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs showed that 1 mg SOD/kg body weight is more efficient than 0.66 mg SOD /kg body weight. As a positive control, SOD liposomes intravenously injected were used for comparison and confirmed the biological efficiency of epicutaneously applied SOD in Tfs. SOD solution and empty Tfs epicutaneously applied exerted no effect. In addition, epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs used prophylactically was able to suppress the induced rat paw oedema. Radiographic images showed less joint lesions in SOD-Tfs treated animals in comparison with control and placebo treated rats. It was shown for the first time that SOD incorporated into Tfs and applied onto a skin area not necessarily close to the inflamed tissue is able to promote non-invasive treatment of induced arthritis.

  15. Therapeutic effect of umbelliferon-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(2(I)→1(II))-α-D-glucopyranoside on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Anwar, Firoz; Verma, Amita; Mujeeb, Mohd

    2015-06-01

    The aim and objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the antiarthritic and antioxidant effect of umbelliferon-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(2I→1II)-α-D-glucopyranoside (UFD) in chemically induced arthritic rats. The different doses of the UFD were tested against the turpentine oil (TO), formaldehyde induced acute arthritis and complete fruend's adjuvant (CFA) induced chronic arthritis in Wistar rats. Arthritic assessment and body weight was measured at regular interval till 28 days. On day 28, all the groups animals were anaesthetized, blood were collected from the puncturing the ratro orbital and estimated the hematological parameters. The animals were sacrificed; synovial tissue was extracted and estimated the malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The different doses of the UFD showed the protective effect against turpentine oil, formaldehyde induced acute arthritis and CFA induced chronic arthritis at dose dependent manner. Acute model of arthritis such as TOand formaldehyde induced inflammation due to releasing of the inflammatory mediators; significantly inhibited by the UFD at dose dependent manner. CFA induced arthritic rats treated with the different doses of the UFD showed the inhibitory effect on the delayed increase in joint diameter as seen in arthritic control group rats. UFD significantly improved the arthritic index, body weight and confirmed the antiarthritic effect. UFD showed the effect on the hematological parameter such as improved the level of the RBC, Hb and decline the level of the EBC, ESR and confirmed the immune suppressive effect. UFD significantly improved the level of the endogenous antioxidant and confirmed the antioxidant effect. This present investigation suggests that the UFD has prominent antiarthritic impact which can be endorsed to its antiarthritic and antioxidant effects.

  16. New potential antimalarial agents: therapeutic-index evaluation of pyrroloquinazolinediamine and its prodrugs in a rat model of severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lisa H; Li, Qigui; Lin, Ai J; Smith, Kirsten; Zhang, Jing; Skillman, Donald S

    2006-05-01

    Tetra-acetamide pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD-A4) and bis-ethylcarbamyl pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD-BE) are new derivatives of pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD) and are being investigated as potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malaria. Comparative studies to assess the therapeutic indices of PQD-A4, PQD-BE, and PQD were conducted in Plasmodium berghei-infected rats following daily intragastric dosing for three consecutive days. Artesunate (AS), a standard drug for treatment of severe malaria, was used as a comparator. The minimum doses required to clear malaria parasitemia were 156 micromol/kg of body weight for AS and 2.4 micromol/kg for PQD, PQD-4A, and PQD-BE. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of AS was 625 micromol/kg, and its therapeutic index was calculated to be 4. The MTDs of PQD-A4, PQD-BE, and PQD were found to be 190, 77, and 24 micromol/kg, respectively, yielding therapeutic indices of 80, 32, and 10, respectively. Although PQD-A4 and PQD-BE are only half as potent as PQD based on their curative effects, the two new derivatives, PQD-4A and PQD-BE, are 8.0-fold and 3.2-fold safer, respectively, than their parent compound when they are dosed for three consecutive days. Oral PQD-A4 and PQD-BE are 44 to 70 times more potent on an mg basis than intravenous AS. As assessed from the therapeutic index over 3 days, PQD-A4, PQD-BE, and PQD administered orally are 20.0, 8.0, and 2.5 times safer than AS given intravenously. The results indicate that PQD-4A is a promising candidate for antimalarial treatment.

  17. Adjuvants for Animal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Burakova, Yulia; Madera, Rachel; McVey, Scott; Schlup, John R; Shi, Jishu

    2017-06-15

    Vaccines are essential tools for the prevention and control of infectious diseases in animals. One of the most important steps in vaccine development is the selection of a suitable adjuvant. The focus of this review is the adjuvants used in vaccines for animals. We will discuss current commercial adjuvants and experimental formulations with attention to mineral salts, emulsions, bacterial-derived components, saponins, and several other immunoactive compounds. In addition, we will also examine the mechanisms of action for different adjuvants, examples of adjuvant combinations in one vaccine formulation, and challenges in the research and development of veterinary vaccine adjuvants.

  18. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia.

  19. Recent advances in metamaterial split-ring-resonator circuits as biosensors and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    RoyChoudhury, Sohini; Rawat, Vaishali; Jalal, Ahmed Hasnain; Kale, S N; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2016-12-15

    Potential applications of thin film metamaterials are diverse and their realization to offer miniaturized waveguides, antennas and shielding patterns are on anvil. These artificially engineered structures can produce astonishing electromagnetic responses because of their constituents being engineered at much smaller dimensions than the wavelength of the incident electromagnetic wave, hence behaving as artificial materials. Such micro-nano dimensions of thin film metamaterial structures can be customized for various applications due to their exclusive responses to not only electromagnetic, but also to acoustic and thermal waves that surpass the natural materials' properties. In this paper, the recent major advancements in the emerging fields of diagnostics (sensors) and therapeutics involving thin film metamaterials have been reviewed and underlined; discussing their edge over conventional counterpart techniques; concentrating on their design considerations and feasible ways of achieving them. Challenges faced in sensitivity, precision, accuracy and factors that interfere with the degree of performance of the sensors are also dealt with, herein.

  20. Immunomodulators as Therapeutic Agents in Mitigating the Progression of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grimmig, Bethany; Morganti, Josh; Nash, Kevin; Bickford, Paula C

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that primarily afflicts the elderly. It is characterized by motor dysfunction due to extensive neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. There are multiple biological processes that are negatively impacted during the pathogenesis of PD, and are implicated in the cell death in this region. Neuroinflammation is evidently involved in PD pathology and mitigating the inflammatory cascade has been a therapeutic strategy. Age is the number one risk factor for PD and thus needs to be considered in the context of disease pathology. Here, we discuss the role of neuroinflammation within the context of aging as it applies to the development of PD, and the potential for two representative compounds, fractalkine and astaxanthin, to attenuate the pathophysiology that modulates neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27669315

  1. Using adjuvants and environmental factors to modulate the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Walkenhorst, William F

    2016-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant and multi-drug resistant bacterial infections has serious implications for the future of health care. The difficulty in finding both new microbial targets and new drugs against existing targets adds to the concern. The use of combination and adjuvant therapies are potential strategies to counter this threat. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising class of antibiotics (ABs), particularly for topical and surface applications. Efforts have been directed toward a number of strategies, including the use of conventional ABs combined with AMPs, and the use of potentiating agents to increase the performance of AMPs. This review focuses on combination strategies such as adjuvants and the manipulation of environmental variables to improve the efficacy of AMPs as potential therapeutic agents. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  2. Heterocyclic N-Oxides – An Emerging Class of Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mfuh, Adelphe M.; Larionov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic N-oxides have emerged as potent compounds with anticancer, antibacterial, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, anti-HIV, anti-inflammatory, herbicidal, neuroprotective, and procognitive activities. The N-oxide motif has been successfully employed in a number of recent drug development projects. This review surveys the emergence of this scaffold in the mainstream medicinal chemistry with a focus on the discovery of the heterocyclic N-oxide drugs, N-oxide-specific mechanisms of action, drug-receptor interactions and synthetic avenues to these compounds. As the first review on this subject that covers the developments since 1950s to date, it is expected that it will inspire wider implementation of the heterocyclic N-oxide motif in the rational design of new medicinal agents. PMID:26087764

  3. Injectable and topical neurotoxins in dermatology: Basic science, anatomy, and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cerrene N; Matarasso, Seth L; Ozog, David M

    2017-06-01

    Botulinum toxin is a potentially deadly anaerobic bacterial toxin that acts by inhibiting release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, thereby inhibiting contraction of the exposed striated muscle. There are currently 4 botulinum toxin preparations approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA): onabotulinumtoxin, abobotulinumtoxin, incobotulinumtoxin and rimabotulinumtoxin. While significant overlap exists, each product has unique properties and specifications, including dosing, diffusion, and storage. Extensive physician knowledge of facial anatomy, coupled with key differences of the various neurotoxin types, is essential for safe and successful treatments. The first article in this continuing medical education series reviews key characteristics of each neurotoxin, including new and upcoming agents, and provides an anatomic overview of the most commonly injected cosmetic sites. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Apelin, Elabela/Toddler, and biased agonists as novel therapeutic agents in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiran; Maguire, Janet J.; Davenport, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Apelin and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) have emerged as a key signalling pathway in the cardiovascular system. The peptide is a potent inotropic agent and vasodilator. Remarkably, a peptide, Elabela/Toddler, that has little sequence similarity to apelin, has been proposed as a second endogenous apelin receptor ligand and is encoded by a gene from a region of the genome previously classified as ‘non-coding’. Apelin is downregulated in pulmonary arterial hypertension and heart failure. To replace the missing endogenous peptide, ‘biased’ apelin agonists have been designed that preferentially activate G protein pathways, resulting in reduced β-arrestin recruitment and receptor internalisation, with the additional benefit of attenuating detrimental β-arrestin signalling. Proof-of-concept studies support the clinical potential for apelin receptor biased agonists. PMID:26143239

  5. A Novel Therapeutic Agent for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: SGLT2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chang Hee; Jang, Jung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder, and a major public health problem that is rapidly increasing in prevalence. Although a wide range of pharmacotherapies for glycemic control is now available, management of T2DM remains complex and challenging. The kidneys contribute immensely to glucose homeostasis by reabsorbing glucose from the glomerular filtrate. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, a new class of antidiabetic agents that inhibit glucose absorption from the kidney independent of insulin, offer a unique opportunity to improve the outcomes of patients with T2DM. In this review, we provide an overview of two globally-approved SGLT2 inhibitors, dapagliflozin and canagliflozin, and discuss their effects and safety. This information will help clinicians to decide whether these drugs will benefit their patients. PMID:25215272

  6. A Novel Synthesized Sulfonamido-Based Gallate—JEZ-C as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Lin, Cuiwu; Liu, Buming; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) and its derivatives are anti-inflammatory agents reported to have an effect on osteoarthritis (OA). However, GA has much weaker anti-oxidant effects and inferior bioactivity compared with its derivatives. We modified GA with the introduction of sulfonamide to synthesize a novel compound named JEZ-C and analyzed its anti-arthritis and chondro-protective effects. Comparison of JEZ-C with its sources i.e. GA and Sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) was also performed. Results showed that JEZ-C could effectively inhibit the IL-1-mediated induction of MMP-1 and MMP-13 and could induce the expression of TIMP-1, which demonstrated its ability to reduce the progression of OA. JEZ-C can also exert chondro-protective effects by promoting cell proliferation and maintaining the phenotype of articular chondrocytes, as evidenced by improved cell growth, enhanced synthesis of cartilage specific markers such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9. Meanwhile, expression of the collagen I gene was effectively downregulated, revealing the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by JEZ-C. Hypertrophy that may lead to chondrocyte ossification was also undetectable in JEZ-C groups. The recommended dose of JEZ-C ranges from 6.25×10-7 μg/ml to 6.25×10-5 μg/ml, among which the most profound response was observed with 6.25×10-6 μg/ml. In contrast, its source products of GA and SMZ have a weak effect not only in the inhibition of OA but also in the bioactivity of chondrocytes, which indicated the significance of this modification. This study revealed JEZ-C as a promising novel agent in the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions. PMID:26107568

  7. Reflux-free cannula for convection-enhanced high-speed delivery of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Michal T.; Saito, Ryuta; Noble, Charles; Tamas, Matyas; Bringas, John; Park, John W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2013-01-01

    Object Clinical application of the convection-enhanced delivery (CED) technique is currently limited by low infusion speed and reflux of the delivered agent. The authors developed and evaluated a new step-design cannula to overcome present limitations and to introduce a rapid, reflux-free CED method for future clinical trials. Methods The CED of 0.4% trypan blue dye was performed in agarose gel to test cannula needles for distribution and reflux. Infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 50 μl/minute were used. Agarose gel findings were translated into a study in rats and then in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) by using trypan blue and liposomes to confirm the efficacy of the reflux-free step-design cannula in vivo. Results of agarose gel studies showed reflux-free infusion with high flow rates using the step-design cannula. Data from the study in rats confirmed the agarose gel findings and also revealed increasing tissue damage at a flow rate above 5-μl/minute. Robust reflux-free delivery and distribution of liposomes was achieved using the step-design cannula in brains in both rats and nonhuman primates. Conclusions The authors developed a new step-design cannula for CED that effectively prevents reflux in vivo and maximizes the distribution of agents delivered in the brain. Data in the present study show reflux-free infusion with a constant volume of distribution in the rat brain over a broad range of flow rates. Reflux-free delivery of liposomes into nonhuman primate brain was also established using the cannula. This step-design cannula may allow reflux-free distribution and shorten the duration of infusion in future clinical applications of CED in humans. PMID:16304999

  8. STAT3 inhibitor, cucurbitacin I, is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Toru; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Matsumine, Akihiko; Matsubara, Takao; Nakamura, Tomoki; Iino, Takahiro; Asanuma, Yumiko; Goto, Mikinobu; Okuno, Kazuma; Kakimoto, Takuya; Yada, Yuki; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The development of clinical agents remains a costly and time-consuming process. Although identification of new uses of existing drugs has been recognized as a more efficient approach for drug discovery than development of novel drugs, little screening of drugs that might be used for a rare malignant tumor such as osteosarcoma (OS) has been performed. In this study, we attempted to identify new molecular targeted agents for OS by employing Screening Committee of Anticancer Drugs (SCADS) kits. To screen compounds for OS treatment, their effect on cell viability of the OS cell lines 143B, MG63, HOS, SAOS-2, and HUO9 were evaluated. Candidate drugs were narrowed down based on a global anti-proliferative effect against these five OS cell lines. After excluding cytotoxic compounds and compounds unsuitable for in vivo administration, cucurbitacin I was extracted. Cucurbitacin I has been found to have cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties against several tumors through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Cucurbitacin I dose- and time-dependently inhibited the proliferation of all five OS cell lines. Following cucurbitacin I treatment, STAT3 was inactivated and analysis of Mcl-1, cleaved PARP and caspase-3 indicated apoptosis induction. Expression of cell cycle regulator proteins, such as phospho-cyclin D1, c-Myc and survivin, were suppressed. Finally, cucurbitacin I potently inhibited the tumor growth of human OS 143B cells in nude mice. Our in vitro and in vivo results suggest that STAT3 inhibition by cucurbitacin I will be an effective and new approach for the treatment of OS. PMID:27840900

  9. Reflux-free cannula for convection-enhanced high-speed delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Krauze, Michal T; Saito, Ryuta; Noble, Charles; Tamas, Matyas; Bringas, John; Park, John W; Berger, Mitchel S; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2005-11-01

    Clinical application of the convection-enhanced delivery (CED) technique is currently limited by low infusion speed and reflux of the delivered agent. The authors developed and evaluated a new step-design cannula to overcome present limitations and to introduce a rapid, reflux-free CED method for future clinical trials. The CED of 0.4% trypan blue dye was performed in agarose gel to test cannula needles for distribution and reflux. Infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 50 microl/minute were used. Agarose gel findings were translated into a study in rats and then in cynomolgus monkeys (Macacafascicularis) by using trypan blue and liposomes to confirm the efficacy of the reflux-free step-design cannula in vivo. Results of agarose gel studies showed reflux-free infusion with high flow rates using the step-design cannula. Data from the study in rats confirmed the agarose gel findings and also revealed increasing tissue damage at a flow rate above 5-microl/minute. Robust reflux-free delivery and distribution of liposomes was achieved using the step-design cannula in brains in both rats and nonhuman primates. The authors developed a new step-design cannula for CED that effectively prevents reflux in vivo and maximizes the distribution of agents delivered in the brain. Data in the present study show reflux-free infusion with a constant volume of distribution in the rat brain over a broad range of flow rates. Reflux-free delivery of liposomes into nonhuman primate brain was also established using the cannula. This step-design cannula may allow reflux-free distribution and shorten the duration of infusion in future clinical applications of CED in humans.

  10. Adjuvant therapy after surgical stone management.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Michael N; Monga, Manoj; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the most widely researched adjuvant medical therapies for the surgical management of urolithiasis. Articles were identified and reviewed from PubMed and Medline databases with MeSH headings focusing on the various surgical treatments of urolithiasis and adjuvant therapy. Additional articles were retrieved from references and conference proceedings. Surgical treatments reviewed included shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Adjuvant therapy was considered medical or complementary therapy as an adjunct to these surgical interventions. Adjuvant therapy for the surgical management of urolithiasis has been documented to increase stone-free rates, reduce stone remission rates, prevent renal damage, and decrease postoperative morbidity. A variety of agents have been studied, ranging from antioxidants to alpha-blockers and to alkalinizing agents. Additionally, there is increasing interest in complementary adjuvant therapy (ie, acupuncture). Adjuvant therapy is a fertile area for research in the surgical management of urolithiasis. The optimal agents have yet to be determined and therefore further investigation is warranted and necessary.

  11. Cynaropicrin: A Comprehensive Research Review and Therapeutic Potential As an Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Agent

    PubMed Central

    Elsebai, Mahmoud F.; Mocan, Andrei; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2016-01-01

    The different pharmacologic properties of plants-containing cynaropicrin, especially artichokes, have been known for many centuries. More recently, cynaropicrin exhibited a potential activity against all genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Cynaropicrin has also shown a wide range of other pharmacologic properties such as anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-trypanosomal, anti-malarial, antifeedant, antispasmodic, anti-photoaging, and anti-tumor action, as well as activation of bitter sensory receptors, and anti-inflammatory properties (e.g., associated with the suppression of the key pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway). These pharmacological effects are very supportive factors to its outstanding activity against HCV. Structurally, cynaropicrin might be considered as a potential drug candidate, since it has no violations for the rule of five and its water-solubility could allow formulation as therapeutic injections. Moreover, cynaropicrin is a small molecule that can be easily synthesized and as the major constituent of the edible plant artichoke, which has a history of safe dietary use. In summary, cynaropicrin is a promising bioactive natural product that, with minor hit-to-lead optimization, might be developed as a drug for HCV. PMID:28008316

  12. Discovery of specific flavodoxin inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Cremades, Nunilo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Neira, José L; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Hermoso, Juan; Jiménez, Pilar; Lanas, Angel; Hoffman, Paul S; Sancho, Javier

    2009-11-20

    Helicobacter pylori establishes life-long infections in the gastric mucosa of over 1 billion people worldwide. In many cases, without specific antimicrobial intervention, H. pylori infected individuals will develop type B gastritis, chronic peptic ulcers and, more rarely, gastric neoplasias. Conventional antimicrobial therapy has been complicated by dramatic increases in resistance to macrolides, metronidazole and fluoroquinolones. Here, we report the development of novel therapeutics that specifically target the unique flavodoxin component of an essential metabolic pathway of H. pylori. With the use of high-throughput screening methodology, we have tested 10,000 chemicals and have identified 29 compounds that bind flavodoxin, four of which interrupted in vitro electron transfer to flavodoxin physiological partners. Three of these compounds are bactericidal and promisingly selective for H. pylori. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of two of them are 10 times lower than their minimal cytotoxic concentrations for HeLa cells. Importantly, neither of the four inhibitors is toxic for mice after administration of 1-10 mg kg(-1) doses twice a day for 5 days. Enzymatic, thermodynamic and structural characterization of the inhibitor-flavodoxin complexes suggests these compounds could act by modifying the redox potentials of flavodoxin. These newly discovered inhibitors represent promising selective leads against the different diseases associated to H. pylori infection.

  13. NADPH oxidase enzymes in skin fibrosis: molecular targets and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Olubukola; Mamalis, Andrew; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-05-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review, we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms by which Nox enzymes influence specific fibrotic skin disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists.

  14. microRNAs as neuroregulators, biomarkers and therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Basak, Indranil; Patil, Ketan S; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2016-02-01

    The last decade has experienced the emergence of microRNAs as a key molecular tool for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Although the focus has mostly been on cancer, neurodegenerative diseases present an exciting, yet less explored, platform for microRNA research. Several studies have highlighted the significance of microRNAs in neurogenesis and neurodegeneration, and pre-clinical studies have shown the potential of microRNAs as biomarkers. Despite this, no bona fide microRNAs have been identified as true diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for neurodegenerative disease. This is mainly due to the lack of precisely defined patient cohorts and the variability within and between individual cohorts. However, the discovery that microRNAs exist as stable molecules at detectable levels in body fluids has opened up new avenues for microRNAs as potential biomarker candidates. Furthermore, technological developments in microRNA biology have contributed to the possible design of microRNA-mediated disease intervention strategies. The combination of these advancements, with the availability of well-defined longitudinal patient cohort, promises to not only assist in developing invaluable diagnostic tools for clinicians, but also to increase our overall understanding of the underlying heterogeneity of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the existing knowledge of microRNAs in neurodegeneration and provide a perspective of the applicability of microRNAs as a basis for future therapeutic intervention strategies.

  15. Nanoparticles as potential clinical therapeutic agents in Alzheimer's disease: focus on selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Muhamad, Salina; Pecze, Laszlo

    2017-07-01

    In etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), involvement of amyloid β (Aβ) plaque accumulation and oxidative stress in the brain have important roles. Several nanoparticles such as titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, silver and zinc oxide have been experimentally using for treatment of neurological disease. In the last decade, there has been a great interest on combination of antioxidant bioactive compounds such as selenium (Se) and flavonoids with the oxidant nanoparticles in AD. We evaluated the most current data available on the physiological effects of oxidant and antioxidant nanoparticles. Areas covered: Oxidative nanoparticles decreased the activities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the brain of rats and mice. However, Se-rich nanoparticles in small size (5-15 nm) depleted Aβ formation through decreasing ROS production. Reports on low levels of Se in blood and tissue samples and the low activities of GSH-Px, catalase and SOD enzymes in AD patients and animal models support the proposed crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AD. Expert commentary: In conclusion, present literature suggests that Se-rich nanoparticles appeared to be a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of AD.

  16. NADPH Oxidase Enzymes in Skin Fibrosis: Molecular Targets and Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft versus host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms that Nox enzymes influence specific skin fibrotic disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists. PMID:24155025

  17. Preparation and standardization of a herbal agent for the therapeutic management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Emeje, Martins; Izuka, Amaka; Isimi, Christiana; Ofoefule, Sabinus; Kunle, Olobayo

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to develop a suitable single tablet dosage form containing a mixture of hot water stem back extracts of Anogeissus leiocarpus and Prosopis africana (AA1), suitable for use in the therapeutic management of asthma. The compaction characteristics of the oven-dried hot water extract (HWE) were studied using the Heckel equation. The mechanical properties as well as disintegration and dissolution profile of the compacts were also assessed. The results showed that AA1 exhibited high densification due to dye filling while the subsequent rearrangement of the granules did not contribute, significantly, to their densification. The granules had enhanced plasticity as shown by the low yield point, Py. The tablets produced from the extract had good mechanical properties, with hardness increasing with compression pressure while the friability decreased. Of the four disintegrants tested, tablets containing Explotab had the shortest disintegration time of 11 min while tablets containing Prosolv had the longest disintegration time of 40 min. The order of disintegrant property is Explotab > Cellactose > Emcocel > Maize starch > Prosolv. Dissolution results (t(90%)) show that tablets containing Explotab released 100% of the drug in 20 min proving to be the most suitable in acute asthma attack. The order of dissolution is Explotab > Cellactose > Maize starch > Prosolv > Emcocel. It is concluded that incorporation of Explotab (10%w/w) as a disintegrant in AA1 preparation produced tablets of suitable compressional properties and ensured adequate drug release for the management of acute asthma.

  18. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  19. Glutathione-garlic sulfur conjugates: slow hydrogen sulfide releasing agents for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Ashif Iqbal; Papajani, Vilma Toska; Paci, Maurizio; Melino, Sonia

    2015-01-20

    Natural organosulfur compounds (OSCs) from Allium sativum L. display antioxidant and chemo-sensitization properties, including the in vitro inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through the induction of apoptosis. Garlic water- and oil-soluble allyl sulfur compounds show distinct properties and the capability to inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we optimized a new protocol for the extraction of water-soluble compounds from garlic at low temperatures and the production of glutathionyl-OSC conjugates during the extraction. Spontaneously, Cys/GSH-mixed-disulfide conjugates are produced by in vivo metabolism of OSCs and represent active molecules able to affect cellular metabolism. Water-soluble extracts, with (GSGaWS) or without (GaWS) glutathione conjugates, were here produced and tested for their ability to release hydrogen sulfide (H2S), also in the presence of reductants and of thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (TST) enzyme. Thus, the TST catalysis of the H2S-release from garlic OSCs and their conjugates has been investigated by molecular in vitro experiments. The antiproliferative properties of these extracts on the human T-cell lymphoma cell line, HuT 78, were observed and related to histone hyperacetylation and downregulation of GAPDH expression. Altogether, the results presented here pave the way for the production of a GSGaWS as new, slowly-releasing hydrogen sulfide extract for potential therapeutic applications.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutics Agents: Quality and Environmental Regulatory Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sabata, Roger; Verges, Josep; Zugaza, José L.; Ruiz, Adolfina; Clares, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the main stem cells that have been used for advanced therapies and regenerative medicine. To carry out the translational clinical application of MSCs, their manufacturing and administration in human must be controlled; therefore they should be considered as medicine: stem cell-based medicinal products (SCMPs). The development of MSCs as SCMPs represents complicated therapeutics due to their extreme complex nature and rigorous regulatory oversights. The manufacturing process of MSCs needs to be addressed in clean environments in compliance with requirements of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Facilities should maintain these GMP conditions according to international and national medicinal regulatory frameworks that introduce a number of specifications in order to produce MSCs as safe SCMPs. One of these important and complex requirements is the environmental monitoring. Although a number of environmental requirements are clearly defined, some others are provided as recommendations. In this review we aim to outline the current issues with regard to international guidelines which impact environmental monitoring in cleanrooms and clean areas for the manufacturing of MSCs. PMID:27999600

  1. A camelid antibody candidate for development of a therapeutic agent against Hemiscorpius lepturus envenomation.

    PubMed

    Yardehnavi, Najmeh; Behdani, Mahdi; Bagheri, Kamran Pooshang; Mahmoodzadeh, Amir; Khanahmad, Hossein; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Hassanzadeh Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Muyldermans, Serge

    2014-09-01

    Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpionism poses one of the most dangerous health problems in many parts of the world. The common therapy consists of using antivenom antibody fragments derived from a polyclonal immune response raised in horses. However, this immunotherapy creates serious side effects, including anaphylactic shock sometimes even leading to death. Thus, many efforts have been made to introduce new replacement therapeutics that cause less adverse reactions. One of the most attractive approaches to replacing the available therapy is offered by single-domain antibody fragments, or nanobodies (Nbs). We immunized dromedaries with H. lepturus toxin and identified a functional recombinant Nb (referred to as F7Nb) against heminecrolysin (HNc), the major known hemolytic and dermonecrotic fraction of H. lepturus venom. This Nb was retrieved from the immune library by phage display selection. The in vitro neutralization tests indicated that 17.5 nmol of the F7Nb can inhibit 45% of the hemolytic activity of 1 EC100 (7.5 μg/ml) of HNc. The in vivo neutralization tests demonstrated that F7Nb had good antihemolytic and antidermonecrotic effects against HNc in all tested mice. Surprisingly, F7Nb (8.75 nmol) neutralized 1 LD100 of HNc (10 μg) via an intracerebroventricular route or 1 LD100 (80 μg) via a subcutaneous route. All of the control mice died. Hence, this Nb is a potential leading novel candidate for treating H. lepturus scorpionism in the near future. © FASEB.

  2. Singing as a Therapeutic Agent, inThe Etude, 1891-1949.

    PubMed

    Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The Etude music magazine, founded by Theodore Presser, was one of a number of popular music magazines published in the years prior to the establishment of the music therapy profession in 1950. During its publication run from 1883 to 1957, over 100 music therapy related articles appeared, including 13 on the health benefits of singing published between 1891 and 1949. Written by authors with diverse backgrounds, such as the famous Battle Creek, Michigan physician John Harvey Kellogg and Boston music critic Louis C. Elson, the articles contained consistent and adamant support regarding the health benefits of singing. The advantages described were both physical and psychological, and were recommended prophylactically for well persons and therapeutically for ill persons. Although the articles varied in perspective, from philosophical to theoretical to pedagogical, there is a consistent holistic medicine theme that appeared almost ahead of its time and no doubt linked to the push for vocal music education in that era. The importance of The Etude in promulgating ideas that helped shape the early practice of music therapy should not be underestimated. For much of its publication run The Etude was the largest music periodical in print, reaching its peak circulation of 250,000 copies per month in 1924.

  3. Ferrous iron-dependent delivery of therapeutic agents to the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Sumit S; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Renslo, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    Background The malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax generate significant concentrations of free unbound ferrous iron heme as a side product of hemoglobin degradation. The presence of these chemically reactive forms of iron, rare in healthy cells, presents an opportunity for parasite-selective drug delivery. Accordingly, our group is developing technologies for the targeted delivery of therapeutics to the intra-erythrocytic malaria parasite. These so-called ‘fragmenting hybrids’ employ a 1,2,4-trioxolane ring system as an iron(II)-sensing ‘trigger’ moiety and a ‘traceless’ retro-Michael linker to which a variety of partner drug species may be attached. After ferrous iron-promoted activation in the parasite, the partner drug is released via a β-elimination reaction. Methods In this report, we describe three orthogonal experimental approaches that were explored in order to generate in vitro proof-of-concept for ferrous iron-dependent drug delivery from a prototypical fragmenting hybrid. Conclusion Studies of two fragmenting hybrids by orthogonal approaches confirm that a partner drug species can be delivered to live P. falciparum parasites. A key advantage of this approach is the potential to mask a partner drug’s intrinsic bioactivity prior to release in the parasite. PMID:23234548

  4. A bioluminescent orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma that allows sensitive and rapid evaluation of new therapeutic agents In vivo.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Kenine E; Hall, Christopher L; Daignault, Stephanie; Mandlebaum, Sarah A; Yu, Chunyan; Keller, Evan T

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in children, 30% of whom develop lung metastases despite aggressive treatment. Our objective was to develop a mouse model of OSA for preclinical studies that (i) incorporates the natural history of OSA including tumor growth in bone and development of lung metastasis and (ii) is amenable to non-invasive detection methods. A human OSA cell line that expresses high levels of luciferase was created. Following subcutaneous injection, nine out of ten mice showed tumor growth. Eight out of ten mice showed tumor growth following orthotopic injection into the proximal tibia. Thirty percent of mice showed pulmonary metastasis by bioluminescent imaging eight to 10 weeks following orthotopic injection. Animals receiving cisplatin treatment showed reduced tumor volume compared to animals treated with vehicle alone. This model allows real-time detection of tumors and can be used to study mechanisms of OSA metastasis and test new therapeutic agents.

  5. Antiretroviral Drug Interactions: Overview of Interactions Involving New and Investigational Agents and the Role of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Management

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, R. Chris; Liedtke, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Antiretrovirals are prone to drug-drug and drug-food interactions that can result in subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic concentrations. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other diseases are common due to shared metabolism through cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and transport by membrane proteins (e.g., p-glycoprotein, organic anion-transporting polypeptide). The clinical significance of antiretroviral drug interactions is reviewed, with a focus on new and investigational agents. An overview of the mechanistic basis for drug interactions and the effect of individual antiretrovirals on CYP450 and UGT isoforms are provided. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other co-morbidities are summarized. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in the detection and management of antiretroviral drug interactions is also briefly discussed. PMID:24309307

  6. Adjuvants for malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Coler, R N; Carter, D; Friede, M; Reed, S G

    2009-09-01

    There is a renewed enthusiasm about subunit vaccines for malaria coincident with the formation of new alliances and partnerships raising international public awareness, attracting increased resources and the re-focusing of research programs on adjuvant development for infectious disease vaccines. It is generally accepted that subunit vaccines for malaria will require adjuvants to induce protective immune responses, and availability of suitable adjuvants has in the past been a barrier to the development of malaria vaccines. Several novel adjuvants are now in licensed products or in late stage clinical development, while several others are in the earlier development pipeline. Successful vaccine development requires knowing which adjuvants to use and knowing how to formulate adjuvants and antigens to achieve stable, safe, and immunogenic vaccines. For the majority of vaccine researchers this information is not readily available, nor is access to well-characterized adjuvants. In this minireview, we outline the current state of adjuvant research and development as it pertains to effective malaria vaccines.

  7. Ferrous iron-dependent drug delivery enables controlled and selective release of therapeutic agents in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deu, Edgar; Chen, Ingrid T; Lauterwasser, Erica M W; Valderramos, Juan; Li, Hao; Edgington, Laura E; Renslo, Adam R; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-11-05

    The precise targeting of cytotoxic agents to specific cell types or cellular compartments is of significant interest in medicine, with particular relevance for infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we describe a method to exploit aberrant levels of mobile ferrous iron (Fe(II)) for selective drug delivery in vivo. This approach makes use of a 1,2,4-trioxolane moiety, which serves as an Fe(II)-sensitive "trigger," making drug release contingent on Fe(II)-promoted trioxolane fragmentation. We demonstrate in vivo validation of this approach with the Plasmodium berghei model of murine malaria. Malaria parasites produce high concentrations of mobile ferrous iron as a consequence of their catabolism of host hemoglobin in the infected erythrocyte. Using activity-based probes, we successfully demonstrate the Fe(II)-dependent and parasite-selective delivery of a potent dipeptidyl aminopeptidase inhibitor. We find that delivery of the compound in its Fe(II)-targeted form leads to more sustained target inhibition with greatly reduced off-target inhibition of mammalian cathepsins. This selective drug delivery translates into improved efficacy and tolerability. These findings demonstrate the utility of a purely chemical means to achieve selective drug targeting in vivo. This approach may find useful application in parasitic infections and more broadly in any disease state characterized by aberrant production of reactive ferrous iron.

  8. New drugs from old natural compounds: scarcely investigated sesquiterpenes as new possible therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Suta, Stefania; Maggi, Filippo; Nicoletti, Marcello; Baldan, Valeria; Dall Acqua, Stefano

    2017-04-04

    Sesquiterpene are natural products that have been extensively studied for their bioactivities, evidencing their potentiality as useful scaffolds for the development of drugs. Considering the different derivatives, the sesquiterpene lactones have been evaluated, especially on cancer cell and antineoplastic efficacy in in vivo studies. Their bioactivity is strictly related to the presence of the reactive α-methylene-γ-lactone group (αMγL). Nevertheless, several other sesquiterpene lacking of the αMγL are known and have been studied for their biological effects and potential usefulness in the development of new drugs. In this review, we focused on several sesquiterpenes that are not presenting the αMγL moiety and may have future potential as scaffold for the development of new drugs, namely the bicyclic compounds belonging to the carotane type (daucanes) that present significant effect as antiproliferative and estrogenic agents. The monocyclic humulane derivatives correlated to zerumbone, and the bicyclic compound beta-caryophyllene and its derivatives that have been considered in the field of cancer and inflammation. It is noteworthy that published studies on sesquiterpenes, reported in this review, concern on pathologies of increasing importance, like estrogen, anti-proliferative, bone loos, immunity deficiency and anti-tumour activities. Some of the natural "old" sesquiterpenes can be considered for their possible role in drug discovery and in counteracting these "new" challenges.

  9. Amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide is a promising therapeutic agent for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    De, Gejing; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Tan, Tao; Zhu, Hua; Li, Haichang; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide (ATAP) derived from the human anti-apoptotic protein Bfl-1 is a potent inducer of apoptosis by targeting mitochondria permeability transition. By linking ATAP to an internalizing RGD peptide (iRGD), selective targeting for ATAP to tumor cell was achieved. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that ATAP-iRGD could penetrate into cancer cells and distribute along the mitochondria network. ATAP-iRGD triggered mitochondria-dependent cell death through release of cytochrome c. In an effort to promote ATAP-iRGD physiochemical properties to approach clinic application, amino acid substitution and chemical modification were made with ATAP-iRGD to improve its bioactivity. One of these modified peptides, ATAP-iRGD-M8, was with improved stability and aqueous solubility without compromising in vitro cytotoxicity in cultured cancer cells. In vivo xenograft studies with multiple prostate cancer cell lines showed that intravenous administration of ATAP-iRGD-M8 suppressed tumor growth. Toxicological studies revealed that repetitive intravenous administration of ATAP-iRGD-M8 did not produce significant toxicity in the SV129 mice. Our data suggest that ATAP-iRGD-M8 is a promising agent with high selectivity and limited systemic toxicity for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:25245280

  10. Identification of pharmacological chaperones as potential therapeutic agents to treat phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Ying, Ming; Cremades, Nunilo; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Sancho, Javier; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). Over 500 disease-causing mutations have been identified in humans, most of which result in PAH protein misfolding and increased turnover in vivo. The use of pharmacological chaperones to stabilize or promote correct folding of mutant proteins represents a promising new direction in the treatment of misfolding diseases. We performed a high-throughput ligand screen of over 1,000 pharmacological agents and identified 4 compounds (I–IV) that enhanced the thermal stability of PAH and did not show substantial inhibition of PAH activity. In further studies, compounds III (3-amino-2-benzyl-7-nitro-4-(2-quinolyl)-1,2-dihydroisoquinolin-1-one) and IV (5,6-dimethyl-3-(4-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothieno[2,3- d]pyrimidin-4(1H)-one) stabilized the functional tetrameric conformation of recombinant WT-PAH and PKU mutants. These compounds also significantly increased activity and steady-state PAH protein levels in cells transiently transfected with either WT-PAH or PKU mutants. Furthermore, PAH activity in mouse liver increased after a 12-day oral administration of low doses of compounds III and IV. Thus, we have identified 2 small molecules that may represent promising alternatives in the treatment of PKU. PMID:18596920

  11. 4,5-diarylisoxazole Hsp90 chaperone inhibitors: potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Brough, Paul A; Aherne, Wynne; Barril, Xavier; Borgognoni, Jenifer; Boxall, Kathy; Cansfield, Julie E; Cheung, Kwai-Ming J; Collins, Ian; Davies, Nicholas G M; Drysdale, Martin J; Dymock, Brian; Eccles, Suzanne A; Finch, Harry; Fink, Alexandra; Hayes, Angela; Howes, Robert; Hubbard, Roderick E; James, Karen; Jordan, Allan M; Lockie, Andrea; Martins, Vanessa; Massey, Andrew; Matthews, Thomas P; McDonald, Edward; Northfield, Christopher J; Pearl, Laurence H; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ray, Stuart; Raynaud, Florence I; Roughley, Stephen D; Sharp, Swee Y; Surgenor, Allan; Walmsley, D Lee; Webb, Paul; Wood, Mike; Workman, Paul; Wright, Lisa

    2008-01-24

    Inhibitors of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone are showing considerable promise as potential chemotherapeutic agents for cancer. Here, we describe the structure-based design, synthesis, structure-activity relationships and pharmacokinetics of potent small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 based on the 4,5-diarylisoxazole scaffold. Analogues from this series have high affinity for Hsp90, as measured in a fluorescence polarization (FP) competitive binding assay, and are active in cancer cell lines where they inhibit proliferation and exhibit a characteristic profile of depletion of oncogenic proteins and concomitant elevation of Hsp72. Compound 40f (VER-52296/NVP-AUY922) is potent in the Hsp90 FP binding assay (IC50 = 21 nM) and inhibits proliferation of various human cancer cell lines in vitro, with GI50 averaging 9 nM. Compound 40f is retained in tumors in vivo when administered i.p., as evaluated by cassette dosing in tumor-bearing mice. In a human colon cancer xenograft model, 40f inhibits tumor growth by approximately 50%.

  12. Erythrocytes and microbubble contrast agents, improve the therapeutic efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegami, Kenji; Kaneko, Yukio; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2005-03-01

    Erythrocytes, an well as Levovist microbubble contrast agent, enhance the heating effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and increase the coagulation volume produced by HIFU irradiation. In vitro experiments used human plasma with various concentrations of human erythrocytes in combination with or without Levovist. In vivo experiments used eight Japan white rabbits with three levels of anaemia. Using a 2.17 MHz transducer, HIFU was applied for 60 seconds, and the temperature rise and the volume of coagulation necrosis was evaluated. There was a significant correlation between the HIFU-induced temperature rise and hematocrit, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (p=0.0001). Although the temperature rise was smaller at low hematocrit, it was significantly increased by adding Levovist to the suspension (p<0.01). The mean volume of coagulation necrosis was significantly higher in the rabbits with higher hematocrit (p<0.01), and that in the moderate anaemia group was significantly increased by using Levovist (p<0.01).

  13. α1-Adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors in voiding function – binding characteristics of therapeutic agents in relation to the pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shizuo; Ito, Yoshihiko; Tsukada, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    In vivo and ex vivo binding of α1-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptors involved in voiding function is reviewed with therapeutic agents (α1-adrenoceptor antagonists: prazosin, tamsulosin and silodosin; and muscarinic receptor antagonists: oxybutynin, tolterodine, solifenacin, propiverine, imiafenacin and darifenacin) in lower urinary tract symptoms. This approach allows estimation of the inhibition of a well-characterized selective (standard) radioligand by unlabelled potential drugs or direct measurement of the distribution and receptor binding of a standard radioligand or radiolabelled form of a novel drug. In fact, these studies could be conducted in various tissues from animals pretreated with radioligands and/or unlabelled novel drugs, by conventional radioligand binding assay, radioactivity measurement, autoradiography and positron emission tomography. In vivo and ex vivo receptor binding with α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists have been proved to be useful in predicting the potency, organ selectivity and duration of action of drugs in relation to their pharmacokinetics. Such evaluations of drug–receptor binding reveal that adverse effects could be avoided by the use of new α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms. Thus, the comparative analysis of α1-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptor binding characteristics in the lower urinary tract and other tissues after systemic administration of therapeutic agents allows the rationale for their pharmacological characteristics from the integrated viewpoint of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The current review emphasizes the usefulness of in vivo and ex vivo receptor binding in the discovery and development of novel drugs for the treatment of not only urinary dysfunction but also other disorders. PMID:21265873

  14. α1-Adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors in voiding function - binding characteristics of therapeutic agents in relation to the pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo; Ito, Yoshihiko; Tsukada, Hideo

    2011-08-01

    In vivo and ex vivo binding of α(1)-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptors involved in voiding function is reviewed with therapeutic agents (α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists: prazosin, tamsulosin and silodosin; and muscarinic receptor antagonists: oxybutynin, tolterodine, solifenacin, propiverine, imiafenacin and darifenacin) in lower urinary tract symptoms. This approach allows estimation of the inhibition of a well-characterized selective (standard) radioligand by unlabelled potential drugs or direct measurement of the distribution and receptor binding of a standard radioligand or radiolabelled form of a novel drug. In fact, these studies could be conducted in various tissues from animals pretreated with radioligands and/or unlabelled novel drugs, by conventional radioligand binding assay, radioactivity measurement, autoradiography and positron emission tomography. In vivo and ex vivo receptor binding with α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists have been proved to be useful in predicting the potency, organ selectivity and duration of action of drugs in relation to their pharmacokinetics. Such evaluations of drug-receptor binding reveal that adverse effects could be avoided by the use of new α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms. Thus, the comparative analysis of α(1)-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptor binding characteristics in the lower urinary tract and other tissues after systemic administration of therapeutic agents allows the rationale for their pharmacological characteristics from the integrated viewpoint of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The current review emphasizes the usefulness of in vivo and ex vivo receptor binding in the discovery and development of novel drugs for the treatment of not only urinary dysfunction but also other disorders. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological

  15. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from food animals to antimicrobial growth promoters and related therapeutic agents in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Bager, F; Jensen, N E; Madsen, M; Meyling, A; Wegener, H C

    1998-06-01

    This study was conducted to describe the occurrence of acquired resistance to antimicrobials used for growth promotion among bacteria isolated from swine, cattle and poultry in Denmark. Resistance to structurally related therapeutic agents was also examined. Three categories of bacteria were tested: 1) indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium), 2) zoonotic bacteria (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Yersinia enterocolitica), and 3) animal pathogens (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Staphylococcus hyicus, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae). All antimicrobials used as growth promoters in Denmark and some structurally related therapeutic agents (in brackets) were included: Avilamycin, avoparcin (vancomycin), bacitracin, carbadox, flavomycin, monensin, olaquindox, salinomycin, spiramycin (erythromycin, lincomycin), tylosin (erythromycin, lincomycin), and virginiamycin (pristinamycin). Bacterial species intrinsically resistant to an antimicrobial were not tested towards that antimicrobial. Breakpoints for growth promoters were established by population distribution of the bacteria tested. A total of 2,372 bacterial isolates collected during October 1995 to September 1996 were included in the study. Acquired resistance to all currently used growth promoting antimicrobials was found. A frequent occurrence of resistance were observed to avilamycin, avoparcin, bacitracin, flavomycin, spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin, whereas resistance to carbadox, monensin, olaquindox and salinomycin was less frequent. The occurrence of resistance varied by animal origin and bacterial species. The highest levels of resistance was observed among enterococci, whereas less resistance was observed among zoonotic bacteria and bacteria pathogenic to animals. The association between the occurrence of resistance and the consumption of the antimicrobial is discussed. The results show the present level of resistance to

  16. Strategies for transformation of naturally-occurring amphibian antimicrobial peptides into therapeutically valuable anti-infective agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Al-Ghaferi, Nadia; Abraham, Bency; Leprince, Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    The emergence of strains of pathogenic microorganisms with resistance to commonly used antibiotics has necessitated a search for novel types of antimicrobial agents. Many frog species produce amphipathic alpha-helical peptides with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity in the skin but their therapeutic potential is limited by varying degrees of cytolytic activity towards eukaryotic cells. Methods for development of such peptides into anti-infective drugs are illustrated by the example of temporin-1DRa (HFLGTLVNLAK KIL.NH(2)). Studies with model alpha-helical peptides have shown that increase in cationicity promotes antimicrobial activity whereas increases in hydrophobicity, helicity and amphipathicity promote hemolytic activity and loss of selectivity for microorganisms. Analogs of temporin-1DRa in which each amino acid is replaced by L-lysine and D-lysine were synthesized and their cytolytic activities tested against a range of microorganisms and human erythrocytes. Small changes in structure produced marked changes in conformation, as determined by retention time on reversed-phase HPLC, and in biological activity. However, peptides containing the substitutions (Val(7) -->L-Lys), (Thr(5)-->D-Lys) and (Asn(8)-->D-Lys) retained the high solubility and potent, broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the naturally occurring peptide but were appreciably (up to 10-fold) less hemolytic. In contrast, analogs in which Leu(9) and Ile(13) were replaced by the more hydrophobic cyclohexylglycine residue showed slightly increased antimicrobial potencies (up to 2-fold) but a 4-fold increase in hemolytic activity. The data suggest a strategy of selective increases in cationicity concomitant with decreases in helicity and hydrophobicity in the transformation of naturally-occurring antimicrobial peptides into non-toxic therapeutic agents.

  17. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A. PMID:26404377

  18. Violet 405-nm light: a novel therapeutic agent against common pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barneck, Mitchell D; Rhodes, Nathaniel L R; de la Presa, Martin; Allen, James P; Poursaid, Ahrash E; Nourian, Maziar M; Firpo, Matthew A; Langell, John T

    2016-12-01

    The increasing incidence of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and multidrug-resistant organisms demonstrate the need for innovative technological solutions. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in particular are common pathogens responsible for a large percentage of indwelling medical device-associated clinical infections. The bactericidal effects of visible light sterilization (VLS) using 405-nm is one potential therapeutic under investigation. Light-emitting diodes of 405-nm were used to treat varying concentrations of S aureus, S pneumonia, E coli, and P aeruginosa. Irradiance levels between 2.71 ± 0.20 to 9.27 ± 0.36 mW/cm(2) and radiant exposure levels up to 132.98 ± 6.68 J/cm(2) were assessed. Dose-dependent effects were observed in all species. Statistically significant reductions were seen in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. At the highest radiant exposure levels, bacterial log10 reductions were E coli-6.27 ± 0.54, S aureus-6.10 ± 0.60, P aeruginosa-5.20 ± 0.84, and S pneumoniae-6.01 ± 0.59. Statistically significant results (<0.001*) were found at each time point. We have successfully demonstrated high-efficacy bacterial reduction using 405-nm light sterilization. The VLS showed statistical significance against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species with the given treatment times. The β-lactam antibiotic-resistant E coli was the most sensitive to VLS, suggesting light therapy could a suitable option for sterilization in drug-resistant bacterial species. This research illustrates the potential of using VLS in treating clinically relevant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. UCP2 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer cells to therapeutic agents by increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    Modulation of oxidative stress in cancer cells plays an important role in the study of the resistance to anticancer therapies. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) may play a dual role in cancer, acting as a protective mechanism in normal cells, while its overexpression in cancer cells could confer resistance to chemotherapy and a higher survival through downregulation of ROS production. Thus, our aim was to check whether the inhibition of UCP2 expression and function increases oxidative stress and could render breast cancer cells more sensitive to cisplatin (CDDP) or tamoxifen (TAM). For this purpose, we studied clonogenicity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cell viability, ROS production, apoptosis, and autophagy in MCF-7 and T47D (only the last four determinations) breast cancer cells treated with CDDP or TAM, in combination or without a UCP2 knockdown (siRNA or genipin). Furthermore, survival curves were performed in order to check the impact of UCP2 expression in breast cancer patients. UCP2 inhibition and cytotoxic treatments produced a decrease in cell viability and clonogenicity, in addition to an increase in ΔΨm, ROS production, apoptosis, and autophagy. It is important to note that CDDP decreased UCP2 protein levels, so that the greatest effects produced by the UCP2 inhibition in combination with a cytotoxic treatment, with regard to treatment alone, were observed in TAM+UCP2siRNA-treated cells. Moreover, this UCP2 inhibition caused autophagic cell death, since apoptosis parameters barely increased after UCP2 knockdown. Finally, survival curves revealed that higher UCP2 expression corresponded with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion, UCP2 could be a therapeutic target in breast cancer, especially in those patients treated with tamoxifen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type a as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-09-23

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a "glamour" drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  1. Anti-microRNAs as Novel Therapeutic Agents in the Clinical Management of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhai; Alexandrov, Peter N; Lukiw, Walter J

    2016-01-01

    Overview- One hundred and ten years since its first description Alzheimer's disease (AD) still retains its prominent status: (i) as the industrialized world's number one cause of age-related intellectual impairment and cognitive decline; (ii) as this country's most rapidly expanding socioeconomic and healthcare concern; and (iii) as an insidious, progressive and lethal neurological disorder of the human central nervous system (CNS) for which there is currently no adequate treatment or cure (Alzheimer, 1991; Alzheimer et al., 1991, 1995) [https://www.alz.org/facts/downloads/facts_figures_2015.pdf (2015)]. The concept of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as being involved in the etiopathogenesis of AD and age-related human neurodegenerative disease was first proposed about 25 years ago, however it was not until 2007 that specific microRNA (miRNA) abundance, speciation and localization to the hippocampal CA1 region (an anatomical area of the human CNS specifically targeted by the AD process) was shown to strongly associate with AD-type change when compared to age-matched controls (Lukiw et al., 1992; Lukiw, 2007; Schipper et al., 2007; Cogswell et al., 2008; Guerreiro et al., 2012). Currently about 400 reports address the potential link between disruptions in miRNA signaling and the development of various features associated with AD neuropathology (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=micro+RNA+alzheimer's+disease). In this "Perspectives" paper we will highlight some of the most recent literature on anti-miRNA (AM; antagomir) therapeutic strategies and some very recent technological advances in the analysis and characterization of defective miRNA signaling pathways in AD compared to neurologically normal age-matched controls.

  2. Current Status and Prospects for Cannabidiol Preparations as New Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Phillips, Sarah; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Walker, Larry A

    2016-07-01

    States and the federal government are under growing pressure to legalize the use of cannabis products for medical purposes in the United States. Sixteen states have legalized (or decriminalized possession of) products high in cannabidiol (CBD) and with restricted ∆(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (∆(9) -THC) content. In most of these states, the intent is for use in refractory epileptic seizures in children, but in a few states, the indications are broader. This review provides an overview of the pharmacology and toxicology of CBD; summarizes some of the regulatory, safety, and cultural issues relevant to the further exploitation of its antiepileptic or other pharmacologic activities; and assesses the current status and prospects for clinical development of CBD and CBD-rich preparations for medical use in the United States. Unlike Δ(9) -THC, CBD elicits its pharmacologic effects without exerting any significant intrinsic activity on the cannabinoid receptors, whose activation results in the psychotropic effects characteristic of Δ(9) -THC, and CBD possesses several pharmacologic activities that give it a high potential for therapeutic use. CBD exhibits neuroprotective, antiepileptic, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and antiinflammatory properties. In combination with Δ(9) -THC, CBD has received regulatory approvals in several European countries and is currently under study in trials registered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the United States. A number of states have passed legislation to allow for the use of CBD-rich, limited Δ(9) -THC-content preparations of cannabis for certain pathologic conditions. CBD is currently being studied in several clinical trials and is at different stages of clinical development for various medical indications. Judging from clinical findings reported so far, CBD and CBD-enriched preparations have great potential utility, but uncertainties regarding sourcing, long-term safety, abuse potential, and regulatory dilemmas remain.

  3. Resveratrol as a therapeutic agent for renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin; Tian, Shoufu; Han, Junxia; Xiong, Peihua

    2014-03-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic kidney disease. This study was designed to examine the protective effects of resveratrol (RSV) against renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). We also attempted to elucidate the potential mechanism involved. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operated, UUO, and UUO/RSV (20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). Histological changes were examined using periodic acid-Schiff and Masson's trichrome staining after 14 days. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-OHdG levels were determined using a commercially available kit. ICAM-1, TNF-α, and TGF-β levels were measured using real-time PCR. Fibronectin levels were measured by western blot, and the Smad3 acetylation and Sirt1 were examined by immunoprecipitation and western blot. Our study showed that RSV treatment significantly attenuated renal injury including extracellular matrix deposition and tubulointerstitium damage. Renal cortical mRNA levels of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and TGF-β, protein expression of fibronectin and Smad3 acetylation were significantly upregulated in the UUO group. However, treatment with RSV significantly decreased the expression of these proteins. Furthermore, RSV also decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including MDA and 8-OHdG, and increased the level of SOD, which protects cells against ROS damage. Our findings suggest that RSV treatment inhibits oxidative stress, Smad3 acetylation, and renal interstitial fibrosis. Therefore, RSV may have potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  4. Nanodiscs as a therapeutic delivery agent: inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection in the lung.

    PubMed

    Numata, Mari; Grinkova, Yelena V; Mitchell, James R; Chu, Hong Wei; Sligar, Stephen G; Voelker, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the application of nanotechnology to solve the difficult problem of therapeutic administration of pharmaceuticals. Nanodiscs, composed of a stable discoidal lipid bilayer encircled by an amphipathic membrane scaffold protein that is an engineered variant of the human Apo A-I constituent of high-density lipoproteins, have been a successful platform for providing a controlled lipid composition in particles that are especially useful for investigating membrane protein structure and function. In this communication, we demonstrate that nanodiscs are effective in suppressing respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infection both in vitro and in vivo when self-assembled with the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG). Preparations of nanodiscs containing POPG (nPOPG) antagonized interleukin-8 production from Beas2B epithelial cells challenged by RSV infection, with an IC50 of 19.3 μg/mL. In quantitative in vitro plaque assays, nPOPG reduced RSV infection by 93%. In vivo, nPOPG suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung, as well as IFN-γ production in response to RSV challenge. nPOPG also completely suppressed the histopathological changes in lung tissue elicited by RSV and reduced the amount of virus recovered from lung tissue by 96%. The turnover rate of nPOPG was estimated to have a halftime of 60-120 minutes (m), based upon quantification of the recovery of the human Apo A-I constituent. From these data, we conclude that nPOPG is a potent antagonist of RSV infection and its inflammatory sequelae both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Their Potential as Novel Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Michel; Ferrer-Tur, Rita; Gockeln, Lena; Stambouli, Oumaima; Becic, Amina; Giebel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, have been identified as mediators of a newly-discovered intercellular communication system. They are essential signaling mediators in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Depending on their origin, they fulfill different functions. EVs of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been found to promote comparable therapeutic activities as MSCs themselves. In a variety of in vivo models, it has been observed that they suppress pro-inflammatory processes and reduce oxidative stress and fibrosis. By switching pro-inflammatory into tolerogenic immune responses, MSC-EVs very likely promote tissue regeneration by creating a pro-regenerative environment allowing endogenous stem and progenitor cells to successfully repair affected tissues. Accordingly, MSC-EVs provide a novel, very promising therapeutic agent, which has already been successfully applied to humans. However, the MSC-EV production process has not been standardized, yet. Indeed, a collection of different protocols has been used for the MSC-EV production, characterization and application. By focusing on kidney, heart, liver and brain injuries, we have reviewed the major outcomes of published MSC-EV in vivo studies. PMID:28684664

  7. Melatonin, a potential therapeutic agent for smooth muscle-related pathological conditions and aging.

    PubMed

    Pozo, M J; Gomez-Pinilla, P J; Camello-Almaraz, C; Martin-Cano, F E; Pascua, P; Rol, M A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D; Camello, P J

    2010-01-01

    Increases or decreases in the contractile response of smooth muscle underlie important pathological conditions such as hypertension, incontinence and altered gastrointestinal transit. These disorders are also frequently encountered in the aged population. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key features in the initiation, progression, and clinical manifestations of smooth muscle disorders. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, has free radical scavenging and antioxidative properties and protects against oxidative insult. Recently, widespread interest has grown regarding the apparent protective effects of melatonin on smooth muscle dysfunction. "In vitro" studies have shown that melatonin decreased vascular tone of vascular beds from control, hypertensive or aged animals, through the reduction of adrenergic contraction and the increase in acetylcholine-induced relaxation. "In vivo", melatonin also attenuates sympathetic tone by direct activation of melatonin receptors, scavenging free radicals or increasing NO availability in the central nervous system. In the gastrointestinal tract, melatonin treatment improves age-related impairments in gallbladder contractility and prevents deleterious effects of cholecystitis on smooth muscle and the enteric nervous system through suppression of oxidative stress. In addition, melatonin improves colonic transit time in constipation-predominant IBS patients. Melatonin is also able to restore impaired contractility of the detrusor muscle from old animals through normalization of Ca(2+) dependent and independent contraction, mitochondrial polarity, neuromuscular function and oxidative stress, which would explain the effects of melatonin counteracting cystometric changes in senescent animals. It also reverses bladder damage following ischemia/reperfusion. In conclusion, melatonin may be a promising candidate for future research of agents that modulate smooth muscle motility.

  8. The presence of Estrogen Receptor β modulates the response of breast cancer cells to therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women. The estrogen receptors (ERs) ratio is important in the maintenance of mitochondrial redox status, and higher levels of ERβ increases mitochondrial functionality, decreasing ROS production. Our aim was to determine the interaction between the ERα/ERβ ratio and the response to cytotoxic treatments such as cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) and tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, apoptosis, autophagy, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial functionality were analyzed in MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio) and T47D (low ERα/ERβ ratio) breast cancer cell lines. Cell viability decreased more in MCF-7 when treated with CDDP and PTX. Apoptosis was less activated after cytotoxic treatments in T47D than in MCF-7 cells. Nevertheless, autophagy was increased more in CDDP-treated MCF-7, but less in TAM-treated cells than in T47D. CDDP treatment produced a raise in mitochondrial mass in MCF-7, as well as the citochrome c oxidase (COX) and ATP synthase protein levels, however significantly reduced COX activity. In CDDP-treated cells, the overexpression of ERβ in MCF-7 caused a reduction in apoptosis, autophagy and ROS production, leading to higher cell survival; and the silencing of ERβ in T47D cells promoted the opposite effects. In TAM-treated cells, ERβ-overexpression led to less cell viability by an increment in autophagy; and the partial knockdown of ERβ in T47D triggered an increase in ROS production and apoptosis, leading to cell death. In conclusion, ERβ expression plays an important role in the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents, especially for cisplatin treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fabrication of Highly Uniform Nanoparticles from Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein Polymers for Therapeutic Agent Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Anumolu, Rajasekhar; Gustafson, Joshua A.; Magda, Jules J.; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Pease, Leonard F.

    2011-01-01

    Here we generate silk-elastinlike protein (SELP) polymeric nanoparticles and demonstrate precise control over their dimensions using an electrospray differential mobility analyzer (ES-DMA). Electrospray produces droplets encompassing several polymer strands. Evaporation ensues, leading polymer strands to accumulate at the droplet interface forming a hollow nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticle size distributions which govern particle yield, depend on buffer concentration to the −1/3 power, polymer concentration to the 1/3 power, and ratio of silk to elastin blocks. Three recombinantly tuned ratios of silk to elastin blocks, 8:16, 4:8, and 4:16, respectively named SELP-815K, SELP-47K, and SELP-415K, are employed with the latter ratio resulting in a thinner shell and larger diameter for the nanoparticles than the former. The DMA narrows the size distribution by electrostatically classifying the aerosolized nanoparticles. These highly uniform nanoparticles have variations of 1.2 nm and 1.4 nm for 24.0 nm and 36.0 nm particles, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the nanoparticles to be faceted, as a buckling instability releases compression energy arising from evaporation after the shell has formed by bending it. A thermodynamic equilibrium exists between compression and bending energies, where the facet length is 1/2 the particle diameter, in agreement with experiments. Rod-like particles also formed from polymer stabilized filaments when the viscous length exceeds the jet radius at higher solution viscosities. The unusual uniformity in composition and dimension indicates the potential of these nanoparticles to deliver bioactive and imaging agents. PMID:21696150

  10. Antibody with an engineered Fc region as a therapeutic agent against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ramadhany, Ririn; Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infectivity is thought to play a crucial role in severe dengue disease. It occurs when pre-existing sub-neutralizing anti-DENV antibody (Ab) produced from a primary infection encounters a DENV serotype different from that of the initial infection and forms immune complexes, which enable the efficient infection of Fcγ receptor-bearing cells. However, the exact role played by Abs during a secondary infection of patients remains unknown. We previously obtained a broadly cross-reactive neutralizing IgG1 human monoclonal anti-DENV envelope (E) Ab (HuMAb) D23-1G7C2-IgG1 from a DENV-infected patient; however, D23-1G7C2-IgG1 had ADE activity. With the aim of being able to reduce the ADE activity, we exchanged the Fc region of D23-1G7C2 to generate Abs bearing each of the three other IgG subclasses (IgG2-4). In addition, N297A, a mutation known to reduce the affinity of the IgG1 Fc region for Fcγ receptors, was introduced into D23-1G7C2-IgG1. Swapping D23-1G7C2-IgG1 to IgG2 or IgG4 subclasses reduced ADE activity in FcγRI and FcγRII-bearing THP-1 cells. By contrast, in FcγRII-bearing K562 cells, the change to IgG2 increased ADE activity. Introducing the N297A mutation into D23-1G7C2-IgG1 resulted in a marked reduction in ADE activity in both cell types. Compared to D23-1G7C2-IgG1, D23-1G7C2-IgG1-N297A was less protective in IFN-α/β/γ receptor knockout mice infected with a lethal dose of recombinant chimeric DENV, carrying prME of DENV-2 in Japanese encephalitis virus (80% vs. 40% survival, respectively). These observations provide valuable information regarding the use of recombinant Abs as therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: a critical review of the pharmacology and clinical effects of current and future therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Miyake, N; Jarskog, L F; Fleischhacker, W W; Lieberman, J A

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of chlorpromazine and throughout the development of the new-generation antipsychotic drugs (APDs) beginning with clozapine, the D(2) receptor has been the target for the development of APDs. Pharmacologic actions to reduce neurotransmission through the D(2) receptor have been the only proven therapeutic mechanism for psychoses. A number of novel non-D(2) mechanisms of action of APDs have been explored over the past 40 years but none has definitively been proven effective. At the same time, the effectiveness of treatments and range of outcomes for patients are far from satisfactory. The relative success of antipsychotics in treating positive symptoms is limited by the fact that a substantial number of patients are refractory to current medications and by their lack of efficacy for negative and cognitive symptoms, which often determine the level of functional impairment. In addition, while the newer antipsychotics produce fewer motor side effects, safety and tolerability concerns about weight gain and endocrinopathies have emerged. Consequently, there is an urgent need for more effective and better-tolerated antipsychotic agents, and to identify new molecular targets and develop mechanistically novel compounds that can address the various symptom dimensions of schizophrenia. In recent years, a variety of new experimental pharmacological approaches have emerged, including compounds acting on targets other than the dopamine D(2) receptor. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to whether drugs selective for singe molecular targets (that is, 'magic bullets') or drugs selectively non-selective for several molecular targets (that is, 'magic shotguns', 'multifunctional drugs' or 'intramolecular polypharmacy') will lead to more effective new medications for schizophrenia. In this context, current and future drug development strategies can be seen to fall into three categories: (1) refinement of precedented mechanisms of action to provide drugs

  12. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as therapeutic agents for knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bruyere, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of OA. This review evaluates published studies of the effect of glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfate preparations on the progression of knee or hip OA. Despite multiple double-blind, controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in OA, controversy regarding the efficacy of these agents with respect to symptomatic improvement remains. Several potential confounders, including placebo response, use of prescription medicines versus over-the-counter pills or food supplements, or use of glucosamine sulfate versus glucosamine hydrochloride, may have relevance when attempting to interpret the seemingly contradictory results of different clinical trials. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial) compared placebo, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and celecoxib in a parallel, blinded 6-month multicentre study of patients with knee OA. This trial showed that glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate alone or in combination did not reduce pain effectively in the overall group of patients with OA of the knee. However, exploratory analyses suggest that the combination of glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate may be effective in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe knee pain. For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of OA has been mainly symptomatic. However, in recent years, several randomised controlled studies have assessed the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate using plain radiography to measure joint space narrowing over years. There is some evidence to suggest a structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin

  13. Silica-Coated Metal Chelating-Melanin Nanoparticles as a Dual-Modal Contrast Enhancement Imaging and Therapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soojeong; Park, Wooram; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-01-11

    Bioinspired melanin nanoparticle (Mel NP) synthesized with dopamine has been of great interest in various biomedical applications. However, the utilization of fascinating characters of Mel NP such as innate MR contrast effects, high affinity to metal ions, strong light absorption requires special design with strategic synthetic method for its own purpose. Here, we have introduced paramagnetic Gd(3+) metal ions and silica nanocoating on Mel NP for the dual-modal MRI/fluorescent contrast-enhanced imaging and therapeutics. The Gd(3+) chelating kinetics of Mel NP by quinone and hydroquinone residues were optimized in various conditions of Gd(3+) amounts and pH in solution for improving MRI contrast enhancing properties of the Mel NP. Then, bioinert silica was coated on the surfaces of Gd-chelated Mel NP (Gd-Mel@SiO2 NP) with a modified sol-gel process. The silica nanocoating allowed increased outer sphere water diffusion time, resulting a significantly brighter MR T1 contrast effect of Gd-Mel@SiO2 NP, comparing with a bare Gd-Mel NP or clinical grade T1 contrast agent. Further, when the Gd-Mel@SiO2 NP was labeled with fluorescent molecules, a significantly enhanced fluorescent intensity was achieved by the silica nanocoating that preventing the innate fluorescent deactivation property of melanin. Finally, in vitro/in vivo dual-modal contrast enhanced MRI/fluorescent imaging and feasibility of image-guided cancer therapeutic applications using Gd-Mel@SiO2 NPs were successfully evaluated in a clinically relevant human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  14. Tailoring the network properties of Ca2+ crosslinked Aloe vera polysaccharide hydrogels for in situ release of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    McConaughy, Shawn D; Kirkland, Stacey E; Treat, Nicolas J; Stroud, Paul A; McCormick, Charles L

    2008-11-01

    Properties of Aloe vera galacturonate hydrogels formed via Ca(2+) crosslinking have been studied in regard to key parameters influencing gel formation including molecular weight, ionic strength, and molar ratio of Ca(2+) to COO(-) functionality. Dynamic oscillatory rheology and pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) studies have been conducted on hydrogels formed at specified Ca(2+) concentrations in the presence and absence of Na(+) and K(+) ions in order to assess the feasibility of in situ gelation for controlled delivery of therapeutics. Aqueous Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in nasal and subcutaneous fluids induce the formation of elastic Aloe vera polysaccharide (AvP) hydrogel networks. By altering the ratio of Ca(2+) to COO (-) functionality, networks may be tailored to provide elastic modulus (G') values between 20 and 20000 Pa. The Aloe vera polysaccharide exhibits time-dependent phase separation in the presence of monovalent electrolytes. Thus the relative rates of calcium induced gelation and phase separation become major considerations when designing a system for in situ delivery applications where both monovalent (Na(+), K(+)) and divalent (Ca(2+)) ions are present. PFG-NMR and fluorescence microscopy confirm that distinctly different morphologies are present in gels formed in the presence and absence of 0.15 M NaCl. Curve fitting of theoretical models to experimental release profiles of fluorescein labeled dextrans indicate diffusion rates are related to hydrogel morphology. These studies suggest that for efficient in situ release of therapeutic agents, polymer concentrations should be maintained above the critical entanglement concentration ( Ce, 0.60 wt %) when [Ca(2+)]/[COO(-)] ratios are less than 1. Additionally, the monovalent electrolyte concentration in AvP solutions should not exceed 0.10 M prior to Ca(2+) crosslinking.

  15. Surface modification of medical implant materials with hydrophilic polymers for enhanced biocompatibility and delivery of therapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbaniak, Daniel J.

    2004-11-01

    In the research reported here, the surface modification of medical grade poly(dimethyl siloxane), polyetherurethane, and stainless steel through gamma-radiation grafting of hydrophilic polymers was investigated. Emphasis was placed on developing improved and simplified surface modification methods that produce more stable and more bioacceptible hydrophilic graft surfaces. As a result of this research, new surface modification techniques were developed that yield significantly improved surface stability unachievable using previous surface modification techniques. The surface modification of poly(dimethyl siloxane) with hydrophilic polymers was carried out using gamma radiation initiated graft polymerization. The addition of alkali metal hydroxides afforded a unique way to enhance the grafting of N-vinyl-2 pyrrolidone, dimethylacryamide, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphoryl choline, N,N-dimethyl-N-(methacryloyloxyethyl)-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium-betaine, N,N-dimethyl-N-(methacrylamidopropyl)-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium-betaine, and copolymers thereof to silicones. Ethanolamine was found to further enhance the grafting of some hydrophilic polymers to silicone. The resulting hydrophilic surface grafts were resistant to hydrophobic surface rearrangement. This process overcomes previous problems inherent in silicone surface modification. The technique was also found to moderately enhance the grafting of hydrophilic monomers to polyetherurethane and to 316-L stainless steel. The surface modification of 316-L stainless steel was further enhanced by treating the substrates with a chromium III methacrylate bonding agent prior to irradiation. The coatings were evaluated for their potential use as depots for delivering therapeutic agents. The release of ofloxacin from surface-modified poly(dimethyl siloxane) and dexamethasone from surface-modified 316-L stainless steel was evaluated by in-vitro experiments. Therapeutic levels of drugs were released from surface-modified specimens

  16. An HPLC/Mass Spectrometry Platform for the Development of Multimodality Contrast Agents and Targeted Therapeutics: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Small Molecule Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Valerie; Misra, Preeti; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    The production of disease-targeted agents requires the covalent conjugation of a targeting molecule with a contrast agent or therapeutic, followed by purification of the product to homogeneity. Typical targeting molecules, such as small molecules and peptides, often have high charge to mass ratios and/or hydrophobicity. Contrast agents and therapeutics themselves are also diverse, and include lanthanide chelates for MRI, 99mTc chelates for SPECT, 90Y chelates for radiotherapy, 18F derivatives for PET, and heptamethine indocyanines for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging. We have constructed a general-purpose HPLC/mass spectrometry platform capable of purifying virtually any targeted agent for any modality. The analytical sub-system is composed of a single dual-head pump that directs mobile phase to either a hot cell for the purification of radioactive agents or to an ES-TOF MS for the purification of nonradioactive agents. Nonradioactive agents are also monitored during purification by ELSD, absorbance, and fluorescence. The preparative sub-system is composed of columns and procedures that permit rapid scaling from the analytical system. To demonstrate the platform's utility, we describe the preparation of five small molecule derivatives specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA): a gadolinium derivative for MRI, indium, rhenium, and technetium derivatives for SPECT, and a yttrium derivative for radiotherapy. All five compounds are derived from a highly anionic targeting ligand engineered to have a single nucleophile for N-hydroxysuccinimide-based conjugation. We also describe optimized column/mobile phase combinations and mass spectrometry settings for each class of agent, and discuss strategies for purifying molecules with extreme charge and/or hydrophobicity. Taken together, our study should expedite the development of disease-targeted, multimodality diagnostic and therapeutic agents. PMID:17193697

  17. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of an adjuvanted protein therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine in subjects with HIV-1 infection: a randomised placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Thomas; Plettenberg, Andreas; Arastéh, Keikawus; Van Lunzen, Jan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Jaeger, Hans; Janssens, Michel; Burny, Wivine; Collard, Alix; Roman, François; Loeliger, Alfred; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Bourguignon, Patricia; Lavreys, Ludo; Voss, Gerald

    2014-05-07

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidate F4/AS01 has previously been shown to induce potent and persistent polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cell responses in HIV-1-seronegative volunteers. This placebo-controlled study evaluated two doses of F4/AS01 1-month apart in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced and ART-naïve HIV-1-infected subjects (1:1 randomisation in each cohort). Safety, HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 viral load were monitored for 12 months post-vaccination. Reactogenicity was clinically acceptable and no vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. The frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells 2 weeks post-dose 2 was significantly higher in the vaccine group than in the placebo group in both cohorts (p<0.05). Vaccine-induced HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells exhibited a polyfunctional phenotype, expressing at least CD40L and IL-2. No increase in HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cells or change in CD8(+) T-cell activation marker expression profile was detected. Absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts were variable over time in both cohorts. Viral load remained suppressed in ART-experienced subjects. In ART-naïve subjects, a transient reduction in viral load from baseline was observed 2 weeks after the second F4/AS01 dose, which was concurrent with a higher frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells expressing at least IL-2 in this cohort. In conclusion, F4/AS01 showed a clinically acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile, and induced polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in ART-experienced and ART-naïve subjects. These findings support further clinical investigation of F4/AS01 as a potential HIV-1 vaccine for therapeutic use in individuals with HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  20. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Rolf F; Wu, Gong; Meisen, W Hans; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Huo, Tianyao; Kellough, David A; Kaumaya, Pravin; Turro, Claudia; Agius, Lawrence M; Kaur, Balveen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP]) fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR) to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux®) as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5) and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt) employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic) convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP382-Pt and PEP455-Pt bioconjugates were cytotoxic in vitro and, based on this, a pilot study was initiated using PEP455-Pt. The end point for this study was tumor size at 6 weeks following tumor cell implantation and 4 weeks following ic CED of PEP455-Pt to F98 glioma-bearing rats. Neuropathologic examination revealed that five of seven rats were either tumor-free or only had microscopic tumors at 42 days following tumor implantation compared to a mean survival time of 20.5 and 26.3 days for untreated controls. In conclusion, we have succeeded in reformatting the

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  3. Bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) as a therapeutic agent: an update on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Yang; Yang, Yin-Xue; Zhe, Hong; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Triterpenoids have been used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries because of their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticancer, and anticarcinogenic properties. Bardoxolone methyl, the C-28 methyl ester of 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) known as CDDO-Me or RTA 402, is one of the derivatives of synthetic triterpenoids. CDDO-Me has been used for the treatment of chronic kidney disease, cancer (including leukemia and solid tumors), and other diseases. In this review, we will update our knowledge of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of CDDO-Me, highlighting its clinical benefits and the underlying mechanisms involved. The role of the Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with CNC homology-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the therapeutic activities of CDDO-Me will be discussed. CDDO-Me contains α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups on rings A and C that can generate reversible adducts with the thiol groups of Cys residues in target proteins such as Keap1 and IκB kinase. At low nanomolar concentrations, CDDO-Me protects the cells against oxidative stress via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, while CDDO-Me at low micromolar concentrations induces apoptosis by increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasinging intracellular glutathione levels. Through Keap1/Nrf2 and nuclear factor-κB pathways, this agent can modulate the activities of a number of important proteins that regulate inflammation, redox balance, cell proliferation and programmed cell death. In a Phase I trial in cancer patients, CDDO-Me was found to have a slow and saturable oral absorption, a relatively long terminal phase half-life (39 hours at 900 mg/day), nonlinearity (dose-dependent) at high doses (600-1,300 mg/day), and high interpatient variability. As a multifunctional agent, CDDO-Me has improved the renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

  4. First In Vivo Evaluation of Liposome-encapsulated 223Ra as a Potential Alpha-particle-emitting Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-09-13

    Liposomes carrying chemotherapeutics have had some success in cancer treatment and may be suitable carriers for therapeutic radionuclides. This study was designed to evaluate the biodistribution of and to estimate the radiation doses from the alpha emitter 223Ra loaded into pegylated liposomes in selected tissues. 223Ra was encapsulated in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin by ionophore-mediated loading. The biodistribution of liposomal 223Ra was compared to free cationic 223Ra in Balb/C mice. We showed that liposomal 223 Ra circulated in the blood with an initial half-time in excess of 24 hours, which agreed well with that reported for liposomal doxorubicin in rodents, while the blood half-time of cationic 223Ra was considerably less than one hour. When liposomal 223 Ra was catabolized, the released 223Ra was either excreted or taken up in the skeleton. This skeletal uptake increased up to 14 days after treatment, but did not reach the level seen with free 223Ra. Pre-treatment with non-radioactive liposomal doxorubicin 4 days in advance lessened the liver uptake of liposomal 223 Ra. Dose estimates showed that the spleen, followed by bone surfaces, received the highest absorbed doses. Liposomal 223 Ra was relatively stable in vivo and may have potential for radionuclide therapy and combination therapy with chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Arsenic trioxide: A promising novel therapeutic agent for lymphoproliferative and autoimmune syndromes in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Bobé, Pierre; Bonardelle, Danielle; Benihoud, Karim; Opolon, Paule; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2006-12-15

    MRL/lpr mice develop a human lupuslike syndrome and, as in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), massive lymphoproliferation due to inactivation of Fas-mediated apoptosis. Presently, no effective therapy exists for ALPS, and long term, therapies for lupus are hazardous. We show herein that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is able to achieve quasi-total regression of antibody- and cell-mediated manifestations in MRL/lpr mice. As2O3 activated caspases and eliminated the activated T lymphocytes responsible for lymphoproliferation and skin, lung, and kidney lesions, leading to significantly prolonged survival rates. This treatment also markedly reduced anti-DNA autoantibody, rheumatoid factor, IL-18, IFN-gamma, nitric oxide metabolite, TNF-alpha, Fas ligand, and IL-10 levels and immune-complex deposits in glomeruli. As2O3 restored cellular reduced glutathione levels, thereby limiting the toxic effect of nitric oxide, which is overproduced in MRL/lpr mice. Furthermore, As2O3 protected young animals against developing the syndrome and induced almost total disease disappearance in older affected mice, thereby demonstrating that it is a novel promising therapeutic agent for autoimmune diseases.

  6. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Human RAD51 Potentiates Breast Cancer Cell Killing by Therapeutic Agents in Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. RAD51, a key homologous recombination protein, promotes the search for homology and DNA strand exchange between homologous DNA molecules. RAD51 is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells. Downregulation of RAD51 by siRNA increases radio- or chemo-sensitivity of cancer cells. We recently developed a specific RAD51 small molecule inhibitor, B02, which inhibits DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51 in vitro. In this study, we used human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to investigate the ability of B02 to inhibit RAD51 and to potentiate an anti-cancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, etoposide, topotecan, and cisplatin. We found that the combination of B02 with cisplatin has the strongest killing effect on the cancer cells. We then tested the effect of B02 and cisplatin on the MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in mouse xenografts. Our results showed that B02 significantly enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on tumor cells in vivo. Our current data demonstrate that use of RAD51-specific small molecule inhibitor represents a feasible strategy of a combination anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24971740

  7. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  8. Inconsistent labeling of food effect for oral agents across therapeutic areas: differences between oncology and non-oncology products

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonmo Peter; Ratain, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several recent oral oncology drug labels were labeled to be administered in fasted states despite the fact that food increases their bioavailability. Since this was inconsistent with principles of oral drug delivery, we hypothesized that there were inconsistencies across therapeutic areas. Experimental Design Oral agents approved by US FDA from January 2000 to May 2009 were included in our study. Comparison of the food labeling patterns between oncology and non-oncology drugs was made using Fisher's exact test. Results Of 99 drugs evaluated, 34 showed significant food effects on bioavailability. When food markedly enhanced bioavailability, 8 out of 9 non-oncology drugs were labeled “fed” to take advantage of the food-drug interaction while all oncology drugs (n=3) were labeled to be administered in “fasted” states (Fisher's exact; p= 0.01). Conclusions Drug labeling pattern with respect to food-drug interactions observed with oncology drugs is in contradiction to fundamental pharmacological principles, as exemplified in the labeling of non-oncology drugs. PMID:20736327

  9. Synthetic Curcumin Analogs as Inhibitors of β -Amyloid Peptide Aggregation: Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    There is a crucial need to develop new effective drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the currently available AD treatments provide only momentary and incomplete symptomatic relief. Amongst natural products, curcumin, a major constituent of turmeric, has been intensively investigated for its neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced toxicity in cultured neuronal cells. The ability of curcumin to attach to Aβ peptide and prevent its accumulation is attributed to its three structural characteristics such as the presence of two aromatic end groups and their co-planarity, the length and rigidity of the linker region and the substitution conformation of these aromatics. However, curcumin failed to reach adequate brain levels after oral absorption in AD clinical trials due to its low water solubility and poor oral bioavailability. A number of new curcumin analogs that mimic the active site of the compound along with analogs that mimic the curcumin anti-amyloid effect combined with anticholinesterase effect have been developed to enhance the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, water solubility, stability at physiological conditions and delivery of curcumin. In this article, we have summarized all reported synthetic analogs of curcumin showing effects on β-amyloid and discussed their potential as therapeutic and diagnostic agents for AD.

  10. Pharmacological profile of the novel anti-inflammatory corticosteroid NS-126, a therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoki; Hashino, Asami; Kageyama, Kiyoto; Zhang, Xin; Sasagawa, Takahiro; Kawakita, Naoko; Takahashi, Yosuke; Yoshida, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Mikiko; Mori, Kazuya; Kyoi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    NS-126 (9-fluoro-11beta,17,21-trihydroxy-16alpha-methylpregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione 21-cyclohexanecarboxylate 17-cyclopropanecarboxylate) is a novel, highly lipophilic anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. We compared NS-126 and the widely used intranasal corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (FP) in a guinea-pig model of allergic rhinitis and a rat model of airway eosinophilia. In the allergic rhinitis model, NS-126 and FP reduced sneezing and nasal obstruction to similar extents. In the airway eosinophilia model, both compounds inhibited the infiltration of eosinophils into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but the effect of NS-126 was longer-lasting than that of FP. In vitro, NS-126 showed lower affinity than FP for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a weaker inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. We also investigated DX-17-CPC, a metabolite of NS-126 generated in nasal tissue by carboxylesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis at the 17-position. DX-17-CPC showed greater affinity than NS-126 for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a stronger inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. The long duration of the anti-allergic effects of NS-126 may be explained by its high lipophilicity, while the strength of its anti-allergic effects may be explained by the generation of the active metabolite DX-17-CPC. NS-126 is a long-acting intranasal corticosteroid and a promising therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis.

  11. Copper(II)-Bis(Thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes as Antibacterial Agents: Insights into Their Mode of Action and Potential as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Maira M.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Shafer, William M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of lipophilic copper (Cu)-containing complexes to combat bacterial infections. In this work, we showed that Cu complexes with bis(thiosemicarbazone) ligands [Cu(btsc)] exert antibacterial activity against a range of medically significant pathogens. Previous work using Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed that Cu(btsc) complexes may act as inhibitors of respiratory dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain. We now show that these complexes are also toxic against pathogens that lack a respiratory chain. Respiration in Escherichia coli was slightly affected by Cu(btsc) complexes, but our results indicate that, in this model bacterium, the complexes act primarily as agents that deliver toxic Cu ions efficiently into the cytoplasm. Although the chemistry of Cu(btsc) complexes may dictate their mechanism of action, their efficacy depends heavily on bacterial physiology. This is linked to the ability of the target bacterium to tolerate Cu and, additionally, the susceptibility of the respiratory chain to direct inhibition by Cu(btsc) complexes. The physiology of N. gonorrhoeae, including multidrug-resistant strains, makes it highly susceptible to damage by Cu ions and Cu(btsc) complexes, highlighting the potential of Cu(btsc) complexes (and Cu-based therapeutics) as a promising treatment against this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26239980

  12. [Anesthesia in the breast feeding period. Excretion of anesthetic agents and adjuvants into breast milk and potential pharmacological side-effects on the suckling infant].

    PubMed

    Lang, C; Geldner, G; Wulf, H

    2003-10-01

    Whenever an anesthetic is needed during the breast feeding period, potential pharmacological side-effects imposed on the infant by any kind of anesthetic agent used during both general and regional anesthesia are in contrast to the potential beneficial effects of breast feeding for the infant and the mother. Despite an increasing knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms of excretion of drugs and their metabolites through breast milk, information about most anesthetic drugs are still either inconclusive or contradictory. Often it is impossible to decide whether a certain substance that is potentially excreted through breast milk might be harmless or harmful for the breast-fed infant. In addition to that only few anesthetic agents and drugs used in conjunction with an anesthetic are officially approved for use during pregnancy and the period of breast feeding and for medico-legal reasons pharmaceutical companies generally advise against the use of any of those drugs during this period. However, based on the knowledge of pharmacological properties of commonly used anesthetic agents it is reasonable to assume that continuing breast feeding in the immediate postoperative period after a single anesthetic can be considered safe for the infant since no adverse effects caused by or secondary to the single use of those drugs can be expected. Provided there is a careful choice of anesthetic drugs, there is no need to consider that a single general or regional anesthetic is an indication to stop breast feeding. Even planned elective surgical procedures do not need to be postponed. No scientifically based interval between surgery under general or regional anesthesia and resumption of breast feeding can be recommended. Instead current opinion is that breast feeding can be resumed as soon as the mother feels physically and mentally capable to do so.

  13. Hepcidin as a predictive factor and therapeutic target in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment for anemia of chronic disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Milan; Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Asshoff, Malte; Haschka, David; Seifert, Markus; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Wilflingseder, Doris; Posch, Wilfried; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick R; Theurl, Igor; Weiss, Günter

    2014-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is a multifactorial disorder, resulting mainly from inflammation-driven reticuloendothelial iron retention, impaired erythropoiesis, and reduced biological activity of erythropoietin. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used for the treatment of anemia of chronic disease, although with varying response rates and potential adverse effects. Serum concentrations of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease and linked to the pathogenesis of this disease, because hepcidin blocks cellular iron egress, thus limiting availability of iron for erythropoiesis. We tested whether serum hepcidin levels can predict and affect the therapeutic efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment using a well-established rat model of anemia of chronic disease. We found that high pre-treatment hepcidin levels correlated with an impaired hematologic response to an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in rats with anemia of chronic disease. Combined treatment with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and an inhibitor of hepcidin expression, LDN-193189, significantly reduced serum hepcidin levels, mobilized iron from tissue stores, increased serum iron levels and improved hemoglobin levels more effectively than did the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent or LDN-193189 monotherapy. In parallel, both the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent/LDN-193189 combined reduced the expression of cytokines known to inhibit erythropoiesis. We conclude that serum hepcidin levels can predict the hematologic responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in anemia of chronic disease. Pharmacological inhibition of hepcidin formation improves the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent's therapeutic efficacy, which may favor a reduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosages, costs and side effects.

  14. Overview of adjuvant systemic therapy in early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A; Singletary, S Eva

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy in reducing risk of distant relapse from breast cancer have been recognized for several decades. The intent of adjuvant therapy is to eliminate the occult micrometastatic breast cancer burden before it progresses into clinically apparent disease. Successful delivery of effective adjuvant systemic therapy as a complement to surgical management of breast cancer has contributed to the steady declines in breast cancer mortality observed internationally over the past 2 decades. Ongoing clinical and translational research in breast cancer seeks to improve the efficacy of systemic agents for use in the conventional postoperative (adjuvant) setting.

  15. A phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of a peptide-based human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine with Candida skin test reagent as a novel vaccine adjuvant for treating women with biopsy-proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, William W; Stratton, Shawna L; Myrick, Rebecca S; Vaughn, Rita; Donnalley, Lisa M; Coleman, Hannah N; Mercado, Maria; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea M; Spencer, Horace J; Andrews-Collins, Nancy R; Hitt, Wilbur C; Low, Gordon M; Manning, Nirvana A; McKelvey, Samantha S; Smith, Dora; Smith, Michael V; Phillips, Amy M; Quick, C Matthew; Jeffus, Susanne K; Hutchins, Laura F; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Non-surgical treatments for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3 (CIN2/3) are needed as surgical treatments have been shown to double preterm delivery rate. The goal of this study was to demonstrate safety of a human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccine called PepCan, which consists of four current good-manufacturing production-grade peptides covering the HPV type 16 E6 protein and Candida skin test reagent as a novel adjuvant. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was a single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation phase I clinical trial, and the patients (n = 24) were women with biopsy-proven CIN2/3. Four injections were administered intradermally every 3 weeks in limbs. Loop electrical excision procedure (LEEP) was performed 12 weeks after the last injection for treatment and histological analysis. Six subjects each were enrolled (50, 100, 250, and 500 μg per peptide). RESULTS: The most common adverse events (AEs) were injection site reactions, and none of the patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities. The best histological response was seen at the 50 μg dose level with a regression rate of 83% (n = 6), and the overall rate was 52% (n = 23). Vaccine-induced immune responses to E6 were detected in 65% of recipients (significantly in 43%). Systemic T-helper type 1 (Th1) cells were significantly increased after four vaccinations (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that PepCan is safe. A significantly increased systemic level of Th1 cells suggests that Candida, which induces interleukin-12 (IL-12) in vitro, may have a Th1 promoting effect. A phase II clinical trial to assess the full effect of this vaccine is warranted. PMID:26451301

  16. Progressive transfusion and growth factor independence with adjuvant sertraline in low risk myelodysplastic syndrome treated with an erythropoiesis stimulating agent and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Kirtan; Li, Rui; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Thiagarajan, Perumal; Mims, Martha; Rivero, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Refractoriness to growth factor therapy is commonly associated with inferior outcome in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (LR-MDS) who require treatment for cytopenias. However, the mechanisms leading to refractoriness are unknown. Here we describe a clinically depressed 74-year-old male with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) and documented growth factor refractory anemia after erythropoeisis stimulating agent (ESA) therapy, who attained transfusion and growth factor independence after the addition of sertraline to his medication regimen. Our case demonstrates hematological improvement-erythroid (HI-E) in growth factor refractory, low risk MDS and highlights a potential mechanistic link between common inflammatory diseases and LR-MDS. PMID:25709889

  17. Challenges facing adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Circe; Fernández, Luis E

    2004-12-01

    An adjuvant is defined as a product that increases or modulates the immune response against an antigen (Ag). Based on this general definition many authors have postulated that the ideal adjuvant should increase the potency of the immune response, while being non-toxic and safe. Although dozens of different adjuvants have been shown to be effective in preclinical and clinical studies, only aluminium-based salts (Alum) and squalene-oil-water emulsion (MF59) have been approved for human use. However, for the development of therapeutic vaccines to treat cancer patients, the prerequisites for an ideal cancer adjuvant differ from conventional adjuvants for many reasons. First, the patients that will receive the vaccines are immuno-compromised because of, for example, impaired mechanisms of antigen presentation, non-responsiveness of activated T cells and enhanced inhibition of self-reactivity by regulatory T cells. Second, the tumour Ag are usually self-derived and are, therefore, poorly immunogenic. Third, tumours develop escape mechanisms to avoid the immune system, such as tumour editing, low or non-expression of MHC class I molecules or secretion of suppressive cytokines. Thus, adjuvants for cancer vaccines need to be more potent than for prophylactic vaccines and consequently may be more toxic and may even induce autoimmune reactions. In summary, the ideal cancer adjuvant should rescue and increase the immune response against tumours in immuno-compromised patients, with acceptable profiles of toxicity and safety. The present review discusses the role of cancer adjuvants at the different phases of the generation of antitumour immunity following vaccination.

  18. siRNA Against KIR3DL1 as a Potential Gene Therapeutic Agent in Controlling HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Feng; Pan, Ji-Cheng; Lin, Nan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Tang, Wei-Ming; Xu, Jin-Shui; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Qiu, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Guo-Hong; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Huan, Xi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the expression of KIR3DL1 receptor on natural killer (NK) cells, in order to promote the ability of NK cells to destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cells and thus prevent failure of siRNA therapy targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus among HIV-1 infected patients in vitro. Methods: A siRNA targeting KIR3DL1 was synthesized and then modified with cholesterol, methylene, and sulfate. The inhibitory action of the siRNAs on primary cultured NK cells was detected. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in NK cells was measured. The intended functions of NK cells in vitro were analyzed by CFSE and PI methods. Results: There were no significant differences in inhibiting the expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells between the modified and unmodified siRNAs, while inhibition by each of them differed significantly from controls. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in the NK cells was abundant due to unsuccessful expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells, which further promoted function of the NK cells. Conclusion: The siRNA against KIR3DL1 could enhance the ability of the NK cells to kill the HIV-1 infected cells in vitro and successfully prevented the failure of siRNA therapy targeting the HIV-1 virus. Therefore, it can act as a potential gene therapeutic agent among HIV-1 infected people. PMID:24834927

  19. Neutron-activatable holmium-containing mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a potential radionuclide therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Yuan, Hong; Chung, Younjee; Kim, Jin-Ki; Huckle, James E; Li, Chenxi; Sadgrove, Matthew; Tran, Thanh Huyen; Jay, Michael; Lu, Xiuling

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were explored as a carrier material for the stable isotope (165)Ho and, after neutron capture, its subsequent therapeutic radionuclide, (166)Ho (half-life, 26.8 h), for use in radionuclide therapy of ovarian cancer metastasis. (165)Ho-MSNs were prepared using (165)Ho-acetylacetonate and MCM-41 silica particles, and stability was determined after irradiation in a nuclear reactor (reactor power, 1 MW; thermal neutron flux of approximately 5.5 × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)s). SPECT/CT and tissue biodistribution studies were performed after intraperitoneal administration of (166)Ho-MSNs to SKOV-3 ovarian tumor-bearing mice. Radiotherapeutic efficacy was studied by using PET/CT with (18)F-FDG to determine tumor volume and by monitoring survival. The holmium-MSNs were able to withstand long irradiation times in a nuclear reactor and did not release (166)Ho after significant dilution. SPECT/CT images and tissue distribution results revealed that (166)Ho-MSNs accumulated predominantly in tumors (32.8% ± 8.1% injected dose/g after 24 h; 81% ± 7.5% injected dose/g after 1 wk) after intraperitoneal administration. PET/CT images showed reduced (18)F-FDG uptake in tumors, which correlated with a marked increase in survival after treatment with approximately 4 MBq of (166)Ho-MSNs. The retention of holmium in nanoparticles during irradiation and in vivo after intraperitoneal administration as well as their efficacy in extending survival in tumor-bearing mice underscores their potential as a radiotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer metastasis.

  20. Acanthamoeba polyphaga Strain Age and Method of Cyst Production Influence the Observed Efficacy of Therapeutic Agents and Contact Lens Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Reanne; Heaselgrave, Wayne; Kilvington, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The effects of age in culture and the type of medium used for induction of Acanthamoeba polyphaga (Ros) cysts on susceptibilities to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB; 3 μg/ml), chlorhexidine digluconate (30 μg/ml), myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (20 μg/ml), H2O2 (3%), and two multipurpose contact lens solutions (MPS-1 and MPS-2, based on 1 μg of PHMB per ml) were examined. Strain Ros-02 was cryopreserved on isolation in 1991, while strain Ros-91 had been in continuous axenic culture. Significant differences in susceptibilities to the disinfectants were found depending on the medium used for cyst preparation and the age of the test strain, with Ros-02 generally being more resistant. For example, the killing of Ros-91 cysts produced from an axenic culture of trophozoites in the presence of 50 mM MgCl2 by MPS-2 was 4 logs, but the killing of Ros-02 by MPS-2 was only 2 logs (P < 0.05) and killing of both strains with cysts obtained from monoxenic cultures with Escherichia coli was only 1 log (P < 0.001). Assays repeated with different batches of the various cyst types gave consistent results. A batch of Ros-91 cysts stored at 4°C and tested over an 8-week period with MPS-1 showed progressively increasing susceptibility to disinfection, although there was no loss of viability during storage (P < 0.01). These observations have important implications for the standardization and interpretation of Acanthamoeba disinfectant and therapeutic agent testing. PMID:14506012

  1. Assessing the adherence to and the therapeutic effectiveness of hypolipidemic agents in a population of patients in Brazil: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Cunico, Cássia; Picheth, Geraldo; Correr, Cassyano J.; Scartezini, Marileia

    2013-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the relation between patient adherence and therapeutic effectiveness of hypolipidemic agents in clinical practice. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 417 patients using hypolipidemic drugs (simvastatin, atorvastatin) between 2003 and 2010 was performed. The population studied consists of patients assisted by the Public Health Service in the far-west region of the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The Medication Possession Ratio obtained from pharmacy refill data was used to measure patient adherence. Therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated based on the difference obtained in the serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, before and after taking the drug, in an average time of 8.3 months. Results Following the treatment with hypolipidemic agents, it has been observed a reduction of 14.3% for total cholesterol, 19.6% for LDL-cholesterol, and 14.4% for triglycerides. HDL-cholesterol increased by an 8.0% average. The major changes in lipid profile were promoted by atorvastatin 20 mg daily. The medication adherence rate decreased over the monitoring period. Adherence rates below 60% were associated with therapeutic failure, while rates equal to 80% or higher were associated with the best response to the lipid-lowering drugs. Conclusion Adherence to hypolipidemic agents is higher at the beginning of the treatment, but it decreases over time, affecting the achievement of therapeutic goals. PMID:25035713

  2. pH Dependent Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins, Their Mechanisms of Action and Potential as Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Erum; Dennison, Sarah R.; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent antibiotics of the innate immune system that have been extensively investigated as a potential solution to the global problem of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. A group of AMPs that are increasingly being reported are those that utilise pH dependent antimicrobial mechanisms, and here we review research into this area. This review shows that these antimicrobial molecules are produced by a diverse spectrum of creatures, including vertebrates and invertebrates, and are primarily cationic, although a number of anionic examples are known. Some of these molecules exhibit high pH optima for their antimicrobial activity but in most cases, these AMPs show activity against microbes that present low pH optima, which reflects the acidic pH generally found at their sites of action, particularly the skin. The modes of action used by these molecules are based on a number of major structure/function relationships, which include metal ion binding, changes to net charge and conformational plasticity, and primarily involve the protonation of histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues at low pH. The pH dependent activity of pore forming antimicrobial proteins involves mechanisms that generally differ fundamentally to those used by pH dependent AMPs, which can be described by the carpet, toroidal pore and barrel-stave pore models of membrane interaction. A number of pH dependent AMPs and antimicrobial proteins have been developed for medical purposes and have successfully completed clinical trials, including kappacins, LL-37, histatins and lactoferrin, along with a number of their derivatives. Major examples of the therapeutic application of these antimicrobial molecules include wound healing as well as the treatment of multiple cancers and infections due to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In general, these applications involve topical administration, such as the use of mouth washes, cream formulations and hydrogel

  3. pH Dependent Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins, Their Mechanisms of Action and Potential as Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Malik, Erum; Dennison, Sarah R; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent antibiotics of the innate immune system that have been extensively investigated as a potential solution to the global problem of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microbes. A group of AMPs that are increasingly being reported are those that utilise pH dependent antimicrobial mechanisms, and here we review research into this area. This review shows that these antimicrobial molecules are produced by a diverse spectrum of creatures, including vertebrates and invertebrates, and are primarily cationic, although a number of anionic examples are known. Some of these molecules exhibit high pH optima for their antimicrobial activity but in most cases, these AMPs show activity against microbes that present low pH optima, which reflects the acidic pH generally found at their sites of action, particularly the skin. The modes of action used by these molecules are based on a number of major structure/function relationships, which include metal ion binding, changes to net charge and conformational plasticity, and primarily involve the protonation of histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues at low pH. The pH dependent activity of pore forming antimicrobial proteins involves mechanisms that generally differ fundamentally to those used by pH dependent AMPs, which can be described by the carpet, toroidal pore and barrel-stave pore models of membrane interaction. A number of pH dependent AMPs and antimicrobial proteins have been developed for medical purposes and have successfully completed clinical trials, including kappacins, LL-37, histatins and lactoferrin, along with a number of their derivatives. Major examples of the therapeutic application of these antimicrobial molecules include wound healing as well as the treatment of multiple cancers and infections due to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In general, these applications involve topical administration, such as the use of mouth washes, cream formulations and hydrogel

  4. Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Fatty Degeneration of Liver and Atheromatous Plaques: An Experimental Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sangi, Sibghatullah Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since long high fat diet (HFD) is being blamed for causing fatty degeneration of liver and formation of atheromatous plaques. At present, no proper pharmacotherapy is available for both the conditions. In this study, different substances containing monounsaturated fatty acids were used to observe their protective effects in the HFD induced damage to liver and coronary vessels. Objectives: To discover effective therapeutic agents for HFD induced fatty degeneration of liver and atheromatous plaques. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted from September 2015 to April 2016. In this study, rats were divided into nine groups according to dietary regimen. Each group comprised six rats. Saturated fat was given in the form of butter, and unsaturated fat was given in the form of corn oil, olive oil, Nigella sativa oil, and crushed garlic. Serum samples were taken to estimate lipid profile, liver functions, cardiac functions, and kidney functions. Visceras were removed after animal sacrifice, and histopathological examination was done. Results and Conclusion: During the study period, the weight of animals changed significantly in some groups. Those animals which were given crushed garlic along with high saturated fat diet, showed protection against accumulation of lipids in the hepatocytes. Olive oil and Nigella sativa oil were comparatively less effective. SUMMARY Consumption of Garlic, Nigella Sativa and Olive oil significantly improved/revised the Fatty Degeneration of liver induced by intake of High Fat Diet.No fat deposition was found in the liver when Garlic, Nigella Sativa and Olive oil, were given concomitantly with HFD.Hepatocytes functioned better even in comparison to control and a decrease in liver enzymes was found with use of Garlic.Use of Garlic, Nigella Sativa and Olive oil, prevented the plaque formation in the vessels and decreased serum lipids.Beneficial effects of Garlic were significant in comparison to Nigella Sativa and Olive oil

  5. A case-control, mono-center, open-label, pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of therapeutic touch in preventing radiation dermatitis in women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Younus, Jawaid; Lock, Michael; Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Malec, Jitka; D'Souza, David; Stitt, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a non-invasive commonly used complementary therapy. TT is based on the use of hand movements and detection of energy field congestion to correct imbalances. Improvement in subjective symptoms in a variety of clinical trials has been seen with TT. The effect of TT during radiotherapy for breast cancer is unknown. Women undergoing adjuvant radiation for Stage I/II breast cancer post conservative surgery were recruited for this cohort study. TT treatments were administered three times per week following radiation therapy. Feasibility was defined as an a priori threshold of 15 of 17 patients completing all TT treatments. The preventive effectiveness of TT was evaluated by documenting the 'time to develop' and the 'worst grade of radiation' dermatitis. Toxicity was assessed using NCIC CTC V3 dermatitis scale. Cosmetic rating was performed using the EORTC Breast Cosmetic Rating. The quality of life, mood and energy, and fatigue were assessed by EORTC QLQ C30, POMS, and BFI, respectively. The parameters were assessed at baseline, and serially during treatment. A total of 49 patients entered the study (17 in the TT Cohort and 32 in the Control Cohort). Median age in TT arm was 63 years and in control arm was 59 years. TT was considered feasible as all 17 patients screened completed TT treatment. There were no side effects observed with the TT treatments. In the TT Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade II in nine patients (53%). Median time to develop the worst grade was 22 days. In the Control Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade III in 1 patient. However, the most common toxicity grade was II in 15 patients (47%). Three patients did not develop any dermatitis. Median time to develop the worst grade in the control group was 31 days. There was no difference between cohorts for the overall EORTC cosmetic score and there was no significant difference in before and after study levels in quality of life, mood

  6. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  7. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  8. (Neo)adjuvant systemic therapy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, M C T; van den Eertwegh, A J; Haanen, J B; Wouters, M W J M

    2017-03-01

    Surgery still is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with stage II and III melanoma, but despite great efforts to gain or preserve locoregional control with excision of the primary tumour, satellites, intransits, sentinel node biopsy and lymphadenectomy, surgery alone does not seem to improve survival any further. Prognosis for patients with high risk melanoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of 40 to 80%. Only interferon-2b has been approved as adjuvant therapy since 1995, but clinical integration is low considering the high risk-benefit ratio. In recent years systemic targeted- and immunotherapy have proven to be beneficial in advanced melanoma and could be a promising strategy for (neo)adjuvant treatment of patients with resectable high risk melanomas as well. Randomised, placebo- controlled phase III trials on adjuvant systemic targeted- and immunotherapy are currently being performed using new agents like ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, vemurafenib and dabrafenib plus trametinib. In this article we review the literature on currently known adjuvant therapies and currently ongoing trials of (neo)adjuvant therapies in high risk melanomas.

  9. Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticle Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Mitchell, Alaina R.; Johnson, Stacy L.; Wagner-Bartak, Claus; Morcol, Tulin; Bell, Steve J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Vaccination to protect against human infectious diseases may be enhanced by using adjuvants that can selectively stimulate immunoregulatory responses. In a murine model, a novel nanoparticulate adjuvant composed of calcium phosphate (CAP) was compared with the commonly used aluminum (alum) adjuvants for its ability to induce immunity to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections. Results indicated that CAP was more potent as an adjuvant than alum, elicited little or no inflammation at the site of administration, induced high titers of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) antibody and neutralizing antibody, and facilitated a high percentage of protection against HSV-2 infection. Additional benefits of CAP include (i) an insignificant IgE response, which is an important advantage over injection of alum compounds, and (ii) the fact that CAP is a natural constituent of the human body. Thus, CAP is very well tolerated and absorbed. These studies were performed with animal models. By virtue of the potency of this CAP adjuvant and the relative absence of side effects, we believe that this new CAP formulation has great potential for use as an adjuvant in humans. PMID:11063495

  10. Near-Infrared Laser Adjuvant for Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Yuan, Jianping; Forbes, Benjamin; Hibert, Mathew L.; Lee, Eugene L. Q.; Whicher, Laura; Goudie, Calum; Yang, Yuan; Chen, Tao; Edelblute, Beth; Collette, Brian; Edington, Laurel; Trussler, James; Nezivar, Jean; Leblanc, Pierre; Bronson, Roderick; Tsukada, Kosuke; Suematsu, Makoto; Dover, Jeffrey; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Safe and effective immunologic adjuvants are often essential for vaccines. However, the choice of adjuvant for licensed vaccines is limited, especially for those that are administered intradermally. We show that non-tissue damaging, near-infrared (NIR) laser light given in short exposures to small areas of skin, without the use of additional chemical or biological agents, significantly increases immune responses to intradermal influenza vaccination without augmenting IgE. The NIR laser-adjuvanted vaccine confers increased protection in a murine influenza lethal challenge model as compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. We show that NIR laser treatment induces the expression of specific chemokines in the skin resulting in recruitment and activation of dendritic cells and is safe to use in both mice and humans. The NIR laser adjuvant technology provides a novel, safe, low-cost, simple-to-use, potentially broadly applicable and clinically feasible approach to enhancing vaccine efficacy as an alternative to chemical and biological adjuvants. PMID:24349390

  11. Comparison of status epilepticus models induced by pilocarpine and nerve agents - a systematic review of the underlying aetiology and adopted therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tang, F R; Loke, W K; Ling, E A

    2011-01-01

    Among potential radiological, nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, cholinergic nerve agents from chemical weapons remain a realistic terrorist threat due to its combination of high lethality, demonstrated use and relative abundance of un-destroyed stockpiles in various militaries around the world. While current fielded antidotes are able to mitigate acute poisoning, effective neuroprotection in the field remains a challenge amongst subjects with established status epilepticus following nerve agent intoxication. Due to ethical, safety and surety issues, extensive preclinical and clinical research on cholinergic nerve agents is not possible. This may have been a contributory factor for the slow progress in uncovering new neuroprotectants for nerve agent casualties with established status epilepticus. To overcome this challenge, comparative research with surrogate chemicals that produce similar hypercholinergic toxicity but with less security concerns would be a useful approach forward. In this paper, we will systemically compare the mechanism of seizure generation, propagation and the subsequent clinical, hematologic, and metabolic, biochemical, neuroinflammatory changes and current therapeutic approaches reported in pilocarpine, soman, and sarin models of seizures. This review will be an important first step in closing this knowledge gap among different closely related models of seizures and neurotoxicity. Hopefully, it will spur further efforts in using surrogate cholinergic models by the wider scientific community to expedite the development of a new generation of antidotes that are better able to protect against delayed neurological effects inflicted by nerve agents.

  12. Intranasal delivery bypasses the blood-brain barrier to target therapeutic agents to the central nervous system and treat neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Leah R; Frey, William H

    2008-12-10

    Intranasal delivery provides a practical, non-invasive method of bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain and spinal cord. This technology allows drugs that do not cross the BBB to be delivered to the central nervous system within minutes. It also directly delivers drugs that do cross the BBB to the brain, eliminating the need for systemic administration and its potential side effects. This is possible because of the unique connections that the olfactory and trigeminal nerves provide between the brain and external environment. Intranasal delivery does not necessarily require any modification to therapeutic agents. A wide variety of therapeutics, including both small molecules and macromolecules, can be targeted to the olfactory system and connected memory areas affected by Alzheimer's disease. Using the intranasal delivery system, researchers have reversed neurodegeneration and rescued memory in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Intranasal insulin-like growth factor-I, deferoxamine, and erythropoietin have been shown to protect the brain against stroke in animal models. Intranasal delivery has been used to target the neuroprotective peptide NAP to the brain to treat neurodegeneration. Intranasal fibroblast growth factor-2 and epidermal growth factor have been shown to stimulate neurogenesis in adult animals. Intranasal insulin improves memory, attention, and functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment, and even improves memory and mood in normal adult humans. This new method of delivery can revolutionize the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and other brain disorders.

  13. Metallic ions as therapeutic agents in tissue engineering scaffolds: an overview of their biological applications and strategies for new developments

    PubMed Central

    Mouriño, Viviana; Cattalini, Juan Pablo; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview on the application of metallic ions in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, focusing on their therapeutic applications and the need to design strategies for controlling the release of loaded ions from biomaterial scaffolds. A detailed summary of relevant metallic ions with potential use in tissue engineering approaches is presented. Remaining challenges in the field and directions for future research efforts with focus on the key variables needed to be taken into account when considering the controlled release of metallic ions in tissue engineering therapeutics are also highlighted. PMID:22158843

  14. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    TITLE: Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Susan F Hudachek, MS, PhD...toxicity of adjuvant breast cancer drug combination therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0457 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...breast cancer. However, co-administration of drugs , particularly agents that are substrates for or inhibitors of p-glycoprotein, can result in

  16. In Vivo Application of Bacteriophage as a Potential Therapeutic Agent To Control OXA-66-Like Carbapenemase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Belonging to Sequence Type 357.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jongsoo; Ryu, Choong-Min; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Hwan; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2016-07-15

    The increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) strains in intensive care units has caused major problems in public health worldwide. Our aim was to determine whether this phage could be used as an alternative therapeutic agent against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, specifically CRAB clinical isolates, using a mouse model. Ten bacteriophages that caused lysis in CRAB strains, including blaOXA-66-like genes, were isolated. YMC13/01/C62 ABA BP (phage Bϕ-C62), which showed the strongest lysis activity, was chosen for further study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), host range test, one-step growth and phage adsorption rate, thermal and pH stability, bacteriolytic activity test, genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, and therapeutic effect of phage using a mouse intranasal infection model. The phage Bϕ-C62 displayed high stability at various temperatures and pH values and strong cell lysis activity in vitro The phage Bϕ-C62 genome has a double-stranded linear DNA with a length of 44,844 bp, and known virulence genes were not identified in silico. In vivo study showed that all mice treated with phage Bϕ-C62 survived after intranasal bacterial challenge. Bacterial clearance in the lung was observed within 3 days after bacterial challenge, and histologic damage also improved significantly; moreover, no side effects were observed. In our study, the novel A. baumannii phage Bϕ-C62 was characterized and evaluated in vitro, in silico, and in vivo These results, including strong lytic activities and the improvement of survival rates, showed the therapeutic potential of the phage Bϕ-C62 as an antimicrobial agent. This study reports the potential of a novel phage as a therapeutic candidate or nontoxic disinfectant against CRAB clinical isolates in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. In Vivo Application of Bacteriophage as a Potential Therapeutic Agent To Control OXA-66-Like Carbapenemase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Belonging to Sequence Type 357

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongsoo; Ryu, Choong-Min; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) strains in intensive care units has caused major problems in public health worldwide. Our aim was to determine whether this phage could be used as an alternative therapeutic agent against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, specifically CRAB clinical isolates, using a mouse model. Ten bacteriophages that caused lysis in CRAB strains, including blaOXA-66-like genes, were isolated. YMC13/01/C62 ABA BP (phage Bϕ-C62), which showed the strongest lysis activity, was chosen for further study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), host range test, one-step growth and phage adsorption rate, thermal and pH stability, bacteriolytic activity test, genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, and therapeutic effect of phage using a mouse intranasal infection model. The phage Bϕ-C62 displayed high stability at various temperatures and pH values and strong cell lysis activity in vitro. The phage Bϕ-C62 genome has a double-stranded linear DNA with a length of 44,844 bp, and known virulence genes were not identified in silico. In vivo study showed that all mice treated with phage Bϕ-C62 survived after intranasal bacterial challenge. Bacterial clearance in the lung was observed within 3 days after bacterial challenge, and histologic damage also improved significantly; moreover, no side effects were observed. IMPORTANCE In our study, the novel A. baumannii phage Bϕ-C62 was characterized and evaluated in vitro, in silico, and in vivo. These results, including strong lytic activities and the improvement of survival rates, showed the therapeutic potential of the phage Bϕ-C62 as an antimicrobial agent. This study reports the potential of a novel phage as a therapeutic candidate or nontoxic disinfectant against CRAB clinical isolates in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27208124

  18. In Vitro Sensitivity Profiling Of Neuroblastoma Cells Against A Comprehensive Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitor Library To Identify Agents For Future Therapeutic Studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anjali; Meier-Stephenson, Vanessa; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru

    2016-11-22

    Solid tumors represent one of the most widespread causes of death in children across the world. Neuroblastoma (NB) constitutes about 8% of all childhood tumors, yet accounts for more than 15% of death, with an unacceptable overall survival rate. Despite the current multimodal therapeutic approaches involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with myeloablative therapy and hematopoietic stem cell rescue, there is growing realization of the limitations of conventional agents to improve the outcome in high risk metastatic disease. Hence, efforts have intensified to identify new targets and novel therapeutic approaches to improve cure rates in these children. Among the significant number of new therapeutics that are being evaluated for cancer each year, the agents that have been developed for common adult malignancies have the added advantage of having usable toxicity data already available for consideration. To identify potential therapeutic targets, we screened a small molecule library of 151 small kinase inhibitors against NB cell lines. Based on our initial screening data, we further examined the potential of Bcr-Abl targeting small molecule inhibitors to affect the growth and survival of NB cells. Our findings confirm the diversity in activity among the currently available Bcr-Abl inhibitors, possibly reflecting the molecular heterogeneity and off-target activity in each combination. In depth analyses of ponatinib, an orally bioavailable multi-target kinase inhibitor and an effective agent in the treatment of refractory Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positive leukemia, show growth inhibition at sub-micromolar concentrations. In addition, we also identified the potential of this agent to interfere with insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathways and Src activity. Ponatinib also induced apoptosis, indicated by caspase-9 and PARP cleavage. Furthermore, at sub-lethal conditions ponatinib significantly inhibited the ability of these cells to migrate

  19. Personalizing colon cancer adjuvant therapy: selecting optimal treatments for individual patients.

    PubMed

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Salazar, Ramon; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-06-01

    For more than three decades, postoperative chemotherapy-initially fluoropyrimidines and more recently combinations with oxaliplatin-has reduced the risk of tumor recurrence and improved survival for patients with resected colon cancer. Although universally recommended for patients with stage III disease, there is no consensus about the survival benefit of postoperative chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer. The most recent adjuvant clinical trials have not shown any value for adding targeted agents, namely bevacizumab and cetuximab, to standard chemotherapies in stage III disease, despite improved outcomes in the metastatic setting. However, biomarker analyses of multiple studies strongly support the feasibility of refining risk stratification in colon cancer by factoring in molecular characteristics with pathologic tumor staging. In stage II disease, for example, microsatellite instability supports observation after surgery. Furthermore, the value of BRAF or KRAS mutations as additional risk factors in stage III disease is greater when microsatellite status and tumor location are taken into account. Validated predictive markers of adjuvant chemotherapy benefit for stage II or III colon cancer are lacking, but intensive research is ongoing. Recent advances in understanding the biologic hallmarks and drivers of early-stage disease as well as the micrometastatic environment are expected to translate into therapeutic strategies tailored to select patients. This review focuses on the pathologic, molecular, and gene expression characterizations of early-stage colon cancer; new insights into prognostication; and emerging predictive biomarkers that could ultimately help define the optimal adjuvant treatments for patients in routine clinical practice.

  20. Practical Synthesis of Prostratin, DPP, and Their Analogs, Adjuvant Leads Against Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Paul A.; Kee, Jung-Min; Warrington, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapies have been effective in decreasing active viral loads in AIDS patients, the persistence of latent viral reservoirs prevents eradication of the virus. Prostratin and DPP (12-deoxyphorbol-13-phenylacetate) activate the latent virus and thus represent promising adjuvants for antiviral therapy. Their limited supply and the challenges of accessing related structures have, however, impeded therapeutic development and the search for clinically superior analogs. Here we report a practical synthesis of prostratin and DPP starting from phorbol or crotophorbolone, agents readily available from renewable sources, including a biodiesel candidate. This synthesis reliably supplies gram quantities of the therapeutically promising natural products, hitherto available only in low and variable amounts from natural sources, and opens access to a variety of new analogs. PMID:18451298

  1. The therapeutic value of natural agents to treat miRNA targeted breast cancer in African-American and Caucasian-American women.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M Wahidur; Sakr, Wael A

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States, with African-American (AA) women showing significantly higher rates than Caucasian-American (CA) women do. The reason for this racial disparity remains unknown, and factors that might be responsible for the differences in incidence and mortality have not been identified. One possible factor could be microRNAs (miRs), which are small noncoding regulatory RNAs involved intimately in cancer, and the expression of certain miRs may be decreased or increased in the breast tumors of AA and CA women. Therefore, modulation of miRs using natural agents could lead to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aggressive forms of breast cancer in women of different racial backgrounds. The function of natural agents in the regulation of miRs has not been investigated extensively. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of naturally occurring agents as potent antitumor agents thought to function by targeting miRs as contributing factors to the disparity in breast cancer between AA and CA women.

  2. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles could function as a novel cancer therapeutic agent by employing a suitable targeted drug delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Hosseini, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Employment of nanovehicular system for delivering apoptogenic agent to cancer cells for inducing apoptosis has widely been investigated. Loading efficacy and controlled release of the agents are of the inseparable obstacles that hamper the efforts in reaching an efficacious targeted cancer therapy method. When the carrier itself is apoptogenic, then there is no need to load the carrier with apoptogenic agent and just delivering of the particle to the specific location matters. Hence, we hypothesize that amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticle (ACPN) is a potent candidate for apoptosis induction, although encapsulation in liposome shell, and surface decoration with targeting ligand (TL), and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) plays a pivotal role in the employment of this agent. It is well understood that elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) would result in the induction of apoptosis. ACPN has the potential to cause imbalance in this medium by elevating [Ca2+]c. Owning to the fact that the nanoparticles should be delivered into cytosol, it is necessary to trap them in a liposomal shell for evading endocytosis. It was demonstrated that employment of the trans-activator of transcription (TAT) as CPP eminently enhances the efficacy of endosomal escape; therefore, the platform is designed in a way that TAT is positioned on the surface of the liposome. Due to the fact that the apoptosis should be induced in sole cancer cells, Folate as TL is also attached on the surface of the liposome. This hypothesis heralds the new generation of chemotherapeutic agents and platforms which could have less side effect than the most common ones, in addition to other advantages they have.

  3. Amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles could function as a novel cancer therapeutic agent by employing a suitable targeted drug delivery platform.

    PubMed

    Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Hosseini, Vahid

    2013-10-30

    Employment of nanovehicular system for delivering apoptogenic agent to cancer cells for inducing apoptosis has widely been investigated. Loading efficacy and controlled release of the agents are of the inseparable obstacles that hamper the efforts in reaching an efficacious targeted cancer therapy method. When the carrier itself is apoptogenic, then there is no need to load the carrier with apoptogenic agent and just delivering of the particle to the specific location matters. Hence, we hypothesize that amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticle (ACPN) is a potent candidate for apoptosis induction, although encapsulation in liposome shell, and surface decoration with targeting ligand (TL), and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) plays a pivotal role in the employment of this agent. It is well understood that elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) would result in the induction of apoptosis. ACPN has the potential to cause imbalance in this medium by elevating [Ca2+]c. Owning to the fact that the nanoparticles should be delivered into cytosol, it is necessary to trap them in a liposomal shell for evading endocytosis. It was demonstrated that employment of the trans-activator of transcription (TAT) as CPP eminently enhances the efficacy of endosomal escape; therefore, the platform is designed in a way that TAT is positioned on the surface of the liposome. Due to the fact that the apoptosis should be induced in sole cancer cells, Folate as TL is also attached on the surface of the liposome. This hypothesis heralds the new generation of chemotherapeutic agents and platforms which could have less side effect than the most common ones, in addition to other advantages they have.

  4. The use of penicillamine as an adjuvant to tartar emetic in the treatment of experimental schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Khayyal, M. T.; Girgis, N. I.; McConnell, E.

    1967-01-01

    One of the principal drawbacks of antimonial therapy in schistosomiasis has been the prevalence of annoying, and sometimes dangerous, side-effects. The adjuvant administration of chelating agents offers a possible solution to this problem, providing this can be achieved without appreciably decreasing the therapeutic effect of the drug. The authors found that the chelating agent penicillamine lowered the toxicity of tartar emetic for mice and hamsters without affecting the tissue uptake of antimony. When administered in a similar manner to hamsters infected with Schistosoma mansoni there was no effect on the uptake of antimony by the parasites, or on the cure rate. This suggests a potential usefulness of penicillamine in antimony therapy. PMID:5301382

  5. Supplemental Substances Derived from Foods as Adjunctive Therapeutic Agents for Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Disorders12

    PubMed Central

    Bigford, Gregory E.; Del Rossi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders and diseases (NDDs) that are either chronically acquired or triggered by a singular detrimental event are a rapidly growing cause of disability and/or death. In recent times, there have been major advancements in our understanding of various neurodegenerative disease states that have revealed common pathologic features or mechanisms. The many mechanistic parallels discovered between various neurodegenerative diseases suggest that a single therapeutic approach may be used to treat multiple disease conditions. Of late, natural compounds and supplemental substances have become an increasingly attractive option to treat NDDs because there is growing evidence that these nutritional constituents have potential adjunctive therapeutic effects (be it protective or restorative) on various neurodegenerative diseases. Here we review relevant experimental and clinical data on supplemental substances (i.e., curcuminoids, rosmarinic acid, resveratrol, acetyl-l-carnitine, and ω-3 (n–3) polyunsaturated fatty acids) that have demonstrated encouraging therapeutic effects on chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration resulting from acute adverse events, such as traumatic brain injury. PMID:25022989

  6. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    PubMed

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  7. Cytokines as adjuvants for ruminant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lofthouse, S A; Andrews, A E; Elhay, M J; Bowles, V M; Meeusen, E N; Nash, A D

    1996-01-01

    Successful vaccination against any potential pathogen is critically dependent on inducing an appropriate immune response. The pivotal role of cytokines in the immune response to vaccination suggests that non-protective responses or responses that exacerbate disease subsequent to infectious challenge may be the result of limiting or preferential production of one or a number of these mediators. This suggests that the use of recombinant cytokines as vaccine adjuvants may offer a mechanism whereby the magnitude and phenotype of the immune response to vaccination can be specifically modified. In mice, recombinant cytokines have been used extensively as therapeutics, while studies describing vaccine adjuvant activity are more limited. Recombinant (r) interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2 and interferon (IFN) gamma have been used primarily to enhance humoral responses with enhanced protection assessed where appropriate. Cytokine adjuvant studies in ruminants have been restricted to recombinant ovine (rov) and bovine (rbov) IL-1 and IL-2. In sheep, their application has been optimised with respect to dose, route of delivery and formulation, for induction of humoral and cell mediated immunity (DTH and cytotoxicity) to the model protein antigen (Ag) avidin. The level of adjuvant activity of IL-1 in particular compares favourably to that of a variety of other traditional and new chemical adjuvants and detailed analysis has indicated no adverse local or systemic side-effects. Recent studies in our laboratory demonstrating the effectiveness of rovIL-1 as an adjuvant in single and multi-component bacterial toxoid vaccines, and studies from other laboratories demonstrating the application of rbovIL-1 as an adjuvant for the response in cattle to live attenuated viral vaccines, suggest that rIL-1 may become the adjuvant of choice for diseases where protection is mediated by high levels of circulating antibody (Ab). With respect to helminth parasites, IL-1 may prove useful as a component of

  8. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA): A therapeutic agent for boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, C. S.; Prasad, P. V.; Busse, Paul; Tang, L.; Zamenhof, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo quantitation of boron is necessary for obtaining pharmacokinetic data on candidate boronated delivery agents developed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Such data, in turn, would facilitate the optimization of the temporal sequence of boronated drug infusion and neutron irradiation. Current approaches to obtaining such pharmacokinetic data include: positron emission tomography employing F-18 labeled boronated delivery agents (e.g., p-boronophenylalanine), ex vivo neutron activation analysis of blood (and very occasionally tissue) samples, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. In general, NMR approaches have been hindered by very poor signal to noise achieved due to the large quadrupole moments of B-10 and B-11 and (in the case of B-10) very low gyromagnetic ratio, combined with low physiological concentrations of these isotopes under clinical conditions. This preliminary study examines the feasibility of proton NMR spectroscopy for such applications. We have utilized proton NMR spectroscopy to investigate the detectability of p-boronophenylalanine fructose (BPA-f) at typical physiological concentrations encountered in BNCT. BPA-f is one of the two boron delivery agents currently undergoing clinical phase-I/II trials in the U.S., Japan, and Europe. This study includes high-resolution 1H spectroscopic characterization of BPA-f to identify useful spectral features for purposes of detection and quantification. The study examines potential interferences, demonstrates a linear NMR signal response with concentration, and presents BPA NMR spectra in ex vivo blood samples and in vivo brain tissues. PMID:10435522

  9. Sales of veterinary antimicrobial agents for therapeutic use in food-producing animal species in Japan between 2005 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Y; Asai, T; Koike, R; Tsuyuki, M; Sugiura, K

    2014-12-01

    The use of veterinary antimicrobial agents in animals can result in the emergence and selection of resistant bacteria in food-producing animals. This study elucidated the use of veterinary antimicrobial agents in Japan in terms of milligrams of active ingredient sold per kilogram of biomass between 2005 and 2010. Data on sales of antimicrobial agents and on the biomass of the target animal species were compiled from statistics published bythe Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. The quantities of antimicrobials used varied between animal species: the highest usage was observed in pigs (392 to 423 mg/ kg), followed by beef cattle (45 to 67 mg/kg), broiler chickens (44 to 63 mg/kg) and dairy cattle (33 to 49 mg/kg). For the animal species combined, usage of third- and fourth-generation cefalosporins, fluoroquinolones and macrolides ranged from 0.10 to 0.14 mg/kg biomass, 1.1 to 1.3 mg/kg biomass and 7.8 to 10.6 mg/kg biomass, respectively.

  10. Erythrocyte-derived photo-theranostic agents: hybrid nano-vesicles containing indocyanine green for near infrared imaging and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Baharak; Bacon, Danielle; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-07-01

    Development of theranostic nano-constructs may enable diagnosis and treatment of diseases at high spatial resolution. Some key requirements for clinical translation of such constructs are that they must be non-toxic, non-immunogenic, biodegradable, with extended circulating lifetime. Cell-based structures, particularly those derived from erythrocytes, are promising candidate carrier systems to satisfy these requirements. One particular type of theranostic materials utilize light-sensitive agents that once photo-activated can provide diagnostic imaging capability, and elicit therapeutic effects. Here we demonstrate the first successful engineering of hybrid nano-scale constructs derived from membranes of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocytes that encapsulate the near infrared chromophore, indocyanine green. We show the utility of the constructs as photo-theranostic agents in fluorescence imaging and photothermal destruction of human cells. These erythrocyte-mimicking nano-structures can be derived autologously, and may have broad applications in personal nanomedicine ranging from imaging and photo-destruction of cancerous tissues to vascular abnormalities, and longitudinal evaluations of therapeutic interventions.

  11. A review of current murine models of multiple myeloma used to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents on tumour growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Paton-Hough, J; Chantry, A D; Lawson, M A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-clinical in vivo models of multiple myeloma are essential tools for investigating the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma and for testing new therapeutic agents and strategies prior to their potential use in clinical trials. Over the last five decades, several different types of murine models of multiple myeloma have been developed ranging from immunocompetent syngeneic models, e.g. the 5 T series of myeloma cells, to immunocompromised models including the SCID xenograft models, which use human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived cells. Other models include hybrid models featuring the implantation of SCID mice with bone chips (SCID-hu or SCID-rab) or 3-D bone scaffolds (SCID-synth-hu), and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop myeloma. Bearing in mind the differences in these models, it is not surprising that they reflect to varying degrees different aspects of myeloma. Here we review the past and present murine models of myeloma, with particular emphasis on their advantages and limitations, characteristics, and their use in testing therapeutic agents to treat myeloma tumour burden and bone disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Discovery of direct inhibitors of Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction as potential therapeutic and preventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Dhulfiqar Ali; Goldstein, Melanie; Albanyan, Haifa; Jin, Huijuan; Hu, Longqin

    2015-01-01

    The Keap1–Nrf2–ARE pathway is an important antioxidant defense mechanism that protects cells from oxidative stress and the Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction (PPI) has become an important drug target to upregulate the expression of ARE-controlled cytoprotective oxidative stress response enzymes in the development of therapeutic and preventive agents for a number of diseases and conditions. However, most known Nrf2 activators/ARE inducers are indirect inhibitors of Keap1–Nrf2 PPI and they are electrophilic species that act by modifying the sulfhydryl groups of Keap1׳s cysteine residues. The electrophilicity of these indirect inhibitors may cause "off-target" side effects by reacting with cysteine residues of other important cellular proteins. Efforts have recently been focused on the development of direct inhibitors of Keap1–Nrf2 PPI. This article reviews these recent research efforts including the development of high throughput screening assays, the discovery of peptide and small molecule direct inhibitors, and the biophysical characterization of the binding of these inhibitors to the target Keap1 Kelch domain protein. These non-covalent direct inhibitors of Keap1–Nrf2 PPI could potentially be developed into effective therapeutic or preventive agents for a variety of diseases and conditions. PMID:26579458

  13. Erythrocyte-derived photo-theranostic agents: hybrid nano-vesicles containing indocyanine green for near infrared imaging and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Baharak; Bacon, Danielle; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-01-01

    Development of theranostic nano-constructs may enable diagnosis and treatment of diseases at high spatial resolution. Some key requirements for clinical translation of such constructs are that they must be non-toxic, non-immunogenic, biodegradable, with extended circulating lifetime. Cell-based structures, particularly those derived from erythrocytes, are promising candidate carrier systems to satisfy these requirements. One particular type of theranostic materials utilize light-sensitive agents that once photo-activated can provide diagnostic imaging capability, and elicit therapeutic effects. Here we demonstrate the first successful engineering of hybrid nano-scale constructs derived from membranes of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocytes that encapsulate the near infrared chromophore, indocyanine green. We show the utility of the constructs as photo-theranostic agents in fluorescence imaging and photothermal destruction of human cells. These erythrocyte-mimicking nano-structures can be derived autologously, and may have broad applications in personal nanomedicine ranging from imaging and photo-destruction of cancerous tissues to vascular abnormalities, and longitudinal evaluations of therapeutic interventions. PMID:23846447

  14. Impact of the direct application of therapeutic agents to the terminal recta of experimentally colonized calves on Escherichia coli O157:H7 shedding.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Stuart W; Nart, Pablo; Sales, Jill; Flockhart, Allen; Gally, David L; Low, J Christopher

    2007-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important intestinal pathogen of humans with a main reservoir of domesticated ruminants, particularly cattle. It is anticipated that the risk of human infection can be reduced by controlling the organism within its reservoir hosts. Several options for the control of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle have been proposed, but none have been demonstrated to be successful in the field. Here we describe a novel experimental method, based on the terminal-rectum-restricted colonization described previously, to eliminate fecal carriage of E. coli O157:H7. In experimentally challenged calves, direct application to the rectal mucosa of either of two therapeutic agents, polymyxin B or chlorhexidine, greatly reduced bacterial shedding levels in the immediate posttreatment period. The most efficacious therapeutic agent, chlorhexidine, was compared in orally and rectally challenged calves. The treatment eliminated high-level shedding and reduced low-level shedding by killing bacteria at the terminal rectum. A rapid-detection system based on the ability to identify E. coli O157:H7 from swabs of the rectal mucosa was also assessed. This test was sufficiently sensitive to identify high-level bacterial carriage. Thus, a combination of the detection method and treatment regimens could be used in the field to eliminate high-level fecal excretion of E. coli O157:H7, so greatly reducing its prevalence within this host and the risk of human infection.

  15. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  16. Therapeutic benefits of regulating inflammation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nikoopour, Enayat; Schwartz, Jordan Ari; Singh, Bhagirath

    2008-09-01

    Autoimmunity results from the dysregulation of the immune system leading to tissue damage. Th1 and Th17 cells are known to be cellular mediators of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. The specific cytokine milieu within the site of inflammation or within secondary lymphatic tissues is important during the priming and effector phases of T cell response. In this review, we will address the nature of the inflammatory response in the context of autoimmune disease, specifically we will discuss the role of dendritic cells following stimulation of their innate pathogen recognition receptors in directing the development of T cell responses. We will focus on how dendritic cell subsets change the balance between major players in autoimmunity, namely Th1, Th17 and regulatory T cells. Th17 cells, once thought to only act as pathogenic effectors through production of IL-17, have been shown to have regulatory properties as well with co-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by a subset now referred to as regulatory Th17 cells. IL-17 is important in the induction of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Study of the inflammatory process following encounter with agents that stimulate the innate immune responses such as adjuvants opens a new horizon for the discovery of therapeutic agents including those derived from microorganisms. Microbial products such as adjuvants that function as TLR ligands may stimulate the immune system by interacting with Toll-like receptors (TLR) on antigen-presenting cells. Microbial agents such as Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or Freund's adjuvant (CFA) that induce a Th17 response are protective in models of autoimmune diseases particularly EAE and type 1 diabetes (T1D). The induction of innate immunity by these microbial products alters the balance in the cytokine microenvironment and may be responsible for modulation of the inflammation and protection from

  17. Targeting activator protein 1 signaling pathway by bioactive natural agents: Possible therapeutic strategy for cancer prevention and intervention.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Devesh; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sureda, Antoni; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Atanasov, Atanas G; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Sethi, Gautam; Bishayee, Anupam

    2017-09-23

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a key transcription factor in the control of several cellular processes responsible for cell survival proliferation and differentiation. Dysfunctional AP-1 expression and activity are involved in several severe diseases, especially inflammatory disorders and cancer. Therefore, targeting AP-1 has recently emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This review summarizes our current understanding of AP-1 biology and function as well as explores and discusses several natural bioactive compounds modulating AP-1-associated signaling pathways for cancer prevention and intervention. Current limitations, challenges, and future directions of research are also critically discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of buparvaquone as a therapeutic and clearing agent of Babesia equi of European origin in horses.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, J L; Lane, V M

    1992-08-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of buparvaquone in eliminating infection with Babesia equi of European origin in carrier horses and in splenectomized horses with experimentally induced acute infection. When administered at the rate of 5 mg/kg of body weight, IV, 4 times at 48-hour intervals, buparvaquone prompted rapid abatement of parasitemia. However, secondary and tertiary recrudescent parasitemias invariably returned with establishment of the carrier state. Buparvaquone, at the dosage evaluated, had transitory therapeutic efficacy against acute B equi infection in splenectomized horses, but was unable alone to clear carrier infection.

  19. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  20. Adjuvant Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, the standard of care for patients who have received nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is radiographic surveillance. With a number of novel targeted agents showing activity in the setting of metastatic RCC, there has been great interest in exploring the potential of the same agents in the adjuvant setting. Herein, we discuss the evolution of adjuvant trials in RCC, spanning from the immunotherapy era to the targeted therapy era. Pitfalls of current studies are addressed to provide a context for interpreting forthcoming results. Finally, we outline avenues to incorporate promising investigational agents, such as PD-1 (programmed death-1) inhibitors and MNNG transforming gene inhibitors, in future adjuvant trials. PMID:24969163

  1. Potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonist compounds as therapeutic agents for a wide range of cancer types.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jack D; Goldenberg, David M; Blumenthal, Rosalyn D

    2008-01-01

    PPARgamma is a therapeutic target that has been exploited for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with agonist drugs. Since PPARgamma is expressed by many hematopoietic, mesodermal and epithelial cancers, agonist drugs were tested and shown to have both preclinical and clinical anticancer activities. While preclinical activity has been observed in many cancer types, clinical activity has been observed only in pilot and phase II trials in liposarcoma and prostate cancer. Most studies address agonist compounds, with substantially fewer reports on anticancer effects of PPARgamma antagonists. In cancer model systems, some effects of PPARgamma agonists were not inhibited by PPARgamma antagonists, suggesting noncanonical or PPARgamma-independent mechanisms. In addition, PPARgamma antagonists, such as T0070907 and GW9662, have exhibited antiproliferative effects on a broad range of hematopoietic and epithelial cell lines, usually with greater potency than agonists. Also, additive antiproliferative effects of combinations of agonist plus antagonist drugs were observed. Finally, there are preclinical in vivo data showing that antagonist compounds can be administered safely, with favorable metabolic effects as well as antitumor effects. Since PPARgamma antagonists represent a new drug class that holds promise as a broadly applicable therapeutic approach for cancer treatment, it is the subject of this review.

  2. Potential of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Antagonist Compounds as Therapeutic Agents for a Wide Range of Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Jack D.; Goldenberg, David M.; Blumenthal, Rosalyn D.

    2008-01-01

    PPARγ is a therapeutic target that has been exploited for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with agonist drugs. Since PPARγ is expressed by many hematopoietic, mesodermal and epithelial cancers, agonist drugs were tested and shown to have both preclinical and clinical anticancer activities. While preclinical activity has been observed in many cancer types, clinical activity has been observed only in pilot and phase II trials in liposarcoma and prostate cancer. Most studies address agonist compounds, with substantially fewer reports on anticancer effects of PPARγ antagonists. In cancer model systems, some effects of PPARγ agonists were not inhibited by PPARγ antagonists, suggesting noncanonical or PPARγ-independent mechanisms. In addition, PPARγ antagonists, such as T0070907 and GW9662, have exhibited antiproliferative effects on a broad range of hematopoietic and epithelial cell lines, usually with greater potency than agonists. Also, additive antiproliferative effects of combinations of agonist plus antagonist drugs were observed. Finally, there are preclinical in vivo data showing that antagonist compounds can be administered safely, with favorable metabolic effects as well as antitumor effects. Since PPARγ antagonists represent a new drug class that holds promise as a broadly applicable therapeutic approach for cancer treatment, it is the subject of this review. PMID:18779871

  3. Exploring the Potential of Venom from Nasonia vitripennis as Therapeutic Agent with High-Throughput Screening Tools

    PubMed Central

    Danneels, Ellen L.; Formesyn, Ellen M.; de Graaf, Dirk C.

    2015-01-01

    The venom from the ectoparasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) contains at least 80 different proteins and possibly even more peptides or other small chemical compounds, demonstrating its appealing therapeutic application. To better understand the dynamics of the venom in mammalian cells, two high-throughput screening tools were performed. The venom induced pathways related to an early stress response and activated reporters that suggest the involvement of steroids. Whether these steroids reside from the venom itself or show an induced release/production caused by the venom, still remains unsolved. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β was found to be down-regulated after venom and LPS co-treatment, confirming the anti-inflammatory action of N. vitripennis veno