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Sample records for adjuvant treatment options

  1. Axillary radiotherapy: an alternative treatment option for adjuvant axillary management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Axillary lymph node dissection is standard management of axilla in invasive breast cancer. Radiotherapy also is important in local treatment. It is controversial as to whether axillary radiotherapy can displace axillary lymph node dissection. We performed a meta-analysis comparing axillary radiotherapy with axillary dissection. No significant difference was observed for disease free survival and overall survival between the radiation group and the dissection group. There was also no significant difference in either the axillary recurrence or the local recurrence between the two groups. But the axillary relapse rate in the radiation group was higher than in the surgery group at five-year follow-up while the local recurrence rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group. A subgroup analysis showed that the difference in the axillary recurrence rate (RR = 0.20, P = 0.01) and local recurrence rate (RR = 4.7, P = 0.01) mainly appeared in the clinical node-positive subgroup. The edema rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group (RR = 2.08, 95%: 1.71–2.54, P < 0.0001). We concluded that radiotherapy may be an alternative treatment option for adjuvant management of the axilla in selected sub-groups of patients. PMID:27212421

  2. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  3. Adjuvant Surgical Oophorectomy Plus Tamoxifen in Premenopausal Women With Operable Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: A Global Treatment Option.

    PubMed

    Love, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    One third of annual new cases of breast cancer globally are now hormone receptor-positive tumors in premenopausal women from low- and middle-income countries. For this subgroup of women with breast cancer, high-income country guidelines suggest impractical and unaffordable adjuvant treatments. The balance of clinical trial evidence now suggests that surgical oophorectomy plus tamoxifen is a safe and practical treatment for these women in low- and middle-income countries. Additionally, new randomized trial data suggest that women in the second half of an anovulatory cycle benefit minimally from surgical oophorectomy done at this time, which implies that regularly cycling women will benefit more than has been shown from this procedure. Allred scoring of levels of hormone receptors is a practical and inexpensive approach to the assessment of magnitudes of response to oophorectomy plus tamoxifen. These circumstances suggest that more detailed consideration of this option should characterize clinical practice guidelines in high-income countries because of their global impact. PMID:27117241

  4. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  5. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  6. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  7. [New options in adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Saltel-Fulero, Aurélien; Donnadieu, Anne; Leman-Detours, Solenne; Cottu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is a compulsory step in the adjuvant management of early breast cancer expressing the estrogen receptor, by reducing as much as possible serum and tissue levels of estrogens. Tamoxifen is the standard therapy for non-menopausal women. Ovarian function suppression, in addition to exemestane or tamoxifen, could be an alternative option for young women at high risk of recurrence and non menopausal after adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Recent studies show a trend for improvement of overall survival and disease-free-survival with aromatase inhibitors among postmenopausal women. However, safety of aromatase inhibitors is controversial and adverse events may lead to switch for tamoxifen with no loss of efficacy. Extension therapy by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor after five years of tamoxifen and for a total duration of ten years significantly improves overall survival. There is to date no data supporting the extension therapy after five years of aromatase inhibitor. PMID:26675809

  8. Porphyria Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... only. For treatment options for Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT) , Congenital Erythropoietic Protoporphyria (CEP) and Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria (HEP) ... Contact Us About Porphyria AIP VP HCP ADP PCT EPP CEP HEP Diet and Nutrition History of ...

  9. ARSENIC TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PPT presentation will provide information on the drinking water treatment options for small utilities to remove arsenic from ground water. The discussion will include information on the EPA BAT listed processes and on some of the newer technologies, such as the iron based ad...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  11. Androgenetic Alopecia: An Update of Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Yanna; Blanco, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by a non-scarring progressive miniaturization of the hair follicle in predisposed men and women with a pattern distribution. Although AGA is a very prevalent condition, approved therapeutic options are limited. This article discusses the current treatment alternatives including their efficacy, safety profile, and quality of evidence. Finasteride and minoxidil for male androgenetic alopecia and minoxidil for female androgenetic alopecia still are the therapeutic options with the highest level evidence. The role of antiandrogens for female patients, the importance of adjuvant therapies, as well as new drugs and procedures are also addressed. PMID:27554257

  12. Achilles Tendinosis: Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options. PMID:25729512

  13. Novel operative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, D N J; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    There are an increasing number of more novel options available for operative intervention. This chapter outlines a series of operative treatment options which are available to the modern clinician to select from once a decision has been made to treat a carious lesion operatively. A series of novel methods of caries removal have been described; including chemomechanical caries removal, air abrasion, sono-abrasion, polymer rotary burs and lasers. There are also novel approaches to ensure complete caries removal and novel approaches for the management of deep caries. A novel question increasingly asked by clinicians is: does all the caries need to be removed? Operative management options here include: therapeutic fissure sealants, ultraconservative caries removal, stepwise excavation and the Hall technique. In conclusion, there is now a growing wealth of evidence that questions the traditional methods of caries removal and restoring the tooth. In parallel, there is a growing movement exploring the merits of therapeutically sealing caries into the tooth. This philosophy is alien to many of today's dentists and, until further randomized controlled trials are carried out in primary care, prudent caution must be exercised with this promising approach. Research is required into techniques which will allow monitoring of sealed caries to detect any rare, but insidious, failures. These novel techniques are an alternative way of managing the later stages of the caries process from a sounder biological basis and have marked potential benefits to patients from treatment, pain and outcome perspectives. PMID:19494685

  14. [Adjuvant treatment of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Lo Pardo, Dante; Pezzuti, Gabriela; Selleri, Carmine; Pepe, Stefano; Esposito, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    A diabetic infected foot with erythema and fluctuation can suspect that the infection has passed the fascial compartmental, a condition that requires surgical drainage. Elective amputation may be considered for patients who have recurrent ulcers, irreversible loss of function or injuries that require long-term treatment in the hospital. If the diabetic infected foot appears ischemic it requires a treatment of revascularization. The outcome of revascularization is related with the extension of the damaged artery. The debridement removes the bacterial colonies, promotes granulation tissue and its reepithelialization, also facilitates the collection of samples for microbiological analyses. This procedure can be performed with the classic sharp instruments or with advanced autolytic dressings, maggots or ultrasonic equipment. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of infected diabetic foot is controversial because studies in this area are few and methodologically questionable. The same conclusion was reached also for the use of growth factors and skin substitutes. PMID:22982696

  15. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a single drug that targets several symptoms, or multiple medications that each treats a specific symptom. In recent years, narcolepsy treatment has changed with the widespread use of modafinil/armodafinil for daytime sleepiness, antidepressants (selective serotonin and dual serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) for cataplexy, and sodium oxybate for both symptoms. Other psychostimulants can also be used, such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and rarely amphetamines, as third-line therapy. Importantly, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness are required to monitor the treatment efficacy and to provide guidance on whether the treatment goals are met. Associated symptoms and comorbid conditions, such as hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, REM- and non REM-related parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea, should also be taken into account and managed, if required. In the near future, the efficacy of new wake-promoting drugs, anticataplectic agents, hypocretin replacement therapy and immunotherapy at the early stages of the disease should also be evaluated. PMID:27155860

  16. Achalasia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Volkanovska, Ance; Gigante, Giovanni; Cali, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, characterized by impaired swallow-induced, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and defective esophageal peristalsis. Unfortunately, there are no etiological therapies for achalasia. Patients present with dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation of undigested food, often leading to weight loss. The currently available treatments have the common aim of relieving symptoms by decreasing the pressure of the LES. This can be achieved with some medications, by inhibiting the cholinergic innervation (botulinum toxin), by stretching (endoscopic dilation) or cutting (surgery) the LES. Recently, other therapeutic options, including per-oral endoscopic myotomy have been developed and are gaining international consensus. The authors report on the benefits and weaknesses of the different therapies and provide an updated approach to the management of achalasia. PMID:26186641

  17. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-05-15

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  18. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  19. Venous ulcers: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Trent, Jennifer T; Falabella, Anna; Eaglstein, William H; Kirsner, Robert S

    2005-05-01

    Venous ulcers affect approximately 1% of the world's population, increasing healthcare expenditures and decreasing quality of life. Several hypotheses may help explain their origin. Incompetent veins or valves or impaired muscle function may lead to abnormal calf muscle pump function that can elevate ambulatory venous pressure (venous hypertension). This hypertension subsequently results in local venous dilatation and pooling, concomitantly trapping leukocytes that may release proteolytic enzymes that destroy tissues. Venous pooling also induces interendothelial pore widening and deposition of fibrin and other macromolecules that "trap" growth factors within them, rendering them unavailable for wound repair. Compression therapy, the mainstay treatment, reduces edema, reverses venous hypertension, and improves calf muscle pump function. Several treatment options can be employed as adjuvants to compression--eg, systemic therapy with pentoxifylline or aspirin, autologous grafts, tissue-engineered skin, growth factor therapy, and/or vein surgery. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management options regarding venous ulcers are reviewed. PMID:16014984

  20. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  1. OCD Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Coverage: ADAA Conference 2016 Submissions Hotel and Travel Conference Highlights Registration and Rates Full-Day Workshop With Reid Wilson Professional Education Clinical Fellows Webinars for Mental Health Treatment Providers Recordings: Webinars for Mental Health ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Melanoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treatments will also be taken. Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy : Procedures in which ... has spread to the lymph nodes . Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy are done to ...

  3. IBS Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... or bring on symptoms Stress management, gut-directed hypnosis, biofeedback, relaxation, or pain management techniques Consulting with ... Complimentary or Alternative Treatments Selecting a CAM Practitioner Hypnosis for IBS Yoga Medications Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents ...

  4. Treatment options--commentary.

    PubMed

    Arceci, R J

    1994-09-01

    Although effective treatments are available for many children with LCH, there are many others for whom no definitive therapy yet exists. These patients include those with 1) multisystem disease and associated organ dysfunction, 2) chronic, relapsing disease, 3) new onset pituitary involvement associated with diabetes insipidus and 4) long-term complications such as pulmonary fibrosis, liver fibrosis or CNS involvement. This introductory paper discusses these clinical problem areas and then reviews several new therapeutic approaches including novel chemotherapeutic agents, immunosuppressive strategies, bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. PMID:8075010

  5. Hyperphosphataemia: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Malberti, Fabio

    2013-05-01

    Hyperphosphataemia can be induced by three main conditions: a massive acute phosphate load, a primary increase in renal phosphate reabsorption, and an impaired renal phosphate excretion due to acute or chronic renal insufficiency. Renal excretion is so efficient in normal subjects that balance can be maintained with only a minimal rise in serum phosphorus concentration even for a large phosphorus load. Therefore, acute hyperphosphataemia usually resolves within few hours if renal function is intact. The most frequent cause of chronic hyperphosphataemia is chronic renal failure. Hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Lowering the phosphate load and maintaining serum phosphorus levels within the normal range are considered important therapeutic goals to improve clinical outcomes in CKD patients. Treatment consists of diminishing intestinal phosphate absorption by a low phosphate diet and phosphate binders. In CKD patients on dialysis an efficient dialysis removal of phosphate should be ensured. Dietary restriction of phosphorus while maintaining adequate protein intake is not sufficient to control serum phosphate levels in most CKD patients; therefore, the prescription of a phosphate binder is required. Aluminium-containing agents are efficient but no longer widely used because of their toxicity. Calcium-based salts are inexpensive, effective and most widely used, but there is now concern about their association with hypercalcaemia, parathyroid gland suppression, adynamic bone disease, and vascular and extraosseous calcification. The average daily dose of calcium acetate or carbonate prescribed in the randomised controlled trials to control hyperphosphataemia in dialysis patients ranges between 1.2 and 2.3 g of elemental calcium. Such doses are greater than the recommended dietary calcium intake and can lead to a positive calcium balance. Although large amounts of calcium salts should

  6. Adjuvant treatments for Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zaffanello, Marco; Brugnara, Milena; Franchini, Massimo; Fanos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Background: The management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) in childhood is controversial. Adjuvant therapies such as immunoglobulin, anticoagulants, and vitamins have been used with conventional treatments despite a lack of evidence of their efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the scientific literature regarding adjuvant treatments administered with conventional drugs in the treatment of childhood HSPN. Methods: Published articles were identified from the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1988–December 2008; key words: Henoch-Schönlein nephritis and Henoch-Schönlein purpura). The search was limited to published English-language studies on therapeutic options for HSPN in children. Results: A total of 12 studies were identified and included in this review; most (n = 8) were case series or retrospective studies. Studies of conventional therapy combined with adjuvant treatment should be interpreted with caution. In particular, factor XIII administration was reported to improve kidney symptoms in 1 study. Based on the results from 9 studies, no convincing evidence on intravenous immunoglobu-lin, urokinase, or anticoagulants was identified. No substantial information was available on the benefit of antiplatelet agents or heparin in treating HSPN. Integrating treatment with vitamin E was not recommended based on the results from 1 randomized controlled trial. Fish oil was reported to be effective in 1 case series. Conclusions: Studies concerning the treatment of HSPN in children with adjuvant therapies were retrospective and recommendations were drawn from level IV evidence. One randomized controlled trial on the use of tocopherol as adjuvant treatment was identified; however, no clinical utility was reported. At present, there is no strong evidence supporting benefits with the use of adjuvant treatments. PMID:24683235

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  8. [Melanoma brain metastases : Treatment options].

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, R; Tabatabai, G; Troost, E G C; Garzarolli, M; Beissert, S; Meier, F

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with metastatic melanoma will develop brain metastases, which are the most common cause of death. Until recently, local therapies (e. g., neurosurgery, radiotherapy) were the only options for brain metastases; however, effective systemic treatment options are now available. Upon suspicion of brain metastases, diagnostic staging with brain MRI and a neurological investigation are indicated. Prognostic factors such as number of cerebral metastases and symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase and S‑100 levels, extracerebral metastases, and ECOG status are considered during therapeutic planning. Treatment planning and therapeutic interventions should be based on an interdisciplinary and multimodal approach. Established treatments for singular brain metastases are neurosurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy, which can prolong survival. In patients with asymptomatic BRAF V600E-mutant brain metastases, the BRAF inhibitors dabrafenib, vemurafenib, and immunotherapy with ipilimumab are used. In the case of multiple symptomatic brain metastases, palliative whole-brain radiotherapy is used for treatment, although it has failed to show an overall survival benefit. Increased intracranial pressure and epileptic seizures are addressed with corticosteroids and anticonvulsants. Current clinical studies for melanoma patients with brain metastases are investigating new treatment options such as PD-1 antibodies, combined ipilimumab and nivolumab, combined BRAF inhibitors and MEK inhibitors, and stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy or targeted therapy. PMID:27206449

  9. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  10. Who benefits most from adjuvant interferon treatment for melanoma?

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Abali, Huseyin; Ascierto, Paolo A; Demidov, Lev; Pehamberger, Hubert; Robert, Caroline; Schachter, Jacob; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hauschild, Axel; Espinosa, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma has a poor prognosis; the median survival for patients with stage IV melanoma ranges from 8 to 18 months after diagnosis. Interferon-α provides significant improvement in disease-free survival at the cost of poor tolerability. Identifying patients who benefit the most may improve the cost:benefit ratio. In addition, no data exist for the role of adjuvant therapy in noncutaneous melanoma. Molecular profiles may help to identify patients who benefit the most from adjuvant interferon therapy. In this review, the American Joint Commission on Cancer 2009 staging criteria and emerging biomarker data to guide adjuvant treatment decisions will be discussed. Several criteria to guide selection of patients are discussed in detail. These include Breslow thickness, number of positive lymph nodes, whether or not the primary lesion has ulcerated, immunologic markers, and cytokine profiles. Substantial progress has been made in deciding which patients benefit from interferon-α adjuvant therapy. Interferon-α is the only agent currently approved for the adjuvant treatment of this deadly disease, despite its side effect profile. More effective drugs with better tolerability are needed. PMID:24176884

  11. New Labor Pain Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Koyyalamudi, Veerandra; Sidhu, Gurleen; Cornett, Elyse M; Nguyen, Viet; Labrie-Brown, Carmen; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Presently, the gold standard for pain control in laboring patients is neuraxial blockade, which includes a spinal, epidural, or a combined spinal-epidural technique. In conjunction with neuraxial blockade or by itself, some of the other agents employed related to labor pain include opioids, non-opioids, nitrous oxide, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and distraction therapy. Alternative treatments include acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques. This review will focus on current updates and recent trends in labor pain management. Neuraxial management, pharmacotherapy, and newer alternative methods to mitigate labor pain are reviewed. Newer techniques in epidural analgesia include the dural puncture epidural technique, which needs further evaluation. There are limited published data on the use of acupuncture, hypnotism, yoga, exercise during pregnancy, hydrotherapy, transcutaneous electronic nerve stimulation, massage, and relaxation techniques in the alleviation of labor pain. These alternative therapies maybe considered as an adjuvant as the analgesic efficiency is inferior to that provided by typical standard pharmacotherapy. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the role of immersion virtual reality in alleviating labor pain. PMID:26780039

  12. [Adjuvant treatment of colon cancer MOSAIC study's main results].

    PubMed

    André, Thierry; Tournigand, Christophe; Achille, Emmanuel; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; Lledo, Gérard; Raoul, Yves; Carola, Elisabeth; Flesch, Michel; Muron, Thierry; Boutan-Laroze, Arnaud; Guérin Meyer, Véronique; Boaziz, Catherine; Maigre, Michel; Ganem, Gérard; Mousseau, Mireille; Mounedji-Boudiaf, Lamia; de Gramont, Aimery

    2006-02-01

    Oxaliplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (LV5FU) improves the response rate and survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The objective of the Mosaic study was to evaluate the efficacy of this association in the adjuvant treatment of stage II and III colon cancer. This international study, including 2,246 patients, compared the efficacy of standard treatment with LV5FU2 alone to that of oxaliplatin-LV5FU (Folfox4 regimen) following R0 resection of the primary tumour. Both treatments were administered every two weeks for six months. At 3-year follow-up, the risk of relapse was decreased by 23% in the Folfox4 group (p = 0.002). The protocol was well tolerated, with an identical overall mortality during treatment (0.5%) in both groups. The main specific complication, peripheral sensory neuropathy was reversible in the great majority of cases. A new analysis at 4-year follow-up (median 48.6 months) confirmed the superior efficacy of the Folfox4 regimen compared to the standard treatment, the reduction in relapse risk being 24% (p = 0.0008). On the strength of these results, oxaliplatin was granted a marketing authorization for the indication adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. Based on the data currently available, physicians should consider adjuvant treatment for stage II patients, making each individual decision for treatment on a case-by-case basis. PMID:16483940

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy in adult medulloblastoma: is it an option for average-risk patients?

    PubMed

    Franceschi, E; Bartolotti, M; Paccapelo, A; Marucci, G; Agati, R; Volpin, L; Danieli, D; Ghimenton, C; Gardiman, M P; Sturiale, C; Poggi, R; Mascarin, M; Balestrini, D; Masotto, B; Brandes, A A

    2016-06-01

    The standard treatment in children with average-risk medulloblastoma (MB) is reduced-dose radiotherapy (RT) followed by chemotherapy. However, in adults, there is no agreement on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of adult MB patients with average-risk disease, defined as no postsurgical residual (or ≤1.5 cm(2)) and no metastatic disease (M0). Main inclusion criteria were: age >16 years, post-surgical treatment with craniospinal irradiation with or without adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide ± cyclophosphamide). From 1988 to 2012 were accrued 43 average-risk MB patients treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifteen (34.9 %) patients received also chemotherapy: 7 before RT, 5 after RT, and 3 before and after RT. Reasons to administer chemotherapy were presence of residual disease (even if ≤1.5 cm) and delay in RT. After a median follow up time of 10 years (range: 8-13), median survival was 18 years (95 % CI 9-28) in patients who receive RT alone, and was not reached in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years were 100 %, 78.6 % (95 % CI 60.0-97.2 %) and 60.2 % (95 % CI 36.9-83.5 %), in patients treated with RT alone, and 100, 100 and 100 %, in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy (p = 0.079). Our findings suggest a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of average-risk MB adult patients. Further improvements might drive to add chemotherapy in average-risk setting with less favourable biological signatures (i.e., non-WNT group). PMID:26940908

  14. [Gastroparesis and its treatment options].

    PubMed

    Igaz, Péter; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2008-03-01

    Gastroparesis is a disorder of gastric emptying that occurs in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Its cardinal features include nausea, vomiting, bloating, early satiety and discomfort. Weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte disturbances and malnutrition may develop in severe cases. The majority of cases is idiopathic, long standing diabetes mellitus is responsible for about 25-30% of cases. Diabetic gastroparesis may render glucose control extremely difficult, its treatment represents a major challenge. Besides frequent, small meals and psychological support, several drug options are available, however, their efficacy is limited and only a few randomized studies have been performed to date. Prokinetic agents (erythromycin, domperidone, metoclopramide) and antiemetics (phenothiazines, serotonin antagonists, butyrophenones) are the most wide-spread medicaments. Among the novel, recently developed agents, 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonists and dopamine D2 receptor antagonists are the most promising. Injection of botulinum toxin into the pyloric sphincter resulted in faster gastric emptying and symptom alleviation in some studies. Gastric electric stimulation appears to be one of the most effective options, both low and high-frequency stimulation may alleviate symptoms. Gastrostomy/jejunostomy and other surgical interventions are considered as "last resort". PMID:18292033

  15. Treatment Options for Children with Undescended Testicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... than men who had only one undescended testicle. Hormonal Treatment Hormonal treatment is another option to treat ... weeks. What have researchers found about how well hormonal treatment works? Researchers found that hormonal treatment with ...

  16. [Adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer and fertility: estimation of the impact, options of preservation and role of the oncologist].

    PubMed

    Mailliez, Audrey; Decanter, Christine; Bonneterre, Jacques

    2011-07-01

    Fifty-two thousand new breast cancers occur each year in France, 7% in patients less than 40 years. The standard regimens of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer now include anthracyclines and taxanes. These therapeutics advances have significantly improved the prognosis of these young women who may later wish to become mother and have biological offspring. The impact of chemotherapy on reproductive function should be accurately assessed and the ovarian reserve has to be taken into account. The estimated risk of chemo-induced amenorrhea and infertility has to be balanced with the expected results and risks of methods of fertility preservation. The place of different options for fertility preservation depends on patient age, presence or not of a partner and the time available before the initiation of treatment. For these breast cancer patients who will receive chemotherapy, new techniques of in vitro oocyte maturation seem promising. Even if some ethical and technical issues are unresolved, fertility preservation must now be part of the management of these young patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. This new approach must be multidisciplinary and complex. PMID:21700552

  17. Opioids, adjuvants, and interventional options for pain management of symptomatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Berger, Ann

    2014-07-01

    Cancer pain is a complex issue that unfortunately affects a majority of cancer patients, the assessment and treatment of which are equally essential in alleviating many facets of this pain. The objective of this section is to address the many facets of cancer pain: its assessment, management, and its varied treatment modalities. We will discuss characteristics of pain, essential aspects of the patient interview, and management using opioids, adjuvants, and interventional and invasive strategies as well as side effects of these techniques. Many of these modalities are used for palliation but may and should be used in cancer patients who experience side effects from both their cancer and their chemotherapeutics. PMID:25841694

  18. Endometrial cancer - reduce to the minimum. A new paradigm for adjuvant treatments?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Up to now, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and the extent of lymph node dissection for early stage endometrial cancer are controversial. In order to clarify the current position of the given adjuvant treatment options, a systematic review was performed. Materials and methods Both, Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge database were searched using the following keywords and MESH headings: "Endometrial cancer", "Endometrial Neoplasms", "Endometrial Neoplasms/radiotherapy", "External beam radiation therapy", "Brachytherapy" and adequate combinations. Conclusion Recent data from randomized trials indicate that external beam radiation therapy - particularly in combination with extended lymph node dissection - or radical lymph node dissection increases toxicity without any improvement of overall survival rates. Thus, reduced surgical aggressiveness and limitation of radiotherapy to vaginal-vault-brachytherapy only is sufficient for most cases of early stage endometrial cancer. PMID:22118369

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  20. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following stages are used for anal cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In stage 0 , abnormal cells ... or check-ups. Treatment Options by Stage Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) Treatment of stage 0 is ...

  2. Adjuvant brachytherapy in the treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Crownover, R L; Marks, K E

    1999-06-01

    For many patients with STS, administering adjuvant radiation treatments in the form of interstitial brachytherapy provides an excellent alternative to a protracted course of EBRT. Ideal patients are those with intermediate- or high-grade tumors amenable to en bloc resection. Attractive features of this approach include an untainted pathologic specimen, expeditious completion of treatment, reduction in wound complications, and improved functional outcome. Brachytherapy can permit definitive reirradiation by tightly localizing the high dose radiation exposure. It is also useful in patients who are known to have or be at high risk of metastatic disease, for whom the rapid completion of local treatment allows systemic therapy to begin quickly. Introduction of HDR techniques has shifted the delivery of brachytherapy from inpatient solitary confinement to an outpatient setting. Early reports using HDR brachytherapy for treatment of adult and pediatric STS are quite encouraging. The clinical equivalence between hyperfractionated HDR schedules and traditional LDR techniques is gaining acceptance. PMID:10432432

  3. Using antimicrobial adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and pre-clinical data demonstrate that adjuvant antimicrobial therapy is beneficial in cancer treatment. There could be several reasons for this effect, which include treating cancer associated bacteria and viruses, prophylaxis of post-chemotherapy infections due to immunosuppression, and antiproliferative effect of certain antimicrobials. Targeting cancer associated viruses and bacteria with antimicrobial agents is currently used for gastric, cervical, hematopoietic, liver and brain cancer. However this treatment is effective only in combination with conventional therapies. Antimicrobials can also have a direct antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect, and can cause apoptosis. Moreover, some antimicrobials are known to be helpful in overcoming side effects of drugs commonly used in cancer treatment. Chemotherapy related bacteremia and neutropenia can be overcome by the appropriately timed use of antimicrobials. This review summarizes the data on the effects of antivirals and antibiotics on cancer treatment and describes their mechanisms. PMID:23164412

  4. Treatment Options for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Ependymoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  6. Treatment Options for Childhood Astrocytomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Craniopharyngioma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Signs or symptoms caused by the ... treatment. Some treatments for tumors cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. Side effects ...

  8. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  9. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  10. Zinc Bromide Waste Solution Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, C.A.

    2001-01-16

    The objective of this effort was to identify treatment options for 20,000 gallons of low-level radioactively contaminated zinc bromide solution currently stored in C-Area. These options will be relevant when the solutions are declared waste.

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  12. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  13. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Jin; Lulla, Amriti; Hernandez, Liz; Gokare, Prashanth; Lim, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM) is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +), hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +), both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer. PMID:25400908

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adrenocortical Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for vulvar cancer may be applied to the skin in a cream or lotion. See Drugs Approved to Treat Vulvar ... treat vulvar lesions and is applied to the skin in a cream. New types of treatment are being tested in ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Melanoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treatments will also be taken. Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy : Procedures in which ... has spread to the lymph nodes . Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy are done to ...

  19. Treatment Options for Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk rhabdomyosarcoma. The following risk groups are used: Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma is ... therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk rhabdomyosarcoma. The following risk groups are used: Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma Low-risk childhood rhabdomyosarcoma is ... therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to ...

  1. Treatment options in odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Maestre-Vera, Juan Ramón

    2004-01-01

    Most infections of the oral cavity are primary, odontogenic infections, with dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis the most common. Treating these infections will encompass odontologic, antimicrobial, surgical or combined treatment. Antimicrobial treatment includes the use of betalactams, macrolydes, tetracyclins, metronidazole, clindamycin, or combined treatment. The most commonly used ones are administered orally. PK/ PD parameters predict THE clinical and microbiological efficacy of the antibiotic. The three indices that are generally used to measure clinical efficacy are: T >MIC (time during which the concentration is above the minimum inhibitory concentration), Cmax/ MIC (ratio between peak concentration and the minimum inhibitory concentration) and AUC/ MIC (ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration). Amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid is one of the antibiotics recommended for the treatment of odontogenic infections due to its wide spectrum, low incidence of resistance, pharmacokinetic profile, tolerance and dosage. PMID:15580134

  2. Treatment Options in Maxillofacial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Guerrissi, Jorge Orlando

    2016-07-01

    From 2000 to 2010, 720 patients with facial trauma were admitted in Plastic Surgery Service of Argerich Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 58 of them with panfacial fractures were included in this study. Height velocity impact is the principal etiology, and most concomitant extrafacial injuries are neurocranium and cervical spine. Common affected areas were orbits, nose, and malar-zygoma. The timing of the treatment was airway evaluation, control of bleeding and consciousness, treatment of associated injuries, and finally facial reconstruction. The applications of craniofacial surgical techniques complete facial treatment in only operatory time by means of standard approaches like coronal, subciliar palpebral, upper and lower vestibular. The treatment was exploration to open sky; reduction and fijation with titanium plates; replacement of comminuted bones with bone autografts harvested iliac crest, calvary, and costal bones. The results were classificated acceptables in 48 (85%) and not acceptables in 9 (15%) according to successful reconstruction of the both form and armony facial, persistent esthetic and functional sequels, and postoperative complications. Postoperative complications were detected in 18 patients. According to most authors the use of internal rigid fixation and bone autograf permits obtaining the best aesthetic and functional results decreasing complications and sequels. The recuperation of tridimensional aspect of the face and aesthetic and functional pretrauma state must be the goal standard. PMID:27391510

  3. Treatment options for apnoea of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sarah U; Smith, Vincent C

    2016-07-01

    Apnoea of prematurity (AOP) affects almost all infants born at <28 weeks gestation or with birth weight <1000 g. When untreated, AOP may be associated with negative outcomes. Because of these negative outcomes, effective treatment for AOP is an important part of optimising care of preterm infants. Standard treatment usually involves xanthine therapy and respiratory support. Cutting-edge work with stochastic vibrotactile stimulation and new pharmaceutical agents continues to expand therapeutic options. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of AOP, associated conditions and treatment options. PMID:27010019

  4. [Treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Guokang

    2016-01-01

    T1 glottic carcinoma is part of early laryngeal carcinoma which involves the vocal cords, including anterior commissure or posterior commissure. We analyzed the treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma by reviewing the related literatures about T1 glottic carcinoma treated by conservative surgery (open surgery and laser microsurgery), radiotherapy, robot surgery, photodynamic treatment. PMID:27192922

  5. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation. PMID:26018442

  6. [Treatment Options for Executive Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Müller, S V

    2016-09-01

    The concept of executive function is a so-called umbrella concept, so that it includes many different and in some cases mutually contradictory higher-level organizational abilities such as planning, monitoring, inhibition and control of action. Typically, the cause of an executive dysfunction is an underlying lesion in the prefrontal cortex or subcortical regions. Deficits in executive functions appear in the fields of cognition as well as behavior. Diagnosis requires the use of a wide-ranging repertoire of tests and questionnaires making it a time-consuming process. Different therapeutic approaches addressing the diverse symptoms of executive dysfunction, both positive and negative, are available. These include modification and manipulation of the environment and practice of cognitive repetitive procedures. The former are implemented particularly in cases of severely impaired persons. The latter are used in persons in whom cognitive dysfunctions are the dominating symptoms of the disorder.The operational area of therapeutic approaches using paper and pencil as well as computer programs limits them to treatment of cognitive dysfunction. If behavioral disturbances dominate the clinical picture, other procedures should be used.The effectiveness of cognitive therapy of executive dysfunction is well demonstrated according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM). PMID:27607068

  7. Adjuvant systemic treatment for individual patients with triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakman, Catherine; Moretti, Erica; Galardi, Francesca; Biagioni, Chiara; Santarpia, Libero; Biganzoli, Laura; Di Leo, Angelo

    2011-10-01

    Chemotherapy is the only evidence based adjuvant systemic treatment option in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Despite emerging results for targeted biological therapies for this subpopulation, lack of robust results does not currently support their use beyond the confines of a clinical trial. Conventional systemic chemotherapy remains the standard of care and is curative in a minority of patients. There is no defined standard chemotherapy and there is currently no robust, prospective, randomized data to advise different use of specific chemotherapy agents in TNBC as compared to non-TNBC. Data suggest high sensitivity to chemotherapy, however it is yet to be determined whether this increased sensitivity is agent/regimen specific or whether it reflects general chemosensitivity. This review will focus on systemic chemotherapy in early TNBC, particularly anthracyclines and platinums, and potential predictive tools to guide chemotherapy use. PMID:22015281

  8. Treatment Options in Cushing’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Ahmed; Honegger, Juergen; Milian, Monika; Psaras, Tsambika

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a grave disease that requires a multidisciplinary and individualized treatment approach for each patient. Approximately 80% of all patients harbour a corticotroph pituitary adenoma (Cushing’s disease) with excessive secretion of adrenocorticotropin-hormone (ACTH) and, consecutively, cortisol. The goals of treatment include normalization of hormone excess, long-term disease control and the reversal of comorbidities caused by the underlying pathology. The treatment of choice is neurosurgical tumour removal of the pituitary adenoma. Second-line treatments include medical therapy, bilateral adrenalectomy and radiation therapy. Drug treatment modalities target at the hypothalamic/pituitary level, the adrenal gland and at the glucocorticoid receptor level and are commonly used in patients in whom surgery has failed. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the second-line treatment for persistent hypercortisolism that offers immediate control of hypercortisolism. However, this treatment option requires a careful individualized evaluation, since it has the disadvantage of permanent hypoadrenalism which requires lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and bears the risk of developing Nelson’s syndrome. Although there are some very promising medical therapy options it clearly remains a second-line treatment option. However, there are numerous circumstances where medical management of CD is indicated. Medical therapy is frequently used in cases with severe hypercortisolism before surgery in order to control the metabolic effects and help reduce the anestesiological risk. Additionally, it can help to bridge the time gap until radiotherapy takes effect. The aim of this review is to analyze and present current treatment options in Cushing’s disease. PMID:22346367

  9. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  10. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  12. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  13. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  14. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed. PMID:26922414

  15. [Necessary and unnecessary treatment options for hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Zindel, Joel; Inglin, Roman; Brügger, Lukas

    2014-12-01

    Up to one third of the general population suffers from symptoms caused by hemorrhoids. Conservative treatment comes first unless the patient presents with an acute hemorrhoidal prolapse or a thrombosis. A fiber enriched diet is the primary treatment option, recommended in the perioperative period as well as a long-term prophylaxis. A timely limited application of topical ointments or suppositories and/or flavonoids are further treatment options. When symptoms persist interventional procedures for grade I-II hemorrhoids, and surgery for grade III-IV hemorrhoids should be considered. Rubber band ligation is the interventional treatment of choice. A comparable efficacy using sclerosing or infrared therapy has not yet been demonstrated. We therefore do not recommend these treatment options for the cure of hemorrhoids. Self-treatment by anal insertion of bougies is of lowrisk and may be successful, particularly in the setting of an elevated sphincter pressure. Anal dilation, sphincterotomy, cryosurgery, bipolar diathermy, galvanic electrotherapy, and heat therapy should be regarded as obsolete given the poor or missing data reported for these methods. For a long time, the classic excisional hemorrhoidectomy was considered to be the gold standard as far as surgical procedures are concerned. Primary closure (Ferguson) seems to be superior compared to the "open" version (Milligan Morgan) with respect to postoperative pain and wound healing. The more recently proposed stapled hemorrhoidopexy (Longo) is particularly advisable for circular hemorrhoids. Compared to excisional hemorrhoidectomy the Longo-operation is associated with reduced postoperative pain, shorter operation time and hospital stay as well as a faster recovery, with the disadvantage though of a higher recurrence rate. Data from Hemorrhoidal Artery Ligation (HAL)-, if appropriate in combination with a Recto-Anal Repair (HAL/RAR)-, demonstrates a similar trend towards a better tolerance of the procedure at the

  16. Current State of Clostridium difficile Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Anilrudh A.; Johnson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of reduced response to standard therapies for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the risk for recurrent CDI that is common with all currently available treatment agents have posed a significant challenge to clinicians. Current recommendations include metronidazole for treatment of mild to moderate CDI and vancomycin for severe CDI. Results from small clinical trials suggest that nitazoxanide and teicoplanin may be alternative options to standard therapies, whereas rifaximin has demonstrated success in uncontrolled trials for the management of multiple recurrences. Anecdotal reports have also suggested that tigecycline might be useful as an adjunctive agent for the treatment of severe complicated CDI. Reports of resistance will likely limit the clinical use of fusidic acid and bacitracin and, possibly, rifaximin if resistance to this agent becomes widespread. Treatment of patients with multiple CDI recurrences and those with severe complicated CDI is based on limited clinical evidence, and new treatments or strategies are needed. PMID:22752868

  17. Radioimmunotherapy of micrometastases: Theoretical evaluation of adjuvant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, G.; Yorke, E.D.; Willins, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Failure of current cancer treatment modalities is generally associated with the inability to control distant metastatic disease. This work examines the adjuvant use of radiolabeled antibodies for targeting micrometastases. A Monte Carlo program is used to estimate the number and size distribution of metastases that are present in a given (node-negative) prostate cancer patient population at the time of diagnosis. These results are used in a second program that solves the equations associated with antibody (Ab) diffusion, binding, and dissociation to yield the kinetics of Ab penetration within pre-vascularized micrometastases. These simulated kinetic data are then micrometastasis. Using a two-compartment macroscopic model of Ab distribution, the red marrow dose is also calculated. Calculations are performed for I-123 and for I-131-labeled antibody. With these results, the fraction of the patient population that would benefit from radioimmunotherapy is estimated. The analysis suggests that a single administration of radioimmunotherapy following surgery or external beam radiotherapy will yield a potentially lethal dose ({ge} 20 Gy for I-123 and {ge} 38 Gy for I-131) to 23% of micrometastases present at the time of initial diagnosis without inducing prohibitive red marrow morbidity (absorbed dose {le}2.5 Gy). Multiple courses of radioimmunotherapy, designed to target micrometastases that are initially too small but that eventually reach a targetable size (i.e., 20 {mu}m {le} micromet. radius {le}200{mu}m), will yield a potentially lethal results suggest that approximately 25% of high risk prostate cancer patients (i.e., patients with occult metastases at the time of diagnosis) could benefit from single course of radioimmunotherapy; multiple courses of radioimmunotherapy could benefit 75% of high risk prostate cancer patients.

  18. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  19. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T; Stark, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  20. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  1. Emerging treatment options for meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jing; Yan, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common diseases observed in clinics; it influences a great number of people, and is the leading cause of evaporative dry eye. Given the increased recognition of the importance of MGD, a great amount of attention has been paid to therapies targeting this condition. The traditional treatments of MGD consist of warm compresses and lid hygiene for removing an obstructed meibum, as well as antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents to improve the quality of the meibum. However, each of these treatments has a different shortcoming and the treatment of MGD remains challenging. Despite the numerous possible treatment options for MGD, it is still difficult to obtain complete relief of signs and symptoms. This review focuses on current emerging treatment options for MGD including intraductal meibomian gland probing, emulsion eye drops containing lipids, the LipiFlow® thermal pulsation system, N-acetyl-cysteine, azithromycin, oral supplementation with omega-3 essential fatty acids, and cyclosporine A. PMID:24043929

  2. Evolving treatment options for melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Parkinson, Christine; Fife, Kate; Corrie, Pippa; Jefferies, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma is a leading cause of lost productivity due to premature cancer mortality. Melanoma frequently spreads to the brain and is associated with rapid deterioration in quality and quantity of life. Until now, treatment options have been restricted to surgery and radiotherapy, although neither modality has been well studied in clinical trials. However, the new immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecularly targeted agents that have been introduced for treatment of metastatic melanoma are active against brain metastases and offer new opportunities to improve disease outcomes. New challenges arise, including how to integrate or sequence multiple treatment modalities, and current practice varies widely. In this Review, we summarise evidence for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases, and discuss the rationale and evidence for combination modalities, highlighting areas for future research. PMID:26433822

  3. Treatment options for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (AD-CMC) is a rare and severe primary immunodeficiency that is characterized by mucocutaneous fungal infection, autoimmunity, cerebral aneurysms, and oropharyngeal and esophageal cancer. Recently, it was discovered that STAT1 mutations are responsible for AD-CMC. These mutations lead to the inability of STAT1 to be dephosphorylated, resulting in hyperphosphorylation, increased binding to the DNA, and gain of function (GOF) effects on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, a characteristic feature of AD-CMC patients is deficiency in the T-helper 17 (Th17) responses, which is believed to be the immunological cause of the mucocutaneous fungal infection. No targeted treatment other than lifelong antifungal prophylaxis exists for AD-CMC. However, the discovery of the genetic and immunological defects makes it now possible to explore new treatment strategies. This review will discuss immunomodulatory treatment options that can be explored in patients with STAT1 GOF mutations. PMID:27161991

  4. 24-h Efficacy of Glaucoma Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Konstas, Anastasios G P; Quaranta, Luciano; Bozkurt, Banu; Katsanos, Andreas; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian; Rossetti, Luca; Shaarawy, Tarek; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Miglior, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Current management of glaucoma entails the medical, laser, or surgical reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) to a predetermined level of target IOP, which is commensurate with either stability or delayed progression of visual loss. In the published literature, the hypothesis is often made that IOP control implies a single IOP measurement over time. Although the follow-up of glaucoma patients with single IOP measurements is quick and convenient, such measurements often do not adequately reflect the untreated IOP characteristics, or indeed the quality of treated IOP control during the 24-h cycle. Since glaucoma is a 24-h disease and the damaging effect of elevated IOP is continuous, it is logical that we should aim to understand the efficacy of all treatment options throughout the 24-h period. This article first reviews the concept and value of diurnal and 24-h IOP monitoring. It then critically evaluates selected available evidence on the 24-h efficacy of medical, laser and surgical therapy options. During the past decade several controlled trials have significantly enhanced our understanding on the 24-h efficacy of all glaucoma therapy options. Nevertheless, more long-term evidence is needed to better evaluate the 24-h efficacy of glaucoma therapy and the precise impact of IOP characteristics on glaucomatous progression and visual prognosis. PMID:26909513

  5. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. PMID:27012935

  6. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  7. Sacral perineural cysts: imaging and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Landers, J; Seex, K

    2002-04-01

    Perineural cysts are an uncommon radiological finding and a rare cause of radicular leg pain. We report the clinical findings, imaging and operative appearances of a patient who presented with radicular leg and perineal pain, which was found to be associated with multiple sacral perineural cysts. The diagnostic and treatment options are explored. In particular, the use of percutaneous fine-needle cyst drainage as a guide to the value of surgery is discussed. Postoperative complications, such as pseudomeningocoele can occur, but may be effectively treated with lumbar drainage. PMID:12046741

  8. Early adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of atypical meningioma.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Michael D; Waqar, Mueez; Farah, Jibril Osman; Farrell, Michael; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; McManus, Robin; Looby, Seamus; Hussey, Deirdre; Fitzpatrick, David; Certo, Francesco; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Atypical meningiomas have a greater propensity to recur than benign meningiomas and the benefits of early adjuvant radiotherapy are unclear. Existing studies report conflicting results. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the role of early adjuvant radiotherapy following surgical resection of atypical meningioma. A triple center case-note review of adults with newly-diagnosed atypical meningiomas between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Pathology diagnosis was made according to the World Health Organization classification in use at the time of surgery. Patients with multiple meningiomas, neurofibromatosis type 2 and radiation-induced meningiomas were excluded. Extent of resection was defined as gross total resection (GTR; Simpson Grade I-III) or subtotal resection (STR; Simpson Grade IV-V). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. One hundred thirty-three patients were identified with a median age of 62years (range 22-86years) and median follow-up of 57.4months (range 0.1-152.2months). Tumors were mostly located in the convexity (50.4%) or falcine/parasagittal regions (27.1%). GTR (achieved in 85%) was associated with longer progression free survival (PFS) (5year PFS 81.2% versus 40.08%, log-rank=11.117, p=0.001) but not overall survival (OS) (5year OS 76.6% versus 39.7%, log-rank=3.652, p=0.056). Following GTR, early adjuvant radiotherapy was administered to 28.3% of patients and did not influence OS (5year OS 77.0% versus 75.7%, log-rank=0.075, p=0.784) or PFS (5year PFS 82.0% versus 79.3%, log-rank=0.059, p=0.808). Although extent of resection emerged as an important prognostic variable, early adjuvant radiotherapy did not influence outcome following GTR of atypical meningiomas. Prospective randomized controlled trials are planned. PMID:26775147

  9. Tackling sleeplessness: Psychological treatment options for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Dautovich, Natalie D; McNamara, Joseph; Williams, Jacob M; Cross, Natalie J; McCrae, Christina S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to review and summarize the research supporting nonpharmacologic treatment options for insomnia. The different treatment approaches are described followed by a review of both original research articles and meta-analyses. Meta-analytic reviews suggest that common nonpharmacologic approaches exert, on average, medium to large effect sizes on SOL, WASO, NWAK, SQR, and SE while smaller effects are seen for TST. Stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, and CBT-I are considered standard treatments for insomnia by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). Sleep restriction, multicomponent therapy without cognitive therapy, paradoxical intention, and biofeedback approaches have received some levels of support by the AASM. Sleep hygiene, imagery training, and cognitive therapy did not receive recommendation levels as single (standalone) therapies by the AASM due to lack of empirical evidence. Less common approaches have been introduced (Internet-based interventions, bright light treatment, biofeedback, mindfulness, acupuncture, and intensive sleep retraining) but require further research. Brief and group treatments have been shown to be as efficacious as longer and individually-administered treatments. Considerations are presented for special populations, including older adults, children and teens, individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds, insomnia comorbid with other disorders, and individuals who are taking hypnotics. PMID:23616696

  10. Minimally invasive treatment options in fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Liebermann, Anja; Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options have become increasingly feasible in restorative dentistry, due to the introduction of the adhesive technique in combination with restorative materials featuring translucent properties similar to those of natural teeth. Mechanical anchoring of restorations via conventional cementation represents a predominantly subtractive treatment approach that is gradually being superseded by a primarily defect-oriented additive method in prosthodontics. Modifications of conventional treatment procedures have led to the development of an economical approach to the removal of healthy tooth structure. This is possible because the planned treatment outcome is defined in a wax-up before the treatment is commenced and this wax-up is subsequently used as a reference during tooth preparation. Similarly, resin- bonded FDPs and implants have made it possible to preserve the natural tooth structure of potential abutment teeth. This report describes a number of clinical cases to demonstrate the principles of modern prosthetic treatment strategies and discusses these approaches in the context of minimally invasive prosthetic dentistry. PMID:26925471

  11. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  12. New treatment options for alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The burden of alcoholic liver disease has rapidly grown in the past two decades and is expected to increase further in the coming years. Alcoholic hepatitis, the most florid presentation of alcoholic liver disease, continues to have high morbidity and mortality, with significant financial and healthcare burden with limited treatment options. Steroids remain the current standard of care in severe alcoholic hepatitis in carefully selected patients. No specific treatments are available for those patients who are steroid ineligible, intolerant or unresponsive. Liver transplant has shown good short-term outcome; however, feasibility, ethical and economic concerns remain. Modification of gut microbiota composition and their products, such as lipopolysaccharide, nutritional interventions, immune modulation, increasing steroid sensitivity, genetic polymorphism and epigenetic modification of alcohol induced liver damage, augmenting hepatic regeneration using GCSF are potential therapeutic avenues in steroid non-responsive/ineligible patients. With better understanding of the pathophysiology, using “Omics” platforms, newer options for patients with alcoholic hepatitis are expected soon. PMID:27099434

  13. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  14. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  15. Current treatment options for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a key component in TB control strategies worldwide. However, as people with LTBI are neither symptomatic nor contagious, any screening decision should be weighed carefully against the potential benefit of preventing active disease in those who are known to be at higher risk and are willing to accept therapy for LTBI. This means that a targeted approach is desirable to maximize cost effectiveness and to guarantee patient adherence. We focus on LTBI treatment strategies in patient populations at increased risk of developing active TB, including candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α blockers. In the last 40 years, isoniazid (INH) has represented the keystone of LTBI therapy across the world. Although INH remains the first therapeutic option, alternative treatments that are effective and associated with increased adherence and economic savings are available. Current recommendations, toxicity, compliance, and cost issues are discussed in detail in this review. A balanced relationship between the patient and healthcare provider could increase adherence, while cost-saving treatment strategies with higher effectiveness, fewer side effects, and of shorter duration should be offered as preferred. PMID:24789003

  16. Treatment options for polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Ahmed; Elnashar, Abubaker

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women. The clinical manifestation of PCOS varies from a mild menstrual disorder to severe disturbance of reproductive and metabolic functions. Management of women with PCOS depends on the symptoms. These could be ovulatory dysfunction-related infertility, menstrual disorders, or androgen-related symptoms. Weight loss improves the endocrine profile and increases the likelihood of ovulation and pregnancy. Normalization of menstrual cycles and ovulation could occur with modest weight loss as little as 5% of the initial weight. The treatment of obesity includes modifications in lifestyle (diet and exercise) and medical and surgical treatment. In PCOS, anovulation relates to low follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations and the arrest of antral follicle growth in the final stages of maturation. This can be treated with medications such as clomiphene citrate, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, metformin, glucocorticoids, or gonadotropins or surgically by laparoscopic ovarian drilling. In vitro fertilization will remain the last option to achieve pregnancy when others fail. Chronic anovulation over a long period of time is also associated with an increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, which should be seriously investigated and treated. There are androgenic symptoms that will vary from patient to patient, such as hirsutism, acne, and/or alopecia. These are troublesome presentations to the patients and require adequate treatment. Alternative medicine has been emerging as one of the commonly practiced medicines for different health problems, including PCOS. This review underlines the contribution to the treatment of different symptoms. PMID:21339935

  17. Adjuvant Treatment after Surgery in Stage IIIA Endometrial Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Juree; Yoon, Won Sup; Choi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Mison; Choi, Youngmin; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Kim, Myungsoo; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Chang, Sei Kyung; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the role of adjuvant therapy in stage IIIA endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients who underwent surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) alone or chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) according to risk group. Materials and Methods A multicenter retrospective study was conducted including patients with surgical stage IIIA endometrial cancertreated by radical surgery and adjuvant RT or CTRT. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Ninety-three patients with stage IIIA disease were identified. Nineteen patients (20.4%) experienced recurrence, mostly distant metastasis (17.2%). Combined CTRT did not affect DFS (74.1% vs. 82.4%, p=0.130) or OS (96.3% vs. 91.9%, p=0.262) in stage IIIA disease compared with RT alone. Patients with age ≥ 60 years, grade G2/3, and lymphovascular space involvement had a significantly worse DFS and those variables were defined as risk factors. The high-risk group showed a significant reduction in 5-year DFS (≥ 2 risk factors) (49.0% vs. 88.0%, p < 0.001) compared with the low-risk group (< 2). Multivariate analysis confirmed that more than one risk factor was the only predictor of worse DFS (hazard ratio, 5.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.12 to 13.98; p < 0.001). Of patients with no risk factors, a subset treated with RT alone showed an excellent 5-year DFS and OS (93.8% and 100%, respectively). Conclusion We identified a low-risk subset of stage IIIA endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients who might be reasonable candidates for adjuvant RT alone. Further randomized studies are needed to determine which subset might benefit from combined CTRT. PMID:26511800

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of gall bladder carcinoma: What is the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2016-03-01

    Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC) is considered the fifth most common one of the most aggressive gastro intestinal tract malignancies. Owing to their large incidence randomised controlled trials have hardly been conducted to look into their optimum treatment. Over the years surgical resection has been considered the only curative treatment of these tumors. However, the outcome still remains guarded. The predominant pattern of failure is loco-regional followed by systemic. Hence, local adjuvant radiation has been used by different institutes with concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy. The large retrospective series with their limitations showed improved survival in patients with regional spread or tumors infiltrating the liver when treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In the present era with modern radiation techniques and target delineation radiation may further improve upon the impact without adding to the toxicity profile. Hence, radiation in gall bladder cancer needs a relook to optimize treatment outcome of such aggressive disease. PMID:26265290

  19. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  20. Pectus excavatum: history, hypotheses and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Brochhausen, Christoph; Turial, Salmai; Müller, Felix K.P.; Schmitt, Volker H.; Coerdt, Wiltrud; Wihlm, Jean-Marie; Schier, Felix; Kirkpatrick, C. James

    2012-01-01

    Pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum represent the most frequent chest wall deformations. However, the pathogenesis is still poorly understood and research results remain inconsistent. To focus on the recent state of knowledge, we summarize and critically discuss the pathological concepts based on the history of these entities, beginning with the first description in the sixteenth century. Based on the early clinical descriptions, we review and discuss the different pathogenetic hypotheses. To open new perspectives for the potential pathomechanisms, the embryonic and foetal development of the ribs and the sternum is highlighted following the understanding that the origin of these deformities is given by the disruption in the maturation of the parasternal region. In the second, different therapeutical techniques are highlighted and based on the pathogenetic hypotheses and the embryological knowledge potential new biomaterial-based perspectives with interesting insights for tissue engineering-based treatment options are presented. PMID:22394989

  1. Autogenous Tooth Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rashmi; Chugh, Vinay Kumar; Wadhwa, Puneet; Kohli, Munish

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autogenous tooth transplantation is the surgical movement of a tooth from one location in the mouth to another in the same individual. Though done for years but it has achieved variable success rates. Although the indications for autotransplantation are narrow, careful patient selection coupled with an appropriate technique can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional results. This article discusses the reviews of previous works done and highlights the criteria and factors influencing the success of autotransplant along with reports of two cases of transplantation of impacted and malposed canine. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Aggarwal R, Chugh VK, Wadhwa P, Kohli M. Autogenous Tooth Transplantation as a Treatment Option. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):87-92. PMID:25206143

  2. EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant treatment of lung cancer: to give or not to give?

    PubMed Central

    Milovancev, Aleksandar; Stojsic, Vladimir; Zaric, Bojan; Kovacevic, Tomi; Sarcev, Tatjana; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Freitag, Lutz; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsavlis, Drosos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Stratakos, Grigoris; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) brought a significant revolution in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a short period of time, EGFR-TKIs became the standard of treatment for mutation-positive, advanced stage non-squamous NSCLC. In recent years, second- and third-generation EGFR-TKIs are emerging, further widening the clinical use. However, the question of EGFR-TKIs efficiency in the treatment of early stage NSCLC still remains open. Early clinical trials failed to approve the use of EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant setting. The majority of these early trials were performed in unselected NSCLC populations and without standardized biomarker identification. One should certainly not rely solely on these results and dismiss the use of EGFR-TKIs as adjuvant therapy. Many important questions are still unanswered. Most important issues such as stage heterogeneity (IA–IIIA), timing (after or concomitantly with chemotherapy), and type of administration (monotherapy or combination) need to be answered in near future. Adjuvant TKIs in the treatment of lung cancer might offer significant number of advancements. Having in mind the significant duration of response observed in advance disease setting, there could be place for prolongation of response in adjuvant setting potentially, leading to improvement in survival. TKIs could offer less-toxic adjuvant treatment with better efficiency than chemotherapy. However, there is a chronic lack of randomized controlled trials in this field, leading to inability to draw any scientifically sound conclusion with regard to the adjuvant treatment. For now, the use of EGFR-TKIs outside clinical trial setting is not recommended. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current and available data. PMID:26508876

  3. EVALUATION OF ON-SITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature review of published and unpublished data was conducted to identify all conceivable alternative on-site systems, including wastewater manipulation, treatment and disposal options. Wastewater manipulation options included flow reduction, wasteload reduction and waste s...

  4. Examples of adjuvant treatment enhancing the antitumor effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Cecic, Ivana; Sun, Jinghai; Chaplin, David J.

    1999-07-01

    Strategies for improving the clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treatment of solid cancers include applications of different types of adjuvant treatments in addition to this modality that may result in superior therapeutic outcome. Examples of such an approach investigated using mouse tumor models are presented in this report. It is shown that the cures of PDT treated subcutaneous tumors can be substantially improved by adjuvant therapy with: metoclopramide (enhancement of cancer cell apoptosis), combretastatin A-4 (selective destruction of tumor neovasculature), Roussin's Black Salt (light activated tumor localized release of nitric oxide), or dendritic cell-based adoptive immunotherapy (immune rejection of treated tumor).

  5. Surgical Resection First for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Are There Adjuvant Options?

    PubMed

    Elimova, Elena; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2015-10-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with upper abdominal bloating followed by modest hematemesis that led to the diagnosis of an ulcerated poorly differentiated (with signet ring cells) adenocarcinoma in the angularis of the stomach. A contrast-enhanced positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT) scan showed higher-than-normal physiologic avidity (standardized uptake value, 4.3) in the proximal stomach but not in the lower stomach, and the CT scan vaguely suggested a polypoid lesion in the distal stomach. Nodes were normal in size, and there were no metastases. He underwent esophagoduodenoscopy with ultrasonography (EUS) that showed a 3- x 2-cm flat nodular mass with an 8-mm ulcer in the angularis. The tumor mass was demarcated well on narrow-band imaging, and with a 20-MHz EUS probe, it was designated eusT1bN0. His case was presented to our weekly Multidisciplinary Gastric Adenocarcinoma Conference, and the consensus was to offer surgery as primary therapy. He underwent a subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy along with D2 nodal dissection. The surgical pathology showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells; the primary tumor measured 2.8 x 2.2 cm in diameter with infiltration through the muscularis propria and into the subserosal fat. Seven of 53 examined lymph nodes were malignant; therefore, his cancer was staged pT3N3M0 (a higher stage than designated clinically). He recovered well without complications, and the postoperative CT scans showed no metastases. His case was represented at the tumor board meeting, and adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine was recommended. PMID:26324361

  6. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation. PMID:26297204

  7. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement during Pregnancy: An Adjuvant Option When Medical Therapy Fails

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Fátima; Torres, Rita; Borges, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 27-year-old multiparous woman, with multiple thrombophilia, whose pregnancy was complicated with deep venous thrombosis requiring placement of a vena cava filter. At 15th week of gestation, following an acute deep venous thrombosis of the right inferior limb, anticoagulant therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was instituted without improvement in her clinical status. Subsequently, at 18 weeks of pregnancy, LMWH was switched to warfarin. At 30th week of gestation, the maintenance of high thrombotic risk was the premise for placement of an inferior vena cava filter for prophylaxis of pulmonary embolism during childbirth and postpartum. There were no complications and a vaginal delivery was accomplished at 37 weeks of gestation. Venal placement of inferior vena cava filters is an attractive option as prophylaxis for pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. PMID:23781361

  8. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia Nr; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists' management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons. PMID:27217799

  9. Overactive bladder syndrome pharmacotherapy: future treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a lifestyle disease and its incidence increases with age. Although it is not a life-threatening disease, it is known to have a significant impact on the quality of life. The first-choice pharmacological treatment of OAB is antimuscarinics. However, their limited clinical effectiveness and unsatisfactory tolerance profile, combined with the advancement of knowledge on the aetiopathogenesis of the disease, have inspired research on new pharmacotherapy options for OAB. Basic research has provided foundations for the development of new OAB treatments, which seem very promising and can be applied in clinical practice. The mechanisms of the studied compounds are based on their effect on certain receptors and neurotransmitters that contribute to regulating the micturition reflex. These compounds are not only more receptor-specific as compared to currently used drugs, but also some of them are organ-specific. Some of such compounds have already passed the proof-of-concept stage of development and have the therapeutic potential to determine the future of OAB pharmacotherapy. This review focuses on the mechanisms of substances that are now undergoing pre-clinical and clinical tests and their effects on the micturition cycle, while also identifying opportunities for using them with specific groups of patients. Due to the fact that OAB is a disease of symptoms and its aetiopathogenesis is complex, it seems that modern treatment methods should be tailor-made and based on the pathophysiological mechanisms that induce disease symptoms, rather than only treating the symptoms by inhibiting the contractility of the urinary bladder. PMID:26848291

  10. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia NR; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists’ management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons. PMID:27217799

  11. Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in the Adjuvant and Definitive Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T. Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHC) are rare tumors for which large randomized studies regarding the use of radiation are not available. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of IHC in a large group of patients. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,839 patients with IHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results: Patients received either surgery alone (25%), radiation therapy alone (10%), surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (7%) or no treatment (58%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 22-102 years); 52% of patients were male and 81% were Caucasian. Median OS was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-13), 6 (95% CI, 5-6), 7 (95% CI, 6-8), and 3 months for surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy, sugery alone, radiation therapy alone, and no treatment, respectively. The OS was significantly different between surgery alone and surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.014) and radiation therapy alone and no treatment (p < 0.0001). Use of surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy conferred the greatest benefit on OS (HR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.34-0.47), followed by surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.44-0.54) and radiation therapy alone (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59-0.77) compared with no treatment, on multivariate analysis. Propensity score adjusted hazard ratios (controlling for age, race/ethnicity, stage, and year of diagnosis) were also significant (surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy vs. surgery alone (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96); radiation therapy alone vs. no treatment (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76)). Conclusions: The study results suggest that adjuvant and definitive radiation treatment prolong survival, although cure rates remain low. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologics to the treatment of

  12. Radiosurgical options in neuro-oncology: a review on current tenets and future opportunities. Part II: adjuvant radiobiological tools.

    PubMed

    Ganau, Mario; Foroni, Roberto Israel; Gerosa, Massimo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe Kenneth; Longhi, Michele; Nicolato, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is currently a well-established, minimally invasive treatment for many primary and secondary tumors, especially deep-sited lesions for which traditional neurosurgical procedures were poorly satisfactory or not effective at all. The initial evolution of SRS was cautious, relying on more than 30 years of experimental and clinical work that preceded its introduction into the worldwide medical community. This path enabled a brilliant present, and the continuous pace of technological advancement holds promise for a brighter future. Part II of this review article will cover the impact of multimodal adjuvant technologies on SRS, and their input to the crucial role played by neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists and medical physicists in the management and care of fragile neuro-oncological patients. PMID:25702646

  13. Docetaxel as adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heys, Steven D; Sarkar, Tarun; Hutcheon, Andrew W

    2004-10-01

    Developments in the role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with breast cancer have focused on the taxes, in particular, docetaxel. This paper discusses the rationale for the introduction of docetaxel into the management of patients following surgery and also its role in those patients with locally-advanced disease, focussing on key clinical trials. The addition of docetaxel to standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic regimens does seem to result in an increased survival in some patients with early-stage disease. In the neoadjuvant setting, the addition of docetaxel to standard regimens does increase pathological response rates, which is a surrogate marker of eventual outcome. PMID:15461550

  14. A Preliminary Evaluation of Fast ForWord-Language as an Adjuvant Treatment in Language Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fey, Marc E.; Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Popescu, Mihai; Lewine, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Fast ForWord-Language (FFW-L) is designed to enhance children's processing of auditory-verbal signals and, thus, their ability to learn language. As a preliminary evaluation of this claim, we examined the effects of a 5-week course of FFW-L as an adjuvant treatment with a subsequent 5-week conventional narrative-based language…

  15. Arthritis associated with adjuvant mycobacterial treatment for carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A; Allard, S A; Maini, R N

    1989-01-01

    A patient who developed an inflammatory polyarthritis following intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) used in the treatment of bladder cancer is described. An inflammatory synovitis comprising predominantly T lymphocytes was demonstrated on synovial biopsy. The synovitis resolved spontaneously within 14 days in this 'human model' of adjuvant arthritis. Images PMID:2786389

  16. Pharmacologic options for the treatment and management of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kobernick, Aaron K; Chambliss, Jeffrey; Burks, A Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy affects approximately 5% of adults and 8% of children in developed countries, and there is currently no cure. Current pharmacologic management is limited to using intramuscular epinephrine or oral antihistamines in response to food allergen exposure. Recent trials have examined the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapy, with varying levels of efficacy and safety demonstrated. Bacterial adjuvants, use of anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, and Chinese herbal formulations represent exciting potential for development of future pharmacotherapeutic agents. Ultimately, immunotherapy may be a viable option for patients with food allergy, although efficacy and safety are likely to be less than ideal. PMID:26289224

  17. What make differences in the outcome of adjuvant treatments for resected gastric cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Toshifusa; Fujii, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    After a long history of Dark Age of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer, definite evidences of survival benefit from adjuvant treatment have been reported since 2000s. These survival benefits are likely attributed to something new approach different from pervious studies. In 2001, South West Oncology Group INT0116 trial yielded survival benefit in curatively resected gastric cancer patients with postoperative chemoradiotherapy [5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + Leucovorin + radiotherapy], followed by positive result by MAGIC Trial, employing peri-operative(pre- and postoperative chemotherapy with Epirubicin, cisplatin (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (ECF) regimen in patients with curative resection. A novel drug [S1: ACTS-GC (Adjuvant chemotherapy trial of TS-1 for gastric cancer) in 2007], or new drug combination chemotherapys [CDDP + 5-FU: FNCLCC/FFCD (Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte contre le cancer/Federation Francophone de Cancerologie Digestive) in 2011, Capecitabine + Oxaliplatin: CLASSIC in 2012] also produced positive results in terms of improved prognosis. Neoadjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy, novel anti-cancer drugs, and chemoradiotherapy might be the key words to develop further improvement in the adjuvant treatment of resectable gastric cancer. Moreover, it is not new but still true to stress the importance of D2 surgery as the baseline treatment in order to minimize the amount of residual tumor after surgery. PMID:25206264

  18. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  1. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  2. Ear keloids: a review and update of treatment options

    PubMed Central

    SOBEC, RALUCA; DOBREANU, CODRIN; FODOR, LUCIAN; ŞOMCUTEAN, ANA; ŢICHIL, IOANA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2013-01-01

    Ear keloids are among the most challenging plastic surgery conditions and may have significant psychosocial impact for the patient. Their aesthetic considerations are serious and despite a variety of treatment options, they often proved to be recurrent. This paper reviews the management options of ear keloids available in literature up to date. Multiple therapeutic options are discussed, such as: surgical treatment, corticosteroid injections, laser therapy, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, pressure therapy, therapy with antitumor or immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26527968

  3. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2016-02-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  5. College Student Receptiveness to Various Alcohol Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler, Amee J.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Loomis, Tiffany B.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Heavy episodic drinking remains a significant problem on college campuses. Although most interventions for college students are behavioral, pharmacological treatments, such as naltrexone, could provide additional options. Participants: The authors evaluated receptivity to various alcohol treatment options in a general population of…

  6. New treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Gary; Ghaneh, Paula; Costello, Eithne; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John P

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very high mortality rate and affects approximately 230,000 individuals worldwide. Gemcitabine has become established as the standard therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer; however, the survival advantage is small. Adjuvant chemotherapy using either 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine is now established in pancreatic cancer as an alternative therapy. Combinations of gemcitabine with either platin agents or capecitabine may be advantageous. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents have been unsuccessful but multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors are under investigation. Of the increasing number of immunological agents, the GV1001 antitelomerase vaccine holds some interest. Targeted agents against important mitogenic pathways, including MEK/ERK, Src, PI3K/Akt, mTOR, Hedgehog and NF-kappaB, as well as agents targeting histone deacetylase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, heat shock protein 90 and other agents such as beta-lapachone, hold considerable interest for further development. However, the probability of individual success is low. PMID:19072345

  7. Adjuvant imatinib treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor: which risk stratification criteria and for how long? A case report.

    PubMed

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Levard, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is approved for the adjuvant treatment of KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) following surgical resection. However, uncertainty remains in terms of patient eligibility for adjuvant treatment and the optimal duration of treatment. Here, we present two challenging patient cases encountered in clinical practice that highlight the ambiguity in the current recommendations for adjuvant imatinib in GIST and discuss our approaches and rationales for treatment. The first case involves a 36-year-old man with a 7 cm duodenal GIST and possible tumor rupture during surgical resection. This patient's risk of GIST recurrence was either intermediate or high depending on which risk stratification criteria were used. The patient was treated with adjuvant imatinib for 3 years and experienced disease recurrence 14 months after the completion of treatment. Imatinib treatment was reintroduced, and the patient is in partial response 17 months later. The second case involves a 46-year-old woman at high risk of recurrence following surgical resection. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib was initiated. After considering the patient's initial high risk and good side-effect profile, the decision was made to continue adjuvant imatinib treatment for 5 years. As of May 2013, the patient has been receiving continuous imatinib treatment for 52 months, with no sign of progression. These reports exemplify the challenges faced in clinical practice because of uncertainties in optimal risk stratification criteria and duration of treatment. They stress the importance of individualized treatment and shared decision making between the physician and the patient. PMID:26457546

  8. Antihormonal treatment associated musculoskeletal pain in women with breast cancer in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Seber, Selcuk; Solmaz, Dilek; Yetisyigit, Tarkan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antihormonal treatment is an effective therapy in the adjuvant setting. However, musculoskeletal pain is a common adverse effect encountered in patients receiving this treatment. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for the development of antihormonal treatment-associated musculoskeletal pain (AHAMP) and its impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey of 78 consecutive breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment for early-stage breast cancer in an academic medical oncology clinic was conducted. AHAMP was assessed by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQOL was assessed by self-administered short form 36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast subscale surveys. Results AHAMP was found to be present in 37 (47.7%) patients. In multivariate regression analysis, having a normal body mass index (<30 kg/m2), cigarette smoking, and low serum vitamin D level (20 ng/mL) were found to be independent risk factors. In HRQOL assessment, physical and mental scores were found to be significantly lower in patients with joint arthralgia. Conclusion AHAMP has an adverse effect on the quality of life of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment, and assessment of predictive factors is important for identification of patient groups at risk of developing this condition. PMID:27563249

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Unusual Cancers of Childhood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment for more information. Esthesioneuroblastoma Esthesioneuroblastoma ( olfactory neuroblastoma ) is a tumor that begins in the olfactory ... first formed. Embryonal tumors such as rhabdomyosarcomas and neuroblastomas are most common in children. Treatment Treatment depends ...

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  13. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  14. Successful treatment of gallbladder mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) carcinomas rarely occur in the gallbladder. Here we reported a case of giant gallbladder unresectable mass with local liver invasion and omentum metastasis, which proved to be neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) by biopsy, received successful radical operation after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy plus somatostatin treatment. The patient showed good response as the neoplasm diminished dramatically and showed clear margin after 6 courses of treatment. A radical operation including cholecystectomy, hepatic wedge resection of the gallbladder fossa segment and lymph node of group 8a and 8p resection was performed successfully. Postoperative histopathological examination revealed neuroendocrine carcinoma mixed with adenocarcinoma in the gallbladder wall. Followed up showed no evidence of recurrence after 7 months of the operation. We suggest that neo-adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial to gallbladder mixed neuroendocrine carcinomas in an advanced stage which could also be advantageous to NEC of other organs. Virtual slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2731892837743787 PMID:23186166

  15. Quercetin: a potential natural drug for adjuvant treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian-Jun; Lin, Yuan; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Hou-Li; Diao, Yun-Peng; Li, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the rheumatism mainly manifested as disabling joint disease and mainly involves hands, wrists, feet and other small joints. Recurrent arthritis attacks, synovial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia and bone and cartilage damages eventually lead to joint dysfunction and other complications, and there is no cure. Quercetin (QU) is a kind of natural flavonoids, with lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and other pharmacological activities, and minor toxic side effects. Thus, we assume that QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. The possible mechanism is through regulation of NF-κB, to inhibit the transcription of joint synovitis factors, hinder the generation of inflammatory factors, and inhibit the inflammatory reaction; through inhibiting the activities of VEGF, bFGF, MMP-2 and other cytokines, to inhibit angiogenesis in multiple links and inhibit synovial pannus formation. QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. PMID:24146468

  16. Therapeutic options in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2009-01-01

    Current theraputic options for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are reviewed. Therapeutic options for mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as defined by the American Urological Association, are generally treated medically. Moderate to severe LUTS can be treated medically or with surgical therapy. Current medical and surgical treatments for LUTS secondary to BPH are reviewed and evolving treatments are explored. PMID:19936164

  17. The neo-adjuvant treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Catania, V; Consoli, A; Cavallaro, A; Liardo, R L E; Malaguarnera, M

    2010-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare intra-abdominal tumor, characterized by a specific histological and immunohistochemical pattern. These tumors affect with higher frequency stomach and small bowel and occur at a median age of 60 years with a slight male predominance. An early stage of GIST often don't cause any symptoms, so most GISTs are diagnosed in later stages of the disease. We report a case of GIST diagnosed only with clinical data and positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib mesylate, a newly developed tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib reduced the mass size and vascularization, making possible a surgical approach. PMID:20707293

  18. Tuberculosis axillary lymph node coexistent breast cancer in adjuvant treatment: case report

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of breast cancer and tuberculosis is rare. In most cases, involvement by tuberculosis occurs in axillary lymph nodes. We report a case of a 43-years-old patient who had undergone adenomastectomy and left sentinel lymph node biopsy due to a triple negative ductal carcinoma. At the end of adjuvant treatment, the patient had an atypical lymph node in the left axilla. Lymph node was excised, and after laboratory analysis, the diagnosis was ganglion tuberculosis. The patient underwent treatment for primary tuberculosis. The development of these two pathologies can lead to problems in diagnosis and treatment. An accurate diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:26018148

  19. Current and future treatment options in SIADH

    PubMed Central

    Zietse, Robert; van der Lubbe, Nils; Hoorn, Ewout J.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of hyponatraemia due to SIADH is not always as straightforward as it seems. Although acute treatment with hypertonic saline and chronic treatment with fluid restriction are well established, both approaches have severe limitations. These limitations are not readily overcome by addition of furosemide, demeclocycline, lithium or urea to the therapy. In theory, vasopressin-receptor antagonists would provide a more effective method to treat hyponatraemia, by virtue of their ability to selectively increase solute-free water excretion by the kidneys (aquaresis). In this review we explore the limitations of the current treatment of SIADH and describe emerging therapies for the treatment of SIADH-induced hyponatraemia. PMID:19881932

  20. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  1. Migraine preventive therapy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, A M; Bigal, M E

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we review new treatment options for migraine prevention. We start with an overview about migraine and then briefly discuss current indications for migraine prevention and new and emerging preventive medications. PMID:15926007

  2. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications What treatment options are available for male infertility? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... deliver a live-born infant, in most cases, infertility has no other outward symptoms. The evaluation of ...

  3. EPO-R expression patterns in resected gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemoradiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Maria; De Castro, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Cejas, Paloma; Casado, Enrique; Barriuso, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Larrauri, Javier

    2009-03-01

    The primary aim was to determine whether Epo-R immunohistochemical expression is related to disease free survival (DFS) in specimens of GC from patients who underwent adjuvant chemoradiation. Specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas obtained from 44 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy and adjuvant treatment were investigated immunohistochemically expression of Epo-R. Three patterns for Epo-R staining were defined: Pattern A (secretory cells-like staining), Pattern B (parietal-like staining) and Pattern C (chief-like staining). Median DFS was 38 months (CI 95%: 33-43) and 15 months (IC 95%: 3-27) in the pattern B and C, respectively, but it was not reached in the pattern A (p = 0.06). Our findings suggest that there may be a relationship between Epo-R expression and DFS in the patients with GC resected. PMID:19002606

  4. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  5. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). Genetic counseling is part of the treatment plan for ... to other parts of the body: CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Adrenocortical Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment for more information.) Having certain genetic conditions increases the risk of adrenocortical carcinoma. Anything ... can be a sign of disease. CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  8. Treatment Options for Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). Genetic counseling is part of the treatment plan for ... to other parts of the body: CT scan (CAT scan) : A procedure that makes a series of ...

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for vulvar cancer may be applied to the skin in a cream or lotion. See Drugs Approved to Treat Vulvar ... treat vulvar lesions and is applied to the skin in a cream. New types of treatment are being tested in ...

  10. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms. PMID:20689798

  11. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  14. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Brain Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on their chemical make-up. SPECT scan (single photon emission computed tomography scan) : A procedure that uses ... has come back after treatment: SPECT scan (single photon emission computed tomography scan) : A procedure that uses ...

  17. Treatment options for the replacement of missing mandibular incisors.

    PubMed

    Fleigel, Jeffrey D; Salmon, Cade A; Piper, James M

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of a mandibular incisor is a dental treatment warranting special consideration. Some of the challenges associated with the anterior mandible are limited space, challenging surrounding anatomy, and tough esthetic requirements. Proper diagnosis and treatment planning may require a multidisciplinary approach to successfully meet the demands of replacing a missing tooth in this sextant. Several treatment options currently exist for mandibular incisor replacement. These options include (1) resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), (2) orthodontic treatment, (3) full-veneer fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), (4) dental implants for single-tooth replacement, (5) possible extraction of one or more incisors and restoration with implant-supported FDPs, (6) possible extraction of one or more teeth and restoration with FDPs from #22 to 27, (7) possible extraction of one or more teeth and restoration with removable dental prostheses (RDPs). This manuscript outlines the various treatment options for the replacement of mandibular incisors and discusses benefits and drawbacks of each. PMID:21631631

  18. [New treatment options for chronic pruritus].

    PubMed

    Zeidler, C; Pfleiderer, B; Ständer, S

    2016-08-01

    Prevalent in 14-17 % of the population, chronic pruritus is among the most common and stressful symptoms in medicine. In spite of new findings regarding the origin and chronification of the symptom, therapy remains a great challenge. There is a lack of approved therapies that provide rapid and efficient reduction of pruritus. As a result, the affected patients suffer a long time (even months to years), and somatic (scratch lesions, super infections, sleep disorders) and psychosomatic disorders develop. Interdisciplinary cooperation with various specialists is important not just for these reasons, but also due to different etiologies of the symptom and common comorbidities. In addition, there remains a great need for uniformly devised, clinically controlled studies, recommendations and guidelines. New therapeutic approaches are currently being verified in clinical trials. This allows for future prospects of possible new and partially targeted therapies. This article provides a summary of current therapeutic options based on case series, individual randomized controlled trials and the current S2K guideline. PMID:27351559

  19. Salvage treatment for childhood ependymoma after surgery only: Pitfalls of omitting 'at once' adjuvant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Giangaspero, Felice; Garre, Maria Luisa; Genitori, Lorenzo; Perilongo, Giorgio; Collini, Paola; Riva, Daria; Valentini, Laura; Scarzello, Giovanni; Poggi, Geraldina; Spreafico, Filippo; Peretta, Paola; Mascarin, Maurizio; Modena, Piergiorgio; Sozzi, Gabriella; Bedini, Nice; Biassoni, Veronica; Urgesi, Alessandro; Balestrini, Maria Rosa; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Sandri, Alessandro; Gandola, Lorenza

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To discuss the results obtained by giving adjuvant treatment for childhood ependymoma (EPD) at relapse after complete surgery only. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2002, 63 children older than 3 years old entered the first Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology protocol for EPD (group A), and another 14 patients were referred after relapsing after more tumor excisions only (group B). Prognostic factors were homogeneously matched in the two groups. We report on the outcome of group B. Results: Mean time to first local progression in group B had been 14 months. Tumors originated in the posterior fossa (PF) in 10 children and were supratentorial (ST) in 4; 11 had first been completely excised (NED) and 3 had residual disease (ED). Diagnoses were classic EPD in 9 patients, anaplastic in 5. Eight children were referred NED and 6 ED after two or more operations, 5 had cranial nerve palsy, 1 had recurrent meningitis, and 2 had persistent hydrocephalus. All received radiotherapy (RT) to tumor bed and 5 also had pre-RT chemotherapy. Six of 14 patients (6/10 with PF tumors) had a further relapse a mean 6 months after the last surgery; 4 of 6 died: progression-free survival and overall survival at 4 years after referral were 54.4% and 77%, respectively. Considering only PF tumors and setting time 0 as at the last surgery for group B, progression-free survival and overall survival were 32% and 50% for group B and 52% (p < 0.20)/70% (p < 0.29) for the 46 patients in group A with PF tumors. Local control was 32% in group B and 70.5% in group A (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Relapsers after surgery only, especially if with PF-EPD, do worse than those treated after first diagnosis; subsequent surgery for tumor relapse has severe neurologic sequelae.

  20. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  1. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  2. Hip Instability: Current Concepts and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D

    2016-07-01

    Instability of the hip can manifest in a wide range of settings, with presenting symptoms including subtle discomfort at end range of motion or more dramatic dislocation of the joint. It can result from traumatic injury with dislocation or subluxation; atraumatic capsular laxity; structural bony abnormality, such as acetabular dysplasia; and iatrogenic injury. Initial treatment of the concentrically reduced joint often begins with physical therapy to strengthen dynamic stabilizers and to allow time for resolution of acute symptoms. Surgical treatment is aimed at repairing injured soft tissue structures, including static stabilizers, and addressing underlying bony structural deficiencies. PMID:27343395

  3. [Extended options of anticoagulant treatment in thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Karetová, Debora; Bultas, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TD) is a relatively common disease with acute risk of death and potential long-term consequences in term of postthrombotic syndrome or chronic pulmonary hypertension. Anticoagulant therapy is the basic therapeutic procedure; thrombolytic therapy and the introduction cava filter are appropriately indicated for individual cases. In past few years, new direct oral anticoagulant drugs (NOAC) have occurred - Xa factor or thrombin inhibitors which have demonstrated the same efficacy and even higher safety in comparison to conventional treatment. In mid 2014, 3 drugs of this group are registered in Czech Republic - rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), dabigatran (Pradaxa®) and apixaban (Eliquis®). These drugs have comparable efficacy and safety but they differ in schedule of dose administration. Rivaroxaban and apixaban can be administered immediately after diagnosis of venous thrombosis or hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism. LMWH application has to precede few days the administration of dabigatran. Limitation of new drugs is their price. Unavailability of antidotes is temporary because current researches continue to find one for dabigatran and another for both of xabans. Duration of anticoagulant treatment after acute phase depends on the presence of thrombosis risk factors and the individual bleeding risk. Minimal duration of anticoagulant therapy is 3 months, commonly 6-12 months and in high risk patients it is "long term" treatment. Good results of new anticoagulant drugs in trials in term of thromboembolism recurrence prevention may change established habits in TD patients with long term treatment. PMID:25600045

  4. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  5. Diabetic retinopathy: current and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Giuliari, Gian P

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a major health concern worldwide and its incidence is projected to increase. Diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) are considered the most sight-threatening ocular complications in these patients. Pivotal studies, such as the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and the Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS), have established macular and pan-retinal laser as the gold-standard of treatment for these complications. The recent discovery of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its role in the development of proliferative disease, has led to a movement towards treating PDR and DME with anti-angiogenic medications alone or in conjunction with the gold-standard of care. Due to the severity of the diabetic ocular complications and the rising incidence of diabetes worldwide, it is important for the non-ophthalmologist care provider to be informed of the new treatments available for these conditions in an effort to better guide their patients. In this review, I will discuss the importance of these new methods of treatment as well as the significance of systemic glucose control, vitreous surgery and laser photocoagulation. PMID:22352446

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation therapy to be given in fewer treatments. Photon-beam radiation therapy : Photon-beam radiation therapy is a type of external ... with or without radiation therapy. Fast neutron or photon-beam radiation therapy . A clinical trial of radiation ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation therapy to be given in fewer treatments. Photon-beam radiation therapy : Photon-beam radiation therapy is a type of external ... with or without radiation therapy. Fast neutron or photon-beam radiation therapy . A clinical trial of radiation ...

  8. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  9. Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL)

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Victoria Mary Lendrum

    2009-01-01

    Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma) can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy. PMID:20054418

  10. [Options for stress management in obesity treatment].

    PubMed

    Czeglédi, Edit

    2016-02-14

    Overeating and physical inactivity are of great importance in the etiology of obesity. Psychological factors are often found in the background of life style. Chronic stress can contribute to physical inactivity and behaviors that hinder the keeping of a diet (e.g., irregular eating pattern, emotional eating). Results of randomized controlled trials show that relaxation can reduce emotional eating, improve cognitive restraint, and thereby reduce weight. However, stress management is more than relaxation. It consists of adaptive emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies and skills to improve relationships. Deflection skills may help in replacing emotional eating with other behaviors. Cognitive restructuring, saying no, and problem solving help to prevent or manage conflicts and difficulties otherwise would result in overeating due to distress. Developing stress management skills may result in greater compliance with the treatment. The techniques presented in the study can be easily applied by general practitioners or specialists, and provide tools for optimizing obesity treatment. PMID:26853727

  11. Current treatment options of acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar R; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Bumbasirević, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic acquired flatfoot is an important orthopaedic problem, due to progressive loss of whole foot function and the increasing problem of patient disability. It is a complex entity, involving the tibialis posterior tendon, ankle joint, hindfoot and midfoot. In most cases the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the root cause of acquired flat foot, but there are other contributors and many different factors have an influence. The clinical picture varies depending on the stage of the deformity, as well as the treatment approach. Initially soft tissue procedures, synoviectomy and augmentation of the PTT are advised. In stage 2, lateral column lengthening and calcaneal osteotomy, with soft tissue - tendon transfers (TA, FHL, FDL) are recommended. In stage 3 subtalar, double or triplearthodesis is preferable, while in stage 4 pantalar fusion is indicated. This article elaborates on the etiology, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment modalities. PMID:24669559

  12. Treatment options for postdissection aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sobocinski, Jonathan; Patterson, Benjamin O; Clough, Rachel E; Spear, Rafaelle; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Azzaoui, Richard; Hertault, Adrien; Haulon, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most devastating catastrophes that can affect the aorta. Surgical treatment is proposed only when complications such as rupture or malperfusion occur. No clear consensus has been reached regarding the best therapy to prevent aortic rupture after the acute phase. We have performed a thorough review of the most recent literature on the strategies to treat patients in the chronic phase of aortic dissection. PMID:26771869

  13. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed. PMID:24619620

  14. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. PMID:27119465

  15. Adjuvant treatment modalities to control macular edema in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ebru Nevin; Yıldırım, Cem

    2013-10-01

    Cataract surgical outcomes in diabetic patients has been subject to changes with the advances in the surgical techniques. Recent studies suggest that cataract surgery does not cause the progression of diabetic retinopathy and intravitreal bevacizumab and/or triamcinolone injections combined with cataract surgery may contribute in short term improvement of macular edema in diabetic patients. This article reviews the progression of diabetic retinopathy after cataract surgery with phacoemulsification and the use of adjuvant intravitreal treatments combined with phacoemusification in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery. PMID:23248073

  16. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  17. Pathogenesis and treatment options for intradialytic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Controversy surrounds the diagnosis and treatment of intradialytic hypertension. Here, we describe the definition, epidemiology and management of intradialytic hypertension. Although this hemodialysis complication has long been recognized, only recently it was associated with increased morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Endothelial cell dysfunction appears to be the major mechanism underlying this blood pressure phenomenon, and the role of extracellular volume and sodium overload remains to be better defined. To treat this potential cardiovascular health threat is necessary to identify and understand the factors that influence it. PMID:27148774

  18. Gynecomastia – evaluation and current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ruth E; Kermott, Cindy A; Murad, M Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best management approach for gynecomastia? Results: In most patients, surgical correction usually leads to immediate cosmetic and symptomatic improvement and is considered the best approach. In men who are being treated with antiandrogen therapies, pharmacological intervention with tamoxifen is the most effective approach, followed by radiotherapy. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating gynecomastia Failure to detect the very rare male breast cancerOverly aggressive early intervention or evaluationAppropriate medical interventionWhen to refer to specialist treatment PMID:21479145

  19. Future treatment options with capecitabine in solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wilke, H

    2002-02-01

    The oral fluoropyrimidine, capecitabine is attracting great interest in the context of tumour-selective therapy and rationally designed combination regimens. Agents such as taxanes upregulate thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and there is therefore a clear rationale for their combination with capecitabine. Preclinical studies of capecitabine/taxane combination therapy demonstrated synergistic antitumour activity and phase I studies showed encouraging efficacy. Therefore, a randomised, phase III trial (docetaxel versus docetaxel/capecitabine) has been initiated in anthracycline-refractory metastatic breast cancer patients. Recruitment is complete. In colorectal cancer, capecitabine/oxaliplatin combination therapy is promising and a phase I, dose-finding trial has been conducted in patients with refractory metastatic solid tumours. A similar trial has evaluated capecitabine/irinotecan combination treatment. Capecitabine is also being investigated as adjuvant therapy for colorectal and breast cancers. The primary objective of the ongoing X-ACT trial in almost 2000 Dukes' C colon cancer patients is to demonstrate at least equivalent disease-free survival between capecitabine and the Mayo Clinic regimen. In addition, the CALGB is planning a randomised, phase III trial of capecitabine versus doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide or cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/5-fluorouracil (CMF) as adjuvant treatment in high-risk, node-negative breast cancer patients aged >65 years. PMID:11841932

  20. Pharmacologic Options for the Treatment of Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia is now clinically defined as a loss of muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration (either walking speed or distance or grip strength). Based on the FRAX studies suggesting that the questions without bone mineral density can be used to screen for osteoporosis, there is now a valid simple questionnaire to screen for sarcopenia, i.e., the SARC-F. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of sarcopenia. These include genetic factors, mitochondrial defects, decreased anabolic hormones (e.g., testosterone, vitamin D, growth hormone and insulin growth hormone-1), inflammatory cytokine excess, insulin resistance, decreased protein intake and activity, poor blood flow to muscle and deficiency of growth derived factor-11. Over the last decade, there has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of muscle, resulting in a marked increase in potential future targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. At present, resistance exercise, protein supplementation, and vitamin D have been established as the basic treatment of sarcopenia. High-dose testosterone increases muscle power and function, but has a number of potentially limiting side effects. Other drugs in clinical development include selective androgen receptor molecules, ghrelin agonists, myostatin antibodies, activin IIR antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, beta antagonists, and fast skeletal muscle troponin activators. As sarcopenia is a major predictor of frailty, hip fracture, disability, and mortality in older persons, the development of drugs to treat it is eagerly awaited. PMID:26100650

  1. Osteoporosis in the aging male: Treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Stephen P; Datta, Harish K

    2007-01-01

    In elderly women, loss in bone mass and micro-architectural changes are generally attributed to the onset of menopause. Men do not experience menopause, they do, however, experience age-related acceleration in bone loss and micro-architecture deterioration. The incidence of osteoporotic fractures in elderly men, just as in aged women, increases exponentially with age; the rise in men, however, is some 5–10 years later than in women. Up to 50% of male osteoporotics have no identifiable etiology; however elderly males have much higher likelihood of having an identifiable secondary cause than younger men. Therefore, clinical and laboratory evaluation of aged male osteoporotics must be thorough and should be aimed at identifying lifestyle or conditions contributing to bone loss and fragility. It is essential to identify and treat secondary causes and ensure adequate vitamin D and calcium intake before embarking upon treatment with pharmacological agents. The evidence from a limited number of trials suggests that bisphosphonates, especially alendronate and risedronate, are effective in improving BMD, and seem to be the treatments of choice in aged men with osteoporosis. In cases where bisphosphonates are contra-indicated or ineffective, teriparatide or alternatives such as strontium should be considered. PMID:18225452

  2. Osteoporosis in the aging male: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Stephen P; Datta, Harish K

    2007-01-01

    In elderly women, loss in bone mass and micro-architectural changes are generally attributed to the onset of menopause. Men do not experience menopause, they do, however, experience age-related acceleration in bone loss and micro-architecture deterioration. The incidence of osteoporotic fractures in elderly men, just as in aged women, increases exponen-tially with age; the rise in men, however, is some 5-10 years later than in women. Up to 50% of male osteoporotics have no identifiable etiology; however elderly males have much higher likelihood of having an identifiable secondary cause than younger men. Therefore, clinical and laboratory evaluation of aged male osteoporotics must be thorough and should be aimed at identifying lifestyle or conditions contributing to bone loss and fragility. It is essential to identify and treat secondary causes and ensure adequate vitamin D and calcium intake before embarking upon treatment with pharmacological agents. The evidence from a limited number of trials suggests that bisphosphonates, especially alendronate and risedronate, are effective in improving BMD, and seem to be the treatments of choice in aged men with osteoporosis. In cases where bisphosphonates are contra-indicated or ineffective, teriparatide or alternatives such as strontium should be considered. PMID:18225452

  3. Dual HER2 blockade in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Cornell, Lauren; Chumsri, Saranya; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that is overexpressed on the surface of 15%–20% of breast tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Consistently improved pathologic response and survival rates have been demonstrated with use of trastuzumab in combination with standard chemotherapy in both early and advanced breast cancer. However, resistance to trastuzumab may pose a major problem in the effective treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 blockade, using agents that work in a complimentary fashion to trastuzumab, has more recently been explored to evade resistance in both the preoperative (neoadjuvant) and adjuvant settings. Increased effectiveness of dual anti-HER2 agents over single blockade has been recently reported in clinical studies. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and taxane is currently approved in the metastatic and neoadjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Various biomarkers have also been investigated to identify subsets of patients with HER2-positive tumors who would likely respond best to these targeted therapy combinations. In this article, available trial data regarding efficacy and toxicity of treatment with combination HER2 agents in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting have been reviewed, and relevant correlative biomarker data from these trials have been discussed. PMID:26451122

  4. Psoriasis: characteristics, psychosocial effects and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sheila

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic non-infectious inflammatory skin disease with many different presentations. The classic presentation is of well-defined red plaques with silver scale. The characteristic scale makes the disorder highly visible and intrusive on the patient's lifestyle. The visible nature of the disease ensures that psoriasis has both physical and psychosocial effects. In normal skin, epidermal cell reproduction and proliferation takes 28 days. In psoriasis, this process is considerably accelerated to approximately four days, resulting in the deposit of immature cells on the skin. While the exact cause of this process is unknown, certain environmental and genetic factors are known to be provoking factors. Disease management will be dependent on disease severity, psychosocial effects and the patient's lifestyle. To effectively treat this disease the nurse must be skilled in psoriasis management, and in patient education and motivation. This article reviews the characteristics, aetiology, psychosocial effects and treatment strategies of psoriasis. PMID:18414290

  5. Metformin: a new option in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Pernía, Olga; Simó, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    Metformin is a biguanine, the most widely used antidiabetic drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Some studies suggest that metformin decreases the incidence of cancer and cancer-related mortality in diabetic patients. Metformin activates the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, a major sensor of the energy status of the cell and an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) catalytic activity, inducing a decrease in blood glucose by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis and stimulating glucose uptake in the muscle. Some preclinical data supports the inhibition of tumour cancer cell growth associated with mTOR inhibition and a decrease in phosphorylation of S6K, rpS6 and 4E-BP1. Here we have summarised some of the preclinical data and data of many clinical trials that are exploring the true value of metformin for cancer patients, mainly breast and prostate cancer. PMID:21680296

  6. Treatment Options for Distal Femur Fractures.

    PubMed

    von Keudell, Arvind; Shoji, Kristin; Nasr, Michael; Lucas, Robert; Dolan, Robert; Weaver, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in implant design, the management of distal femur fractures remains challenging. Fracture comminution and intra-articular extension can make it difficult to obtain an adequate reduction while preserving the soft tissue attachments to bone fragments to allow for bone healing. Many implant manufacturers have developed optimal anatomically contoured, distal femoral locking plates with percutaneous guides. This environment allows for the application of lateral locked plates in a biologically friendly manner. Although initial reports had high success rates, more recently a high rate of nonunion has been found, particularly in elderly patients. Limited literature is available for the treatment of patients with osteoporotic bone and associated ipsilateral total knee replacement and hip replacement. We present a patient with a distal femur fracture with significant comminution in the setting of an ipsilateral total hip replacement. PMID:27441931

  7. Degenerative meniscus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Richard; Kumar, Neil S; Patel, Nimit; Tom, James

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic degenerative meniscus continues to be a source of discomfort for a significant number of patients. With vascular penetration of less than one-third of the adult meniscus, healing potential in the setting of chronic degeneration remains low. Continued hoop and shear stresses upon the degenerative meniscus results in gross failure, often in the form of complex tears in the posterior horn and midbody. Patient history and physical examination are critical to determine the true source of pain, particularly with the significant incidence of simultaneous articular pathology. Joint line tenderness, a positive McMurray test, and mechanical catching or locking can be highly suggestive of a meniscal source of knee pain and dysfunction. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently utilized to examine for osteoarthritis and to verify the presence of meniscal tears, in addition to ruling out other sources of pain. Non-operative therapy focused on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy may be able to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. For patients refractory to conservative therapy, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy can provide short-term gains regarding pain relief, especially when combined with an effective, regular physiotherapy program. Patients with clear mechanical symptoms and meniscal pathology may benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, but surgery is not a guaranteed success, especially with concomitant articular pathology. Ultimately, the long-term outcomes of either treatment arm provide similar results for most patients. Further study is needed regarding the short and long-term outcomes regarding conservative and surgical therapy, with a particular focus on the economic impact of treatment as well. PMID:25405088

  8. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: diagnosis, treatment options, and management

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Kamel, Ihab; Cosgrove, David P.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) is a rare disease with a poor prognosis which typically presents in the 6th decade of life. Of the 3,000 cases seen annually in the United States, less than one half of these tumors are resectable. A variety of risk factors have been associated with HC, most notably primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), biliary stone disease and parasitic liver disease. Patients typically present with abdominal pain, pruritis, weight loss, and jaundice. Computed topography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US) are used to characterize biliary lesions. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) assess local ductal extent of the tumor while allowing for therapeutic biliary drainage. MRCP has demonstrated similar efficacies to PTC and ERCP in identifying anatomic extension of tumors with less complications. Treatment consists of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Biliary drainage of the future liver remnant should be performed to decrease bilirubin levels thereby facilitating future liver hypertrophy. Standard therapy consists of surgical margin-negative (R0) resection with extrahepatic bile duct resection, hepatectomy and en bloc lymphadenectomy. Local resection should not be undertaken. Lymph node invasion, tumor grade and negative margins are important prognostic indicators. In instances where curative resection is not possible, liver transplantation has demonstrated acceptable outcomes in highly selected patients. Despite the limited data, chemotherapy is indicated for patients with unresectable tumors and adequate functional status. Five-year survival after surgical resection of HC ranges from 10% to 40% however, recurrence can be as high as 50-70% even after R0 resection. Due to the complexity of this disease, a multi-disciplinary approach with multimodal treatment is recommended for this complex disease. PMID:24696835

  9. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  10. Naegleria fowleri: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  11. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  12. Treatment options for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Brian; Younossi, Zobair M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become increasingly recognized as the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes in the last few decades and is among the most common forms of chronic liver disease in the Western world and across the globe. With the growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, NAFLD is estimated to affect about one-quarter of the US population. Although most patients with NAFLD have nonprogressive bland steatosis, a minority of patients develop the histological subtype of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related death. This is especially true when NASH patients have type 2 diabetes. Treatment of NAFLD should therefore be directed towards patients with established NASH. Sustained weight loss seems to improve insulin resistance and associated NASH. In fact, weight loss with bariatric surgery leads to biochemical and histological improvement in morbidly obese patients with NASH. Several pharmacologic agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory mediators potentially responsible for the development and progression of NASH. While some studies have shown initial promise, none has established long-term efficacy using randomized clinical trials. This paper briefly reviews the epidemiology, natural history, and pathophysiology of NAFLD and NASH and then focuses on the clinical trials of various therapeutic modalities for NAFLD. These include weight loss agents, bariatric surgery, insulin-sensitizing agents, lipid-lowering agents, antioxidants, probiotics, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, cytoprotective and other novel agents. PMID:21180596

  13. Ichthyosis: clinical manifestations and practical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Oji, Vinzenz; Traupe, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    Ichthyoses constitute a large group of cornification disorders that affect the entire integument. The skin is characterized by visible scaling and in many cases by inflammation, for example, in bullous/keratinopathic ichthyosis or Netherton syndrome. From the viewpoint of classification it is useful to distinguish non-syndromic from syndromic types of ichthyosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris and recessive X-linked ichthyosis are common disorders - often of delayed onset, in contrast to congenital ichthyoses, which belong to the group of rare diseases and present at birth with either the features of collodion membrane or congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. The diagnostic steps are based on clinical data, analyses such as the steroid sulfatase activity test, skin biopsies, and genetic results. However, the dramatic increase in knowledge about the pathophysiology of these conditions has not led to a curative therapy so far. The therapeutic management is multidisciplinary and involves ichthyosis patient organizations in many countries. The mainstay of treatment remains with moisturizing creams containing, for example, urea, lactic acid and other humectants and keratolytics, regular bathing, and mechanical scale removal. Patients with lamellar ichthyosis or ichthyosiform erythroderma in particular profit from oral therapy with retinoids or retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agents. PMID:19824737

  14. Proposed HWIR alters waste treatment, disposal options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.; Robinson, C.

    1996-04-01

    In what it has called its most important change to the hazardous waste rules since 1980, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule for process wastes that currently are regulated by the hazardous waste provisions in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA Subtitle C. The rule addresses wastes that EPA has individually listed as hazardous, as well as wastes that are mixed with, derived from or contain listed hazardous wastes. The HWIR sets constituent-specific exit levels that would let low-risk process wastes escape the rigorous regulations of Subtitle C. EPA also proposes changes to RCRA`s land disposal restrictions so that some wastes that currently must be treated according to strict universal treatment standards may not have to be treated at all -- or could be treated in a less expensive manner -- before disposal. The proposed rule is important to virtually every company that is subject to RCRA`s hazardous waste regulations and raises many issues on which companies may want to comment.

  15. Update on Treatment Options for Gonococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jason W; Mahoney, Monica V; Mandal, Sana; Lawrence, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in the United States has grown over the past decade. The most recent data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that reported cases have increased by almost 10% over the last 5 years. In conjunction with this rise, the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae has also emerged. The 2015 CDC guidelines recommend dual therapy with intramuscular ceftriaxone and oral azithromycin as first-line treatment, although components of this regimen are met with a high level of resistance. Although ceftriaxone resistance has not yet been reported in the United States, it is only a matter of time before such isolates are detected, thus ushering in a new era of difficult-to-manage uncomplicated gonococcal infection. The potential public health crisis and patient-associated sequelae (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease, epididymitis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection) linked with untreatable gonorrhea are cause for great concern. To try to stem this tide, a number of new agents targeted against N. gonorrhoeae are being investigated in clinical trials. In this article, we review the various agents, both currently available and under clinical investigation, and provide recommendations for the management of gonococcal infections. PMID:26343813

  16. An overview of treatment options for urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Hamid; Moazzami, Bobak; Pourghasem, Mohsen; Kasaeian, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Urolithiasis has become a worldwide problem with the prevalence of the disease increasing over the past few decades. While various treatment modalities have evolved over the years, discrepancies exist regarding the clinical indications and the efficacy of each of these treatment options. In the present review, we aim to review the current treatment modalities for urinary tract stones to provide a better understanding on the therapeutic approaches as well as their clinical indications. PMID:26958325

  17. Birdshot uveitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Menezo, Victor; Taylor, Simon RJ

    2014-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a relatively uncommon subtype of idiopathic posterior uveitis with distinct clinical characteristics and a strong genetic association with the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-A29 allele. The diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the presence of typical clinical features, including multiple, distinctive, hypopigmented choroidal lesions throughout the fundus. The long-term visual prognosis of this disorder, however, remains guarded – central visual acuity can be preserved until late in the disease and it is not uncommon for patients to receive inadequate immunosuppressive treatment, leading to a poor long-term outcome in which peripheral retinal damage eventually leads to visual deterioration. Birdshot chorioretinopathy has proven a particularly attractive area of study within the field of uveitis, as it is a relatively easily defined disease with an associated human leukocyte antigen haplotype. Despite this, however, the immune mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis remain unclear, and some patients continue to lose retinal function despite therapy with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive agents. Laboratory research continues to investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease, and clinical research is now being driven to improve the phenotyping and monitoring of this condition as, in the era of so-called personalized medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to identify patients at risk of visual loss early so that they can be treated more aggressively with targeted therapies such as the newer biological agents. This approach requires the formation of collaborative groups, as the relative rarity of the condition makes it difficult for one center to accumulate enough patients for worthwhile studies. Nevertheless, results obtained with newer therapies, such as biological agents directed against particular cytokines or cell-surface receptors, demonstrate ever improving control of the inflammation in refractory

  18. Treatment strategies for atopic dermatitis: optimizing the available therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Paller, Amy S; Simpson, Eric L; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Ellis, Charles N; Mancini, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Bathing and moisturization to control dryness, applications of topical anti-inflammatory agents (including corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors [TCIs]) to control flares, minimization of the risk for infection, and relief of pruritus are the cornerstones of effective therapy for atopic dermatitis. Education of parents and patients is crucial to enhance adherence. Strategies for reduced Staphylococcus aureus colonization may help control re-emergence of flares following cessation of antimicrobial treatment for infection; these include dilute bleach baths and minimizing the risk for contamination of topical agents. In severe, refractory cases, more aggressive therapy with systemic immunosuppressants may be considered, but appropriate laboratory testing must be included as part of patient monitoring during treatment. The value of adjuvant therapy with wet wraps to "cool down" particularly erythematous and pruritic flares is becoming increasingly recognized. PMID:23021780

  19. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the safety, efficacy and anti-tumor effects of a surgery adjuvant treatment on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This approach combined suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by formolized tumor cells and irradiated xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The post-surgical margin of the cavity was infiltrated with lipid-complexed thymidine kinase suicide gene coadministrated with ganciclovir. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. With respect to surgery-treated controls (SC), this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of patients local disease-free from 6 to 58% and distant metastases-free from 43 to 78% (Fisher's Exact test). In addition, CT significantly improved both SC overall 78 (23-540) and metastasis-free survival 112 (0-467) days to more than 1312 days (respective ranges: 43-1312 and 0-1312) (Kaplan-Meier analysis). In those patients subjected to partial surgery or presenting local recurrence, the efficacy of CT was verified by a 49% of objective responses that averaged 85% of tumor mass loss, while 22% displayed tumor progression as 94% of SC did. Therefore, surgery adjuvant CT controlled tumor growth, delaying or preventing post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life. PMID:18033308

  20. Current treatment options of brain metastases and outcomes in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, Jadwiga; Walasek, Tomasz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Blecharz, Paweł; Reinfuss, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with melanoma who have brain metastases is poor, a median survival does not exceed 4-6 months. There are no uniform standards of treatment for patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). The most preferred treatment approaches include local therapy - surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The role of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as an adjuvant to local therapy is controversial. WBRT remains a palliative approach for those patients who have multiple MBMs with contraindications for surgery or SRS, or/and poor performance status, or/and very widespread extracranial metastases. Corticosteroids have been used in palliative treatment of MBMs as relief from symptoms related to intracranial pressure and edema. In recent years, the development of new systemic therapeutic strategies has been observed. Various modalities of systemic treatment include chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Also, multimodality management in different combinations is a common strategy. Decisions regarding the use of specific treatment modalities are dependent on patient's performance status, and the extent of both intracranial and extracranial disease. This review summarizes current treatment options, indications and outcomes in patients with brain metastases from melanoma. PMID:27601961

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  2. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Haley J.; Pogue, Jason M.; Kaye, Keith S.; LaPlante, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of currently available treatment options for infections due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is an emerging and serious global public health threat. Carbapenems have been used as the “last-line” treatment for infections caused by resistant Enterobacteriaceae, including those producing extended spectrum ß-lactamases. However, Enterobacteriaceae that produce carbapenemases, which are enzymes that deactivate carbapenems and most other ß-lactam antibiotics, have emerged and are increasingly being reported worldwide. Despite this increasing burden, the most optimal treatment for CRE infections is largely unknown. For the few remaining available treatment options, there are limited efficacy data to support their role in therapy. Nevertheless, current treatment options include the use of older agents, such as polymyxins, fosfomycin, and aminoglycosides, which have been rarely used due to efficacy and/or toxicity concerns. Optimization of dosing regimens and combination therapy are additional treatment strategies being explored. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with poor outcomes and high mortality. Continued research is critically needed to determine the most appropriate treatment. PMID:26125030

  3. Natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma and current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent primary liver cancer and the most severe complication of chronic liver disease. The annual number of new cases worldwide is approximately 550,000, representing more than 5% of human cancers and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The stages of the malignancy as well as the severity of the underlying liver disease are essential factors in planning the therapeutic approach. Curative treatment options are represented mainly by surgery (ie, resection or transplantation), but most patients are not candidates for a curative option, and only palliative treatment could be given to these patients. Among palliative treatments, only chemoembolization has been proven to be effective, but other options are currently being investigated. Major risk factors for HCC are well known and are dependent on the geographic area. In Europe, the United States, and Japan, the main risk factors are liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol, and tobacco; in contrast, in Africa and Asia, these factors are hepatitis B and C virus, tobacco use, and aflatoxin exposure. Cirrhosis from any cause is a predisposing factor for HCC and could be considered as a premalignant condition. The present concept of carcinogenesis in HCC is a multistage process. This article describes the natural history of HCC and discusses the various treatment options available at present. PMID:18243838

  4. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions: Etiology, Treatment Options and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Do-Young

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke movement disorders are uncommon, but comprise an important part of secondary movement disorders. These exert variable and heterogeneous clinical courses according to the stroke lesion and its temporal relationships. Moreover, the predominant stroke symptoms hinder a proper diagnosis in clinical practice. This article describes the etiology, treatment options and prognosis of post-stroke movement disorders. PMID:27240807

  5. The role of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment for adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Both locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach and gastro-esophageal junction are associated with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. Recently multimodal treatment consisting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy is reported to improve survival when compared to surgery alone. Neoadjuvant therapy in these locally advanced tumors allows for early tumor responses and the extent of tumor regression that can be achieved is considered a significant prognostic factor. This, in turn, increases the resectability of these tumors. Also due to the high frequency of lymph node metastasis, patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma should undergo a D2 lymphadenectomy. Postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy have been studied in gastric adenocarcinomas and showed a survival benefit. However, the surgical techniques used in these trials are no longer considered to be standard by today's surgical practice. In addition, there are no standard recommendations for adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation after R0 resection and adequate lymph node dissection. PMID:21810561

  6. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  7. A randomized trial comparing adjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin, and mitomycin with no treatment in operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Kosmidis, P; Mylonakis, N; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Lisaios, B; Soumilas, A; Mandrekas, D; Tsetis, A; Klonaris, C

    1996-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy (CT) has, in some groups of patients with gastric cancer (GC), who are at a high risk for relapse, resulted in a small but measurable improvement in palliation and patient survival not reaching statistical significance and therefore remaining applicable in an investigational setting. Based on the above data, we studied adjuvant CT with FEM (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), epirubicin, mitomycin C) in a randomized study of patients with completely resected stage III GC and patients with stages T1-3 with a low histologic grade. CT was started 2-3 weeks after surgery. From August 1988 until February 1994, 84 patients with completely resected tumors and lymph nodes were randomized to either group A (FEM) or group B (no treatment). Patients were eligible for randomization if they had a Karnofsky score > 60, no postoperative evidence of residual tumor, and normal cardiac, hepatic and renal functions. Forty-two patients were randomized to each group, with no significant differences regarding: age distribution, group A 53 years (41-65), group B 57 years (35-66); sex, group A 32/10, group B 25/17 (men/women); site of primary tumor, group A 22/20, group B 25/17 (pylorus/antrum); histologic grade, group A 0/19/23, group B 0/25/17 (grades I/II/III); lymph node metastases, group A 30, group B 32, and surgical procedure, group A 33/9/6, group B 35/7/9 (total gastrectomy/partial gastrectomy/splenectomy). Group A received 5-FU 600 mg/m2/day i.v. on days 1, 8, 29 and 36, epirubicin 45 mg/m2/day i.v. on days 1 and 29, and mitomycin C 10 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1. The schedule was repeated every 56 days for 3 cycles. Group B received no treatment odd was only subjected to the regular follow-up. At the last follow-up at 66 months, 27/42 patients in group A (64%) had relapsed or died, compared to 34/42 patients in group B (81%). The differences in the relapse and the disease-free and the overall survival rates were not statistically significant. Only the subgroup of patients

  8. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  9. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie; Eramo, Anna; Francois, Clement; Duffy, Ruth; Legacy, Susan N; Offord, Steve J; Krasa, Holly B; Johnston, Stephen S; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Rohman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical antipsychotics (AAs), an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE) or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results A high proportion of patients (>80%) were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60%) and obesity (>40%). From the nine treatment options available, the number of optimal choices for individual patient segments were limited based on their prior history, including those with cardiometabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities (four); experiencing prolactin elevation-related problems (seven); needing to avoid excessive sedation (four); or at risk of extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia (two). Options were then further restricted among patients in more than one segment when multiple pre-index AE

  10. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  11. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  12. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) as an adjuvant in cancer treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M M; Haniadka, R; Chacko, P P; Palatty, P L; Baliga, M S

    2011-01-01

    Despite acquiring a strong understanding of the molecular basis and advances in treatment, cancer is the second major cause of death in the world. In clinics, the stagedependent treatment strategies may include surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments like hormonotherapy and chemotherapy, which are associated with side effects. The use of traditional herbal medicine in cancer patients is on a rise, as it is believed that these medications are non toxic and alleviate the symptoms of cancer, boost the immune system, or may tackle the cancer itself. Since antiquity the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe commonly known as ginger (family Zingiberaceae) have widely been used as a spice and condiment in different societies. Additionally, ginger also has a long history of medicinal use in various cultures for treating common colds, fever, to aid digestion, treat stomach upset, diarrhoea, nausea, rheumatic disorders, gastrointestinal complications and dizziness. Preclinical studies have also shown that ginger possesses chemopreventive and antineoplastic properties. It is also reported to be effective in ameliorating the side effects of γ-radiation and of doxorubicin and cisplatin; to inhibit the efflux of anticancer drugs by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to possess chemosensitizing effects in certain neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this review is to address observations on the role of ginger as adjuvant to treatment modalities of cancer. Emphasis is also placed on the drawbacks and on future directions for research that will have a consequential effect on cancer treatment and cure. PMID:22006742

  13. Radiation Therapy Field Extent for Adjuvant Treatment of Axillary Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Ballo, Matthew T.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Ross, Merrick I.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment-related outcomes and toxicity for patients with axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to either the axilla only or both the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (extended field [EF]). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 200 consecutive patients treated with postoperative RT for axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received postoperative hypofractionated RT for high-risk features; 95 patients (48%) received RT to the axilla only and 105 patients (52%) to the EF. Results: At a median follow-up of 59 months, 111 patients (56%) had sustained relapse, and 99 patients (50%) had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 51%, 43%, and 46%, respectively. The 5-year axillary control rate was 88%. There was no difference in axillary control rates on the basis of the treated field (89% for axilla only vs. 86% for EF; p = 0.4). Forty-seven patients (24%) developed treatment-related complications. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, only treatment with EF irradiation was significantly associated with increased treatment-related complications. Conclusions: Adjuvant hypofractionated RT to the axilla only for metastatic malignant melanoma with high-risk features is an effective method to control axillary disease. Limiting the radiation field to the axilla only produced equivalent axillary control rates to EF and resulted in lower treatment-related complication rates.

  14. Ovarian hyperstimulation in premenopausal women during adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for endocrine-dependent breast cancer: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    MADEDDU, CLELIA; GRAMIGNANO, GIULIA; KOTSONIS, PARASKEVAS; PARIBELLO, FRANCESCO; MACCIÒ, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy is an integral component of care for endocrine-dependent breast cancer. The aim of this type of therapy is to counteract the production and the action of estrogens. The ovary is the primary site of estrogen production in premenopausal women, whereas, in postmenopausal women, the main source of estrogens is adipose tissue. Therefore, ovarian function suppression is an effective adjuvant strategy in premenopausal estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Similarly, the inhibition of estrogen action at the receptor site by tamoxifen has proven to be effective. To date, international consensus statements recommend tamoxifen (20 mg/day) for five years as the standard adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women. It should be noted that tamoxifen is a potent inducer of ovarian function and consequent hyperestrogenism in premenopausal women. In the present study, we report two cases of ovarian cyst formation with very high estrogen levels and endometrial hyperplasia during the administration of tamoxifen alone as adjuvant treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in premenopausal women. These cases suggest that in young premenopausal patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, ovarian suppression is an essential prerequisite for an adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen. In this context, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist treatment by suppressing effective ovarian function may lead to a hypoestrogenic status that may positively impact breast cancer prognosis and prevent the effects of tamoxifen at the gynecological level. It is important to reconsider the action of tamoxifen on ovarian function and include these specific effects of tamoxifen in the informed consent of premenopausal patients who are candidates for tamoxifen alone as adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25120706

  15. Parents’ Online Portrayals of Pediatric Treatment and Research Options

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Rebecca; Henderson, Gail E.; Churchill, Larry R.; King, Nancy M. P.; Rothschild, Barbra B.; Lohser, Sara; Davis, Arlene M.

    2012-01-01

    Parents of seriously ill children face difficult decisions when standard therapies are limited or ineffective. In their search for information, they may turn to websites created by other parents facing similar experiences. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of 21 websites created by families with children affected by cancer or genetic disease, two serious conditions with a range of treatment and clinical trial options. Our research questions address how parent authors portray serious pediatric illness, available options, parties to decision making, and sources of influence. In addition, we examine what these sites reveal about family vulnerability to various risks, particularly the risk of misunderstanding the distinction between standard treatment and research and the risk of overestimating the likely benefits of research participation, as well as whether vulnerability varies by type of condition. Our results demonstrate typically favorable views on research, but with inadequate distinctions between research and treatment and a complex set of trade-offs in consideration of research risks and potential benefits. While portraits of vulnerability emerge for both parents and children, so do portraits of strength and resilience. As a result, parents describe frustration with both under- and over-protection from research participation. Our discussion of these findings clarifies the potential for parent-authored websites to inform and influence families considering research and treatment options for their seriously ill children. PMID:19754237

  16. Second and third line treatment options for Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingjun; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful bacterium with a high global prevalence and the infection carries significant disease burden. It is also becoming increasingly difficult to eradicate and the main reason for this is growing primary antibiotic resistance rates in a world where antibiotics are frequently prescribed and readily available. Despite knowing much more about the bacterium since its discovery, such as its genomic makeup and pathogenesis, we have seen declining treatment success. Therefore, clinicians today must be prepared to face one, two or even multiple treatment failures, and should be equipped with sufficient knowledge to decide on the appropriate salvage therapy when this happens. This article discusses the factors contributing to treatment failure and reviews the second and third-line treatment strategies that have been investigated. Established empiric second line treatment options include both bismuth based quadruple therapy and levofloxacin based triple therapy. Antibiotic testing is recommended prior to initiating third line treatment. In the event that antibiotic susceptibility testing is unavailable, third line treatment options include rifabutin, rifaximin and sitafloxacin based therapies. PMID:24587627

  17. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  18. Onychomycosis: Evaluation, Treatment Options, Managing Recurrence, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease seen in podiatric practice. Effective long-term management remains problematic. We need to treat onychomycosis effectively to prevent its progression into a severe, debilitating, and painful condition, and to manage recurrence. With new agents now available and greater discussion on management strategies, this article reviews the appropriate evaluation of the disease, treatment options, and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:27215153

  19. Treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Tim; Bliss, Richard

    2016-08-01

    The treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease are the same as in adults, namely antithyroid drug (ATD), surgery (partial or total thyroidectomy) and radioiodine. However, the emphasis and expectation is different in the young person, reflecting a range of considerations including age, pubertal status, disease natural history, likely impact of ATD on disease course and the implications of radiation exposure. New therapeutic strategies that could increase the likelihood of long-term remission are being explored. PMID:26252256

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated. We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: “CAM” in conjunction with “OM” and “children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies. The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications. The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  1. Breast cancer and sexuality: multi-modal treatment options.

    PubMed

    Krychman, Michael L; Katz, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The sexual consequences of breast cancer and its treatments are well known and previously reviewed. Alterations in body image, with or without breast reconstruction, changes in sexual self-esteem and self-efficacy, vulvovaginal atrophy as a result of chemotherapy and/or adjuvant hormone therapy, and loss of libido secondary to dyspareunia and body image issues are common in survivors of breast cancer. Medications that are prescribed for long-term use including those in the class of aromatase inhibitors can have far-reaching implications on quality of life by contributing to vulvar and vaginal atrophic changes. While this is an important issue, there are few widely accepted treatments that have been evaluated for efficacy and safety for these sexual challenges in the breast cancer population. However, progress is being made in finding new and innovative solutions for many of the sexual problems faced by breast cancer survivors and their partners. Many institutions are now compelled to address survivorship concerns and addressing sexuality and intimacy are paramount issues in survivorship care. In this article, we present the evidence for the multimodal approach to the management of sexuality concerns in the breast cancer survivor. Pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and psychosocial interventions will be reviewed. PMID:22151953

  2. Is hormonal treatment still an option in acne today?

    PubMed

    Bettoli, V; Zauli, S; Virgili, A

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal treatment is indicated in cases of papulopustular, nodular and conglobate acne in females with identified hyperandrogenism, in adult women who have monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are unsuccessful or inappropriate. This review summarizes the latest information on hormonal therapies including: combined oral contraceptives; anti-androgens, such as cyproterone acetate, spironolactone and flutamide; low-dose glucocorticoids and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists. It also shares the authors' recommendations for treatment based on the studies discussed here, and personal experience. PMID:25627824

  3. Chemical fixation increases options for hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, G.J.; Tipton, G.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) govern the manner in which hazardous materials are managed. Disposing RCRA hazardous wastes on or in the land is no longer an accepted remedial option. This land disposal restriction requires that all listed and characteristic hazardous wastes must be treated according to specified standards before they are disposed. These treatment standards define technologies and concentration limits. Hazardous wastes that do not meet the standards are prohibited from being disposed on land, such as in landfills, surface impoundments, land treatment units, injection wells, and mines or caves.

  4. Current options for treatment of hypothenar hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hui-Chou, Helen G; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    Hypothenar hammer syndrome is a rare vascular condition resulting from injury to the ulnar artery at the level of Guyon canal. The ulnar artery at the wrist is the most common site of arterial aneurysms of the upper extremity and is particularly prone to injury. Signs and symptoms include a palpable mass, distal digital embolization to long, ring, or small fingers, pain, cyanosis, pallor, coolness, and recurrent episodes of vasospasm. Modalities for diagnosis, evaluation, and surgical planning include duplex study, contrast arteriography, and computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Management includes medical, nonoperative, or operative treatments. Appropriate treatment options are reviewed. PMID:25455356

  5. A Preliminary Evaluation of Fast ForWord-Language as an Adjuvant Treatment in Language Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Marc E.; Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Popescu, Mihai; Lewine, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Fast ForWord-Language (FFW-L) is designed to enhance children's processing of auditory–verbal signals and, thus, their ability to learn language. As a preliminary evaluation of this claim, we examined the effects of a 5-week course of FFW-L as an adjuvant treatment with a subsequent 5-week conventional narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) that targeted narrative comprehension and production and grammatical output. Method Twenty-three children 6–8 years of age with language impairments were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 intervention sequences: (a) FFW-L/NBLI, (b) NBLI/FFW-L, or (c) wait/NBLI. We predicted that after both treatment periods, the FFW-L/NBLI group would show greater gains on measures of narrative ability, conversational grammar, and nonword repetition than the other groups. Results After the first 5-week study period, the intervention groups, taken together (i.e., FFW-L/NBLI and NBLI/FFW-L), significantly outperformed the no-treatment wait/NBLI group on 2 narrative measures. At the final test period, all 3 groups displayed significant time-related effects on measures of narrative ability, but there were no statistically significant between-groups effects of intervention sequence. Conclusions This preliminary study provides no evidence to support the claim that FFW-L enhances children's response to a conventional language intervention. PMID:19696435

  6. Potential pleiotropic beneficial effects of adjuvant melatonergic treatment in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Agorastos, Agorastos; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2016-08-01

    Loss of circadian rhythmicity fundamentally affects the neuroendocrine, immune, and autonomic system, similar to chronic stress and may play a central role in the development of stress-related disorders. Recent articles have focused on the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suggesting that chronodisruption plays a causal role in PTSD development. Direct and indirect human and animal PTSD research suggests circadian system-linked neuroendocrine, immune, metabolic and autonomic dysregulation, linking circadian misalignment to PTSD pathophysiology. Recent experimental findings also support a specific role of the fundamental synchronizing pineal hormone melatonin in mechanisms of sleep, cognition and memory, metabolism, pain, neuroimmunomodulation, stress endocrinology and physiology, circadian gene expression, oxidative stress and epigenetics, all processes affected in PTSD. In the current paper, we review available literature underpinning a potentially beneficiary role of an add-on melatonergic treatment in PTSD pathophysiology and PTSD-related symptoms. The literature is presented as a narrative review, providing an overview on the most important and clinically relevant publications. We conclude that adjuvant melatonergic treatment could provide a potentially promising treatment strategy in the management of PTSD and especially PTSD-related syndromes and comorbidities. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to validate this hypothesis. PMID:27061919

  7. [Low and intermediate risk prostate cancer: Treatment options].

    PubMed

    Miñana-López, B; Reina-Alcaina, L; Rivero-Guerra, A; Rosino-Sánchez, A; Izquierdo-Morejón, E; Pietricica, B

    2016-07-01

    Patients with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer are the most frequently diagnosed group currently. In those with a life expectancy inferior to 10 years it is highly likely that treatment is not necessary so that observation must be the most appropriate approach. In patients in whom active therapy, in any of its forms, is indicated, it is necessary to balance between risk of dying or developing metastases from the disease and adverse effects of commonly accepted radical treatments, such as radical prostatectomy and external beam or interstitial radiotherapy. The significant incidence of associated morbidity, mainly erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence, with high impact on quality of life, demands this approach in the field of decisions shared with patients. The risk of overtreatment in this group of patients has generated the introduction of more conservative approaches such as active surveillance and focal therapy. The first one tries to differ radical treatments as far as there are not enough aggressiveness criteria on the tumor or the patient requests them. The second, called to have a place between active surveillance and radical treatments, involves the performance of a partial ablation of the prostate to avoid the adverse effects of radical treatments, trying to achieve the closest oncological control to the radical options. We perform a review of the therapeutic options and their results in this type of patients. PMID:27416643

  8. Helping Women Understand Treatment Options for Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Diane M; Levine, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a common and progressive medical condition in postmenopausal women. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and its impact in 3,046 postmenopausal U.S. women, and recorded women's attitudes about their interactions with health care providers and about available treatments. REVIVE identified poor disease awareness and understanding among women, failure of health care professionals to evaluate women for VVA signs and symptoms, low treatment rates and concerns about the safety and efficacy of available therapies. Strategies to address these needs include proactive screening, education for women and clinicians about VVA and recommendations for treatment and follow-up. PMID:26264795

  9. Trastuzumab re-treatment following adjuvant trastuzumab and the importance of distant disease-free interval: the HERA trial experience.

    PubMed

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; de Azambuja, Evandro; Procter, Marion; Krieguer, Magalie; Smith, Ian; Baselga, Jose; Cameron, David; Untch, Michael; Jackisch, Christian; Bell, Richard; Gianni, Luca; Goldhirsch, Aron; Piccart, Martine; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective analysis conducted using data from patients enrolled onto the Herceptin Adjuvant has two objectives: The first is to evaluate the impact of the time interval between the end of adjuvant trastuzumab and distant recurrence (TDRI) upon overall survival (OS). The second is to describe the duration of trastuzumab-based regimens in the metastatic setting for patients previously treated with adjuvant trastuzumab. The first objective included 187 patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab and diagnosed with distant recurrence at 4-year median follow-up. The second objective included data from questionnaires sent to investigators retreating patients with trastuzumab upon distant recurrence: 144 of 156 questionnaires were returned (93 %), and 90 patients were selected based on available clinical information and consent for subsequent studies. There was no statistically significant relationship between TDRI following 1 year of adjuvant trastuzumab and OS from distant recurrence: hazard ratio 0.991, p = 0.46. The median OS from distant recurrence was numerically longer among patients with a TDRI of ≥12 months (n = 103) than <12 months (n = 84) but not statistically significant (23.7 vs. 17.8 months, p = 0.47). The median duration of first-line trastuzumab-based regimens for patients previously treated with adjuvant trastuzumab and diagnosed with distant disease recurrence was 8.8 months (n = 88). This retrospective, exploratory study suggests that TDRI did not impact on OS measured from distant recurrence. We argue that prospective collection of treatment information beyond disease progression should be included in future clinical studies. PMID:26708471

  10. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  11. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  12. Options and opportunities for clinical management and treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Udita; Gupta, Madhu; Dube, Devyani; Vyas, Suresh P

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a complex, multifactorial disease that appears to be influenced by immune-mediated components. For many years the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been discordant; the clinical picture suggested that the psoriasis was secondary to abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, but later the role of the T cell was revealed. A variety of treatment options range from topical agents (e.g., coal tar, dithranol, and emollients for milder forms) to systemic agents (i.e., methotrexate or cyclosporin), and phototherapy. Recently, biologics have been added to this list that target particular steps in the immune or inflammatory pathways. Various nanocarriers (e.g., liposomes, niosomes, and microemulsions) have been successfully exploited for the delivery of several antipsoriatic drugs. This review provides insight into various psoriasis treatment strategies-from conventional to novel-currently in use or in development as well as the novel targets that have been explored and/or investigated for anti-psoriatic therapy. The pathogenesis of psoriasis and some of the topical, systemic biological, and novel approaches currently in use or in development are reviewed here. The pros and cons of each treatment strategy are presented, as are some of the animal models used to study features reminiscent of psoriasis. This information can be used to better the understanding of treatment options for this disease. PMID:23510110

  13. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  14. Molecular pathways of human adrenocortical carcinoma - translating cell signalling knowledge into diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Szyszka, Paulina; Grossman, Ashley B; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Dworakowska, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is associated with a low cure rate and a high recurrence rate. The prognosis is poor, and at diagnosis 30-40% of cases are already metastatic. The current therapeutic options (surgical resection, followed by adjuvant mitotane treatment +/- chemotherapy) are limited, and the results remain unsatisfactory. Key molecular events that contribute to formation of adrenocortical cancer are IGF2 overexpression, TP53-inactivating mutations, and constitutive activation of the Wnt/b-catenin signalling pathway via activating mutations of the b-catenin gene. The underlying genetic causes of inherited tumour syndromes have provided insights into molecular pathogenesis. The increased occurrence of adrenocortical tumours in Li-Fraumeni and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes, and Carney complex, has highlighted the roles of specific susceptibility genes: TP53, IGF2, and PRKAR1A, respectively. Further studies have confirmed that these genes are also involved in sporadic tumour cases. Crucially, transcriptome-wide studies have determined the differences between malignant and benign adrenocortical tumours, providing potential diagnostic tools. In conclusion, enhancing our understanding of the molecular events of adrenocortical tumourigenesis, especially with regard to the signalling pathways that may be disrupted, will greatly contribute to improving a range of available diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 427-440). PMID:27387247

  15. Influence of Patient and Treatment Factors on Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Catherine M.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Casillo, Frances E.; Cohen, Susan M.; Dailey, Meredith M.; Donovan, Heidi S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Sherwood, Paula R.; Sereika, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To comprehensively assess the patient and illness or treatment factors that may predict nonadherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and to explore whether an interaction occurs between these factors in women with breast cancer. Design Repeated-measures design. Setting The Outpatient Services of the Women's Cancer Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and participants' homes. Sample 91 women with early-stage breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Methods Adherence was assessed continuously for the first 18 months of endocrine therapy. Patient and illness or treatment factors were assessed at four time points (Time 1 to Time 4). Time 1 (baseline) was within two weeks prior to the initiation of endocrine therapy. Times 2–4 occurred at six-month intervals, as many as 18 months after Time 1. Main Research Variables Adherence, patient factors, and illness or treatment factors. Findings Adherence to endocrine therapy declined significantly during the first 18 months of treatment in women with breast cancer. The presence of negative mood and symptoms before starting treatment predicted nonadherence to endocrine therapy over time. Perceptions of financial hardship, symptoms, disease stage, and more complex medication regimens intensified the effect of negative mood on adherence over time. Conclusions Women with breast cancer may be at risk for nonadherence to prescribed endocrine therapy if they experience depression or anxiety and symptoms prior to initiating therapy. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses should be alert to women with breast cancer who are depressed or anxious or who are experiencing symptoms. Management of negative mood and symptoms may result in better adherence. PMID:24769592

  16. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-10

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  17. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  18. Weight gain during adjuvant endocrine treatment for early-stage breast cancer: What is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Nyrop, K A; Williams, G R; Muss, H B; Shachar, S S

    2016-07-01

    Most breast cancer (BC) tumors are early stage and hormone receptor positive, where treatment generally includes adjuvant endocrine treatment (ET). Oncology providers and women about to start ET want to know about side effects, including potential weight gain. The aim of this study was a literature review to identify the independent effect of ET on post-diagnosis weight gain. Weight gain is of concern with regard to potential associations with BC recurrence, mortality, and quality of life in survivorship. We conducted a targeted review of the literature. Thirty-eight studies met our inclusion criteria. Patient-reported weight gain ranged widely from 18 to 52 % of patients in Year 1 and from 7 to 55 % in Year 5. Some studies reported categories of weight change: lost weight (9-17 %), stable weight (47-64 %), and gained weight (27-36 %). Most studies comparing ET with placebo or tamoxifen with AI reported no significant difference between the two groups. Wide-ranging and inconsistent results point to the need for further research to clarify annual weight change (loss, gain, stability) from BC diagnosis through 5 years of ET and beyond. There is also a need to explore weight change by type of ET and to explore risk factors for weight gain in women on ET, including tumor type, sociodemographic characteristics, and health behaviors. More specific information is needed to identify high-risk BC patients who could be targeted for weight management interventions. PMID:27342454

  19. New treatment option for sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré.

    PubMed

    Nikomarov, David; Zaidman, Michael; Katzman, Alexander; Keren, Yaniv; Eidelman, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré continues to be a puzzling entity, with a nonspecific clinical description and course, an obscure pathogenesis, and no consensus on a predictable and helpful method of treatment. The proposed treatment options according to the literature are observation, analgesics and NSAIDs, and bone curettage. Here we present a 15-year-old girl treated by resection of a 12 cm-long lesion after failed conservative treatment, followed by bone transport using a circular external fixator. This treatment method has not been described previously for this condition. The duration of bone transport was 3 months, and the total duration of the frame treatment was 12 months. After hardware removal, and at 2.5-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and achieved good functional results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of bone resection and transport for the treatment of this condition, even though it is well described for the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis and other conditions necessitating bone resection. On the basis of this case we suggest that resection and bone transport using a circular external fixator for the treatment of sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré might be an effective and safe method. Of course, being a rare entity, large cohorts are difficult to obtain, and more data and longer follow-up are required to form a convincing recommendation. Level IV evidence. PMID:23812085

  20. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  1. Medical and Surgical Treatment Options for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Kathleen E; Rinella, Mary E

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease in the USA with a growing prevalence worldwide. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), progressive form of NAFLD, can lead to the development of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and the need for liver transplantation. Treatment of NASH may decrease the risk of progressive disease. Treatment for NAFLD should center around weight loss and exercise. Pharmacotherapy with vitamin E and pioglitazone should be considered for those with NASH, especially those with fibrosis. Weight loss surgery is also an effective treatment for NASH in individuals with other indications for surgery. In this review, we will discuss the currently available therapies for NASH including lifestyle, pharmacologic, and surgical options. PMID:26942734

  2. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Oudijn, Marloes S; Storosum, Jitschak G; Nelis, Elise; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the

  3. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Umland, Elena M; Falconieri, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management. PMID:22870045

  4. Options for pharmacological treatment of refractory bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Tondo, Leonardo; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2014-02-01

    Bipolar disorders of types I and II, even when treated by currently standard options, show a marked excess of depressive morbidity. Treated, type I patients in mid-course or from the onset of illness are ill, overall, 50 % of weeks of follow-up, and 75 % of that unresolved morbidity is depressive. Currently widely held impressions are that bipolar depression typically is poorly responsive to antidepressants, that treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is characteristic of the disorder, and that risk of mania with antidepressant treatment is very high. However, none of these views is supported consistently by available research. TRD may be more prevalent in bipolar than unipolar mood disorders. Relatively intense research attention is directed toward characteristics and treatments of TRD in unipolar depression, but studies of bipolar TRD are uncommon. We found only five controlled trials, plus 10 uncontrolled trials, providing data on a total of 13 drug treatments, all of which involved one or two trials, in 87 % as add-ons to complex, uncontrolled regimens. In two controlled trials, ketamine was superior to placebo but it is short-acting and not orally active; pramipexole was weakly superior to placebo in one controlled trial; three other drugs failed to outperform controls. Other pharmacotherapies are inadequately evaluated and nonpharmacological options are virtually untested in bipolar TRD. The available research supports the view that antidepressants may be effective in bipolar depression provided that currently agitated patients are excluded, that risk of mania with antidepressants is only moderately greater than risk of spontaneous mania, and that bipolar TRD is not necessarily resistant to all treatments. PMID:24425269

  5. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  6. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}/day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}, daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles.

  7. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  8. Efficacy and Interaction of Antioxidant Supplements as Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Asuka; Urushima, Hayato; Ito, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is a key component in carcinogenesis. Although radiation produces reactive oxygen species, some anticancer agents such as alkylating agents, platinum and antitumor antibiotics exert cytotoxicity by generating free radicals. Nonenzymatic exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols can quench ROS activity. However, whether antioxidants alter antitumor effects during radiotherapy and some types of chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we reviewed antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients during chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Electronic literature searches were performed to select all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in which antioxidants were administered to cancer patients along with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Articles or abstracts written in English were included. In total, 399 reports received primary screening. Duplicated articles and those meeting the exclusion criteria (not RCT, not human, and no oral administration) were excluded. Finally, 49 reports matching the inclusion criteria were included. It was difficult to determine whether antioxidants affect treatment outcomes or whether antioxidants ameliorate adverse effects induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It is desirable to use an evidence-based method to select supplements best suited to cancer patients. Although there are many opinions about risks or benefits of antioxidant supplementation, we could mostly conclude that the harm caused by antioxidant supplementation remains unclear for patients during cancer therapy, except for smokers undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26503419

  9. Economic comparison of capecitabine + oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aitini, Enrico; Rossi, Anna; Morselli, Patrizia; Vivorio, Beatrice; Bruschi, Alessandra; Bottura, Chiara; Colombo, Giorgio L

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent and lethal cancers. The aim of this study was to analyze the costs relating to treatment of colorectal cancer between Xelox and Folfox-4 at a regional level according to the clinical experience at an Italian hospital in Lombardy. Methods A cost analysis was carried out regarding resource consumption by patients suffering from colorectal cancer based on data collected over a 12-month period between 2010 and 2011. The analysis involved 40 patients who attended the Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology at Carlo Poma Hospital to undergo adjuvant therapy for colorectal cancer. A chart was created for each patient containing their medical history, their pharmacological therapy indicating the number and duration of chemotherapy cycles, dose in mg administered for each cycle, number of day hospital visits for each cycle, number of days spent in hospital to position the central vein catheter, type of infusion pump used, any subsequent supportive therapy, and any side effects and outpatient visits connected with side effects. Results The cost analysis shows the savings involved in using Xelox for a single cycle of treatment, ie, approximately €1414.00 per patient (53% compared with Folfox-4). For each single cycle of treatment, the savings generated by using capecitabine compared with 5-FU can be attributed mostly to the fact that oral administration of chemotherapy requires fewer resources and does not require use of a central vein catheter (approximately 70% of overall cost) which amply compensates for the higher cost of capecitabine compared with 5-FU-LV. Sensibility analysis confirms the results of the base-case scenario. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that infusion via a central vein catheter represents a significant cost, and that substitution with an oral therapy, even when associated with drugs administered intravenously, represents a consistent saving of hospital resources. PMID

  10. Surgical Excision with Adjuvant Irradiation for Treatment of Keloid Scars: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stokmans, Suzanne C.; Bulstra, Anne Eva J.; Meijer, Otto W. M.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Ket, Johannes C. F.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Niessen, Frank B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excision followed by adjuvant irradiation is considered safe and most efficacious for treatment of keloid scars. Recently, different authors published successful treatment protocols and recommended the following: (1) the use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy or external radiation; (2) a short-time interval between operation and irradiation; (3) single fraction instead of multifraction irradiation; and (4) a minimum of 12- to 24-month follow-up post treatment. Methods: This study evaluates the above recommendations with a systematic review of the English-language literature, based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. Both PubMed and EMBASE were searched. Studies were graded according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Rating Levels of Evidence. Results: Thirty-three studies were selected. Six studies were graded as level of evidence type II studies and 27 as type III. High-dose-rate brachytherapy showed lower recurrence rates compared with low-dose-rate brachytherapy and external radiation. A short-time (<7 hours) interval between scar excision and irradiation results in a lower recurrence rate compared with long-time intervals (>24 hours). Single-fraction irradiation showed promising results in terms of recurrence rate and patient convenience. Finally, scar recurrences were seen between 2 and 36 months, with a mean of 15 months. Conclusions: Based on this systematic review of the literature, the evidence confirms the recommendations stated by authors in the recent years. However, due to the lack of high-quality randomized studies, the quality of this evidence is limited. More randomized studies will generate stronger recommendations. PMID:26301129

  11. Tackling sleeplessness: psychological treatment options for insomnia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M; O’Brien, Erin M; Kay, Daniel; McCrae, Christina S

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a broad review of the extant literature involving the treatment of sleeplessness in older adults with insomnia. First, background information (including information regarding key issues in late-life insomnia and epidemiology of late-life insomnia) pertinent to achieving a general understanding of insomnia in the elderly is presented. Next, theories of insomnia in older adults are examined and discussed in relation to treatment of insomnia in late-life. With a general knowledge base provided, empirical evidence for both pharmacological (briefly) and psychological treatment options for insomnia in late-life are summarized. Recent advances in the psychological treatment of insomnia are provided and future directions are suggested. This review is not meant to be all-inclusive; however, it is meant to provide professionals across multiple disciplines (physicians; psychologists; applied and basic researchers) with a mix of breadth and depth of knowledge related to insomnia in late-life. It is our hope that readers will see the evidence in support of psychological treatments for late-life insomnia, and the utility in continuing to investigate this treatment modality. PMID:22323897

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy after primary treatments for cervical cancer: a critical point of view and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Aloisi, Alessia; Capriglione, Stella; Gennari, Paolo; Linciano, Francesca; Li Destri, Marta; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Montera, Roberto; Plotti, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy represents the standard of care for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer, while radical surgery (RS) and radiotherapy is widely used for treating early stage cervical cancer. However, the poor control of micrometastasis, declining operability, the lack of radiotherapy departments and the high incidence of long-term complications due to radiotherapy have brought about the development of different therapeutic approaches such as neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS. Unfortunately, treatment results are still unsatisfactory due to a high recurrence rate and several authors have studied the possibility to add an adjuvant treatment to primary therapy. We reviewed the literature concerning the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS and after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24483847

  13. Tear trough deformity: review of anatomy and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Stutman, Ross L; Codner, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    The lower eyelid can be a challenging area in facial rejuvenation. While lower eyelid bags are commonly the reason that patients present for lower eyelid rejuvenation, a separate entity known as a tear trough deformity may occur in conjunction with lower eyelid bags or alone. In this article, the authors outline the current understanding of the tear trough anatomy; describe multiple classification systems, which provide an objective means of evaluating the deformity and aid the surgeon in choosing appropriate treatment options; and review surgical and nonsurgical techniques for correcting the tear trough deformity. Treatment options include hyaluronic acid filler, fat grafting, skeletal implants, and fat transposition. Each procedure is associated with advantages and disadvantages, and each should be considered more complex than traditional lower blepharoplasty alone. While lower blepharoplasty removes excess fat and may tighten the anterior lamella, tear trough procedures require the addition of volume to the underlying depression. These procedures requiring release of the ligamentous structures and orbicularis (of which the tear trough is composed), as well as fat transposition or fat grafting, are associated with additional complications, which are also reviewed. PMID:22523096

  14. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee: Biomechanics, Evaluation, and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allison J; Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Yanke, Adam B; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  15. Pediatric insomnia: new insights in clinical assessment and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Oliviero; Angriman, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders in children can compromise quality of life of both children and families and chronic sleep deprivations is associated with poorer developmental outcome, overweight and behavioral disturbances. Clinicians should incorporate questions about sleep into their routine health assessment, and the assessment of insomnia should follow a medical approach primary and secondary contributing factors should be assessed, as well as maladaptive behaviors related to sleep. A careful examination of sleep/wake schedule, abnormal movements or behavior during sleep, and daytime consequences of sleep disruption or deprivation is mandatory. Sleeping environment, and bedtime routines should be examined to identify behavioral issues related to sleep. Polysomnography is not routinely indicated for children with insomnia, but actigraphy can give an objective estimation of sleep parameters. The Authors propose a new classification of pediatric insomnia, based on both genetic and clinical aspects, and suggest specific treatment options, including sleep hygiene, behavioral strategies and pharmacological treatment. PMID:26742668

  16. Facial Erythema of Rosacea - Aetiology, Different Pathophysiologies and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, Martin; Schmelz, Martin; Schauber, Jürgen

    2016-06-15

    Rosacea is a common chronic skin condition that displays a broad diversity of clinical manifestations. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms of the four subtypes are not completely elucidated, the key elements often present are augmented immune responses of the innate and adaptive immune system, and neurovascular dysregulation. The most common primary feature of all cutaneous subtypes of rosacea is transient or persistent facial erythema. Perilesional erythema of papules or pustules is based on the sustained vasodilation and plasma extravasation induced by the inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, transient erythema has rapid kinetics induced by trigger factors independent of papules or pustules. Amongst the current treatments for facial erythema of rosacea, only the selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist brimonidine 0.33% topical gel (Mirvaso®) is approved. This review aims to discuss the potential causes, different pathophysiologies and current treatment options to address the unmet medical needs of patients with facial erythema of rosacea. PMID:26714888

  17. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: pathophysiology and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, J; Jörg, I; Fenyvesi, T

    2002-01-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a severe complication of heparin therapy. It is generally accompanied by a paradoxical decrease in platelets leading to activation of platelets and of the coagulation system. HIT type I is a mild, transient, non-immune disorder. HIT type II is an immune-mediated reaction towards neo-antigen on PF4, which is platelet factor 4 (PF4) that is exposed upon binding to heparins. A low sulfated octasaccharide is required for binding to PF4. The generated immunoglobulines bridge platelets by binding to the FcgRIIa-receptor. In patients with HIT type II heparin/LMW-heparin has to be discontinued immediately upon clinical suspicion. Diagnosis can be confirmed by laboratory tests. As patients are at high risk for or because they have developed thromboembolism, anticoagulation is mandatory, despite thrombocytopenia. Treatment options are danaparoid, r-hirudin, bivalirudin, argatroban, dextransulfate, and dermatansulfate. In future, fondaparinux and ximelagatran may be considered for treatment. PMID:13679659

  18. Guanfacine Extended Release: A New Pharmacological Treatment Option in Europe.

    PubMed

    Huss, Michael; Chen, Wai; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2016-01-01

    Children/adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a poor or inadequate response to psychostimulants or be unable to tolerate their side-effects; furthermore, stimulants may be inappropriate because of co-existing conditions. Only one non-stimulant ADHD pharmacotherapy, the noradrenaline transporter inhibitor atomoxetine, is currently approved for use in Europe. We review recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of ADHD with a focus on the roles of catecholamine receptors in context of the α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine extended release (GXR), a new non-stimulant treatment option in Europe. Neuroimaging studies of children/adolescents with ADHD show impaired brain maturation, and structural and functional anomalies in brain regions and networks. Neurobiological studies in ADHD and medication response patterns support involvement of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (primarily dopamine and noradrenaline). Guanfacine is a selective α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist that has been shown to improve prefrontal cortical cognitive function, including working memory. The hypothesized mode of action of guanfacine centres on direct stimulation of post-synaptic α2A-adrenergic receptors to enhance noradrenaline neurotransmission. Preclinical data suggest that guanfacine also influences dendritic spine growth and maturation. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of GXR in ADHD, and it is approved as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to stimulants in Canada and the USA (for children and adolescents). GXR was approved recently in Europe for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents for whom stimulants are not suitable, not tolerated or have been shown to be ineffective. GXR may provide particular benefit for children/adolescents who have specific co-morbidities such as chronic tic disorders or oppositional defiant disorder (or oppositional symptoms) that have failed to respond to first-line treatment

  19. Metastatic melanoma - a review of current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; Cornelius, Lynn A; Bowen, Glen M; Phan, Tiffany; Patel, Falin B; Fitzmaurice, Sarah; He, Young; Burrall, Barbara; Duong, Christopher; Kloxin, April M; Sultani, Hawa; Wilken, Reason; Martinez, Steve R; Patel, Forum

    2015-05-01

    Despite advances in treatment and surveillance, melanoma continues to claim approximately 9,000 lives in the US annually (SEER 2013). The National Comprehensive Cancer Network currently recommends ipilumumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and high-dose IL-2 as first line agents for Stage IV melanoma. Little data exists to guide management of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases despite the fact that they are relatively common. Existing options include intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, isolated limb perfusion/infusion, interferon-α, topical imiquimod, cryotherapy, radiation therapy, interferon therapy, and intratumoral interleukin-2 injections. Newly emerging treatments include the anti-programmed cell death 1 receptor agents (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), anti-programmed death-ligand 1 agents, and oncolytic vaccines (talimogene laherparepevec). Available treatments for select sites include adoptive T cell therapies and dendritic cell vaccines. In addition to reviewing the above agents and their mechanisms of action, this review will also focus on combination therapy as these strategies have shown promising results in clinical trials for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:25520039

  20. An Update on Medical Treatment Options for Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Deckers, I E; Prens, E P

    2016-02-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by recurrent inflammatory nodules mostly located in the armpits and groin. Over the years multiple treatments for HS have been proposed; however, to date a cure is still lacking. In this update we provide an overview of most drug treatments reported on for HS, where possible with their mode of action and side effects. In mild cases, clindamycin lotion or resorcinol cream have proven effective. Tetracyclines are a first-line systemic option in more widespread or severe cases, followed by the combination of clindamycin and rifampicin. However, the recurrence rate is high after discontinuation of clindamycin plus rifampicin combination therapy. Long-term treatment with retinoids, especially acitretin is feasible, although teratogenicity has to be taken into account in females of reproductive age. Multiple anti-inflammatory drugs have been suggested for HS, such as dapsone, fumarates or cyclosporine. However, their effectiveness in HS is based on small case series with varying results. If most common treatments have failed, biologics (e.g., infliximab or adalimumab) are the next step. Although not addressed in this review, surgical interventions are often needed to achieve remission. PMID:26659474

  1. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Wang, Julie C; Powers, Mary K; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated. PMID:24400231

  2. Management of primary cicatricial alopecias: options for treatment.

    PubMed

    Harries, M J; Sinclair, R D; Macdonald-Hull, S; Whiting, D A; Griffiths, C E M; Paus, R

    2008-07-01

    Primary cicatricial alopecias (PCAs) are a poorly understood group of disorders that result in permanent hair loss. Clinically, they are characterized not only by permanent loss of hair shafts but also of visible follicular ostia along with other visible changes in skin surface morphology, while their histopathological hallmark usually (although not always) is the replacement of follicular structures with scar-like fibrous tissue. As hair follicle neogenesis in adult human scalp skin is not yet a readily available treatment option for patients with cicatricial alopecias, the aim of treatment, currently, remains to reduce symptoms and to slow or stop PCA progression, namely the scarring process. Early treatment is the key to minimizing the extent of permanent alopecia. However, inconsistent terminology, poorly defined clinical end-points and a lack of good quality clinical trials have long made management of these conditions very challenging. As one important step towards improving the management of this under-investigated and under-serviced group of dermatoses, the current review presents evidence-based guidance for treatment, with identification of the strength of evidence, and a brief overview of clinical features of each condition. Wherever only insufficient evidence-based advice on PCA management can be given at present, this is indicated so as to highlight important gaps in our clinical knowledge that call for concerted efforts to close these in the near future. PMID:18489608

  3. Emerging treatment options for myelofibrosis: focus on pacritinib

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; O’Connell, Casey Lee; Mehrvar, Azim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a myeloid malignancy associated with a heavy symptomatic burden that decreases quality of life and presents a risk for leukemic transformation. While there are limited curative treatments, the recent discovery of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway dysregulation has led to many clinical investigations for new treatment approaches. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease state, an overview of treatment options, and specifically focuses on the efficacy and safety of pacritinib in the management of MF. Pacritinib is a novel selective inhibitor of JAK2 and FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) currently in Phase III trials for the treatment of MF. Thus far, studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy in reducing splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. Common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, while hematologic toxicity was limited. However, it was announced that all ongoing clinical trials on pacritinib have been placed on hold by the US Food and Drug Administration in February 2016, due to concerns for increased intracranial hemorrhage and cardiac events. With comprehensive risk-benefit analysis of clinical trial data, the utility of pacritinib in the management of MF may be more clearly defined. PMID:27226728

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the Elderly: Treatment Options and Personalized Management.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Sonja; Wiesinger, Petra; Stauder, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are typical diseases of the elderly, with a median age of 68-75 years at initial diagnosis. Demographic changes producing an increased proportion of elderly in our societies mean the incidence of MDS will rise dramatically. Considering the increasing number of treatment options, ranging from best supportive care to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), decision making is rather complex in this cohort of patients. Moreover, aspects of the aging process also have to be considered in therapy planning. Treatment of elderly MDS patients is dependent on the patient's individual risk and prognosis. Comorbidities play an essential role as predictors of survival and therapy tolerance. Age-adjusted models and the use of geriatric assessment scores are described as a basis for individualized treatment algorithms. Specific treatment recommendations for the different groups of patients are given. Currently available therapeutic agents, including supportive care, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), immune-modulating agents, hypomethylating agents, and HSCT are described in detail and discussed with a special focus on elderly MDS patients. The inclusion of elderly patients in clinical trials is of utmost importance to obtain data on efficacy and safety in this particular group of patients. Endpoints relevant for the elderly should be integrated, including maintenance of quality of life and functional activities as well as evaluation of use of healthcare resources. PMID:26476843

  5. Splenomegaly and Its Associations with Genetic Polymorphisms and Treatment Outcome in Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Adjuvant FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Han, Sae-Won; Lee, Dae-Won; Cha, Yongjun; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock-Ah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Splenomegaly is a clinical surrogate of oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). We investigated development of splenomegaly and its association with treatment outcome and genetic polymorphisms following adjuvant 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Materials and Methods Splenomegaly was determined by spleen volumetry using computed tomography images obtained before initiation of chemotherapy and after completion of adjuvant FOLFOX in CRC patients. Ten genetic polymorphisms in 4 SOS-related genes (VEGFA, MMP9, NOS3, and GSTP1) were analyzed using DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Of 124 patients included, increase in spleen size was observed in 109 (87.9%). Median change was 31% (range, –42% to 168%). Patients with splenomegaly had more severe thrombocytopenia compared to patients without splenomegaly during the chemotherapy period (p < 0.0001). The cumulative dose of oxaliplatin and the lowest platelet count during the chemotherapy period were clinical factors associated with splenomegaly. However, no significant associations were found between genetic polymorphisms and development of splenomegaly. Disease-free survival was similar regardless of the development of splenomegaly. Conclusion Splenomegaly was frequently observed in patients receiving adjuvant FOLFOX and resulted in more severe thrombocytopenia but did not influence treatment outcome. Examined genetic polymorphisms did not predict development of splenomegaly. PMID:26790967

  6. Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Diabetes Care.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Müller, Timo D; Finan, Brian; Tschöp, Matthias H; DiMarchi, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes constitutes an increasing threat to human health, particularly in newly industrialized and densely populated countries. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes arise from different etiologies but lead to similar metabolic derangements constituted by an absolute or relative lack of insulin that results in elevated plasma glucose. In the last three decades, a set of new medicines built upon a deeper understanding of physiology and diabetic pathology have emerged to enhance the clinical management of the disease and related disorders. Recent insights into insulin-dependent and insulin-independent molecular events have accelerated the generation of a series of novel medicinal agents, which hold the promise for further advances in the management of diabetes. In this chapter, we provide a historical context for what has been accomplished to provide perspective for future research and novel emerging treatment options. PMID:25903416

  7. Antenatal hydronephrosis: differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Herndon, C D Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis, evaluation and management of antenatal hydronephrosis has undergone a two stage paradigm shift since the advent of prenatal ultrasonography in the early 1980s. Initially the identification of a large number of asymptomatic infants appeared to afford the surgeon the opportunity for preemptive intervention. However, it has now become apparent that antenatal hydronephrosis (AH) is far more difficult to interpret than originally perceived. The initial enthusiasm for surgery has now been replaced by a much more conservative approach to ureteropelvic junction(UPJ) obstruction, multi-cystic dysplastic kidney(MCDK), vesicoureteral reflux and the non-refluxing megaureter. This review will highlight the postnatal evaluation of AH and include an overview of the Society for Fetal Urology grading system for hydronephrosis. The differential diagnosis and treatment options for UPJ obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, MCDK, duplication anomalies, megaureter, and posterior urethral valves will be discussed. PMID:17619702

  8. [Surgical options in the treatment of chronic venous ulcers].

    PubMed

    Stellmes, Arno; Derungs, Urs; Schmidli, Jürg; Widmer, Matthias K

    2011-03-01

    Surgery offers several options in prevention of chronic venous insufficiency and its sequelae. Both the operation on veins with valve dysfunction to reduce reflux and the elimination of obstruction in thrombosed veins aim for the reduction of venous hypertension. Elevated venous pressure, impairment of cutaneous capillaries and a chronic inflammatory process result in sclerosis of skin and subcutaneous tissue and might proceed to the fascia resulting in a chronic compartment syndrome. Non- healing chronic venous ulcers under conservative therapy for more than three months may be treated by vein-surgery, local wound care therapy like shaving and negative pressure treatment and if necessary by lowering of elevated intracompartimental pressure by fasciotomy or even fasciectomy. PMID:21360463

  9. Treatment options for traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the paravisceral abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sonny; Rowe, Vincent L; Rao, Rajeev; Hood, Douglas B; Harrell, Donald; Weaver, Fred A

    2005-09-01

    Penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the abdominal aorta are frequently lethal. Alternative management options for treatment of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta are illustrated by three patient case histories. Patient A sustained two GSWs to the abdomen (midepigastrium, right subcostal region). He was hypotensive in the field. Emergent laparotomy was undertaken with suture ligature of a celiac injury and distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy for a pancreatic injury. Postoperative abdominal CT for an intraabdominal infection with leukocytosis revealed a 4 cm traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta that extended from the suprarenal aorta to the level of the renal arteries. Six weeks later, he underwent an open repair. Patient B sustained multiple GSWs to his right arm and right upper quadrant. He was hemodynamically stable. He underwent abdominal exploration for a grade 3 liver laceration. Postoperative abdominal CT revealed a supraceliac abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm. An aortogram demonstrated a 1.5 cm defect in the aortic wall above the celiac trunk communicating with the inferior vena cava (IVC). He underwent endovascular repair with covered aortic stent graft. Patient C sustained multiple thoracoabdominal GSWs. He was hemodynamically stable. Emergent laparotomy revealed multiple left colonic perforations, two duodenal lacerations, and an unsalvageable left kidney laceration. Postoperatively, he developed a duodenal-cutaneous fistula with multiple intraabdominal abscesses. Serial CT scans revealed an enlarging infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm. He underwent angiographic coil embolization and intraarterial injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysm sac. The average time from injury to surgical treatment was 46 days (range 29-67). Postoperatively, none of the patients developed paraplegia. Advances in endovascular techniques have provided options to deal with traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta. In a hemodynamically stable

  10. Oral clodronate for adjuvant treatment of operable breast cancer (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-34): a multicentre, placebo-controlled, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Alexander H G; Anderson, Stewart J; Lembersky, Barry C; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Falkson, Carla I; King, Karen M; Weir, Lorna M; Brufsky, Adam M; Dakhil, Shaker; Lad, Thomas; Baez-Diaz, Luis; Gralow, Julie R; Robidoux, André; Perez, Edith A; Zheng, Ping; Geyer, Charles E; Swain, Sandra M; Costantino, Joseph P; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Bisphosphonates are thought to act through the osteoclast by changing bone microenvironment. Previous findings of adjuvant clodronate trials in different populations with operable breast cancer have been mixed. The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) protocol B-34 aims to ascertain whether oral clodronate can improve outcomes in women with primary breast cancer. Methods NSABP B-34 is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 3323 women with stage 1–3 breast cancer. After surgery to remove the tumour, patients were stratified by age, axillary nodes, and oestrogen and progesterone receptor status and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either oral clodronate 1600 mg daily for 3 years (n=1662) or placebo (1661). The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00009945. Findings Median follow-up was 90·7 months (IQR 82·7–100·0) and 3311 patients had data for this period. Disease-free survival did not differ between groups (286 events in the clodronate group vs 312 in the placebo group; hazard ratio 0·91, 95% CI 0·78–1·07; p=0·27). Moreover, no differences were recorded for overall survival (0·84, 0·67–1·05; p=0·13), recurrence-free interval (0·83, 0·67–1·04; p=0·10), or bone metastasis-free interval (0·77, 0·55–1·07; p=0·12). Non-bone metastasis-free interval was slightly increased with clodronate (0·74, 0·55–1·00; p=0·047). Analyses in women age 50 years or older on study entry showed benefits of clodronate for recurrence-free interval (0·75, 0·57–0·99; p=0·045), bone metastasis-free interval (0·62, 0·40–0·95; p=0·027), and non-bone metastasis-free interval (0·63, 0·43–0·91; p=0·014), but not for overall survival (0·80, 0·61–1·04, p=0·094). Adherence to treatment at 3 years was 56% for the clodronate group and 60% for the placebo group. Grade 3 or

  11. Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilay; Calhoun, David A; Dudenbostel, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is an increasingly common clinical problem that is often heterogeneous in etiology, risk factors, and comorbidities. It is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure on optimal doses of three antihypertensive agents, ideally one being a diuretic. The definition also includes controlled hypertension with use of four or more antihypertensive agents. Recent observational studies have advanced the characterization of patients with RHTN. Patients with RHTN have higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality compared with patients with more easily controlled hypertension. Secondary causes of hypertension, including obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renovascular disease, are common in patients with RHTN and often coexist in the same patient. In addition, RHTN is often complicated by metabolic abnormalities. Patients with RHTN require a thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and optimize treatment, which typically includes a combination of lifestyle adjustments, and pharmacologic and interventional treatment. Combination therapy including a diuretic, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a beta blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist where warranted is the classic regimen for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like spironolactone or eplerenone have been shown to be efficacious in patients with RHTN, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and primary aldosteronism. Novel interventional therapies, including baroreflex activation and renal denervation, have shown that both of these methods may be used to lower blood pressure safely, thereby providing exciting and promising new options to treat RHTN. PMID:24231917

  12. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  13. Hepatic sarcoidosis: pathogenesis, clinical context, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Syed, Umer; Alkhawam, Hassan; Bakhit, Mena; Companioni, Rafael A Ching; Walfish, Aron

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is typically characterized as a non-caseating granulomatous disease that has the ability to affect multiple different organ systems. Although extra-thoracic sarcoidosis can occur in the presence and also without lung involvement, isolated extra-pulmonary disease is rare. The liver is the third most commonly affected organ system after the lungs and lymph nodes. When discussing hepatic sarcoidosis it is important to keep in mind that many patients in this population may not present as one would typically expect since most of the patients are asymptomatic or have mild presentations. Therefore, the diagnosis can be difficult at times since no single laboratory or imaging study can definitively diagnose this systemic disease. In the rare case of some patients where there is difficulty in discerning between different pathologies, the use of image-guided tissue biopsy may be necessary to establish a diagnosis. At the current time, there are no clear guidelines for the management of hepatic sarcoidosis and are mostly dependent on a patient's clinical status at time of presentation. The current body of research in regard to treatment suggests steroids to be the mainstay of therapy. However, there is a role for additional immunosuppressive therapy in cases where the initial treatment is refractory to steroids. In this manuscript, we discussed the pathogenesis of liver sarcoidosis and context of its presentation. In addition, the differential diagnosis and imaging evaluation in this population is discussed. Finally, treatment options are reviewed in setting of previous studies for liver sarcoidosis. PMID:27175775

  14. Iodine and doxorubicin, a good combination for mammary cancer treatment: antineoplastic adjuvancy, chemoresistance inhibition, and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although mammary cancer (MC) is the most common malignant neoplasia in women, the mortality for this cancer has decreased principally because of early detection and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of several preparations that cause MC regression, doxorubicin (DOX) is the most active, first-line monotherapeutic. Nevertheless, its use is limited due to the rapid development of chemoresistance and to the cardiotoxicity caused by free radicals. In previous studies we have shown that supplementation with molecular iodine (I2) has a powerful antineoplastic effect in methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced experimental models of MC. These studies also showed a consistent antioxidant effect of I2 in normal and tumoral tissues. Methods Here, we analyzed the effect of I2 in combination with DOX treatment in female Sprague Dawley rats with MNU-induced MC. In the first experiment (short) animals were treated with the therapeutic DOX dose (16 mg/kg) or with lower doses (8 and 4 mg/Kg), in each case with and without 0.05% I2 in drinking water. Iodine treatment began on day 0, a single dose of DOX was injected (ip) on day 2, and the analysis was carried out on day 7. In the second experiment (long) animals with and without iodine supplement were treated with one or two injections of 4 mg/kg DOX (on days 0 and 14) and were analyzed on day 56. Results At all DOX doses, the short I2 treatment induced adjuvant antineoplastic effects (decreased tumor size and proliferating cell nuclear antigen level) with significant protection against body weight loss and cardiotoxicity (creatine kinase MB, cardiac lipoperoxidation, and heart damage). With long-term I2, mammary tumor tissue became more sensitive to DOX, since a single injection of the lowest dose of DOX (4 mg/Kg) was enough to stop tumor progression and a second DOX4 injection on day 14 caused a significant and rapid decrease in tumor size, decreased the expression of chemoresistance markers (Bcl2 and survivin), and increased

  15. Oral Zinc Sulfate as Adjuvant Treatment in Children With Nephrolithiasis: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Cyrus, Ali; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Frohar, Faryar; Safi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrolithiasis in children is associated with a high rate of complications and recurrence. Objectives: Since some evidences reported that zinc has an important place amongst inhibitors of crystallization and crystal growth, we decided to assess the effectiveness of oral zinc sulfate as adjuvant treatment in children with nephrolithiasis. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. 102 children in the age range 1 month to 11 years with first nephrolithiasis were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (intervention and control groups). Intervention group received conservative measures for stones and 1 mg/kg/day (maximum 20 mg/day) oral zinc sulfate syrup for 3 months. Control group received placebo in addition to conservative measures, also for 3 months. Patients were followed up by ultrasonography for 9 months, in 5 steps (at the end of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 9th month after treatment) assessing size and number of stones in the kidneys. Results: Only at the end of the first month, the average number (intervention: 1.15 ± 3.78, control: 1.3 ± 2.84) (P = 0.001) and size (cm) (intervention: 0.51 ± 1.76, control: 0.62 ± 1.39) (P = 0.001) of stones was significantly lower in the intervention group, and in other points there was no significant therapeutic efficacy in oral zinc adjuvant treatment compared to conservative treatment alone. Also, during the 9-month follow-up, the number and size of stones in both groups decreased significantly (both: P < 0.0001) in a way that the decrease in the intervention group showed no difference with the control group. Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with zinc is not more effective than consecutive treatment in children with nephrolithiasis. However, further studies are recommended due to the lack of clinical evidence in this field. PMID:26635934

  16. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  17. Liraglutide: A New Option for the Treatment of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nuffer, Wesley A; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2015-10-01

    Obesity continues to pose a major public health risk to the United States and across the world, with an estimated one-third of adult Americans being defined as obese. Obesity treatment guidelines recommend the use of pharmacologic therapy in adults who have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) or higher or in patients with a BMI of 27 kg/m(2) or higher who have at least one weight-related comorbid condition (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus). Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist that has been successfully used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes for several years. Weight loss has been well described as an additional benefit with liraglutide therapy, which prompted the manufacturer to evaluate and develop a higher dose formulation specifically for the treatment of obesity. Liraglutide 3 mg/day was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this indication in December 2014. We performed a search of the Medline database to identify relevant literature focused on liraglutide's role specifically in treating obesity. Five clinical trials with this primary end point were identified. Data demonstrated that liraglutide can successfully achieve weight-loss benchmarks of 5% or more and 10% or more loss from baseline. The most common adverse effects were gastrointestinal and mild to moderate in intensity. The cost of therapy is high, averaging over $1000/month for out-of-pocket expenses if insurance coverage is not available. Liraglutide is also available for delivery only by subcutaneous injection, which may represent a barrier for patients. Liraglutide 3 mg/day represents another pharmacologic option for the treatment of obesity. PMID:26497479

  18. Diagnostic methods and treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Duchowny, Michael; Jayakar, Prasanna; Krsek, Pavel; Kahane, Philippe; Tassi, Laura; Melani, Federico; Polster, Tilman; Andre, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Krueger, Darcy A; Cross, J Helen; Spreafico, Roberto; Cosottini, Mirco; Gotman, Jean; Chassoux, Francine; Ryvlin, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bernasconi, Andrea; Stefan, Hermann; Miller, Ian; Devaux, Bertrand; Najm, Imad; Giordano, Flavio; Vonck, Kristl; Barba, Carmen; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2015-11-01

    Our inability to adequately treat many patients with refractory epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), surgical inaccessibility and failures are significant clinical drawbacks. The targeting of physiologic features of epileptogenesis in FCD and colocalizing functionality has enhanced completeness of surgical resection, the main determinant of outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG)-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are helpful in guiding electrode implantation and surgical treatment, and high-frequency oscillations help defining the extent of the epileptogenic dysplasia. Ultra high-field MRI has a role in understanding the laminar organization of the cortex, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is highly sensitive for detecting FCD in MRI-negative cases. Multimodal imaging is clinically valuable, either by improving the rate of postoperative seizure freedom or by reducing postoperative deficits. However, there is no level 1 evidence that it improves outcomes. Proof for a specific effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in FCD is lacking. Pathogenic mutations recently described in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) genes in FCD have yielded important insights into novel treatment options with mTOR inhibitors, which might represent an example of personalized treatment of epilepsy based on the known mechanisms of disease. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been demonstrated to be particularly effective in children with epilepsy caused by structural abnormalities, especially FCD. It attenuates epigenetic chromatin modifications, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell, thereby modifying disease progression. This could imply lasting benefit of dietary manipulation. Neurostimulation techniques have produced variable clinical outcomes in FCD. In widespread dysplasias, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has achieved responder rates >50%; however, the efficacy of noninvasive

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first

  20. Laparoscopic Cerclage as a Treatment Option for Cervical Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, D.; Raio, L.; Imboden, S.; Mueller, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional surgical treatment for cervical insufficiency is vaginal placement of a cervical cerclage. However, in a small number of cases a vaginal approach is not possible. A transabdominal approach can become an option for these patients. Laparoscopic cervical cerclage is associated with good pregnancy outcomes but comes at the cost of a higher risk of serious surgical complications. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intraoperative and long-term pregnancy outcomes after laparoscopic cervical cerclage, performed either as an interval procedure or during early pregnancy, using a new device with a blunt grasper and a flexible tip. Methods: All women who underwent laparoscopic cervical cerclage for cervical insufficiency in our institution using the Goldfinger® device (Ethicon Endo Surgery, Somerville, NJ, USA) between January 2008 and March 2014 were included in the study. Data were collected from the patientsʼ medical records and included complications during and after the above-described procedure. Results: Eighteen women were included in the study. Of these, six were pregnant at the time of laparoscopic cervical cerclage. Mean duration of surgery was 55 ± 10 minutes. No serious intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. All patients were discharged at 2.6 ± 0.9 days after surgery. One pregnancy ended in a miscarriage at 12 weeks of gestation. All other pregnancies ended at term (> 37 weeks of gestation) with good perinatal and maternal outcomes. Summary: Performing a laparoscopic cervical cerclage using a blunt grasper device with a flexible tip does not increase intraoperative complications, particularly in early pregnancy. We believe that use of this device, which is characterized by increased maneuverability, could be an important option to avoid intraoperative complications if surgical access is limited due to the anatomical situation. However, because of the small sample size, further studies are needed

  1. Cachexia and pancreatic cancer: Are there treatment options?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C; Burmeister, Marc A; Bachmann, Jeannine; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-01-01

    Cachexia is frequently described in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is associated with reduced survival and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options of this multi-factorial and complex syndrome are limited. This is due to the fact that, despite extensive preclinical and clinical research, the underlying pathological mechanisms leading to PDAC-associated cachexia are still not fully understood. Furthermore, there is still a lack of consensus on the definition of cachexia, which complicates the standardization of diagnosis and treatment as well as the analysis of the current literature. In order to provide an efficient therapy for cachexia, an early and reliable diagnosis and consistent monitoring is required, which can be challenging especially in obese patients. Although many substances have been tested in clinical and preclinical settings, so far none of them have been proven to have a long-term effect in ameliorating cancer-associated cachexia. However, recent studies have demonstrated that multidimensional therapeutic modalities are able to alleviate pancreatic cancer-associated cachexia and ultimately improve patients’ outcome. In this current review, we propose a stepwise and pragmatic approach to facilitate and standardize the treatment of cachexia in pancreatic cancer patients. This strategy consists of nutritional, dietary, pharmacological, physical and psychological methods. PMID:25071331

  2. Treatment options for the management of pervasive developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kathryn; Carter, K Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (previously known as pervasive developmental disorders) is characterized by social communication deficits, impaired functioning, and restrictive or repetitive behaviors and interests. Patients with autism spectrum disorder also commonly experience core maladaptive behaviors such as aggression and irritability, self-injurious behaviors, hyperactivity, and sleep abnormalities. These behaviors may be sources of stress for caregivers and patients alike and may require pharmacologic management. Risperidone and aripiprazole are frequently used to treat both irritability and self-injurious behavior related to autism spectrum disorder. The opioid antagonist naltrexone has also been studied for self-injurious behaviors, although long-term data are lacking when used in the autism spectrum disorder population. Methylphenidate, atomoxetine, clonidine, and guanfacine are all potential options for the treatment of hyperactivity or attention-deficient hyperactivity disorder-like symptoms in patients with autism spectrum disorder. Lastly, melatonin is the most widely researched medication strategy for the management of sleep disorders in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies reviewing new pharmacologic treatment approaches in combination with non-pharmacologic therapies are warranted to ensure that target behaviors of autism spectrum disorder are appropriately managed. PMID:27079778

  3. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  4. Small Vestibular Schwannomas: Does Surgery Remain a Viable Treatment Option?

    PubMed

    Anaizi, Amjad N; DiNapoli, Vincent V; Pensak, Myles; Theodosopoulos, Philip V

    2016-06-01

    Background Surgery for small vestibular schwannomas (Koos grade I and II) has been increasingly rejected as the optimal primary treatment, instead favoring radiosurgery and observation that offer lower morbidity and potentially equal efficacy. Our study assesses the outcomes of contemporary surgical strategies including tumor control, functional preservation, and implications of pathologic findings. Design Retrospective review. Setting/Participants Eighty consecutive patients (45 women, 35 men; mean: 47 years of age). Main Outcomes Measures Approaches included retrosigmoid approach (52%), translabyrinthine (40%), and middle fossa (8%). Operated on by the same surgical team, we analyzed presentation, radiographic imaging, surgical data, and outcomes. Results At last follow-up (mean: 34 months), 95% had good facial nerve function (House-Brackmann grade I or II); 36% who presented with serviceable hearing retained it; and 93% who presented with vestibular dysfunction reported resolution. Pathology identified two grade I meningiomas. Conclusions As one of the largest contemporary surgical series of small vestibular schwannomas, we discuss some nuances to help refine treatment algorithms. Although observation and radiosurgery have established roles, our results reinforce microsurgery as a viable, safe option for a subgroup of patients. PMID:27175315

  5. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer: optimal treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Cardonick, Elyce

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is diagnosed approximately once per 1,000 pregnancies; most commonly due to the reproductive age of the women, these include breast, cervical, melanoma, thyroid, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma diagnoses. As a single diagnosis, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Cancer is expected to complicate pregnancy more often due to the trend for women to delay child bearing to later maternal ages. Delayed first birth is itself a risk factor for breast cancer. Termination of pregnancy has not been shown to afford a survival benefit. While protecting the interests of mother and unborn fetus, breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both. Some modification of the protocols used for nonpregnant women with suspicious palpable breast masses is required. This article reviews the challenges for physicians in making the diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy and upon diagnosis, counseling patients about treatment options. The consequences of diagnostic investigations and cancer treatment for the exposed fetus are also addressed. PMID:25395871

  6. Current and future treatment options for polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Griesshammer, Martin; Gisslinger, Heinz; Mesa, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Patients with polycythemia vera (PV), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by an elevated red blood cell mass, are at high risk of vascular and thrombotic complications and have reduced quality of life due to a substantial symptom burden that includes pruritus, fatigue, constitutional symptoms, microvascular disturbances, and bleeding. Conventional therapeutic options aim at reducing vascular and thrombotic risk, with low-dose aspirin and phlebotomy as first-line recommendations for patients at low risk of thrombotic events and cytoreductive therapy (usually hydroxyurea or interferon alpha) recommended for high-risk patients. However, long-term effective and well-tolerated treatments are still lacking. The discovery of mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as the underlying molecular basis of PV has led to the development of several targeted therapies, including JAK inhibitors, and results from the first phase 3 clinical trial with a JAK inhibitor in PV are now available. Here, we review the current treatment landscape in PV, as well as therapies currently in development. PMID:25832853

  7. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  8. Eugenia punicifolia (Kunth) DC. as an adjuvant treatment for type-2 diabetes mellitus: a non-controlled, pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sales, Débora Simone; Carmona, Fabio; de Azevedo, Bruna Cestari; Taleb-Contini, Silvia Helena; Bartolomeu, Ana Carolina Duó; Honorato, Fernando B; Martinez, Edson Z; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares

    2014-12-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a highly prevalent disease with significant morbidity and mortality around the world. However, there is no universally effective treatment, because response to different treatment regimens can vary widely among patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the use of the powdered dried leaves of Eugenia punicifolia (Kunth) DC. (Myrtaceae) is effective as an adjuvant to the treatment of patients with type-2 DM. Fifteen patients were enrolled in a pilot, non-controlled study, and received E. punicifolia for 3 months. After treatment, we observed a significant decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, C-reactive protein, and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There were no changes in fasting and postprandial glycemia. The compounds myricetin-3-O-rhamnoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, quercetin-3-O-xyloside, quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside, kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside, phytol, gallic acid, and trans-caryophyllene present in the powdered dried leaves of E. punicifolia may be responsible for the therapeutic effect. In conclusion, the powdered leaves of E. punicifolia are promising as an adjuvant in the treatment of type-2 DM and deserve further investigation. PMID:25132112

  9. Improvements in breast cancer survival between 1995 and 2012 in Denmark: The importance of earlier diagnosis and adjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Ejlertsen, Bent; Mouridsen, Henning T; Christiansen, Peer

    2016-06-01

    Background Breast cancer mortality has declined from 1995 through 2012 which may be attributed to earlier diagnosis, changes in lifestyle risk factors, and improved treatments. To a large extent the relative contribution of these modalities are unknown. Mammography screening was introduced late in Denmark; in 1995 around 20% of the Danish female population aged 50-69 was covered by population-based screening, and this was in 2008 extended to the entire population. Breast conserving surgery gradually replaced mastectomy, and sentinel node biopsy was introduced. In the same period adjuvant treatment was extended considerable. Methods A population-based study of 68 842 breast cancer patients registered in the clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 1995-2012. Comprehensive data on prognostic factors, comorbidity and treatment together with complete follow-up for survival were used to evaluate improvements in mortality and standardized mortality rate in successive time periods. Results The results from this study demonstrated a significant improvement in prognosis in successive time periods covering 1995-2012. Apart from patients with a high Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) improvements were seen in all subgroups of patients. Prognostic factors were more favorable in the latest time period accordingly to the introduction of nationwide screening. In the study period adjuvant treatment was extended considerable. Conclusion The impact of screening was by nature of limited magnitude. The modified treatment strategies implemented by the use of nationwide guidelines seemed to have a major impact on the substantial survival improvements. PMID:26797010

  10. Improved Survival Endpoints With Adjuvant Radiation Treatment in Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Vance, Sean; Suri, Jaipreet S.; Mahan, Meredith; Munkarah, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the impact of adjuvant radiation treatment (RT) on recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with high-risk 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We identified 382 patients with high-risk EC who underwent hysterectomy. RFS, DSS, and OS were calculated from the date of hysterectomy by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to explore the risks associated with various factors on survival endpoints. Results: The median follow-up time for the study cohort was 5.4 years. The median age was 71 years. All patients underwent hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, 93% had peritoneal cytology, and 85% underwent lymphadenectomy. Patients with endometrioid histology constituted 72% of the study cohort, serous in 16%, clear cell in 7%, and mixed histology in 4%. Twenty-three percent of patients had stage II disease. Adjuvant management included RT alone in 220 patients (57%), chemotherapy alone in 25 patients (7%), and chemoradiation therapy in 27 patients (7%); 110 patients (29%) were treated with close surveillance. The 5-year RFS, DSS, and OS were 76%, 88%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was a significant predictor of RFS (P<.001) DSS (P<.001), and OS (P=.017). Lymphovascular space involvement was a significant predictor of RFS and DSS (P<.001). High tumor grade was a significant predictor for RFS (P=.038) and DSS (P=.025). Involvement of the lower uterine segment was also a predictor of RFS (P=.049). Age at diagnosis and lymphovascular space involvement were significant predictors of OS: P<.001 and P=.002, respectively. Conclusion: In the treatment of patients with high-risk features, our study suggests that adjuvant RT significantly improves recurrence-free, disease-specific, and overall survival in patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma

  11. Geothermal Produced Fluids: Characteristics, Treatment Technologies, and Management Options

    SciTech Connect

    Finster, Molly; Clark, Corrie; Schroeder, Jenna; Martino, Louis

    2015-10-01

    options for produced fluids that require additional treatment for these constituents are also discussed, including surface disposal, reuse and recycle, agricultural industrial and domestic uses, mineral extraction and recovery, and solid waste handling.

  12. The effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on testicular function in men undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-05-15

    Testicular function was studied in 26 men with sarcoma who received adjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate (with or without radiotherapy). Testicular size, sperm output, and serum FSH, LH and testosterone levels were assessed after treatment. Five of 17 men who received chemotherapy or chemotherapy with radiotherapy to the neck, arm, chest, or leg, had normal testicular function. Eight of the remaining 12 men who provided ejaculates were oligospermic or azoospermic and serum FSH was increased threefold and LH twofold; testosterone levels were normal. In the five men with normal testicular function, FSH was increased fourfold during therapy but returned to normal six to 21 months after treatment. In men less than 40 years old, the mean FSH was less than that of men over 40 years of age (P . to 0.05), suggesting that recovery from the injury was age-related. By contrast, all nine men who received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to the abdomen or thigh had decreased testicular size, azoospermia, fourfold increase in FSH, and twofold increase in LH levels; but testosterone concentration was normal. These data increase in FSH, and reversible testicular injury occurs after treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate; recovery is age-related. However, these agents in combination with use of adjuvant radiotherapy to the thigh or abdomen may produce permanent testicular injury even in young patients.

  13. Meta-analysis of trials comparing anastrozole and tamoxifen for adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aydiner, Adnan; Tas, Faruk

    2008-01-01

    Objective It was aimed to review the literature and make a meta-analysis of the trials on both upfront, switching, and sequencing anastrozole in the adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer. Methods The PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov and Cochrane databases were systematically reviewed for randomized-controlled trials comparing anastrozole with tamoxifen in the adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer. Results The combined hazard rate of 4 trials for event-free survival (EFS) was 0.77 (95%CI: 0.70–0.85) (P < 0.0001) for patients treated with anastrozole compared with tamoxifen. In the second analysis in which only ITA, ABCSG 8, and ARNO 95 trials were included and ATAC (upfront trial) was excluded, combined hazard rate for EFS was 0.64 (95%CI: 0.52–0.79) (P < 0.0001). In the third analysis including hazard rate for recurrence-free survival (excluding non-disease related deaths) of estrogen receptor-positive patients for ATAC trial and hazard rate for EFS of all patients for the rest of the trials, combined hazard rate was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.65–0.81) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Anastrozole appears to have superior efficacy than tamoxifen in the adjuvant hormonal treatment of early breast cancer. Until further clinical evidence comes up, aromatase inhibitors should be the initial hormonal therapy in postmenopausal early breast cancer patients and switching should only be considered for patients who are currently receiving tamoxifen. PMID:18664277

  14. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater and Its Treatment Options in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S. M.; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S. M.; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  15. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  16. Arsenic contaminated groundwater and its treatment options in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S M; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  17. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective. PMID:26652284

  18. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  19. Novel Treatment Options for Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Leblebjian, Houry; Agarwal, Amit; Ghobrial, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia first described by Jan Waldenström in 1944 is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by the presence of an immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy in the blood and monoclonal small lymphocytes and lymphoplasmacytoid cells in the bone marrow. WM is a rare and indolent disease but remains incurable. In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and focus on novel treatment options that target pathways deregulated in this disease. Recent studies have helped us identify specific genetic mutations that are commonly seen in WM and may prove to be important therapeutic targets in the future. We discuss the role of epigenetics and the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment that are important in the pathogenesis of WM. The commonly used drugs are discussed with a focus on novel agents that are currently being used as single agents or in combinations to treat WM. We finally focus on some agents that have shown preclinical efficacy and may be available in the near future. PMID:24290218

  20. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Dobinson, Hazel C.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Chambers, Stephen T.; Doogue, Matthew P.; Seaward, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic

  1. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on testicular function in men undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-05-15

    Testicular function was studied in 26 men with sarcoma who received adjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate (with or without radiotherapy). Testicular size, sperm output, and serum FSH, LH and testosterone levels were assessed after treatment. Five of 17 men who received chemotherapy or chemotherapy with radiotherapy to the neck, arm, chest or leg, had normal testicular function. Eight of the remaining 12 men who provided ejaculates were oligospermic or azoospermic and serum FSH was increased threefold and LH twofold; testosterone levels were normal. In men less than 40 years old, the mean FSH level was less than that of men over 40 years of age (P = 0.05), suggesting that recovery from the injury was age-related. By contrast, all nine men who received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to the abdomen or thigh had decreased testicular size, azoospermia, fourfold increase in FSH, and twofold increase in LH levels; but testosterone concentration was normal. These data indicate that reversible testicular injury occurs after treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate; recovery is age-related. However, these agents in combination with use of adjuvant radiotherapy to the thigh or abdomen may produce permanent testicular injury even in young patients.

  2. Metronomic Adjuvant Chemotherapy Improves Treatment Outcome in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Postradiation Persistently Detectable Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Twu, Chih-Wen; Wang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Liang, Kai-Li; Jiang, Rong-San; Wu, Ching-Te; Shih, Yi-Ting; Lin, Po-Ju; Liu, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with persistently detectable plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pEBV DNA) after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 625 NPC patients with available pEBV DNA levels before and after treatment. Eighty-five patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after 1 week of completing radiation therapy were eligible for this retrospective study. Of the 85 patients, 33 were administered adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of oral tegafur-uracil (2 capsules twice daily) for 12 months with (n=4) or without (n=29) preceding intravenous chemotherapy of mitomycin-C, epirubicin, and cisplatin. The remaining 52 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy served as the control group. Results: Baseline patient characteristics at diagnosis (age, sex, pathologic type, performance status, T classification, N classification, and overall stage), as well as previous treatment modality, were comparable in both arms. After a median follow-up of 70 months for surviving patients, 45.5% (15 of 33 patients) with adjuvant chemotherapy and 71.2% (37 of 52 patients) without adjuvant chemotherapy experienced tumor relapses (P=.0323). There were a significant reduction in distant failure (P=.0034) but not in local or regional recurrence. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.6% for patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and 28.7% for patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0.27; 95% confidence interval 0.17-0.55; P<.0001). Conclusions: Our retrospective data showed that adjuvant chemotherapy can reduce distant failure and improve overall survival in NPC patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy.

  3. Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS): treatment options and considerations.

    PubMed

    Vilke, Gary M; Bozeman, William P; Dawes, Donald M; Demers, Gerard; Wilson, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    and initiate appropriate stabilizing treatment. ExDS patients will generally require transfer to an emergency department (ED) for further management, evaluation, and definitive care. In this paper, we present a typical ExDS case and then review existing literature for current treatment options. PMID:22390995

  4. Intravitreal Ranibizumab Injection as an Adjuvant in the Treatment of Neovascular Glaucoma Accompanied by Vitreous Hemorrhage after Diabetic Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xi; Chen, Yanwei; Wang, Yanuo; Yang, Lu; Zhong, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab injection as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of neovascular glaucoma (NVG) accompanied by postvitrectomy diabetic vitreous hemorrhage (PDVH). Methods. Eighteen NVG patients (18 eyes) accompanied by PDVH were enrolled in this prospective, monocenter, 12-month, interventional case series. The consecutive 18 patients with an IOP ≥ 25 mmHg despite being treated with the maximum medical therapy were treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injections. Vitreous surgery or/with Ahmed valve implantation were indicated if no clinical improvement in vitreous haemorrhage and uncontrolled IOP was shown. Results. Ten patients got clear vitreous and controlled IOP only with 2.7 ± 1.8 injections of ranibizumab without additional surgery. Vitrectomy or/with Ahmed valve implantation was administered in the other 8 eyes due to uncontrolled VH and IOP. At follow-up month 12, all the 18 eyes gained clear vitreous. At month 12 BCVA improved significantly compared to baseline. The baseline and follow-up at month 12 IOP/medication usage were 36.7 ± 8.1 mmHg on 3.4 ± 0.7 medications and 16.2 ± 4.9 mmHg on 0.67 ± 0.77 medications, respectively. Conclusions. The findings suggest that intravitreal ranibizumab injection as adjuvant therapy for treatment of NVG accompanied by PDVH may be safe and potentially effective. This clinical trial is registered with NCT02647515. PMID:27293875

  5. GSTP1 and MTHFR polymorphisms are related with toxicity in breast cancer adjuvant anthracycline-based treatment.

    PubMed

    Zárate, R; González-Santigo, S; de la Haba, J; Bandres, E; Morales, R; Salgado, J; Gómez, A; Aranda, E; García-Foncillas, J

    2007-06-01

    We have analyzed several members of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and other polymorphisms in genes implicated in tumor aggressivity regarding possible links between specific genetic variability in systemic drug bioavailability and toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant anthracycline-based treatment. PCR-RFLP and sequencing analyses technique were used for evaluating fourteen previously identified polymorphisms in 94 patients. GSTP1A>G and MTHFR 1298A>C genotypes remained as significant predictors in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. GSTP1 polymorphism was linked to haematological GIII-IV toxicity (P = 0.044, HR= 6.4, 95% CI = 1.05 to 39. Increased and significant HR was obtained for MTHFR-1298 AC+CC group when non-haematological toxicities GIII-IV toxicities were evaluated (HR = 24; 95% CI = 2.3 to 254), P = 0.008. Our results suggest that GSTP1 and MTHFR genotypes may be consider relevant and independent factors of toxicity in adjuvant anthracycline-based treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17584018

  6. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta : current treatment options and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Coppin, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable condition characterized by abnormally brittle bones, with an approximate prevalence of 1/20 000 births. Fractures are the main cause of suffering and disability, but owing to the abundance and wide distribution of the defective type I collagen in the body, a variety of symptoms occur. Several types of osteogenesis imperfecta (I-VII) have been described that vary in severity. For many years, therapy consisted of rehabilitation and orthopedic surgery. Presently, pharmacologic therapies aimed at strengthening bone are available, which decrease the pain and fracture rate associated with this condition, and allow more appropriate rehabilitation programs that will hopefully result in a less marked failure to thrive in affected children. In particular, the bisphosphonates, especially pamidronate, have been used for several years. They have been successful in increasing bone mineral density (BMD) and improving bone resistance, leading to a decrease in the fracture rate. Various regimens have been proposed, but it is the therapeutic regimen first used by Glorieux and co-workers in Montreal that has been the most frequently applied.However, as yet there is no definite consensus regarding the indications for therapy, the osteogenesis imperfecta types that are of the greatest concern, the appropriate age at the outset of therapy, and the treatment duration, without yet speaking about the best bisphosphonate regimen for use. The authors have proposed some personal recommendations for the clinical use of bisphosphonates, based on their own experience with the management of patients with this condition; these include the indications for therapy, based on the clinical status, and the treatment duration. These recommendations will certainly not be unanimously endorsed, but they should help to stimulate discussion. Ameliorating BMD is an important step, but will not prevent all fractures because bisphosphonate therapy does not correct the

  9. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  10. Impact of adjuvant treatment modalities on survival outcomes in curatively resected pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benekli, Mustafa; Unal, Olcun Umit; Unek, İlkay Tugba; Tastekin, Didem; Dane, Faysal; Algın, Efnan; Ulger, Sukran; Eren, Tulay; Topcu, Turkan Ozturk; Turkmen, Esma; Babacan, Nalan Akgül; Tufan, Gulnihal; Urakci, Zuhat; Ustaalioglu, Basak Oven; Uysal, Ozlem Sonmez; Ercelep, Ozlem Balvan; Taskoylu, Burcu Yapar; Aksoy, Asude; Canhoroz, Mustafa; Demirci, Umut; Dogan, Erkan; Berk, Veli; Balakan, Ozan; Ekinci, Ahmet Şiyar; Uysal, Mukremin; Petekkaya, İbrahim; Ozturk, Selçuk Cemil; Tonyalı, Önder; Çetin, Bülent; Aldemir, Mehmet Naci; Helvacı, Kaan; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Oztop, İlhan; Coskun, Ugur; Uner, Aytug; Ozet, Ahmet; Buyukberber, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the impact of adjuvant modalities on resected pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma (PAC). Methods A total of 563 patients who were curatively resected for PAC were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Results Of 563 patients, 472 received adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) alone, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) alone, and chemoradiotherapy plus chemotherapy (CRT-CT) were analyzed. Of the 472 patients, 231 were given CRT-CT, 26 were given CRT, and 215 were given CT. The median recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 and 19 months, respectively. When CT and CRT-CT groups were compared, there was no significant difference with respect to both RFS and OS, and also there was no difference in RFS and OS among CRT-CT, CT and CRT groups. To further investigate the impact of radiation on subgroups, patients were stratified according to lymph node status and resection margins. In node-positive patients, both RFS and OS were significantly longer in CRT-CT than CT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between groups when patients with node-negative disease or patients with or without positive surgical margins were considered. Conclusions Addition of radiation to CT has a survival benefit in patients with node-positive disease following pancreatic resection. PMID:26361410

  11. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  12. Impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms in tamoxifen adjuvant breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ramón y Cajal, T; Altés, A; Paré, L; del Rio, E; Alonso, C; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of CYP2D6 genotyping in predicting disease-free survival and toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. DNA from 91 patients was genotyped using the AmpliChip CYP450 GeneChip, Roche that facilitates the classification of individuals by testing 27 alleles. When patients were grouped into group 1 (*4/*4, *4/*41, *1/*5 and *2/*5) and group 2 (the remaining genotypes), a significant difference in disease-free survival (DFS) was observed between groups (P = 0.016). The mean DFS in group 1 was 95 months in contrast with 119 months in group 2. No significant relationship was found between the CYP2D6 genotype classification and severe, mild or no toxicity (P = 0.2). Nevertheless, severe, and mild toxicity was more frequent among poor metabolizer patients than in patients with a normal metabolizer pattern (18.8 and 43.8% vs. 10.7 and 36%, respectively). In breast cancer, patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen, non-functional and severely impaired CYP2D6 variants are associated with a worse DFS and with a higher frequency of severe and mild toxicities. Larger studies of the CYP2D6 genotype-clinical outcomes association are needed to complement initial results. PMID:19189210

  13. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  14. Imiquimod 5% cream as an adjuvant pre-operative treatment for basal cell carcinoma of the periocular area.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Rosa; Solebo, Ameenat L; Khandwala, Mona A; Jones, Carole A

    2014-12-01

    Despite national guidelines in the UK, patients with low-grade periocular malignancies frequently wait a period of months for their surgery. We have devised a protocol of pre-treatment with an immune modulator in an attempt to reduce the tumour size whilst patients await surgery. We present a case series of 5 patients who used Imiquimod 5% cream (Aldara) for 4 weeks as an adjuvant treatment prior to the excision of periocular nodular basal cell carcinomas. We also assessed tolerability of the cream using a visual analogue scale and recorded adverse events. Our patients had an average 22% reduction in tumour area (range 3.31%-39.64%) whilst awaiting surgery. The medication had a good tolerability profile and there were no ocular adverse events. Due to the promising results, this pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and value of a planned multicentre, prospective research project to further explore these initial findings. PMID:25255050

  15. NKT cell adjuvant-based tumor vaccine for treatment of myc oncogene-driven mouse B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    West, Alison C.; Steegh, Kim; Duret, Helene; Paget, Christophe; Martin, Ben; Matthews, Geoffrey M.; Shortt, Jake; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Bots, Michael; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    Immunomodulators are effective in controlling hematologic malignancy by initiating or reactivating host antitumor immunity to otherwise poorly immunogenic and immune suppressive cancers. We aimed to boost antitumor immunity in B-cell lymphoma by developing a tumor cell vaccine incorporating α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) that targets the immune adjuvant properties of NKT cells. In the Eμ-myc transgenic mouse model, single therapeutic vaccination of irradiated, α-GalCer–loaded autologous tumor cells was sufficient to significantly inhibit growth of established tumors and prolong survival. Vaccine-induced antilymphoma immunity required NKT cells, NK cells, and CD8 T cells, and early IL-12–dependent production of IFN-γ. CD4 T cells, gamma/delta T cells, and IL-18 were not critical. Vaccine treatment induced a large systemic spike of IFN-γ and transient peripheral expansion of both NKT cells and NK cells, the major sources of IFN-γ. Furthermore, this vaccine approach was assessed in several other hematopoietic tumor models and was also therapeutically effective against AML-ETO9a acute myeloid leukemia. Replacing α-GalCer with β-mannosylceramide resulted in prolonged protection against Eμ-myc lymphoma. Overall, our results demonstrate a potent immune adjuvant effect of NKT cell ligands in therapeutic anticancer vaccination against oncogene-driven lymphomas, and this work supports clinical investigation of NKT cell–based immunotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:22932803

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  18. Treatment Options for Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  19. Neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment of Siewert type II gastroesophageal junction cancer: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Joseph A.; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T.; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Choi, Minsig; Zhang, Yue; Yoon, Hannah; Ryu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) has been rising in incidence in recent years. The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of GEJ cancer remains unclear, as the largest prospective trials advocating for either adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combine GEJ cancer with either gastric or esophageal cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the association of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant treatment with overall and disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with surgically resected cancer of the true GEJ (Siewert type II). Methods The surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry database (2001–2011) was queried for cases of surgically resected Siewert type II GEJ cancer. A total of 1,497 patients with resectable GEJ cancer were identified, with 746 receiving adjuvant RT and 751 receiving neoadjuvant RT. Retrospective analysis was performed with the endpoints of overall and DSS. Results Using cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, race, stage, grade, histology, and year of diagnosis), we showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a significantly lower death risk [hazard ratio (HR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.97; P value=0.0168] and significantly lower disease-specific death risk (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.97; P value=0.0211) as compared to neoadjuvant RT. Conclusions This analysis of SEER data showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a survival benefit as compared to neoadjuvant RT for the treatment of Siewert type II GEJ cancer. We suggest future prospective studies to compare outcomes of adjuvant versus neoadjuvant treatment for true GEJ cancer. PMID:27284473

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  1. Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of influenza: current and future options.

    PubMed

    Poehling, K A; Edwards, K M

    2001-02-01

    Because influenza significantly affects the health of children, this review describes the current and future options for preventing, diagnosing, and treating influenza infections. Currently, the inactivated influenza vaccine is recommended for prevention of influenza; however, the live, attenuated, intranasal influenza vaccine is a potential future option. For diagnosis, viral culture is the gold standard, although four rapid diagnostic tests are available for more immediate results. The impetus for rapid results is the availability of effective antiviral agents indicated for early influenza infection. The four currently approved antiviral agents are amantadine, rimantadine, zanamivir [Relenza, Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC] and oseltamivir [Tamiflu, Roche Pharmaceuticals, Nutley, NJ]. The indications, benefits, side effects and ages for which each drug is approved are reviewed. PMID:11176246

  2. Approved and Off-Label Uses of Obesity Medications, and Potential New Pharmacologic Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Isidro, Maria Luisa; Cordido, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Available anti-obesity pharmacotherapy options remain very limited and development of more effective drugs has become a priority. The potential strategies to achieve weight loss are to reduce energy intake by stimulating anorexigenic signals or by blocking orexigenic signals, and to increase energy expenditure. This review will focus on approved obesity medications, as well as potential new pharmacologic treatment options.

  3. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  5. New Treatment Option for Young Women with Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment option for young women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer Posted: June 1, 2014 Contact: NCI Press Office 301-496-6641 A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a ...

  6. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... UI? Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5- ... own home. Page 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on ...

  7. The Prognostic Impact of NK/NKT Cell Density in Periampullary Adenocarcinoma Differs by Morphological Type and Adjuvant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Warfvinge, Carl Fredrik; Elebro, Jacob; Heby, Margareta; Nodin, Björn; Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Bjartell, Anders; Leandersson, Karin; Eberhard, Jakob; Jirström, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells and NK T cells (NKT) are vital parts of tumour immunosurveillance. However, their impact on prognosis and chemotherapy response in periampullary adenocarcinoma, including pancreatic cancer, has not yet been described. Methods Immune cell-specific expression of CD56, CD3, CD68 and CD1a was analysed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays with tumours from 175 consecutive cases of periampullary adenocarcinoma, 110 of pancreatobiliary type (PB-type) and 65 of intestinal type (I-type) morphology. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis were applied to determine the impact of CD56+ NK/NKT cells on 5-year overall survival (OS). Results High density of CD56+ NK/NKT cells correlated with low N-stage and lack of perineural, lymphatic vessel and peripancreatic fat invasion. High density of CD56+ NK/NKT cells was associated with prolonged OS in Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.003), and in adjusted Cox regression analysis (HR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29–0.86). The prognostic effect of high CD56+ NK/NKT cell infiltration was only evident in cases not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy in PB-type tumours (p for interaction = 0.014). Conclusion This study demonstrates that abundant infiltration of CD56+ NK/NKT cells is associated with a prolonged survival in periampullary adenocarcinoma. However, the negative interaction with adjuvant treatment is noteworthy. NK cell enhancing strategies may prove to be successful in the management of these cancers. PMID:27275582

  8. A Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Platinum-Based Adjuvant Treatment on the Outcome of Borderline Ovarian Tumors With Invasive Implants

    PubMed Central

    Olschewski, Jessica; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment of borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) remains contentious, and there is no consensus regarding therapy for BOTs with invasive implants (BOTi). The benefits of platinum-based adjuvant treatment were evaluated in patients with BOTi at primary diagnosis. Methods. The PubMed database was systematically searched for articles using the following terms: ((borderline) OR (low malignant potential) AND (ovarian)) AND ((tumor) OR (cancer)) AND (invasive implants) AND ((follow-up) OR (survival) OR (treatment) OR (chemotherapy) OR (adjuvant treatment) OR (surgery) OR (surgical treatment)). Results. We identified 27 articles including 3,124 patients, 181 with invasive implants. All studies provided information regarding mortality or recurrence rates. Central pathological examination was performed in 19 studies. Eight studies included more than 75% stage I patients; 7 included only advanced-stage patients, and 14 included only serous BOT. The pooled recurrence estimates for both treatment groups (adjuvant treatment: 44.0%, upfront surgery: 21.3%) did not differ significantly (p = .114). A meta-analysis of the 6 studies providing separate mortality data for both treatment groups favored surgical treatment only, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (.05 < p < .1; odds ratio: 0.33; 95% confidence interval: 0.09–1.71; p = .086). We were unable to pool the results of the included studies because not all studies registered events in both treatment groups. Egger’s regression indicated low asymmetry of the studies (p = .39), and no heterogeneity was found (I2 = 0%). Conclusion. We did not find evidence supporting platinum-based adjuvant therapy for BOT with invasive implants. PMID:25601963

  9. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  10. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  11. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study. PMID:27217816

  12. Treatment options for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of different subtypes, characterized by their different clinicopathological characteristics, prognoses and responses to treatment. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer sensitive to hormonal treatments, as well as in patients whose malignant cells overexpress or amplify HER2. In contrast, mainly due to the lack of molecular targets, little progress has been made in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recent improved understanding of the natural history, pathophysiology, and molecular features of triple-negative breast cancers have provided new insights into management and therapeutic strategies for women affected with this entity. Ongoing and planned translational clinical trials are likely to optimize and improve treatment of women with this disease. PMID:20979652

  13. Transdermal estradiol for postpartum depression: A promising treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Berga, Sarah L.; Kalro, Brinda; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth and affects one out of seven childbearing women. While conventional pharmacological and psychotherapeutic antidepressant treatments are effective for PPD, a natural alternative may be preferred by postpartum women, especially those who breastfeed their infants. The treatment of PPD with synthetic forms of naturally occurring estrogen is mechanistically appealing because PPD occurs in the context of estrogen withdrawal at parturition. Preliminary evidence suggests that PPD is a disorder of hormone-related mood dysregulation (similar to perimenopausal depression) that can be effectively treated with estrogen. This review provides the basic science and clinical background as well as safety considerations to support the application of transdermal estradiol as a treatment for PPD. We conclude that estradiol treatment for PPD requires confirmation of efficacy in a randomized clinical trial prior to routine clinical use as monotherapy. Additional data regarding maternal tolerability of cyclic progestins, long-term safety of estradiol treatment, estradiol passage into breastmilk and infants, and interdisciplinary collaboration among psychiatrists and gynecologists is also needed before estradiol is used in women who decline or fail to respond to first-line antidepressant treatments, or as an augmentation of conventional antidepressant treatment. PMID:19661765

  14. Advanced Vulvar Cancers: What are the Best Options for Treatment?

    PubMed

    Soderini, Alejandro; Aragona, Alejandro; Reed, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    The treatment of patients with vulvar cancer remains challenging for gynecologic oncologists. Up to 30 % of the cases are diagnosed in a clinical condition of irresectability, and some kind of strategy has to be taken into account beyond surgery. In this regard, a common and standard definition is critical to maximize oncological results and minimize complications after treatments. Each patient treatment must be tailored individually according to their clinical and biological features and to the setting in which they are dealing with. PMID:27586378

  15. Fertility-Preserving Treatment Options in Patients with Malignant Hematological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Küçük, Mert; Bolaman, Ali Zahit; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Kadıköylü, Gürhan

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients of reproductive age diagnosed with various malignant hematological diseases increases every year. These patients undergo chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and various other treatments that may have gonadotoxic effects. The life expectancy of these patients is increasing rapidly due to the variety of treatment options. As such, an increasing number of patients—as well as their parents and spouses—express their concerns about the patient’s fertility post treatment. In the present review it was aimed to provide an overview of current fertility-preserving treatment options and the future of fertility preservation. PMID:24744663

  16. Pancreatic cancer from bench to bedside: molecular pathways and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christoforos; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Kotidis, Efstathios; Mixalopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsavlis, Drosos; Baka, Sofia; Man, Yan-Gao; Kanellos, John

    2016-01-01

    In the last forty years the pancreatic cancer treatment has made advances, however; still novel drugs are needed. It is known that the five year survival rate remains around 5%. The best treatment option still remains surgery, if patients are diagnosed early. In the last decade the biology of pancreatic cancer has been vastly explored and novel agents such as; tyrosine kinase agents, or vaccines have been added as a treatment perspective. The big challenge is now to translate this knowledge in better outcomes for patients. In this current review we will present information from pancreatic cancer diagnosis to molecular pathways and treatment options; current and future. PMID:27275478

  17. Integrating emerging treatment options in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Brad S; Fowler, Nathan H; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an uncommon lymphoma subtype that is currently considered incurable and lacks a single standard of care. Choice of treatment is complicated by the disease’s clinical heterogeneity. The course of the disease may be indolent, moderately aggressive, or aggressive. A translocation between chromosomes 11 and 14 is observed in the majority of mantle cell lymphoma patients, and the diseased cells may develop a variety of other genetic aberrations. Although the disease tends to respond well to treatment, patients almost invariably relapse, with many becoming chemotherapy refractory over time. The development of new treatment strategies has improved the prognosis for these patients. Novel approaches include intensive chemotherapy, often in combination with stem cell transplantation; maintenance therapy with extended duration; and new targeted treatments such as ibrutinib, bendamustine, bortezomib, lenalidomide, and idelalisib. Many of these new agents have shown promising activity, both as single agents and in combination regimens. PMID:24893155

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  20. Parkinson Disease Treatment Options - Medications (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments depends upon the person's signs and symptoms, age, stage and severity of disease, and their level of physical activity. The information that follows can help patients and family members ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  5. Treatment Options by Type of Adult Brain Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... on their chemical make-up. SPECT scan (single photon emission computed tomography scan) : A procedure that uses ... has come back after treatment: SPECT scan (single photon emission computed tomography scan) : A procedure that uses ...

  6. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  7. Current options and perspectives in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Várkonyi, Tamás; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Keresztes, Katalin; Martos, Tímea; Lengyel, Csaba; Stirban, Alin; Jermendy, György; Kempler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to summarise recent advances in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. Although all therapeutic choices in the treatment of diabetes mellitus itself are based on clear pathophysiological basis, this approach is less present in the treatment of the "forgotten complication", diabetic neuropathy. As part of pathogenetic oriented treatment, the role of glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors are reviewed. The mode of action of benfotiamine is based on inhibition of key alternative pathways, including the polyol, hexosamine, protein-kinase-C pathways, and inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation, just as on activation of transketolase. Alpha- lipoic-acid is considered as the most potent antioxidant. Other forms of pathogenetic oriented treatment, including actovegin, will be summarised. The anticonvulsants gabapentin and pregabalin, as well as the antidepressant duloxetine represent the most important new drugs among agents for symptomatic relief. Most likely, we should offer combination treatment to our patients much more often, first of all combination of pathogenetic and symptomatic drugs. Finally, the broad spectrum of non-pharmacological treatment will be reviewed. PMID:23278494

  8. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  9. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  10. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  11. Faropenem medoxomil: a treatment option in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hadley, James A; Tillotson, Glenn S; Tosiello, Robert; Echols, Roger M

    2006-12-01

    Faropenem medoxomil is the first oral penem in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics. Faropenem medoxomil has excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and other key pathogens implicated in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Clinical studies have demonstrated that, in the treatment of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults, 7 days of treatment with faropenem medoxomil is as clinically and bacteriologically effective as 10 days of treatment with cefuroxime axetil. One study showed faropenem medoxomil to be superior to cefuroxime axetil. Overall, the safety profile of faropenem medoxomil is similar to that of most comparators. Specifically, the minimal impact of faropenem medoxomil on the gastrointestinal flora leads to less diarrhea and other adverse events than coamoxicillin-clavulanate. Faropenem medoxomil has almost no drug-drug interactions and little requirement for dosage adjustments in the typical acute rhinosinusitis population. PMID:17181408

  12. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients’ access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program. PMID:25204360

  13. Medical Treatments of Hidradenitis Suppurativa: More Options, Less Evidence.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Hessel H; Gulliver, Wayne P

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a common debilitating skin disease that has been neglected by science. The disease is getting more and more attention, reflected by the rising number of scientific publications. There is a clear need for effective treatment. We are still at the beginning of improving care for these patients as demonstrated by the low levels of evidence for the medical treatments. Many of these therapies showed promising results, but are still waiting to be validated in randomized, controlled trials. Much more research is needed to strengthen the Level of Evidence for these therapies and thus improve patient care. PMID:26617362

  14. Fungal infections of the skin and nail: new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Matthew L; Chambers, Cindy J; Sharon, Victoria R; Thompson, George R

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of the currently available antifungal agents, along with clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic methods, can help the medical professional optimally manage skin and nail fungal infections. With regards to treatment of fungal disease of the skin or nail, there are a variety of systemic antifungal agents, including several newer agents that have different formulations, tolerability, adverse effect profiles and spectrum of activity. This review will highlight the clinically important fungal infections of the skin and nail and describe the activity and role of antifungal treatment. PMID:25241767

  15. Hydrogels for brain repair after stroke: an emerging treatment option.

    PubMed

    Nih, Lina Ratiba; Carmichael, Stanley Thomas; Segura, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    Stroke disability is the only major disease without an effective treatment. The substantial clinical burden of stroke in disabled survivors and the lack of a medical therapy that promotes recovery provide an opportunity to explore the use of biomaterials to promote brain repair after stroke. Hydrogels can be injected as a liquid and solidify in situ to form a gelatinous solid with similar mechanical properties to the brain. These biomaterials have been recently explored to generate pro-repair environments within the damaged organ. This review highlights the clinical problem of stroke treatment and discusses recent advances in using in situ forming hydrogels for brain repair. PMID:27162093

  16. Impact of UGT2B7 His268Tyr polymorphism on the outcome of adjuvant epirubicin treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Epirubicin is a common adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. It is mainly eliminated after glucuronidation through uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7). The present study aimed to describe the impact of the UGT2B7His268Tyr polymorphism on invasive disease-free survival in breast cancer patients after epirubicin treatment. Methods This is a pharmacogenetic study based on samples collected from 745 breast cancer patients of the Austrian Tumor of breast tissue: Incidence, Genetics, and Environmental Risk factors (TIGER) cohort who did not present metastases at baseline. This cohort included 205 women with epirubicin-based combination chemotherapy, 113 patients having received chemotherapy without epirubicin and 427 patients having received no chemotherapy at all. Of the epirubicin-treated subgroup, 120 were subsequently treated with tamoxifen. For all women UGT2B7His268Tyr was genotyped. Invasive disease-free survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox's proportional hazard regression analysis. Results Among the 205 epirubicin-treated patients, carriers of two UGT2B7268Tyr alleles had a mean invasive disease-free survival of 8.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.9 to 9.3) years as compared to 7.5 (95% CI 6.9 to 8.0) years in carriers of at least one UGT2B7268His allele (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 2.64 (95% CI 1.22 to 5.71); P = 0.014). In addition, the impact of the UGT2B7His268Tyr polymorphism became even more pronounced in patients subsequently treated with tamoxifen (adjusted HR = 5.22 (95% CI 1.67 to 26.04); P = 0.015) whereas no such difference in invasive disease-free survival was observed in patients not receiving epirubicin. Conclusions Breast cancer patients carrying the UGT2B7268Tyr/Tyr genotype may benefit most from adjuvant epirubicin-based chemotherapy. These results warrant confirmation in further studies. PMID:21658222

  17. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Review of Current Evidence-based Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amy; Nguyen, Christine; Lu, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) can induce an ischemic and hypoxic state with resulting sequelae of macular edema and neovascularization. Many treatment options have been studied. Our review aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of the multiple treatment options of CRVO. A PubMed and Cochrane literature search was performed. Well-controlled randomized clinical trials that demonstrated strong level 1 evidence-based on the rating scale developed by the British Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine were included. Seven clinical trials met inclusion criteria to be included in this review. These included studies that investigated the safety and efficacy of retinal photocoagulation (1 study), intravitreal steroid treatment (2 studies), and antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment (4 studies) for the treatment of CRVO. In addition, studies evaluating surgical treatment options for CRVO were also included. Many treatment modalities have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CRVO. These treatment options offer therapeutic benefits for patients and clinically superior visual acuity and perhaps the quality of life after suffering from a CRVO. PMID:26957838

  18. Treatment Options for Low Back Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Petering, Ryan C.; Webb, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Context: Low back pain is one of the most common medical presentations in the general population. It is a common source of pain in athletes, leading to significant time missed and disability. The general categories of treatment for low back pain are medications and therapies. Evidence acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database from 1990 to 2010. A manual review of reference lists of identified sources was also performed. Results: It is not clear whether athletes experience low back pain more often than the general public. Because of a aucity of trials with athlete-specific populations, recommendations on treatments must be made from reviews of treatments for the general population. Several large systemic reviews and Cochrane reviews have compiled evidence on different modalities for low back pain. Superficial heat, spinal manipulation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, and skeletal muscle relaxants have the strongest evidence of benefit. Conclusions: Despite the high prevalence of low back pain and the significant burden to the athletes, there are few clearly superior treatment modalities. Superficial heat and spinal manipulation therapy are the most strongly supported evidence-based therapies. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and skeletal muscle relaxants have benefit in the initial management of low back pain; however, both have considerable side effects that must be considered. Athletes can return to play once they have recovered full range of motion and have the strength to prevent further injury. PMID:23016058

  19. [PCSK9 inhibitors : New treatment option in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Müller-Wieland, D; Marx, N

    2016-06-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors leading to their degradation in the liver. Inhibition of PCSK9 leads to an increase in LDL receptors and as a result to a reduction of LDL cholesterol in blood. Currently, two antibodies against PCSK9 are available for clinical treatment in Germany, evolocumab (Repatha®) and alirocumab (Praluent®). Clinical studies have shown that treatment with these antibodies, which must be subcutaneously injected by patients every 2 or 4 weeks, in addition to an already existing lipid therapy can lower the LDL cholesterol level in blood by an average of 50-60 %. Data from previous study programs show that this treatment is safe although long-term data are still lacking. The results of currently running cardiovascular endpoint studies are not yet available, whereby a beneficial effect is to be expected after the preliminary analyses. These novel effective therapy approaches open up new perspectives for the treatment of patients whose LDL cholesterol values are still in excess of the corresponding target values despite previous maximum lipid-reducing therapy and suffer from a preexisting cardiovascular disease, statin intolerance, genetic forms of familiar hypercholesterolemia and patients on LDL apheresis. PMID:27215418

  20. Treatment Options for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... actually breast cancer cells. The disease is metastatic breast cancer, not bone cancer . The following stages are used for breast ... other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs , liver , or brain. The treatment of breast cancer depends partly on the stage of the disease. ...

  1. Oral 2.01: Proton beam radiation therapy for adjuvant and definitive treatment of thymoma and thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jennifer H.; Berman, Abigail T.; Pechet, Taine T.; William, Levin P.; Gabriel, Peter E.; Khella, Sami; Singhal, Sunil; Kucharczuk, John C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a critical component of treatment for thymic tumors. However, radiation-induced toxicity may reduce benefit, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Proton beam therapy (PBT), due to its characteristic Bragg peak, is ideally suited to treat the anterior mediastinum while sparing organs at risk. To date, PBT to treat thymic tumors has only been reported in three single-patient case studies. In this study, we evaluated patterns of failure and toxicity in patients treated for thymoma and thymic carcinoma using PBT and hypothesized that PBT can achieve excellent local control with limited high grade toxicity. Methods All patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma treated with PBT between 2011–2015 were analyzed. Either double scattered proton therapy (DS-PT) or pencil beam scanning (PBS) were used. Toxicity was assessed using CTCAE v 4.2. Local control, distant control, and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of PBT completion. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. Patients were a median age of 56 years, predominantly female (56%), and had thymoma (85%) or thymic carcinoma (15%). They were treated with definitive (22%) or salvage (15%) PBT or adjuvant (63%) PBT following resection with predominantly close (23%) or positive (50%) margins. Forty-one percent also received chemotherapy. Patients were treated to a median of 61.2 Gy (range 50.4–70.2 Gy) using DS-PT (85%) or PBS (15%). Median mean lung dose, volume of lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V20), and V5 were 98 cGy (1–2,050 cGy), 18% (0–38%), and 26.2% (0–55%). Median mean heart and esophagus doses were 1,065 cGy (105–3,356cGy) and 1,072cGy (0–4,655 cGy). No patient experienced grade ≥3 acute or chronic toxicity. Acute grade ≥2 toxicities included fatigue (11%), esophagitis (7%), dermatitis (37%), and pneumonitis in one patient (4%) who received 2 prior thoracic radiotherapy courses. Late grade ≥2 toxicity was limited to a single

  2. Current Standards and Novel Treatment Options for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Yabar, Cinthya S; Brody, Jonathan R; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid tumors. The prognosis of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal, with a median survival of less than 1 year, due in large part to the fact that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy. However, there recently have been significant improvements in outcomes for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: ongoing trials have shown promise, and these may lead to still further progress. Here we review the current treatment paradigms for metastatic disease, focusing on ways to ameliorate symptoms and lengthen survival. We then summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular aspects of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we outline new approaches currently under development for the treatment of metastatic disease, arising from our improved understanding of the genetic and nongenetic alterations within pancreatic cancer cells-and of interactions between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and the immune system. PMID:26573060

  3. The antimicrobial armamentarium: evaluating current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bosso, John A

    2005-10-01

    The development and introduction of new antibiotics has, unfortunately, not kept pace with the development of bacterial resistance, and the need for new agents is becoming acute. Although some currently marketed agents remain valuable tools in the treatment of infectious diseases, few new drugs have reached the market in the last decade. In recent years, antibiotics with activity against certain problematic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including linezolid and daptomycin, have been approved for clinical practice. Recently, tigecycline, a minocycline derivative, received approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure and intraabdominal infections; the agent is also active against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Of the other agents in phase III development, ceftobiprole--a cephalosporin, and faropenem and doripenem--both carbapenems, have wide antibacterial spectra. Antimicrobial agents in the pipeline with marked gram-positive activity include dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin. PMID:16178676

  4. [New treatment options for infections with Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    van Nood, Els; Keller, Josbert J; Kuijper, Ed J; Speelman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Currently available broad spectrum antibiotics are not sufficiently effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). Donor faecal microbiota transplantation is a very effective treatment for second and recurrent infection but is time-consuming and requires careful screening of donors. The new narrow spectrum antibiotic fidaxomicin is a good alternative in a first CDI or a first recurrence, but treatment is expensive and there are no data on its effectiveness in a second or later recurrence. Fidaxomicin is less effective against infections caused by the Ribotype 027 strain, a virulent strain that is regularly encountered in the Netherlands. The effectiveness of various other promising narrow spectrum antibiotics is currently being investigated. Medications that support the gut flora or the immune system seem to offer new perspectives. Expectations for the currently available probiotic preparations and toxin binders are not high. PMID:24279951

  5. Nonmelanoma skin cancer. Risks, treatment options, and tips on prevention.

    PubMed

    Kibarian, M A; Hruza, G J

    1995-12-01

    The incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer is rapidly increasing. With early diagnosis and treatment, almost all basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas can be cured. Premalignant actinic keratoses are treated with cryosurgery; the CO2 laser is the treatment of choice for actinic cheilitis. Generally, nonmelanoma skin cancer can be effectively treated with excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, cryosurgery, or radiation therapy; 5-year cure rates are over 90%. Large, locally recurrent, and aggressive lesions, as well as lesions located in the central face, are best managed with Mohs' surgery; 5-year cure rates as high as 99% have been reported. Patient education about the dangers of sun exposure and tanning salons can potentially reduce the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The use of sunscreens starting early in life should be stressed. PMID:7501580

  6. Pathological fractures in children: Diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Canavese, F; Samba, A; Rousset, M

    2016-02-01

    A fracture is defined as pathological when it arises in a bone tissue that has been modified and reshaped by a local or systemic pathological process. In children, pathological fractures can be secondary to several conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases to tumors, infections or neuromuscular pathologies. History, clinical examination and radiologic assessment are essential to making a diagnosis, to identifying the underlying cause and to planning the right treatment of a pathological fracture. Treatment must be tailored to both the fracture and the underlying cause. The objective of this work is to present the diagnostic approach and the course to follow when a child presents with a pathological fracture. The most common causes of pathological fractures, as well as their characteristics, will be described. Pathological fractures occurring in osteogenesis imperfecta and in abused children as well as stress fractures will not be discussed. PMID:26774903

  7. Modern treatment options for the therapy of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Tomalla, Mark; Cagnolati, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    The following case report describes the implantation of intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS) and the postoperative contact lens treatment in a 42-year-old patient with bilateral advanced keratoconus. The patient had a preoperative contact lens intolerance. After femtosecond laser assisted surgery and the implantation of ICRS new custom mini-scleral contact lenses were fitted. The postoperative subjective and objective contact lens tolerance was excellent. PMID:17207654

  8. Fecal incontinence: A review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Fejka, Michael David

    2016-09-01

    Fecal incontinence affects patients of all sexes, races, and ethnicities; however, those affected often are afraid or too embarrassed to ask for help. Attention to risk factors and directed physical examinations can help healthcare providers diagnose and formulate treatment plans. Numerous diagnostic tests are available. Diligent follow-up is needed to direct patients to second-line therapies such as sacral nerve stimulation or surgical procedures. PMID:27580000

  9. Treatment options for tank farms long-length contaminated equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, W.S.

    1995-10-16

    This study evaluated a variety of treatment and disposal technologies for mixed waste (MW) meeting the following criteria: 1. Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank System (tank farms) equipment and other debris; 2. length greater than 12 feet; and contaminated with listed MW from the tank farms. This waste stream, commonly referred to as tank farms long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE), poses a unique and costly set of challenges during all phases of the waste management lifecycle.

  10. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  11. Emerging Treatment Options in Mild to Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Sandborn, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with rectal bleeding and urgency, tenesmus, and diarrhea. Several medical therapies can be used in the treatment of UC. Aminosalicylates are widely used based on their efficacy in the induction and maintenance of remission. Although corticosteroids are effective in patients with more severe disease, systemic use is associated with significant safety concerns. The newer corticosteroid budesonide has lower systemic bioavailability and, consequently, a more favorable safety profile. A budesonide extended-release formulation allows once-daily dosing and delivers the agent locally throughout the colon. Biologic agents used for the treatment of moderate to severe UC include the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, and the integrin inhibitor vedolizumab. Rectally administered therapy can also be useful in the treatment of UC. In October 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a budesonide foam formulation for inducing remission in patients with active mild to moderate distal UC extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. Budesonide foam rapidly distributes to the sigmoid colon and the rectum and avoids some of the drawbacks of suppositories and enemas. PMID:26491415

  12. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  14. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  15. Uveal metastatic disease: current and new treatment options (review).

    PubMed

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Sadaka, Ama

    2012-03-01

    Choroidal metastasis represents the most common form of intraocular malignancies. It may occur in up to 10% of patients with systemic metastasis with almost half of the patients developing central nervous system disease. The most common primary sites of ocular metastasis are breast cancer in women and lung cancer in men. In most cases, these lesions tend to be asymptomatic and are not evaluated by an ophthalmologist. The diagnosis is generally made by the history of present or prior malignancies and an ophthalmological examination with slit-lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. As with other malignancies, management may vary with each patient. Small tumors, that do not compromise the vision and that have responded previously to systemic treatment, may be closely observed. For larger lesions and for symptomatic ones, external beam radiation offers an excellent alternative to save the eye and stabilize vision. Bevacizumab (Avastin), a potent monoclonal antibody that has also been employed for the treatment of ocular vaso-proliferative diseases, has been used in the treatment of choroidal metastasis and has shown promising results. PMID:22134585

  16. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  17. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  18. Chronic urticaria: aetiology, management and current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Martina M A; Sabroe, Ruth A

    2004-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common condition that can be very disabling when severe. A cause for chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is only infrequently identified. Potential causes include reactions to food and drugs, infections (rarely) and, apart from an increased incidence of thyroid disease, uncomplicated urticaria is not usually associated with underlying systemic disease or malignancy. About one-third of patients with CIU have circulating functional autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor or against IgE, although it is not known why such antibodies are produced, or how the presence of such antibodies alters the course of the disease or response to treatment. There are only a few publications relating to childhood urticaria, but it is probably similar to the adult form, except that adult urticaria is more common. The diagnosis is based on patient history and it is vital to spend time documenting this in detail. Extensive laboratory tests are not required in the vast majority of patients. Chronic urticaria resolves spontaneously in 30-55% of patients within 5 years, but it can persist for many years. Treatment is aimed firstly at avoiding underlying causative or exacerbating factors. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists remain the mainstay of oral treatment for all forms of urticaria. The newer low-sedating antihistamines desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine and mizolastine should be tried first. Sedating antihistamines have more adverse effects but are useful if symptoms are causing sleep disturbance. Low-dose dopexin is effective and especially suitable for patients with associated depression. There is controversy as to whether the addition of an histamine H2 receptor antagonist or a leukotriene antagonist is helpful. For CIU, second-line agents include ciclosporin (cyclosporine) [which is effective in approximately 75% of patients], short courses of oral corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis, although the last two were

  19. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  20. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  1. Treatment Options for Villous Adenoma of the Ampulla of Vater

    PubMed Central

    Cugat, E.; Veloso, E.; Marco, C.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Duodenal villous adenoma arising from the ampulla of Vater has a high risk of malignant development. Excluding associated malignant disease prior to resection of an adenoma of the ampulla is not always possible. Therefore, the surgical procedure of choice to treat this rare tumour is still controversial. Objective: To evaluate retrospectively results of treatment of villous adenoma arising from ampulla of Vater with dysplasia or associated carcinoma limited to the ampulla. Patients and Methods: From 1985 to 1996, eight patients have been diagnosed with ampullary villous adenoma suitable for resection. We have reviewed treatment, morbidity, mortality, follow-up and final outcome. Results: Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) was performed in 4 patients. Transduodenal ampullectomy and endoscopic resection was performed in 2 patients each. There was no perioperative mortality. None of the patients had biliary, pancreatic or intestinal leakage but two patients who underwent PD had minor postoperative complications. The mean follow-up was 44 (range: 6–132) months. Villous adenoma was associated with adenocarcinoma in 50% of the cases (4/8 patients). During the followup both patients who underwent transduodenal ampullectomy developed recurrent disease. All patients initially treated by PD are alive without evidence of recurrent disease. Conclusions: Treatment of villous adenoma of the ampulla must be individualized within certain limits. In our series, PD achieve good results and it appears to be the procedure of choice in order to treat villous adenomas with proved presence of carcinoma, carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia. Endoscopic or local resection may be appropriate for small benign tumours in high risk patients. PMID:10674748

  2. Aneurysmal bone cysts of the spine: treatment options and considerations.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Stefano; Lo, Sheng-fu L; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Fisher, Charles G; Varga, Peter P; Rhines, Laurence D; Germscheid, Niccole M; Luzzati, Alessandro; Chou, Dean; Reynolds, Jeremy J; Williams, Richard P; Zadnik, Patti; Groves, Mari; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2014-10-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign bone lesions with annual incidences ranging from 1.4 to 3.2 cases per million people. Approximately, 10-30% of ABCs are found in the spine. Such lesions are traditionally treated with curettage or other intralesional techniques. Because ABCs can be locally aggressive, intralesional resection can be incomplete and result in recurrence. This has led to increased use of novel techniques, including selective arterial embolization (SAE). This study aims to: (1) compare outcomes based on extent of surgical resection, and (2) compare the efficacy of SAE versus surgical resection. Clinical data pertaining to 71 cases of spinal ABCs were ambispectively collected from nine institutions in Europe, North America, and Australia. Twenty-two spinal ABCs were treated with surgery, 32 received preoperative embolization and surgery, and 17 were treated with SAE. Most tumors were classified as Enneking stage 2 (n = 29, 41%) and stage 3 (n = 29, 41%). Local recurrence and survival were investigated and a significant difference was not observed between treatment groups. However, all three local recurrences occurred following surgical resection. Surgical resection was further categorized based on Enneking appropriateness. Recurrences only occurred following intralesional Enneking inappropriate (EI) resections (P = 0.10), a classification that characterized 47% of all surgical resections. Furthermore, 56% of intralesional resections were EI, compared to only 10% of en bloc resections (P = 0.01). Although SAE treatment did not result in any local recurrences, 35% involved more than five embolization procedures. Spinal ABCs can be effectively treated with intralesional resection, en bloc resection, or SAE. Preoperative embolization should be considered before intralesional resection to limit intraoperative bleeding. Treatment plans must be guided by lesion characteristics and clinical presentation. PMID:25059450

  3. Metabolic bone disease in children : etiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Elzbieta; Lorenc, Roman S

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease in children includes many hereditary and acquired conditions of diverse etiology that lead to disturbed metabolism of the bone tissue. Some of these processes primarily affect bone; others are secondary to nutritional deficiencies, a variety of chronic disorders, and/or treatment with some drugs. Some of these disorders are rare, but some present public health concerns (for instance, rickets) that have been well known for many years but still persist. The most important clinical consequences of bone metabolic diseases in the pediatric population include reduced linear growth, bone deformations, and non-traumatic fractures leading to bone pain, deterioration of motor development and disability. In this article, we analyze primary and secondary osteoporosis, rickets, osteomalacia (nutritional and hereditary vitamin D-dependent, hypophosphatemic and that due to renal tubular abnormalities), renal osteodystrophy, sclerosing bony disorders, and some genetic bone diseases (hypophosphatasia, fibrous dysplasia, skeletal dysplasia, juvenile Paget disease, familial expansile osteolysis, and osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome). Early identification and treatment of potential risk factors is essential for skeletal health in adulthood. In most conditions it is necessary to ensure an appropriate diet, with calcium and vitamin D, and an adequate amount of physical activity as a means of prevention. In secondary bone diseases, treatment of the primary disorder is crucial. Most genetic disorders await prospective gene therapies, while bone marrow transplantation has been attempted in other disorders. At present, affected patients are treated symptomatically, frequently by interdisciplinary teams. The role of exercise and pharmacologic therapy with calcium, vitamin D, phosphate, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, sex hormones, growth hormone, and thiazides is discussed. The perspectives on future therapy with insulin-like growth factor-1, new analogs of vitamin D

  4. Pretubulysin: a new option for the treatment of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Braig, S; Wiedmann, R M; Liebl, J; Singer, M; Kubisch, R; Schreiner, L; Abhari, B A; Wagner, E; Kazmaier, U; Fulda, S; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents such as taxol, vincristine or vinblastine are well-established drugs in clinical treatment of metastatic cancer. However, because of their highly complex chemical structures, the synthesis and hence the supply issues are still quite challenging. Here we set on stage pretubulysin, a chemically accessible precursor of tubulysin that was identified as a potent microtubule-binding agent produced by myxobacteria. Although much simpler in chemical structure, pretubulysin abrogates proliferation and long-term survival as well as anchorage-independent growth, and also induces anoikis and apoptosis in invasive tumor cells equally potent to tubulysin. Moreover, pretubulysin posseses in vivo efficacy shown in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with T24 bladder tumor cells, in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells and finally in a model of lung metastasis induced by 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Pretubulysin induces cell death via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by abrogating the expression of pivotal antiapoptotic proteins, namely Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and shows distinct chemosensitizing properties in combination with TRAIL in two- and three-dimensional cell culture models. Unraveling the underlying signaling pathways provides novel information: pretubulysin induces proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (especially JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)) and phosphorylation of Mcl-1, which is then targeted by the SCF(Fbw7) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination and degradation. In sum, we designate the microtubule-destabilizing compound pretubulysin as a highly promising novel agent for mono treatment and combinatory treatment of invasive cancer. PMID:24434509

  5. Pretubulysin: a new option for the treatment of metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braig, S; Wiedmann, R M; Liebl, J; Singer, M; Kubisch, R; Schreiner, L; Abhari, B A; Wagner, E; Kazmaier, U; Fulda, S; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents such as taxol, vincristine or vinblastine are well-established drugs in clinical treatment of metastatic cancer. However, because of their highly complex chemical structures, the synthesis and hence the supply issues are still quite challenging. Here we set on stage pretubulysin, a chemically accessible precursor of tubulysin that was identified as a potent microtubule-binding agent produced by myxobacteria. Although much simpler in chemical structure, pretubulysin abrogates proliferation and long-term survival as well as anchorage-independent growth, and also induces anoikis and apoptosis in invasive tumor cells equally potent to tubulysin. Moreover, pretubulysin posseses in vivo efficacy shown in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with T24 bladder tumor cells, in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells and finally in a model of lung metastasis induced by 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Pretubulysin induces cell death via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by abrogating the expression of pivotal antiapoptotic proteins, namely Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and shows distinct chemosensitizing properties in combination with TRAIL in two- and three-dimensional cell culture models. Unraveling the underlying signaling pathways provides novel information: pretubulysin induces proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (especially JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)) and phosphorylation of Mcl-1, which is then targeted by the SCFFbw7 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination and degradation. In sum, we designate the microtubule-destabilizing compound pretubulysin as a highly promising novel agent for mono treatment and combinatory treatment of invasive cancer. PMID:24434509

  6. Obesity: An overview on its current perspectives and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nammi, Srinivas; Koka, Saisudha; Chinnala, Krishna M; Boini, Krishna M

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a multi-factorial disorder, which is often associated with many other significant diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases, osteoarthritis and certain cancers. The management of obesity will therefore require a comprehensive range of strategies focussing on those with existing weight problems and also on those at high risk of developing obesity. Hence, prevention of obesity during childhood should be considered a priority, as there is a risk of persistence to adulthood. This article highlights various preventive aspects and treatment procedures of obesity with special emphasis on the latest research manifolds. PMID:15084221

  7. Current and future systemic treatment options in metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    Although pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death, only modest improvement has been observed in the past two decades, single agent gemcitabine has been the only standard treatment in patients with advanced disease. Recently newer agents such as nab-paclitaxel, nimotuzumab and regimens such as FOLFIRINOX have been shown to have promising activity being superior to gemcitabine as a single agent. With better understanding of tumour biology coupled with the improvements in targeted and immunotherapies, there is increasing expectation for better response rates and extended survival in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25083302

  8. Osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint: nonsurgical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carfagno, David G; Ellenbecker, Todd S

    2002-04-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon type of osteoarthritis characterized by loss of anterior or forward flexion. Assessing range of motion, impingement, and strength, combined with radiologic imaging, can help determine the extent of damage. Published studies focus primarily on surgical treatment, but commonly used nonsurgical approaches include anti-inflammatory medications, oral and injectable viscosupplementation, and physical therapy. These conservative measures can be very effective for active patients and also appeal to their physicians who consider shoulder surgery as a last resort. PMID:20086520

  9. A Review of Treatment Options for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

    PubMed

    Stamelou, Maria; Höglinger, Günter

    2016-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an atypical parkinsonian condition characterized by a symmetric akinetic-rigid syndrome, early falls, supranuclear gaze palsy, and a frontotemporal behavioral syndrome. The typical phenotype is termed Richardson's syndrome, but numerous other phenotypes have been described. The pathophysiology of PSP is not fully understood, but dysfunction of the tau protein seems to play a central role. Despite exciting new knowledge on the pathophysiology of PSP, there is still no highly effective symptomatic or disease-modifying treatment. We review the evidence on pharmacotherapy and experimental therapies in PSP and provide levels of recommendation for the off-label use of commonly used drugs in this disorder. PMID:27222018

  10. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  11. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L; Walker, Jennifer N; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host-pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  12. Incontinence-associated dermatitis in the elderly: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Eleanor; Woodward, Sue

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in older people. However, it is frequently misdiagnosed and poorly treated. There is often uncertainty about which product to use to prevent and treat IAD; the different types, brands and how to apply them. This literature review looks specifically at the use of barrier products in the prevention and treatment of IAD. A systematic search found six primary research papers that analysed the effectiveness of various barrier products; they will be compared and contrasted in this review. There is a lack of evidence to recommend any one barrier product over another for use in a standardised skin care protocol such as the regimen suggested by Gray et al (2012). More research needs to be conducted to establish the most effective barrier products on the market. More research is also needed on the efficacy of barrier products in the prevention and treatment solely of IAD rather than combined studies looking at IAD with pressure ulcers. PMID:23905225

  13. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  14. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eldebawy, Eman; Parker, William; Abdel Rahman, Wamied; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  15. Pharmacological options for the treatment of Tourette's disorder.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; García-Ruiz, P J

    2001-01-01

    Tourette's disorder is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterised clinically by motor and vocal tics, which may be associated to conductual disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although the neurochemistry of Tourette's disorder is not well known, there are some effective therapies for tics, OCD and ADHD. However, these are not devoid of adverse effects. Tics only require treatment when they interfere with the functioning of the patient. If therapy is needed, monotherapy at the minimal effective dose is desirable, but some patients may require two or more drugs. The most frequently used drugs for tics are antipsychotics (mainly pimozide and haloperidol) and clonidine. The potential usefulness of atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine, ziprasidone) and other dopaminergic drugs (fluphenazine, sulpiride, tiapride, metoclopramide, piquindone, tetrabenazine), clonazepam, calcium channel antagonists, botulinum toxin, dopamine agonists, selegiline, and other drugs is discussed. The drugs of choice for OCD in patients with Tourette's disorder are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), although the tricyclic antidepressant clomiplamine, which inhibits both serotonin and noradrenaline uptake, has also been found to be useful. ADHD can be treated with some psychostimulants, mainly methylphenidate, although these drugs must be used with caution. Other potentially useful drugs for the treatment of ADHD in patients with Tourette's disorder are clonidine, guanfacine, selegiline, some tricyclic antidepressants, sertraline, pimozide and clonazepam. Finally, the potential value of some nonpharmacological therapies (hypnotherapy, biofeedback, conductual therapies, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture and surgery) is briefly reviewed. PMID:11772131

  16. The Pharmacological Options in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Milano, W.; De Rosa, M.; Milano, L.; Riccio, A.; Sanseverino, B.; Capasso, A.

    2013-01-01

    The eating disorders (DCA) are complex systemic diseases with high social impact, which tend to become chronic with significant medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The literature data showed that there is good evidence to suggest the use of SSRIs, particularly at high doses of fluoxetine, in the treatment of BN reducing both the crisis of binge that the phenomena compensates and reducing the episodes of binge in patients with BED in the short term. Also, the topiramate (an AED) showed a good effectiveness in reducing the frequency and magnitude of episodes of binge with body weight reduction, both in the BN that is in the therapy of BED. To date, modest data support the use of low doses of second-generation antipsychotics in an attempt to reduce the creation of polarized weight and body shapes, the obsessive component, and anxiety in patients with AN. Data in the literature on long-term drug treatment of eating disorders are still very modest. It is essential to remember that the pharmacotherapy has, however, a remarkable efficacy in treating psychiatric disorders that occur in comorbidity with eating disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety, insomnia, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders and behavior. PMID:23956871

  17. Treatment options for chronic idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    George, J N

    2000-01-01

    The goal of treatment for idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is to prevent serious bleeding. Traditionally, corticosteroids have been used as first-line therapy followed by splenectomy. Experience with splenectomy over 60 years shows that approximately two thirds of patients achieve normal platelet counts during the initial observation, but that thrombocytopenia often recurs with longer follow-up. We know that long-term use of corticosteroids can lead to significant morbidities; there is no consensus regarding the appropriate timing or indications for splenectomy. To address the Issue of appropriate use of splenectomy, we designed a multicenter clinical trial that will randomize patients to either standard care, involving prednisone followed by splenectomy, or to a novel regimen of limited prednisone treatment followed by WinRho SDF (Nabi, Boca Raton, FL) (anti-D) therapy to maintain the platelet count in a safe range for 1 year. Anti-D can be administered easily in an outpatient setting with few side effects and can provide predictable, transient increases in platelet count. The hypothesis is that prolonged maintenance therapy with a nontoxic regimen may increase the percentage of patients who will experience a spontaneous remission from thrombocytopenia, thereby avoiding an invasive and permanent surgical procedure, splenectomy, and its potentially life-threatening sequelae. PMID:10676922

  18. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  19. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-08-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  20. Novel treatment options for hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2004-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects between 350 and 400 million people globally. Interferon-alpha, lamivudine and adefovir (Hepsera) are approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B; however, the use of interferon-alpha is limited. Lamivudine and adefovir have excellent antiviral activity and oral bioavailability, although viral rebound after cessation of therapy and development of resistance after long-term therapy with lamivudine are major clinical limitations. Adefovir has proven to be effective against lamivudine-resistant strains in vitro and in vivo. The various steps of HBV replication provide opportunities for new antiviral drugs to interact with the virus. Recent developments, including new antivirals that interfere with viral DNA replication, hold promise for the future. Sustained reduction in viral load and improved treatment of chronic HBV infection could, in future, be achieved by the development of new drugs with different mechanisms of action and resistance profiles, and with combination therapy involving two or more nucleosides with or without immunomodulators. PMID:15043391

  1. Opioids: an unexplored option for treatment of dyspnea in IPF

    PubMed Central

    Kohberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Charlotte Uggerhøj; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common among the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and has the worst prognosis, with a median survival of 3–5 years. The most common symptom in IPF is dyspnea, impacting on the patient's quality of life and life expectancy. Morphine in the treatment of dyspnea has been investigated but with conflicting results. This review aims to clarify the role of opioids in the treatment of dyspnea in patients with IPF. Methods A literature search was performed using the MeSH and PubMed databases. As only very few studies included patients with IPF, studies conducted primarily with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were also included. In total, 14 articles were found. Results Seven studies reported use of systemic morphine and seven studies of inhaled morphine. Five of the seven studies investigating systemic administration detected an improvement in either dyspnea or exercise capacity, whereas no beneficial effect on dyspnea was detected in any study using inhaled morphine. No severe adverse effects such as respiratory depression were reported in any study, although constipation was reported as a notable adverse effect. Conclusions Results were inconsistent, but in some studies systemic morphine administration showed a significant improvement in the dyspnea score on a visual analog scale without observation of severe side effects. Nebulized morphine had no effect on dyspnea. PMID:26969472

  2. A systematic review of quality of life in head and neck cancer treated with surgery with or without adjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Shrinivas; Livergant, Jonathan; Klein, Jonathan; Witterick, Ian; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important consideration in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). We systematically reviewed the literature to assess the impact of curative surgical resection (+/- adjuvant therapy) of HNC on QoL. Eligible studies (participants>age 18 years, reported fully in English, and prospectively assessed QoL) were filtered using quality criteria, and classified according to the added value, using a published taxonomy. MEDLINE and EMBASE searching yielded 302 distinct reports, 49 met eligibility, and 26 met quality criteria. Among the eligible studies, achievement of certain quality criteria was poor: a priori hypothesis (8%), statistical accounting of missing data (8%), reporting of assessment interval (35%) and rationale for chosen measure (53%). The most frequent ways QoL added value were: understanding of treatment benefit and risk (100%), comparing treatments for QoL effect (92%) and advancing QoL research methodology (50%). QoL (physical/social functioning and various symptom domains) deteriorated with treatment, gradually recovering to baseline (cancer diagnosis) level. Swallowing, chewing, saliva, taste, eating disruption, and aesthetic deficits may persist. Advanced tumors, extensive surgical resection, need for flap reconstruction, neck dissection, and postoperative radiation are associated with worse QoL outcomes. Knowledge of these trends can be applied in shared decision making, identification of commonly faced QoL issues, and to develop and provide survivorship resources. Future research should focus on routinely incorporating QoL in randomized studies, reporting the result according to guidelines, and following knowledge translation principles to maximize the clinician's and patient's ability to use QoL data. PMID:26209066

  3. Adjuvant bisphosphonate treatment for breast cancer: Where are we heading and can the pre-clinical literature help us get there?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Kent; Clemons, Mark; Costa, Luis; Addison, Christina L.

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have demonstrated anti-tumour activity in preclinical studies of bone metastatic disease, thus it was natural to transition these agents into the adjuvant cancer therapy setting. Surprisingly, the results of adjuvant breast cancer trials have shown either modest to no benefit or even harm. We sought to explore whether the preclinical results supporting bisphosphonate use provided clues to help explain the current clinical data. Interestingly, the majority of preclinical data suggested that bisphosphonate treatment was more efficacious when administered after the establishment of osseous metastases. This is similar to the findings of one clinical study whereby patients with biopsy evidence of osseous micrometastases derive greater survival benefit from bisphosphonate treatment. Another clinical study found bisphosphonates were associated with increased incidence of visceral metastases, similar to what has been previously published in preclinical models using “preventative” dosing strategies. While the current clinical data suggest bisphosphonates may be more efficacious in post-menopausal or oestrogen depleted patients, or those with hormone receptor positive tumours, to date no appropriately designed preclinical studies have evaluated these effects. Furthermore, putative mechanisms that regulate response to bisphosphonates in other tumour types remain to be evaluated in breast cancer. Despite the initial optimism regarding adjuvant bisphosphonate therapy, the conflicting clinical results from large trials suggest that we should return to the bench to further investigate factors that may influence response to bisphosphonate treatment or identify appropriate characteristics that would indicate the sub-groups of patients most likely to benefit from bisphosphonate treatment. PMID:26909249

  4. Treatment of Aggressive Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas with Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Cruz, Aurora S; Benkers, Tara; Rostad, Steven; Broyles, Frances Broyles; Yuen, Kevin; Mayberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas demonstrate slow growth and are effectively managed with medical/surgical therapy. Rarely, these tumors can behave aggressively with rapid growth and invasion of local tissues, and are refractory to medical, surgical, or radio-surgical therapies. We report a case of a prolactin-secreting adenoma in a young woman, which became progressively aggressive and refractory to usual treatment modalities, but responded to treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. In addition, we review the literature for treatment of refractory adenomas with temozolomide. The clinical and pathologic characteristics of aggressive prolactin-secreting adenomas are reviewed, as well as their response to dopamine agonists, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. PMID:27489751

  5. Treatment of Aggressive Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas with Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aurora S; Benkers, Tara; Rostad, Steven; Broyles, Frances Broyles; Yuen, Kevin; Mayberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas demonstrate slow growth and are effectively managed with medical/surgical therapy. Rarely, these tumors can behave aggressively with rapid growth and invasion of local tissues, and are refractory to medical, surgical, or radio-surgical therapies. We report a case of a prolactin-secreting adenoma in a young woman, which became progressively aggressive and refractory to usual treatment modalities, but responded to treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. In addition, we review the literature for treatment of refractory adenomas with temozolomide. The clinical and pathologic characteristics of aggressive prolactin-secreting adenomas are reviewed, as well as their response to dopamine agonists, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. PMID:27489751

  6. Newer treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Murugan; Linden, Peter K

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, serious skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by multidrug resistant pathogens have become more common. While the majority of SSTIs are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or beta-haemolytic streptococci that are methicillin/oxacillin susceptible, the emergence of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant community-acquired and nosocomial Gram-positive pathogens has created a need for different therapeutic agents, such as linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, and newer generation carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. This review focuses on agents presently in clinical development for the treatment of SSTIs caused by Gram-positive pathogens such as staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Newer-generation carbapenems, such as meropenem and ertapenem, are characterised by a broad-spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and -negative aerobes and anaerobes, and are resistant to hydrolysis by many beta-lactamases. Current-generation fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, have demonstrated better eradication rates for S. aureus than conventional penicillin and cephalosporins. These antimicrobial agents can be used to treat methicillin-susceptible staphylococcal and streptococcal strains. Oxazolidinones, streptogramin combinations and cyclic lipopeptides have novel mechanisms of action and have been studied in several multinational phase III clinical trials in the treatment of complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. They possess a broad spectrum of activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including MRSA and VRE. Linezolid has been shown to be active against a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial antimicrobial-resistant pathogens with comparability to vancomycin, as well as resulting in reduced lengths of hospital stay. Cyclic lipopeptides such as daptomycin have a unique mechanism of action

  7. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Exo, J; Smith, C; Smith, R; Bell, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracranial injuries evolve, is necessary in order to attain maximal neurological outcome for these children. It is hopeful that new therapies, such as early hypothermia or others currently in preclinical trials, will ultimately improve outcome and quality of life for children after traumatic brain injury. PMID:20191093

  8. Treatment Options: Biological Basis of Regenerative Endodontic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Diogenes, Anibal; Teixeira, Fabricio B.

    2013-01-01

    Dental trauma occurs frequently in children and often can lead to pulpal necrosis. The occurrence of pulpal necrosis in the permanent but immature tooth represents a challenging clinical situation since the thin and often short roots increase the risk of subsequent fracture. Current approaches for treating the traumatized immature tooth with pulpal necrosis do not reliably achieve the desired clinical outcomes, consisting of healing of apical periodontitis, promotion of continued root development and restoration of the functional competence of pulpal tissue. An optimal approach for treating the immature permanent tooth with a necrotic pulp would be to regenerate functional pulpal tissue. This review summarizes the current literature supporting a biological rationale for considering regenerative endodontic treatment procedures in treating the immature permanent tooth with pulp necrosis. PMID:23439043

  9. Laser and light-based treatment options for hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Griffith, James L; Riyaz, Farhaad; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that commonly develops painful, deep dermal abscesses and chronic, draining sinus tracts. Classically, pharmacologic and surgical therapies have been effective for reducing lesion activity and inflammation, but provide only modest success in the prevention of future recurrences and disease progression. Adjunctive therapies, such as laser and light-based therapies, have become more commonly used in the management of HS. These therapies work to reduce the occurrence of painful HS flare-ups by decreasing the number of hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and bacteria in affected areas, and by ablatively debulking chronic lesions. The best results are seen when treatment is individualized, taking disease severity into consideration when selecting specific energy-based approaches. This article will discuss various light-based therapies and the evidence supporting their use in the management of HS. PMID:26470622

  10. Aggression in autism spectrum disorder: presentation and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Sarah E; Srivorakiat, Laura; Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Erickson, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent difficulties in social communication and social interaction, coupled with restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior or interest. Research indicates that aggression rates may be higher in individuals with ASD compared to those with other developmental disabilities. Aggression is associated with negative outcomes for children with ASD and their caregivers, including decreased quality of life, increased stress levels, and reduced availability of educational and social support. Therapeutic strategies including functional behavioral assessment, reinforcement strategies, and functional communication training may have a significant impact in reducing the frequency and intensity of aggressive behavior in individuals with ASD. Pharmacologic treatments, particularly the use of second-generation antipsychotics, may also be of some benefit in reducing aggression in individuals with ASD. With the ever-increasing rate of ASD diagnosis, development of effective therapeutic and pharmacologic methods for preventing and treating aggression are essential to improving outcomes in this disorder. PMID:27382295

  11. [Low Back Pain in Pregnancy: Diagnosis, Treatment Options and Outcomes].

    PubMed

    Mühlemann, Daniel; Mühlemann, Malin B

    2015-05-20

    Low back pain in pregnancy is a common occurrence and is mainly caused by hormonal and biomechanical changes. Patients with pregnancy-induced low back pain (PILBP) frequently complain of moderate to severe and disabling pain often restricting their daily activities. In these cases, a “watch and wait” approach cannot be the best solution. On the basis of anamnesis and examination PILBP can be divided into three subgroups: pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP), pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and the combination of PLBP and PGP. The three entities ask for different diagnostic workups and therapeutic modalities. There are many possible treatments for PLBP, however, only a few are based on sound evidence. Information and advice, exercise and training programs, acupuncture, stabilizing belts and analgesic medication can have a positive impact on pain and disability. PGP und PLBP respond well to chiropractic interventions. PMID:26098153

  12. Oral antihyperglycemic treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Table 3 provides an overview of the oral antihyperglycemic drugs reviewed in this article. A 2011 meta-analysis by Bennett and colleagues found low or insufficient quality of evidence favoring an initial choice of metformin, SUs, glinides, TZDs, or (table see text) DPP-4 inhibitors (alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, bromocriptine mesylate, and SGLT2 inhibitors were not included in this meta-analysis) with regard to the outcomes measures of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and mortality, and incidence of microvascular disease (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) in previously healthy individuals with newly diagnosed T2DM. Likewise, the Bennett and colleagues meta-analysis judged these drugs to be of roughly equal efficacy with regard to reduction of HbA1c (1%–1.6%) from the pretreatment baseline. The ADOPT clinical trial of 3 different and, at the time, popular, oral monotherapies for T2DM provides support for the consensus recommendation of metformin as first-line therapy. The ADOPT trial showed slightly superior HbA1c reduction for rosiglitazone compared with metformin, which was in turn superior to glyburide. However, significant adverse events, including edema, weight gain, and fractures, were more common in the rosiglitazone-treated patients. The implication of this trial is that the combination of low cost, low risk, minimal adverse effects, and efficacy of metformin justifies use of this agent as the cornerstone of oral drug treatment of T2DM. Judicious use of metformin in groups formerly thought to be at high risk for lactic acidosis (ie, those with CHF, chronic kidney disease [eGFR >30 mL/min/1.73 m2], and the elderly) may be associated with mortality benefit rather than increased risk. Secondary and tertiary add-on drug therapy should be individualized based on cost, personal preferences, and overall treatment goals, taking into account the wishes and priorities of the patient. PMID:25456645

  13. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  14. Slightly focused high-energy shockwave therapy: a potential adjuvant treatment for osteoporotic fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Hai-Ming; Li, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Ge-Jun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Slightly focused high-energy shockwave (HESW) therapy is characterized by a wide focal area, a large therapy zone, easy positioning and less pain during treatment. The objective of this study was to perform for the first time an in vivo test of the slightly focused HESWs for osteoporotic fractures. Bilateral proximal tibial osteotomies were made in 30 ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague-Dawley rats and secured with internal fixation. The osteotomy site in the left tibia was subsequently treated with slightly focused HESWs with the energy flux density of 0.26 mj/mm2, shock repetition frequency of 1 Hz and 2000 shocks (OVX + HESW group). The contralateral right tibia was not treated and served as the control (OVX group). Roentgenographic examination 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after osteotomy showed that HESW treatment accelerated tibia fracture healing in osteoporotic rats. Histological examination 2, 4, and 8 weeks after HESW treatment showed a greater inflammatory reaction in the OVX + HESW group, with more mature collagen and trabeculae than in the OVX group. Micro computer tomography (Micro-CT) scanning after 4 and 8 weeks showed that bone volume (BV), bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), mean trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and mean trabecular number (Tb.N) were about 45.0% and 33.1%, 18.4% and 20.1%, 38.2% and 20.9%, 26.7% and 28.4%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05); and the mean trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) was about 16.7% and 27.3% lower in the treatment group (P < 0.05). Four and eight weeks after HESW treatment, the maximum compressive callus endurance was about 72.3% and 25.5%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05). These results show that slightly focused HESW therapy has a beneficial effect on osteoporotic tibial fracture healing. Slightly focused HESWs could increase callus endurance, induce bone formation, and improve trabecular bone microarchitecture and biomechanical

  15. A review of treatment options for Graves' disease: why total thyroidectomy is a viable option in selected patients.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vinuta; Lind, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. If left untreated, patients may have multiple systemic complications such as cardiac, reproductive, and skeletal disease. Thionamides, such as methimazole and propylthiouracil, and I(131) iodine ablation are the most commonly prescribed treatment for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy is often overlooked for treatment and is usually only offered if the other options have failed. In our case, we discuss a patient who was admitted to our medical center with symptomatic hyperthyroidism secondary to long-standing Graves' disease. She had a history of non-compliance with medications and medical clinic follow-up. The risks and benefits of total thyroidectomy were explained and she consented to surgery. A few months after the procedure, she was biochemically and clinically euthyroid on levothyroxine. She had no further emergency room visits or admissions for uncontrolled thyroid disease. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of the more typically prescribed treatments, thionamides and I(131)iodine ablation. We also review the importance of shared decision making and the benefits of total thyroidectomy for the management of Graves' disease. Given the improvement in surgical techniques over the past decade and a significant reduction of complications, we suggest total thyroidectomy be recommended more often for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27609732

  16. A Comprehensive Review of Treatment Options for Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Shalini; Trevino, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that involves a combination of emotional and physical symptoms that result in significant functional impairment. Because of the debilitating nature of PMDD, multiple treatment options have been considered. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these therapeutic regimens to help health care professionals provide adequate treatment for PMDD and premenstrual syndrome. The treatments that are reviewed are organized into the following categories: psychiatric, anovulatory, supplements, herbal, nonpharmacological, and other. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been established as the first-line treatment for PMDD. Although luteal phase or continuous dosing can be used, additional research is needed to more thoroughly compare the efficacies and differential symptom response of continuous, semi-intermittent, luteal phase, and symptoms-onset dosing. The psychiatric medications venlafaxine, duloxetine, alprazolam, and buspirone have also been found to be useful treatments for PMDD. Various anovulatory-related treatments have demonstrated efficacy; however, the use of some of these treatments remains limited due to potential side effects and/or the availability of cheaper alternatives. Although a variety of supplement and herbal-related treatments have been proposed, with some warranting further research, at this time only calcium supplementation has demonstrated a consistent therapeutic benefit. In conclusion, serotoninergic antidepressants have been established as the first-line treatment option for PMDD; however, there are a variety of additional treatment options that should be considered if a patient fails to achieve an adequate therapeutic response with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. PMID:26352222

  17. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  18. Korean-Americans' Knowledge about Depression and Attitudes about Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjung; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore first-generation Korean-Americans' knowledge about depression and attitudes about depression treatment options. Self-report survey data were gathered from 73 first-generation Korean-Americans (KAs) using instruments developed for this study. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics including t-tests. Data indicated participants lacked knowledge about depression. Among all depression treatment options, exercise was the option that first-generation KAs were most willing to try and was rated as having the least shame attached to it. Taking an antidepressant was the option KAs reported being most unwilling to try and had the highest shame attached to it. No significant differences in knowledge about depression and attitudes about depression treatment options were found between low and high acculturation groups, with the exception that the high acculturation group demonstrated more agreement than the low acculturation group with the item that emotional symptoms, such as mood changes, can be depression symptoms. These results suggest that initiating depression treatment with exercise may be the most acceptable starting point in treating depression in first-generation KA immigrants. PMID:26241572

  19. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yelluri, Rama Krishna; Munshi, AK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of treatment options, ranging from Maryland bridges to implants, are available for the replacement of congenitally or traumatically missing permanent anterior teeth. But, there are several limitations of these therapeutic options when they have to be used before the completion of the growth, particularly in children. Reinforcement of composite resins with polyethylene fibers significantly improves their mechanical properties. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) bridge can offer a good alternative to conventional treatment options in replacing a missing permanent anterior tooth until a more definitive prosthesis can be provided at the end of the growth period. The purpose of this article is to present a clinical case of a single tooth replacement utilizing noninvasive and metal free fixed FRC bridge in a 13 years old child as an interim treatment option. How to cite this article: Gupta A, Yelluri RK, Munshi AK. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Bridge: A Treatment Option in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):62-65. PMID:26124584

  20. Hand dermatitis--differential diagnoses, diagnostics, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hand dermatitis is multifactorial, and includes factors such as genetic predisposition and exposure. A high incidence rate is associated with female gender, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. The most important risk factors for the persistence of hand dermatitis include its extent, contact allergic or atopic etiology, childhood dermatitis, and early onset (before the age of 20). The cost of illness of hand dermatitis corresponds to this seen in moderate to severe psoriasis. The diagnostic workup of hand dermatitis and its differential diagnoses requires a detailed assessment of occupational and recreational exposure. In case of possible work-related triggers, early notification of the accident insurer should be sought (via the dermatologist's report). Exposure to a contact allergen is a contributing factor in one-half of all cases of hand dermatitis. It is therefore imperative that all patients with hand dermatitis persisting for more than three months undergo patch testing. Successful and sustainable treatment of hand dermatitis starts with the proper identification and elimination of individual triggers, including the substitution of identified contact allergens and irritants, as well as optimizing preventive measures. Graded therapy taking the clinical severity into account is essential. Validated instruments may be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26713631

  1. Severe alcoholic hepatitis-current concepts, diagnosis and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won; Kim, Dong Joon

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute hepatic manifestation occurring from heavy alcohol ingestion. Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) is histologically characterized by steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. Despite the wide range of severity at presentation, those with severe ASH (Maddrey’s discriminant function ≥ 32) typically present with fever, jaundice, and abdominal tenderness. Alcohol abstinence is the cornerstone of therapy for AH and, in the milder forms, is sufficient for clinical recovery. Severe ASH may progress to multi-organ failure including acute kidney injury and infection. Thus, infection and renal failure have a major impact on survival and should be closely monitored in patients with severe ASH. Patients with severe ASH have a reported short-term mortality of up to 40%-50%. Severe ASH at risk of early death should be identified by one of the available prognostic scoring systems before considering specific therapies. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for severe ASH. When corticosteroids are contraindicated, pentoxifylline may be alternatively used. Responsiveness to steroids should be assessed at day 7 and stopping rules based on Lille score should come into action. Strategically, future studies for patients with severe ASH should focus on suppressing inflammation based on cytokine profiles, balancing hepatocellular death and regeneration, limiting activation of the innate immune response, and maintaining gut mucosal integrity. PMID:25349640

  2. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  3. Prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment options for mastocytosis-related osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rossini, M; Zanotti, R; Orsolini, G; Tripi, G; Viapiana, O; Idolazzi, L; Zamò, A; Bonadonna, P; Kunnathully, V; Adami, S; Gatti, D

    2016-08-01

    Mastocytosis is a rare condition characterized by abnormal mast cell proliferation and a broad spectrum of manifestations, including various organs and tissues. Osteoporosis is one of the most frequent manifestations of systemic mastocytosis, particularly in adults. Osteoporosis secondary to systemic mastocytosis is a cause of unexplained low bone mineral density that should be investigated when accompanied by suspicious clinical elements. Bone involvement is often complicated by a high recurrence of fragility fractures, mainly vertebral, leading to severe disability. The mechanism of bone loss is the result of different pathways, not yet fully discovered. The main actor is the osteoclast with a relative or absolute predominance of bone resorption. Among the stimuli that drive osteoclast activity, the most important one seems to be the RANK-RANKL signaling, but also histamine and other cytokines play a significant role in the process. The central role of osteoclasts made bisphosphonates, as anti-resorptive drugs, the most rational treatment for bone involvement in systemic mastocytosis. There are a few small studies supporting this approach, with large heterogeneity of drug and administration scheme. Currently, zoledronate has the best evidence in terms of gain in bone mineral density and bone turnover suppression, two surrogate markers of anti-fracture efficacy. PMID:26892042

  4. The Impact of Neoadjuvant Treatment on Surgical Options and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Beyhan; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2016-10-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) has become a well-established treatment method for patients with breast cancer, not only for those with large tumors, but also for patients with early high-risk cancers. In earlier times, the clinical advantage of NST was seen in improvement of tumor shrinkage for better operability, conversion of mastectomy candidates to breast conservation, and optimization of cosmetic results. Over the decades, therapy regimens were optimized, resulting in significantly higher response rates. Rates for breast conservation and for conversion from mastectomy to breast conservation, especially for patients with advanced breast cancers, rose significantly for patients undergoing NST. A multidisciplinary approach with close and accurate diagnostic assessment of the breast, axillary tumor, or both during NST and individual-response-guided surgery is mandatory. To reduce unnecessary surgery and prevent mastectomies, more conclusive prediction models and minimally invasive methods for selection of patients with pathologic complete remission after NST are needed. Furthermore, prospective studies demonstrate that sentinel node biopsy for patients with initial clinically node-positive axillary nodes converting to clinically node-negative axillary nodes is oncologically safe and offers less morbidity, avoiding complete axillary node dissection. Initial concerns regarding surgical complications and morbidity due to potential immune frailty of patients with NST were not observed. PMID:27364505

  5. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  6. Tear trough deformity: different types of anatomy and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jindou; Wang, Xuekun; Chen, Rongrong; Xia, Xueying; Sun, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the efficacy of tear trough deformity treatment with the use of hyaluronic acid gel or autologous fat for soft tissue augmentation and fat repositioning via arcus marginalis release. Material and methods Seventy-eight patients with the tear trough were divided into three groups. Class I has tear trough without bulging orbital fat or excess of the lower eyelid skin. Class II is associated with mild to moderate orbital fat bulging, without excess of the lower eyelid skin. Class III is associated with severe orbital fat bulging and excess of the lower eyelid skin. Class I or II was treated using hyaluronic acid gel or autologous fat injections. Class III was treated with fat repositioning via arcus marginalis release. The patients with a deep nasojugal groove of class III were treated with injecting autologous fat into the tear trough during fat repositioning lower blepharoplasty as a way of supplementing the volume added by the repositioned fat. Results Seventy-eight patients with tear trough deformity were confirmed from photographs taken before and after surgery. There were some complications, but all had complete resolution. Conclusions Patients with mild to moderate peri-orbital volume loss without severe orbital fat bulging may be good candidates for hyaluronic acid filler or fat grafting alone. However, patients with more pronounced deformities, severe orbital fat bulging and excess of the lower eyelid skin are often better served by fat repositioning via arcus marginalis release and fat grafting. PMID:27605904

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution of antimicrobial resistance-treatment options.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  8. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO{sub 3} and is contaminated by low levels of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable.

  9. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Options for Insomnia: A Primer for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Asnis, Gregory M.; Thomas, Manju; Henderson, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder with deleterious effects such as decreased quality of life, and a predisposition to a number of psychiatric disorders. Fortunately, numerous approved hypnotic treatments are available. This report reviews the state of the art of pharmacotherapy with a reference to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as well. It provides the clinician with a guide to all the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved hypnotics (benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, ramelteon, low dose sinequan, and suvorexant) including potential side effects. Frequently, chronic insomnia lasts longer than 2 years. Cognizant of this and as a result of longer-term studies, the FDA has approved all hypnotics since 2005 without restricting the duration of use. Our manuscript also reviews off-label hypnotics (sedating antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and antihistamines) which in reality, are more often prescribed than approved hypnotics. The choice of which hypnotic to choose is discussed partially being based on which segment of sleep is disturbed and whether co-morbid illnesses exist. Lastly, we discuss recent label changes required by the FDA inserting a warning about “sleep-related complex behaviors”, e.g., sleep-driving for all hypnotics. In addition, we discuss FDA mandated dose reductions for most zolpidem preparations in women due to high zolpidem levels in the morning hours potentially causing daytime carry-over effects. PMID:26729104

  10. PSEUDOXANTHOMA ELASTICUM: DIAGNOSTIC FEATURES, CLASSIFICATION, AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Jiang, Qiujie; Váradi, András; Bercovitch, Lionel G.; Terry, Sharon F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a multisystem orphan disease, clinically affects the skin, the eyes, and the cardiovascular system with considerable morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestations reflect the underlying pathology consisting of ectopic mineralization of peripheral connective tissues. Areas Covered The diagnostic criteria of PXE include characteristic clinical findings, together with histopathology of accumulation of pleiomorphic elastic structures in the dermis with progressive mineralization, and the presence of mutations in the ABCC6 gene. PXE-like cutaneous changes can also be encountered in other ectopic mineralization disorders, including generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene. In some cases, overlapping clinical features of PXE/GACI, associated with mutations either in ABCC6 or ENPP1, have been noted. PXE demonstrates considerable inter- and intrafamilial heterogeneity, and consequently, accurate diagnosis is required for appropriate classification with prognostic implications. There is no effective and specific treatment for the systemic manifestations of PXE, but effective therapies to counteract the ocular complications are in current clinical use. Expert Opinion A number of observations in the murine model, the Abcc6−/− mouse, have indicated that the mineral composition of diet, particularly the magnesium content, can influence the severity of the mineralization phenotype. These observations suggest that appropriate dietary interventions, coupled with lifestyle modifications, including smoking cessation, might alleviate the symptoms and improve the quality of life of individuals affected with this, currently intractable, orphan disease. PMID:25383264

  11. Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution of Antimicrobial Resistance—Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yohei; Murray, Gerald L.; Peleg, Anton Y.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of the 20th century witnessed a surge in the incidence of infections due to several highly antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in hospitals worldwide. Acinetobacter baumannii is one such organism that turned from an occasional respiratory pathogen into a major nosocomial pathogen. An increasing number of A. baumannii genome sequences have broadened our understanding of the genetic makeup of these bacteria and highlighted the extent of horizontal transfer of DNA. Animal models of disease combined with bacterial mutagenesis have provided some valuable insights into mechanisms of A. baumannii pathogenesis. Bacterial factors known to be important for disease include outer membrane porins, surface structures including capsule and lipopolysaccharide, enzymes such as phospholipase D, iron acquisition systems, and regulatory proteins. A. baumannii has a propensity to accumulate resistance to various groups of antimicrobial agents. In particular, carbapenem resistance has become commonplace, accounting for the majority of A. baumannii strains in many hospitals today. Carbapenem-resistant strains are often resistant to all other routinely tested agents. Treatment of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection therefore involves the use of combinations of last resort agents such as colistin and tigecycline, but the efficacy and safety of these approaches are yet to be defined. Antimicrobial-resistant A. baumannii has high potential to spread among ill patients in intensive care units. Early recognition and timely implementation of appropriate infection control measures is crucial in preventing outbreaks. PMID:25643273

  12. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Options for Insomnia: A Primer for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Asnis, Gregory M; Thomas, Manju; Henderson, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder with deleterious effects such as decreased quality of life, and a predisposition to a number of psychiatric disorders. Fortunately, numerous approved hypnotic treatments are available. This report reviews the state of the art of pharmacotherapy with a reference to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as well. It provides the clinician with a guide to all the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved hypnotics (benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, ramelteon, low dose sinequan, and suvorexant) including potential side effects. Frequently, chronic insomnia lasts longer than 2 years. Cognizant of this and as a result of longer-term studies, the FDA has approved all hypnotics since 2005 without restricting the duration of use. Our manuscript also reviews off-label hypnotics (sedating antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and antihistamines) which in reality, are more often prescribed than approved hypnotics. The choice of which hypnotic to choose is discussed partially being based on which segment of sleep is disturbed and whether co-morbid illnesses exist. Lastly, we discuss recent label changes required by the FDA inserting a warning about "sleep-related complex behaviors", e.g., sleep-driving for all hypnotics. In addition, we discuss FDA mandated dose reductions for most zolpidem preparations in women due to high zolpidem levels in the morning hours potentially causing daytime carry-over effects. PMID:26729104

  13. Successful Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Cancer with Thermochemotherapy and Adjuvant Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kleef, R.; Kekic, S.; Ludwig, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 4-year progression-free survival of a 54-year-old female first diagnosed in December 2007 with advanced bilateral ovarian cancer FIGO IIIc, disseminated peritoneal carcinosis and malignant diaphragm invasion. Treatment started in January 2008 with 6 cycles of Taxol 175 mg/m2/carboplatin AUC 5 in 3-week intervals. Twenty-four hours following each chemotherapy session, fever-range long-duration whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) was performed at the temperature plateau of 40°C body core temperature for 6 h. Three months after completion of chemotherapy, 4 more long-duration WBH procedures were performed in monthly intervals. Importantly, long-duration WBH was paralleled with intradermal vaccination of autologous dendritic cells. No other treatment was given to the patient. Four years following the first diagnosis, the patient is still in complete remission with no evidence of disease. PMID:22679425

  14. Treatment options for acute uncomplicated cystitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Naber

    2000-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is classified as uncomplicated if it occurs in a patient with a structurally and functionally normal urinary tract. Acute uncomplicated cystitis is observed chiefly in women. It needs, however, to be differentiated depending on whether it occurs in premenopausal, postmenopausal or pregnant women. Only a small number of 15-50 year old, otherwise healthy men suffer acute uncomplicated cystitis. In premenopausal, non-pregnant women, single-dose antimicrobial therapy is generally less effective than the same antibiotic used for longer duration. However, most antimicrobial agents given for 3 days are as effective as those given for longer duration, and adverse events tend to be found more often with longer treatment. Trimethoprim (or co-trimoxazole) can be recommended as first-line empirical therapy only in communities with resistance rates of uropathogens to trimethoprim of 10%) of Escherichia coli strains in the community are already resistant to fluoroquinolones, as in Spain, for example. Recurrent UTIs are common among young, healthy women even though they generally have anatomically and physiologically normal urinary tracts. The following prophylactic antimicrobial regimens are recommended: (i) the use of long-term, low-dose prophylactic antimicrobials taken at bedtime; (ii) post-coital prophylaxis for women in whom episodes of infection are associated with sexual intercourse. Other prophylactic methods are not as yet as effective as antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:10969048

  15. Treatment options for acute uncomplicated cystitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Naber, K G

    2000-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is classified as uncomplicated if it occurs in a patient with a structurally and functionally normal urinary tract. Acute uncomplicated cystitis is observed chiefly in women. It needs, however, to be differentiated depending on whether it occurs in premenopausal, postmenopausal or pregnant women. Only a small number of 15-50 year old, otherwise healthy men suffer acute uncomplicated cystitis. In premenopausal, non-pregnant women, single-dose antimicrobial therapy is generally less effective than the same antibiotic used for longer duration. However, most antimicrobial agents given for 3 days are as effective as those given for longer duration, and adverse events tend to be found more often with longer treatment. Trimethoprim (or co-trimoxazole) can be recommended as first-line empirical therapy only in communities with resistance rates of uropathogens to trimethoprim of < or =10-20%. Otherwise fluoroquinolones are recommended. Alternatives are fosfomycin trometamol or beta-lactams, such as second- or third-generation oral cephalosporins or pivmecillinam, especially when fluoroquinolones are contraindicated or a high proportion (>10%) of Escherichia coil strains in the community are already resistant to fluoroquinolones, as in Spain, for example. Recurrent UTIs are common among young, healthy women even though they generally have anatomically and physiologically normal urinary tracts. The following prophylactic antimicrobial regimens are recommended: (i) the use of long-term, low-dose prophylactic antimicrobials taken at bedtime; (ii) post-coital prophylaxis for women in whom episodes of infection are associated with sexual intercourse. Other prophylactic methods are not as yet as effective as antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:11051620

  16. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  17. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  18. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  19. Distal biceps tendon injuries--current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tony; Jazayeri, Reza; Sherman, Orrin H; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Three percent of all biceps tendon ruptures occur at the distal aspect, where the tendon inserts into the radial tuberosity. Distal bicep tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males after an eccentric extension load is applied to the elbow. Patients usually complain of a sudden, sharp, and painful tearing sensation in the antecubital region, with a palpable defect. The biceps squeeze and hook tests are specific maneuvers by which to diagnose distal biceps ruptures on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound maybe be helpful to distinguish between partial and complete tears. Anatomic studies suggest there are two distinct insertions for the short and long heads of the distal biceps. The short head may be a more powerful flexor, and the long head may be a more powerful supinator. Nonoperative treatment typically results in loss of flexion and supination strength and endurance. Early anatomic re-attachment is the goal. Surgical approaches include one- or two-incision techniques, and tendon fixation methods include the use of suture anchors, bone tunnels, an endobutton, or biotenodesis screws. Biomechanical studies have shown that endobuttons have higher load-to-failure strengths, compared to the other fixation methods. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that patients do well regardless of surgical approach or fixation method. Possible complications include nerve injuries, heterotopic ossification, postoperative fracture, tendon rerupture, complex regional pain syndrome, and wound infection. Partial ruptures are significantly less common and initially can be treated conservatively. Chronic tears are more difficult to treat because of possible tendon retraction and poor tissue quality. Tendon grafts using semitendinosus, fascia lata, hamstring, Achilles (calcaneal), or flexor carpi radialis have been successfully used for length restoration in these cases. PMID:20632985

  20. Multimodal MRI and cognitive function in patients with breast cancer prior to adjuvant treatment--the role of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Menning, Sanne; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Veltman, Dick J; Koppelmans, V; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Boogerd, Willem; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schagen, Sanne B

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of literature indicates that chemotherapy (ChT) for breast cancer (BC) is associated with adverse effects on the brain. Recent research suggests that cognitive and brain function in patients with BC may already be compromised before the start of chemotherapy. This is the first study combining neuropsychological testing, patient-reported outcomes, and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine pretreatment cognition and various aspects of brain function and structure in a large sample. Thirty-two patients with BC scheduled to receive ChT (pre-ChT+), 33 patients with BC not indicated to undergo ChT (pre-ChT-), and 38 no-cancer controls (NCs) were included. The examination consisted of a neuropsychological test battery, self-reported aspects of psychosocial functioning, and multimodal MRI. Patients with BC reported worse scores on several aspects of quality of life, such as higher levels of fatigue and stress. However, cortisol levels were not elevated in the patient groups compared to the control group. Overall cognitive performance was lower in the pre-ChT+ and the pre-ChT- groups compared to NC. Further, patients demonstrated prefrontal hyperactivation with increasing task difficulty on a planning task compared to NC, but not during a memory task. White matter integrity was lower in both patient groups. No differences in regional brain volume and brain metabolites were found. The cognitive and imaging data converged to show that symptoms of fatigue were associated with the observed abnormalities; the observed differences were no longer significant when fatigue was accounted for. This study suggests that cancer-related psychological or biological processes may adversely impact cognitive functioning and associated aspects of brain structure and function before the start of adjuvant treatment. Our findings stress the importance to further explore the processes underlying the expression of fatigue and to study whether it has a

  1. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 ..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E/sub 2/ (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E/sub 2/, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  2. Multimodal MRI and cognitive function in patients with breast cancer prior to adjuvant treatment — The role of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Menning, Sanne; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Veltman, Dick J.; Koppelmans, V.; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Boogerd, Willem; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schagen, Sanne B.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of literature indicates that chemotherapy (ChT) for breast cancer (BC) is associated with adverse effects on the brain. Recent research suggests that cognitive and brain function in patients with BC may already be compromised before the start of chemotherapy. This is the first study combining neuropsychological testing, patient-reported outcomes, and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine pretreatment cognition and various aspects of brain function and structure in a large sample. Thirty-two patients with BC scheduled to receive ChT (pre-ChT+), 33 patients with BC not indicated to undergo ChT (pre-ChT−), and 38 no-cancer controls (NCs) were included. The examination consisted of a neuropsychological test battery, self-reported aspects of psychosocial functioning, and multimodal MRI. Patients with BC reported worse scores on several aspects of quality of life, such as higher levels of fatigue and stress. However, cortisol levels were not elevated in the patient groups compared to the control group. Overall cognitive performance was lower in the pre-ChT+ and the pre-ChT− groups compared to NC. Further, patients demonstrated prefrontal hyperactivation with increasing task difficulty on a planning task compared to NC, but not during a memory task. White matter integrity was lower in both patient groups. No differences in regional brain volume and brain metabolites were found. The cognitive and imaging data converged to show that symptoms of fatigue were associated with the observed abnormalities; the observed differences were no longer significant when fatigue was accounted for. This study suggests that cancer-related psychological or biological processes may adversely impact cognitive functioning and associated aspects of brain structure and function before the start of adjuvant treatment. Our findings stress the importance to further explore the processes underlying the expression of fatigue and to study whether it has a

  3. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  4. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  5. Micro and Macro Element Composition of Kalanchoe integra Leaves: An Adjuvant Treatment for Hypertension in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong-Manso, S.; Asiedu-Gyekye, I. J.; Naadu, J. P.; Magnus-Aryitey, G. T.; Nyarko, A. K.; Boamah, D.; Awan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two samples, water extract and blended whole leaves, of fresh Kalanchoe integra leaves (Crassulaceae), a traditional antihypertensive medicine used in Ghana, were analyzed with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF). Analysis revealed 12 macro and 26 micro elements in both extracts. Further quantitative assessment of the results for amounts of elements that are pharmacologically significant revealed that the amounts of calcium, potassium, and magnesium present in the extracts could be correlated to its traditional usage in managing hypertension and arrhythmias. However, heavy metals (lead and inorganic arsenic) detected in the extracts may pose a threat at doses normally used traditionally for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26495138

  6. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  7. Treatment of stage D bladder cancer with adjuvant doxorubicin hydrochloride and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, A.J.; Grayhack, J.T.; Merrill, J.M.; Bulkley, G.J.; Shetty, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    pathologic Stage D bladder cancer was recognized in 16 patients by evaluation tissue obtained by radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy (7), pelvic lymph node dissection (3) or biopsies (3), ileal conduit and pelvic lymph node biopsy (1), or transurethral biopsy of the bladder and prostate (2). Treatment of these patients with radiation preceded and followed by doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) was initiated three to four weeks postoperatively. The treatment regimen consisted of the following: (1) doxorubicin 60 mg/M2 intravenously every three weeks for three cycles; (2) 5,000 rad external radiation to the whole pelvis in five to six weeks; and (3) doxorubicin for five cycles. The mean survival was twenty-three months. The survival rate was as follows: one year, 10 of 15 patients at risk; two years, 6 of 11; three years, 5 of 9; four years, 1 of 4; and five years, 0 of 2. Ten patients died six to thirty-six months (mean 13.6) postoperatively. In 6 of the patients significant obstruction of small bowel developed. These preliminary observations indicate encouraging therapeutic results with an acceptable morbidity for this regimen.

  8. Tamoxifen with ovarian function suppression versus tamoxifen alone as an adjuvant treatment for premenopausal breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shunchao; Li, Kai; Jiao, Xin; Zou, Huawei

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian function suppression (OFS) significantly downregulates the concentration of plasma estrogens. However, it is unclear whether it offers any survival benefits if combined with adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in premenopausal women. This meta-analysis was designed to assess data from previous studies involving adjuvant tamoxifen treatment plus OFS in premenopausal breast cancer. Methods Electronic literature databases (PubMed, Embase, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials published prior to February 1, 2015. Only randomized controlled trials that compared tamoxifen alone with tamoxifen plus OFS for premenopausal women with breast cancer were selected. The evaluated endpoints were disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Four randomized controlled trials comprising 6,279 patients (OFS combination, n=3,133; tamoxifen alone, n=3,146) were included in the meta-analysis. There was no significant improvement in disease-free survival or overall survival with addition of OFS in either the whole population or the hormone receptor-positive subgroup. The risk of distant recurrence was not reduced with the addition of OFS in the whole population. A subgroup analysis showed that addition of OFS significantly improved overall survival in patients who were administered chemotherapy. Conclusion Based on the available studies, concurrent administration of OFS and adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for premenopausal women with breast cancer has no effect on prolonging disease-free survival and overall survival, excluding patients who were administered chemotherapy. It should not be widely recommended, except perhaps for women who were hormone-receptor positive and who were also administered adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26109867

  9. Adjuvant percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of feeding artery of hepatocellular carcinoma before treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Bin; Chen, Min-Hua; Yan, Kun; Wu, Jin-Yu; Yang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the feeding artery of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in reducing the blood-flow-induced heat-sink effect of RFA. METHODS: A total of 154 HCC patients with 177 pathologically confirmed hypervascular lesions participated in the study and were randomly assigned into two groups. Seventy-one patients with 75 HCCs (average tumor size, 4.3 ± 1.1 cm) were included in group A, in which the feeding artery of HCC was identified by color Doppler flow imaging, and were ablated with multiple small overlapping RFA foci [percutaneous ablation of feeding artery (PAA)] before routine RFA treatment of the tumor. Eighty-three patients with 102 HCC (average tumor size, 4.1 ± 1.0 cm) were included in group B, in which the tumors were treated routinely with RFA. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was used as post-RFA imaging, when patients were followed-up for 1, 3 and 6 mo. RESULTS: In group A, feeding arteries were blocked in 66 (88%) HCC lesions, and the size of arteries decreased in nine (12%). The average number of punctures per HCC was 2.76 ± 1.12 in group A, and 3.36 ± 1.60 in group B (P = 0.01). The tumor necrosis rate at 1 mo post-RFA was 90.67% (68/75 lesions) in group A and 90.20% (92/102 lesions) in group B. HCC recurrence rate at 6 mo post-RFA was 17.33% (13/75) in group A and 31.37% (32/102) in group B (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: PAA blocked effectively the feeding artery of HCC. Combination of PAA and RFA significantly decreased post-RFA recurrence and provided an alternative treatment for hypervascular HCC. PMID:19496195

  10. Self-adjuvanted hyaluronate--antigenic peptide conjugate for transdermal treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Won Ho; Sung, Dong Kyung; Kim, Hyemin; Yang, Jeong-A; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Kim, Ki Su; Lee, Jeehun; Kim, Deok-Ho; Yun, Seok Hyun; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disorder accompanied with muscle weakness and wasting. Since myostatin was reported to be a key regulator of muscle wasting, myostatin inhibitors have been investigated as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of muscular diseases. Here, we report an antigenic peptide of myostatin fragment (MstnF) conjugated to hyaluronate (HA) with a low molecular weight (MW, 17 kDa) for transdermal immunotherapy of DMD. Facilitating the transdermal delivery, the low MW HA showed a boosting effect on the immunization of MstnF possibly by engaging both toll-like receptors and cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44). In vivo two-photon microscopy clearly visualized the effective transdermal penetration of HA-MstnF conjugates into deep intact skin layers. The transdermal immunization of mdx mice significantly increased antibody titers against myostatin. Furthermore, the mdx mice immunized with HA-MstnF conjugates resulted in statistically significant improvement in the biochemical and pathological status of skeletal musculature as well as functional behaviors. PMID:26724457

  11. What is the optimal neo-adjuvant treatment for liver metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Wu, Christina; Bloomston, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the Western population and has a 5-year overall survival of 5–10% when metastatic. Approximately 30% of the patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have limited disease apparently isolated to the liver and, if this can be resected, the 5-year overall survival is improved to 30–60%. Therefore, it is important to identify patients who have both resectable disease and those with initially unresectable tumors who can potentially be downsized with chemotherapy to allow resection. First-line doublet chemotherapy regimens lead to response rates of 50–60%, triplet chemotherapy regimens may result in a response rate of up to 70%, and biological agents may add to responses or induce morphologic changes that facilitate disease resection. Surgical advances in recent years have also increased resectability rates and have challenged prior rules of resectability. Local therapies including ablation and radiation, often performed in conjunction with resection, may further aid in control of disease. The aim of this article is to focus on the role of neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment of colorectal liver metastases. PMID:23858331

  12. Treatment Options for the Cardinal Symptoms of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tourian, Leon; LeBoeuf, Amélie; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gignac, Martin; Labelle, Réal; Guile, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: DSM-5 has added a new developmentally appropriate child and adolescent mood disorder subtype called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The core features of DMDD are temper outbursts (manifested by either verbal rages and/or physical aggression) and unrelenting irritability or anger. Currently, the literature is lacking a thorough review of the possible treatment options for the cardinal symptoms constituting DMDD. The objective of this article is to provide a thorough review of peer-reviewed studies on the subject of pharmacological treatment options for children and adolescents with the cardinal symptoms of DMDD. Methods: Relevant articles for this study were obtained through Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO and PsychINDEXplus using the key words: “adolescents,” “children,” “paediatric,” “youth,” “irritability,” “temper outbursts,” “aggression,” “rage,” “disruptive behaviour,” “treatment,” “dysphoria,” “autism,” “mental retardation/intellectual disability,” “impulsivity,” “ADHD,” “oppositional defiant disorder,” and “conduct disorder.” A total of 823 studies were generated; only English studies focusing on pharmacological treatment were retained. Results: Currently there are no established guidelines or thorough reviews summarizing the treatment of DMDD. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment options of both aggression and chronic irritability include: antidepressants/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. Conclusion: Treatment options of severe, persistent irritability in youth are numerous, and a consensual treatment algorithm has not yet emerged from the literature. Further studies and clinical trials are warranted to determine efficacious and safe treatment modalities. PMID:26336379

  13. Telomerase expression and telomere length in breast cancer and their associations with adjuvant treatment and disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Telomere length plays important roles in maintaining genome stability and regulating cell replication and death. Telomerase has functions not only to extend telomere length but also to repair DNA damage. Studies have shown that telomerase may increase cancer cell resistance to DNA-damaging anticancer agents; tamoxifen may suppress telomerase expression in breast cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the role of telomere length and telomerase activity in breast cancer prognosis. Methods qPCR and qRT-PCR were used to analyze telomere length and telomerase expression, respectively, in tumor samples of 348 breast cancer patients. Cox regression analysis was performed to examine telomere length and telomerase expression in association with disease-free survival and cause-specific mortality. Results Telomere length had no relation to tumor features or disease outcomes. Telomerase expression was detected in 53% of tumors. Larger tumors or aggressive disease were more likely to have telomerase expression. Among patients treated with chemotherapy, high telomerase was found to be associated with increased risk of death (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.15; 95% CI: 1.34 to 7.40) and disease recurrence (HR = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.96 to 4.30) regardless of patient age, disease stage, tumor grade, histological type or hormone receptor status. Patients treated with endocrine therapy had different results regarding telomerase: high telomerase appeared to be associated with better survival outcomes. Telomerase expression made no survival difference in patients who received both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Conclusions Overall, telomerase expression was not associated with disease outcome, but this finding may be masked by adjuvant treatment. Patients with high telomerase expression responded poorly to chemotherapy in terms of disease-free and overall survival, but fared better if treated with endocrine therapy. PMID:21645396

  14. The Efficacy of Adjuvant Intratympanic Steroid Treatment for Otitis Media with Effusion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Hazem Saeed; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Elfeky, Alaa Eldin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a leading cause of hearing impairment in children. Therefore, early and proper management is essential. Objectives  The objective of this research is to assess the efficacy of intratympanic (IT) steroids injection for management of otitis media with effusion (OME). Methods  This study involved 42 children (84 ears) with bilateral OME. We used tympanometry to confirm the childreńs middle ear effusion and pure tone audiometry to determine hearing threshold. We performed myringotomy and inserted ventilation tubes (VTs) bilaterally, followed by a steroid injection of 0.4–0.6 mL methylprednisolone (40 mg/mL) into one randomly selected middle ear. This procedure was followed by once-weekly administration of steroids (0.5 mL methylprednisolone at a concentration of 40 mg/mL) into the middle ear for three consecutive weeks. Results  We found recurrent OME after VT alone in nine (21.4%) ears; whereas, after VT combined with steroid administration, we found two (4.76%), with statistically significant difference. We noted tympanosclerosis postoperatively in six (12.9%) ears and in one of the injected ears (2.3%) (p = 0.0484). Otorrhea occurred in eight (19%) ears with VT alone and in three (7.1%) injected ears, with non-significant difference. The duration between VT insertion and its extrusion was 6.6 = 1.1 months for ears with VT alone and 6.95 =1.12 months in injected ears (p = 0.1541 NS). Conclusion  IT Steroids injection for treatment of OME is a safe and simple intervention with lower incidence of symptoms recurrence and postoperative complications. Thus, its use in management of OME is recommended.

  15. Current strategies for surgical management and adjuvant treatment of childhood papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey B; Hay, Ian D

    2004-12-01

    Childhood papillary thyroid carcinoma is associated with more locally aggressive and more frequent distant disease than its adult counterpart. Recurrence rates tend to be higher in children, but cause-specific mortality remains low. Optimal initial treatment of childhood papillary thyroid carcinoma should include total or near-total thyroidectomy and central compartment node clearance. Modified neck dissections should be performed for biopsy-proven lateral neck disease. Every effort should be made to maintain parathyroid and laryngeal nerve function. Radical neck dissections are to be avoided. Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA), appropriate thyroid hormone suppressive therapy (THST), and judicious use of therapeutic doses of (131)I are applied to achieve a disease-free status, which is most often confirmed by negative neck ultrasonography, negative whole-body scan (either withdrawal or recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated), and extremely low levels of serum thyroglobulin. Appropriate utilization of (131)I, THST, repeat surgery, external beam radiotherapy, and rarely chemotherapy may provide long-term palliation and some cures in patients with recurrent/persistent disease. Follow-up should be lifelong, and the care of children after age 17 should subsequently be transferred to adult-care endocrinologists with expertise in managing thyroid neoplasia. Optimal surgical management can be achieved if adequate operations are routinely carried out by "high-volume" thyroid surgeons with expertise in the care of children. Nowhere is a multidisciplinary approach (endocrinologists, surgeons, nuclear medicine physicians, pediatricians, pathologists, oncologists) more critical than in the long-term management of papillary thyroid carcinoma that presents during childhood. PMID:15517490

  16. New option for surgical treatment of the trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Narihito; Takemura, Yoshinori; Imai, Shinji; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old, left-handed woman with left thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint arthritis. The patient had no pain and could use the hand actively in daily life with a new option of surgical treatment, a vascularized pedicled third CMC joint transfer to the thumb CMC joint.

  17. 26 CFR 1.1504-4 - Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... single class are considered to have the same value. Thus, control premiums and minority and blockage... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of warrants, options, convertible obligations, and other similar interests. 1.1504-4 Section 1.1504-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...

  18. Parkinson's Disease and Its Management: Part 3: Nondopaminergic and Nonpharmacological Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    DeMaagd, George; Philip, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    This installment of a five-part series reviews the role of nondopaminergic pharmacotherapies and adjunctive options-such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, and anticholinergic agents-in managing Parkinson's disease. Nonpharmacological treatments are also explored. PMID:26535023

  19. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  20. Second-line treatment of metastatic gastric cancer: Current options and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavel, Dheepak; Fedyanin, Mikhail; Tryakin, Alexey; Tjulandin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, regardless of its decreasing incidence and newly available treatment options. Most patients present at an advanced stage and are treated with upfront systemic chemotherapy. Those patients receiving first-line therapy may initially respond to treatment, but many of them relapse over time. In such condition, second-line treatment for disease progression remains the only available option. Although there exists no standard approach in the second-line setting, several phase III trials have shown modest survival benefit in patients receiving irinotecan, taxane and ramucirumab over the best supportive care or active agents. This review analyzes the currently available treatment regimens and future directions of research in the second-line setting for metastatic gastric cancer with the best available evidence. Additionally, the prognostic factors that influence patient survival in those receiving second-line therapy are discussed. PMID:26556991

  1. Update on the pathogenic potential and treatment options for Blastocystis sp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although Blastocystis is one of the most common enteric parasites, there is still much controversy surrounding the pathogenicity and potential treatment options for this parasite. In this review we look at the evidence supporting Blastocystis as an intestinal pathogen as shown by numerous case studies and several in vivo studies and the evidence against. We describe the chronic nature of some infections and show the role of Blastocystis in immunocompromised patients and the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and Blastocystis infection. There have been several studies that have suggested that pathogenicity may be subtype related. Metronidazole is the most widely accepted treatment for Blastocystis but several cases of treatment failure and resistance have been described. Other treatment options which have been suggested include paromomycin and trimethroprim- sulfamethoxazole. PMID:24883113

  2. Decision-Making in Prostate Cancer: Active Surveillance Over Other Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, David; Duff, Jed; Stricker, Phil; Walker, Kim

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative-descriptive study of four patients with prostate cancer used the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework to understand how and why men diagnosed with prostate cancer choose active surveillance over other treatment options. In accordance with the literature, it was found that the surgeon or general practitioner's recommendation was the most influential factor when patients are making a treatment decision. PMID:27501595

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Casali, Paolo G

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is not standard treatment in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). However, when the risk of relapse is high, it is an option for shared decision making with the patient in conditions of uncertainty. This is because available evidence is conflicting, even if several randomized clinical trials have been performed for 4 decades and also have been pooled into meta-analyses. Indeed, available meta-analyses point to a benefit in the 5% to 10% range in terms of survival and distant relapse rate. Some local benefit also was suggested by some trials. Placing chemotherapy in the preoperative setting may help gain a local advantage in terms of the quality of surgical margins or decreased sequelae. This may be done within a personalized approach according to the clinical presentation. Attempts to personalize treatment on the basis of the variegated pathology and molecular biology of STS subgroups are ongoing as well, according to what is done in the medical treatment of advanced STS. Thus, decision making for adjuvant and neoadjuvant indications deserves personalization in clinical research and in clinical practice, taking profit from all multidisciplinary clinical skills available at a sarcoma reference center, though with a degree of subjectivity because of the limitations of available evidence. PMID:25993233

  4. State of the art psychopharmacological treatment options in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mesut; Batmaz, Sedat; Songur, Emrah; Oral, Esat Timuçin

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is defined as a subtype of mood disorders in DSM 5, and it is characterized by a seasonal onset. SAD is proposed to be related to the seasonal changes in naturally occurring light, and the use of bright light therapy for depressive symptoms has been shown to reduce them in placebo controlled trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy has also been demonstrated to be effective in SAD. This review article aims to focus on the psychopharmacological treatment options for SAD. According to clinical trial results, first line treatment options seem to be sertraline and fluoxetine, and are well tolerated by the patients. There is some evidence that other antidepressants (e.g. bupropion) might be effective as well. Although clinical trials have shown that some of these antidepressants may be of benefit, a recent review has concluded that there is not enough evidence to support the use of any of these agents for the treatment of SAD yet. Moreover, more studies are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of other treatment options, e.g., propranolol, melatonin, hypericum, etc. In addition to the above proposed treatments, patients with seasonal depressive symptoms should thoroughly be evaluated for any cues of bipolarity, and their treatment should be planned accordingly. PMID:26938817

  5. The impact of the 21-gene assay on adjuvant treatment decisions in oestrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kuchel, Anna; Robinson, Tim; Comins, Charles; Shere, Mike; Varughese, Mohini; Sparrow, Geoff; Sahu, Ajay; Saunders, Louise; Bahl, Amit; Cawthorn, Simon J; Braybrooke, Jeremy P

    2016-01-01

    Background: International guidelines, including NICE, recommend using the 21-gene Recurrence Score assay for guiding adjuvant treatment decisions in ER+, HER2-negative early breast cancer (BC). We investigated the impact of adding this assay to standard pathological tests on clinicians'/patients' treatment decisions and on patients' decisional conflict in the United Kingdom. Methods: In this prospective multicentre study, eligibility criteria included: ER+ HER2-negative BC (N0/Nmic for patients ⩽50 years; ⩽3 positive lymph nodes for patients >50 years) and being fit for chemotherapy. Physicians'/patients' treatment choices and patients' decisional conflict were recorded pre- and post testing. Results: The analysis included 137 patients. Overall, adjuvant treatment recommendations changed in 40.7% of patients, with the direction of the change consistent with the Recurrence Score results (net decrease in chemotherapy recommendation rate in low Recurrence Score patients and net increase in high Recurrence Score patients). Patients' choices were generally consistent with physicians' recommendations. Post-testing, patients' decisional conflict decreased significantly (P<0.0001). In the 67 patients meeting the NICE criteria for testing, the recommendation change rate was 49.3%. Conclusions: Recurrence Score testing significantly influenced treatment recommendations overall and in the subgroup of patients meeting the NICE criteria, suggesting that this test could substantially alter treatment patterns in the United Kingdom. PMID:26954715

  6. Prior Adjuvant Tamoxifen Treatment in Breast Cancer Is Linked to Increased AIB1 and HER2 Expression in Metachronous Contralateral Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alkner, Sara; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Ehinger, Anna; Lövgren, Kristina; Rydén, Lisa; Fernö, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    Aim The estrogen receptor coactivator Amplified in Breast Cancer 1 (AIB1) has been associated with an improved response to adjuvant tamoxifen in breast cancer, but also with endocrine treatment resistance. We hereby use metachronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC) developed despite prior adjuvant tamoxifen for the first tumor as an “in vivo”-model for tamoxifen resistance. AIB1-expression in the presumable resistant (CBC after prior tamoxifen) and naïve setting (CBC without prior tamoxifen) is compared and correlated to prognosis after CBC. Methods From a well-defined population-based cohort of CBC-patients we have constructed a unique tissue-microarray including >700 patients. Results CBC developed after adjuvant tamoxifen more often had a HER2-positive/triple negative-subtype and a high AIB1-expression (37% vs. 23%, p = 0.009), than if no prior endocrine treatment had been administered. In patients with an estrogen receptor (ER) positive CBC, a high AIB1-expression correlated to an inferior prognosis. However, these patients seemed to respond to tamoxifen, but only if endocrine therapy had not been administered for BC1. Conclusions Metachronous CBC developed after prior endocrine treatment has a decreased ER-expression and an increased HER2-expression. This is consistent with endocrine treatment escape mechanisms previously suggested, and indicates metachronous CBC to be a putative model for studies of treatment resistance “in vivo”. The increased AIB1-expression in CBC developed after prior tamoxifen suggests a role of AIB1 in endocrine treatment resistance. In addition, we found indications that the response to tamoxifen in CBC with a high AIB1-expression seem to differ depending on previous exposure to this drug. A different function for AIB1 in the tamoxifen treatment naïve vs. resistant setting is suggested, and may explain previously conflicting results where a high AIB1-expression has been correlated to both a good response to adjuvant

  7. [Advanced malignant soft tissue tumors: plastic reconstructive options for palliative treatment].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M; Jokuszies, A

    2010-12-01

    Plastic and reconstructive procedures for the oncological treatment of malignant tumors in the head and neck region, trunk and extremities are primarily curative. Less is known about the treatment options of plastic surgery in patients with locally advanced or incurable tumors. Therefore superficial, mostly exulcerated and superinfected tumors are treated with a palliative approach. A plethora of symptoms drastically restricts the quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. Pain, oozing of blood and bacterial superinfection with fetidness compromise the patient's general condition, self-esteem and activity. Many patients suffer from increasing isolation. A stage-adapted and plastic-reconstructive approach aiming at reducing the tumor mass and closing ulcerating wounds provides a considerable benefit especially in these patients. In this article a variety of treatment options regarding palliative resections and plastic reconstructive procedures and the disease alleviating benefits for patients with incurable tumors are presented. PMID:19949764

  8. New treatment option for an incomplete vertical root fracture--a preliminary case report.

    PubMed

    Hadrossek, Paul Henryk; Dammaschke, Till

    2014-01-01

    Instead of extraction this case report presents an alternative treatment option for a maxillary incisor with a vertical root fracture (VRF) causing pain in a 78-year-old patient. After retreatment of the existing root canal filling the tooth was stabilized with a dentine adhesive and a composite restoration. Then the tooth was extracted, the VRF gap enlarged with a small diamond bur and the existing retrograde root canal filling removed. The enlarged fracture line and the retrograde preparation were filled with a calcium-silicate-cement (Biodentine). Afterwards the tooth was replanted and a titanium trauma splint was applied for 12d. A 24 months clinical and radiological follow-up showed an asymptomatic tooth, reduction of the periodontal probing depths from 7 mm prior to treatment to 3 mm and gingival reattachment in the area of the fracture with no sign of ankylosis. Hence, the treatment of VRF with Biodentine seems to be a possible and promising option. PMID:24670232

  9. Standard and Novel Treatment Options for Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Elliott M; Yu, Katherine; Wong, Nathan D.; Malik, Shaista

    2014-01-01

    Type II Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are two intertwined conditions that are critical to the healthcare landscape in the United States and abroad. Patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome can have a dramatically increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Numerous treatment options have existed for some time, which include non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Additionally, within the last decade a multiple of novel treatment options have emerged for the management of hyperglycemia in particular. By targeting novel pathways beyond the secretion and supply of insulin, these new therapeutics provide a valuable adjunctive to the currently available therapies for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Here we discuss the current guideline driven usage of standard therapies with some novel indications. In addition we discuss the novel therapies for the treatment of hyperglycemia, their mechanisms of action and appropriate therapeutic indications. PMID:24234946

  10. Perioperative treatment options in resectable pancreatic cancer - how to improve long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Marianne; Bahra, Marcus; Denecke, Timm; Travis, Sue; Pelzer, Uwe; Riess, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Surgery remains the only chance of cure for pancreatic cancer, but only 15%-25% of patients present with resectable disease at the time of primary diagnosis. Important goals in clinical research must therefore be to allow early detection with suitable diagnostic procedures, to further broaden operation techniques and to determine the most effective perioperative treatment of either chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. More extensive operations involving extended pancreatectomy, portal vein resection and pancreatic resection in resectable pancreatic cancer with limited liver metastasis, performed in specialized centers seem to be the surgical procedures with a possible impact on survival. After many years of stagnation in pharmacological clinical research on advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) - since the approval of gemcitabine in 1997 - more effective cytotoxic substances (nab-paclitaxel) and combinations (FOLFIRINOX) are now available for perioperative treatment. Additionally, therapies with a broader mechanism of action are emerging (stroma depletion, immunotherapy, anti-inflammation), raising hopes for more effective adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment concepts, especially in the context of “borderline resectability”. Only multidisciplinary approaches including radiology, surgery, medical and radiation oncology as the backbones of the treatment of potentially resectable PDAC may be able to further improve the rate of cure in the future. PMID:26989460

  11. Contribution of ABCB1 and CYP2D6 genotypes to the outcome of tamoxifen adjuvant treatment in premenopausal women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Argalácsová, S; Slanař, O; Vítek, P; Tesařová, P; Bakhouche, H; DraŽďáková, M; Bartošová, O; Zima, T; PertuŽelka, L

    2015-01-01

    Recent pre-clinical evidence suggests that the active metabolite of tamoxifen, endoxifen, is a substrate for efflux pump P-glycoprotein. The aim of our study was to evaluate, if the polymoprhisms within ABCB1 gene alter tamoxifen adjuvant treatment efficacy in premenopausal women. Totally 71 premenopausal women with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer indicated for tamoxifen adjuvant treatment were followed retrospectively for median period of 56 months. The gentic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 and ABCB1 were analyzed and potential covariates as tumor grading, staging, age at the diagnosis, comedication, quantitative positivity of ER or PR were also evaluated. Cox proportional-hazards regression model indicated that patients carrying at least one variant allele in ABCB1 rs1045642 had significantly longer time to event survival compared to wild type subjects. Non-significant trend was noted for better treatment outcome of patients carrying at least one variant allele in the SNP rs2032582, while for the CYP2D6 polymorphism poor metabolizer phenotype resulted in worse outcome in comparison to extensive metabolizers subjects with HR of 4.04 (95 % CI 0.31-52.19). Similarly, patients using CYP2D6 inhibitors had non-significantly shorter time-to-event as compared to never users resulting in hazard ratio of 2.06 (95 % CI 0.40-10.63). ABCB1 polymorphisms may affect outcome of tamoxifen adjuvant treatment in premenopausal breast cancer patiens. This factor should be taken into account in addition to the CYP2D6 polymorphism or phenotypic inhibition of CYP2D6 activity. PMID:26681084

  12. Treatment for infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: what options do we still have?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is increasingly becoming a major challenge in clinical and public health settings. To date, the treatment for serious CRE infections remains difficult. The intelligent use of antimicrobials and effective infection control strategies is crucial to prevent further CRE spread. Early consultation with experts in the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant organisms is valuable in patient management. This brief review will focus on the current, yet limited, treatment options for CRE infections. PMID:25041592

  13. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  14. [Quadriceps tendon insufficiency and rupture : Treatment options in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Preininger, B; Perka, C

    2016-05-01

    Quadriceps tendon injuries and insufficiencies in total knee arthroplasty are rare, but are followed by a devastating complication that left untreated leads to a complete loss of function of the knee. This review article summarizes the functional anatomy, risk factors, and the prevalence and diagnosis of quadriceps tendon injuries, in addition to the possible management options for partial and complete ruptures. The treatment options are adapted according to the extent of the loss of function (partial, complete) and the duration of the injury (acute vs chronic). Furthermore, the choice of treatment should take into account the quality and availability of primary tissue, the patient's general health, along with their likely functional requirements. Conservative treatment is often justified in partial ruptures with good results. Complete ruptures require surgical intervention and multiple operative techniques are described. Treatment options for acute ruptures include direct primary repair with autogenous or synthetic tissue augmentation. In the case of chronic insufficiency and a lack of soft-tissue surroundings, reconstruction with the aid of a muscle flap or allograft tissue can be considered. All surgical intervention techniques used so far have been fraught with complications and rarely lead to satisfactory results. A new surgical approach to the reconstruction and augmentation of the extensor mechanism consists of the use of a synthetic mesh. The technique is described here in detail. PMID:27125235

  15. Operative and nonoperative treatment options for ACL tears in the adult patient: a conceptual review.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Matava, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is common among athletic individuals. Both nonoperative and operative treatment options exist. The optimal treatment of an adult with an ACL tear depends on several patient-specific factors, including age, occupation, and desired activity level. In less active patients with sedentary jobs, nonoperative management, consisting of physical therapy, bracing, and activity modification can yield successful results. In active patients who want to resume participation in jumping, cutting, or pivoting sports, patients who have physically demanding occupations, or patients who fail a trial of nonoperative management, ACL reconstruction is recommended. Reconstruction utilizing autograft tissue is preferred over allograft, especially in the younger athlete, but allograft tissue is a reasonable option in the older (aged > 40 years) and less active adult, as well. Successful results have been achieved with both patellar tendon and hamstring grafts. The optimal treatment in adult patients with ACL tears should be based on careful consideration of the patient's goals for return to activity, knee-specific comorbidities, such as coexistent meniscal pathology or osteoarthritis, and his or her willingness to follow a detailed rehabilitation regimen. Our article provides an overview of current nonoperative and operative treatment options for adults with ACL tears, considers the outcomes of both nonoperative and operative strategies, and provides general recommendations as to the ideal management for a given patient. PMID:24231595

  16. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  17. Perioral dermatitis: a review of the condition with special attention to treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tempark, Therdpong; Shwayder, Tor A

    2014-04-01

    Perioral dermatitis is a common acneiform facial eruption found in both adults and children. Its variants are periorificial and granulomatous periorificial dermatitis. The etiology of perioral dermatitis remains unknown; however, topical corticosteroid use on the face commonly precedes the manifestation of this condition. There are an overwhelming number of treatment options for perioral dermatitis, and the options in children are slightly different from those in adults for both systemic medications and topical treatment. This article provides a literature review of the various applicable treatments available based on the level and quality of the evidence by the US Preventive Service Task Force. Oral tetracycline reveals the best valid evidence. However, if the patient is less than 8 years old, then this oral therapy may not be suitable. Topical metronidazole, erythromycin, and pimecrolimus also represent effective treatment choices with good evidence. Topical corticosteroid use is common in these cases and the question of whether it is a good treatment or a cause remains unanswered. Corticosteroid cream can improve the clinical picture, but there is a risk of rebound when treatment is stopped. We propose a treatment algorithm to assist dermatologists, pediatric dermatologists, and general practitioners encountering this condition. PMID:24623018

  18. Informing patients about emerging treatment options: creating "saviour siblings" for haemopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Strong, Kimberly A

    2009-05-01

    In June 2008, the ABC screened a television documentary involving a couple who decided to have an additional child in the hope of obtaining umbilical cord blood to treat their daughter who had leukaemia. The couple conceived naturally, meaning that there was a one in four chance that their child would be suitably matched. They seemed to be unaware of technologies that, if successful, could provide a near certainty that the next child would be a matched "saviour sibling". This story raises questions about whether clinicians have an obligation to discuss emerging and morally contentious treatment options. Ignorance of technology, assumptions about availability, and medical assessment of burdens and benefits may affect attitudes towards treatment options, but they do not justify non-disclosure of information. PMID:19413524

  19. Retrospective analysis of drug utilization, health care resource use, and costs associated with IFN therapy for adjuvant treatment of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Le, Trong Kim; Shaw, James W; Kotapati, Srividya

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines real-world drug utilization patterns, health care resource use, and costs among patients receiving adjuvant treatment with IFN versus patients receiving no treatment (“observation”) for malignant melanoma following surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims from Truven Health Analytics (MarketScan®) to identify all adjuvant melanoma patients (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed between June 2007 and June 2011 who had a lymph node dissection (ie, index surgery) and were treated with IFN or subsequently observed. Health care resource use and costs of services were converted to 2012 US dollars and were evaluated and compared using multivariable regression. Results Of 1,999 eligible subjects with melanoma surgery claims, 179 (9.0%) were treated with IFN and 1,820 (91.0%) were observed. The median duration (days) and number of doses of IFN therapy were 73 and 36, respectively. Among IFN-treated patients, only 10.6% completed ≥80% of maintenance therapy. The total average cost for patients treated with IFN was US$60,755±$3,972 (n=179); significantly higher than for patients undergoing observation ($31,641±$2,471; P<0.0001). Similar trends were observed when evaluating total cost components, including melanoma-related and non-melanoma–related medical costs. Among the melanoma-related medical costs, outpatient services, including office visits and laboratory testing, represented between 33% and 53% of total costs and demonstrated the largest difference between IFN-treated and observation patients. Outpatient service costs for IFN-treated patients were $32,414±$2,498, over three times greater than those for observation patients ($10,556±$1,128; P<0.0001). Conclusion The majority of adjuvant melanoma patients in this study was treated with observation versus IFN treatment. Among those who attempted IFN treatment, most could not complete the recommended course of therapy. Health care costs were

  20. A retrospective study on IVF/ICSI outcome in patients with anti-nuclear antibodies: the effects of prednisone plus low-dose aspirin adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are suspected of having relevance to adverse reproductive events. Methods This study aims to investigate the potential effect of ANA on IVF/ICSI outcome and the therapeutic role of prednisone plus low-dose aspirin (P + A) adjuvant treatment in ANA + patients. The first IVF/ICSI cycles without P + A of sixty-six ANA + women were enrolled as the ANA + group, and the 233 first IVF/ICSI cycles of matched ANA- women served as the ANA- group. The ANA + group was divided into the Titre < =1:320 subgroup and the Titre > 1:320 subgroup. Twenty-one ANA + women with adverse outcomes in their first cycles (ANA + cycles without P + A) received P + A adjuvant treatment for three months before the second IVF/ICSI cycle (ANA + cycles with P + A). The clinical characteristics and the IVF/ICSI outcomes were compared, respectively, between 1) the ANA + group and the ANA- group, 2) the Titre < =1:320 subgroup and the Titre > 1:320 subgroup, and 3) the ANA + cycles without P + A and the ANA + cycles with P + A. Results No significant differences were observed between each of the two-group pairs in the clinical characteristics. The ANA + group exhibited significantly lower MII oocytes rate, normal fertilisation, pregnancy and implantation rates, as well as remarkably higher abnormal fertilisation and early miscarriage rates. The Titre < =1:320 subgroup’s IVF/ICSI outcomes were as poor as those of the Titre > 1:320 subgroup. After the P + A adjuvant treatment, the number of two pro-nuclei, perfect embryos and available embryos, and the implantation rate increased significantly. Conclusions These observations suggest that ANA could exert a detrimental effect on IVF/ICSI outcome that might not be titre-dependent, and P + A adjuvant treatment could be useful for ANA + patients. This hypothesis should be verified in further prospective randomised studies. PMID:24093222

  1. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  2. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  3. The challenge of faecal sludge management in urban areas--strategies, regulations and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ingallinella, A M; Sanguinetti, G; Koottatep, T; Montanger, A; Strauss, M

    2002-01-01

    In urban centres of industrialising countries, the majority of houses are served by on-site sanitation systems such as septic tanks and unsewered toilets. The faecal sludges (FS) collected from these systems are usually discharged untreated into the urban and peri-urban environment, posing great risks to water resources and to public health. Contrary to wastewater management, the development of strategies to cope with faecal sludges, adapted to the conditions prevailing in developing countries, have long been neglected. The authors describe the current situation and discuss selected issues of FS management. A proposal is made for a rational setting of sludge quality or treatment standards in economically emerging countries. The authors stipulate that regulatory setting should take into account local economic, institutional and technical conditions. Defining suitable treatment options as critical control points in securing adequate sludge quality is better than setting and relying on numerical sludge quality standards. A separate section is devoted to the practice and to regulatory aspects of (faecal) sludge use in Argentina. An overview of treatment options, which may prove sustainable in less industrialized countries is provided. Planted sludge drying beds are one of these options. It has been piloted in Thailand for four years and details on its performance and operation are presented along with data on the hygienic quality of treated biosolids. PMID:12479483

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated.We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: "CAM" in conjunction with "OM" and "children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies.The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications.The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  5. Adjuvant treatment in patients at high risk of recurrence of thymoma: efficacy and safety of a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy regimen

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Francesco; Pisconti, Salvatore; Conson, Manuel; Pacelli, Roberto; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Gnoni, Antonio; D’Aniello, Carmine; Cavaliere, Carla; Licchetta, Antonella; Cella, Laura; Giuliano, Mario; Schiavone, Concetta; Falivene, Sara; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Muto, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical benefits of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with thymoma are still controversial. In the absence of defined guidelines, prognostic factors such as stage, status of surgical margins, and histology are often considered to guide the choice of adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy). In this study, we describe our single-institution experience of three-dimensional conformal PORT administered as adjuvant treatment to patients with thymoma. Methods Twenty-two consecutive thymoma patients (eleven male and eleven female) with a median age of 52 years and treated at our institution by PORT were analyzed. The patients were considered at high risk of recurrence, having at least one of the following features: stage IIB or III, involved resection margins, or thymic carcinoma histology. Three-dimensional conformal PORT with a median total dose on clinical target volume of 50 (range 44–60) Gy was delivered to the tumor bed by 6–20 MV X-ray of the linear accelerator. Follow-up after radiotherapy was done by computed tomography scan every 6 months for 2 years and yearly thereafter. Results Two of the 22 patients developed local recurrence and four developed distant metastases. Median overall survival was 100 months, and the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 83% and 74%, respectively. Median disease-free survival was 90 months, and the 5-year recurrence rate was 32%. On univariate analysis, pathologic stage III and presence of positive surgical margins had a significant impact on patient prognosis. Radiation toxicity was mild in most patients and no severe toxicity was registered. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved good local control and showed an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with high-risk thymoma. PMID:26089683

  6. Impact of intratumoral expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes on treatment outcomes of adjuvant S-1 therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Eun; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dae-Won; Kim, Se-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Keun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes (thymidylate synthase [TS], dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [DPD], thymidine phosphorylase [TP] and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT]) to identify potential biomarkers related to treatment outcomes in gastric cancer (GC) patients receiving adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy. In this study, 184 patients who received curative gastrectomy (D2 lymph node dissection) and adjuvant S-1 were included. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to measure the protein and mRNA levels of TS, DPD, TP, and OPRT in tumor tissue. In univariate analysis, low intratumoral DPD protein expression was related to poorer 5-year disease-free survival (DFS; 78% vs. 88%; P = 0.068). Low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (1st [lowest] quartile) was also related to poorer DFS (69% vs. 90%; P < 0.001) compared to high intratumoral DPD expression (2nd to 4th quartiles). In multivariate analyses, low intratumoral DPD protein or mRNA expression was related to worse DFS (P < 0.05), irrespective of other clinical variables. TS, TP, and OPRT expression levels were not related to treatment outcomes. Severe non-hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3) had a trend towards more frequent development in patients with low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (29% vs. 16%; P = 0.068). In conclusion, GC patients with high intratumoral DPD expression did not have inferior outcome following adjuvant S-1 therapy compared with those with low DPD expression. Instead, low intratumoral DPD expression was related to poor DFS. PMID:25793299

  7. Emerging options for the treatment of melanoma – focus on ipilimumab

    PubMed Central

    Roddie, Claire; Peggs, Karl S

    2014-01-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human immunoglobulin subclass G1 anticytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-antigen-4 monoclonal antibody. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency for use in advanced melanoma following clear evidence of survival benefit in randomized Phase III studies. It is also under investigation as a treatment for other solid tumors such as renal cell, lung, and prostate cancers. The purported mechanism of antitumor activity of ipilimumab is through T-cell activation, and the side effect profile reflects this. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) affect 60% of treated patients and 15% are defined as severe. Fortunately, most irAEs are reversible with early diagnosis and correct management. FDA approval of ipilimumab is dependent on the careful execution of a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, with the aim of increasing awareness amongst patients and clinicians of the immunological risks of treatment, and providing algorithms for management of irAEs as they develop. Ipilimumab is one of the first immunotherapies to become widely available in the setting of solid tumors, and ongoing research aims to elucidate optimal dosing, optimal scheduling, and expanded access to ipilimumab as an adjuvant or maintenance therapy where appropriate. The identification of clinical correlates or biomarkers to identify those likely to benefit from this high-cost therapy is a top priority. PMID:27482517

  8. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge recycling options and treatment processes in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Hara, K; Mino, T

    2008-12-01

    Tokyo has historically suffered from a shortage of final disposal sites for the treated sewage sludge. Given this situation, sludge recycling and incineration have been promoted to reduce the volume of treated sludge conveyed to the disposal site, and the recycling options have changed since the late 1990s. This study aims to revisit the sewage sludge treatment and recycling processes in Tokyo and to evaluate different recycling options (brick, aggregate, refuse derived fuel and slag) from the energy consumption perspective by clarifying the complex flow of treated sludge within Tokyo's 23 wards. The study also estimates environmental loads associated with the operation of the whole sludge management system in the area. The environmental loads include: (1) total energy consumption and (2) gas emissions (greenhouse and acidification gases). The estimation was carried out for the years 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2001, during which a drastic change in recycling options occurred. The results indicated that the production of refuse derived fuel was the most energy consuming recycling option while aggregate production is the least energy consuming. They also showed that despite the increasing sludge volume, the energy consumption associated with the operation of the whole system decreased during the period while the gas emissions increased. PMID:18439814

  9. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  10. Dural Reduction Surgery: A Treatment Option for Frontotemporal Brain Sagging Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Emily; Schievink, Wouter I; Sim, Valerie L

    2016-07-01

    Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome is a dementia associated with hypersomnolence, personality changes, and features of intracranial hypotension on magnetic resonance imaging. The literature is sparse with respect to treatment options; many patients simply worsen. We present a case in which this syndrome responded to lumbar dural reduction surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicated normalization of brain sagging and lumbar intrathecal pressure. Although no evidence of cerebrospinal leak was found, extremely thin dura was noted intraoperatively, suggesting that a thin and incompetent dura could result in this low-pressure syndrome. Clinicians who encounter this syndrome should consider dural reduction surgery as a treatment strategy. PMID:26972054

  11. [Extemporaneous magistral formulas for the topical treatment of pruritus : Proven and new options].

    PubMed

    Staubach, P; Weisshaar, E

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pruritus, primarily chronic pruritus, is often difficult and must be treated simultaneously with the cause of pruritus and the individual demands of the skin. Due to the chronicity, a combination of systemic therapies, different active ingredients and basic formulas must be used in local therapies and adjusted during the course of the treatment. There are still therapeutic gaps, which can be closed by the use of extemporaneous preparations. Magistral formulas, which are already checked for plausibility, should be preferred over individual prescriptions. In the following, different therapeutic options in daily practice by using extemporaneous formulas from the NRF (New German Pharmacopoeia for compounded medications) are presented. PMID:27341823

  12. Treatment Options for Individuals with PTSD and Concurrent TBI: A Literature Review and Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hans R; Ghani, Musammar; Correll, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a well-studied mental health condition with existing guidelines and algorithms for treatment of PTSD. Those guidelines, while acknowledging an increased complexity, fail to provide clear PTSD treatment guidelines when an individual has a concurrent traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnosis. Therefore, a literature review along with an accompanying case presentation is presented to demonstrate the minimum necessary considerations for approaching treatment of this complex population. Treatment approaches must be lead by providers that have the expertise and training necessary to consider all facets of the patient and their potential options. The provider must consider the pathophysiology of PTSD and TBI and be capable of leading a team to identify the patient's source(s) of dysfunction, current cognitive abilities, and potential indications for psychotropic medications and/or other types of therapeutic intervention. PMID:27222137

  13. Differences in Supratentorial Damage of White Matter in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors With and Without Adjuvant Treatment as Detected by Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Luedemann, Lutz; Henze, Guenter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Patients and Methods: Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Results: Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients.

  14. Utility of PET/CT Imaging Performed Early After Surgical Resection in the Adjuvant Treatment Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, Stephanie A.; Foote, Robert L. Lowe, Val J.; Brown, Paul D.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Kasperbauer, Jan L.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) early after surgical resection and before postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We studied a prospective cohort of 91 consecutive patients referred for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after complete surgical resection. Tumor histologies included 62 squamous cell and 29 non-squamous cell cancers. Median time between surgery and postoperative PET/CT was 28 days (range, 13-75 days). Findings suspicious for persistent/recurrent cancer or distant metastasis were biopsied. Correlation was made with changes in patient care. Results: Based on PET/CT findings, 24 patients (26.4%) underwent biopsy of suspicious sites. Three patients with suspicious findings did not undergo biopsy because the abnormalities were not easily accessible. Eleven (45.8%) biopsies were positive for cancer. Treatment was changed for 14 (15.4%) patients (11 positive biopsy and 3 nonbiopsied patients) as a result. Treatment changes included abandonment of radiation therapy and switching to palliative chemotherapy or hospice care (4), increasing the radiation therapy dose (6), extending the radiation therapy treatment volume and increasing the dose (1), additional surgery (2), and adding palliative chemotherapy to palliative radiation therapy (1). Treatment for recurrent cancer and primary skin cancer were significant predictors of having a biopsy-proven, treatment-changing positive PET/CT (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Even with an expectedly high rate of false positive PET/CT scans in this early postoperative period, PET/CT changed patient management in a relatively large proportion of patients. PET/CT can be recommended in the postoperative, preradiation therapy setting with the understanding that treatment-altering PET/CT findings should be biopsied for confirmation.

  15. Long-term quality of life after intensified multi-modality treatment of oral cancer including intra-arterial induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adorján F.; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Thorn, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) studies are well established when accompanying trials in head and neck cancer, but studies on long-term survivors are rare. Aims: The aim was to evaluate long-term follow-up patients treated with an intensified multi-modality therapy. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study, tertiary care center. Patients and Methods: A total of 135 oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors having been treated with an effective four modality treatment (intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, radical surgery, adjuvant radiation, concurrent systemic chemotherapy) filled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and HN35 questionnaires. Mean distance to treatment was 6.1 (1.3–16.6) years. Results were compared with a reference patient population (EORTC reference manual). In-study group comparison was also carried out. Statistical Analysis: One-sample t-test, Mann–Whitney-test, Kruskal–Wallis analysis. Results: QoL scores of both populations were well comparable. Global health status, cognitive and social functioning, fatigue, social eating, status of teeth, mouth opening and dryness, and sticky saliva were significantly worse in the study population; pain and need for pain killers, cough, need for nutritional support, problems with weight loss and gain were judged to be significantly less. Patients 1-year posttreatment had generally worse scores as compared to patients with two or more years distance to treatment. Complex reconstructive measures and adjuvant (chemo) radiation were main reasons for significant impairment of QoL. Conclusion Subjective disease status of patients following a maximized multi-modality treatment showed an expectable high degree of limitations, but was generally comparable to a reference group treated less intensively, suggesting that the administration of an intensified multi-modality treatment is feasible in terms of QoL/effectivity ratio. PMID:26389030

  16. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  17. A systematic review of active treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X.; Corbett, T.; Gupta, A.A.; Kandel, R.A.; Verma, S.; Werier, J.; Ghert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We conducted a systematic review to determine the optimal treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours who have declined observational management. Methods A search was conducted of the medline and embase databases (1990 to September 2012), the Cochrane Library, and relevant guideline Web sites and conference materials. Results One systematic review and forty-six studies met the preplanned study selection criteria; data from twenty-eight articles were extracted and analyzed. For local control, three studies reported a statistically significant difference in favour of surgery plus radiotherapy (rt) compared with surgery alone, and one study did not; two studies reported the lack of a statistical difference between surgery plus rt and rt alone in maintaining local control. Multivariate risk factors for local recurrence included positive surgical margins and young patient age. Single-agent imatinib led to a progression-free survival rate of 55% at 2 years and 58% at 3 years. Methotrexate plus vinblastine led to a progression-free survival rate of 67% at 10 years. Significant toxicities were reported for all treatment modalities, including surgical morbidity, and rt- and chemotherapy-related toxicities. Conclusions In patients who have declined observational management, the local control rate was higher with surgery plus rt than with surgery alone. However, the additional rt-related complications should be considered in treatment decision-making. Surgery, rt, and systemic therapy are all reasonable treatment options for patients with desmoid tumours. PMID:25089111

  18. Ustekinumab as an Alternative Treatment Option for Chronic Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Davila, Ulysses; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is an exceptionally rare, chronic inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology. Patients classically present with small, follicular keratosis and salmon-colored plaques that begin at the head and neck and slowly progress to widespread erythroderma including the palms and soles. It is difficult to distinguish PRP from other inflammatory dermatoses; however, features that help aid in the diagnosis include ‘islands’ of spared skin, orangish hue and typical findings on biopsy. There are no specific guidelines on therapy and treatment options include corticosteroids, vitamin D analogs, retinoids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, azathioprine and tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists. Unfortunately options are limited for patients when these drugs do not work. We report a case of chronic PRP, refractory to conventional treatment, successfully treated with ustekinumab monotherapy. The patient was treated with 90 mg subcutaneous ustekinumab injections and began to show improvement within only 8 weeks. Long-term control of the disease has been attained without any significant side effects. We report this case to show that ustekinumab can be used as an alternative treatment method for patients with chronic, unremitting PRP. Treatment response is remarkably rapid and the infrequent dosing leads to patient compliance and a significantly improved quality of life. PMID:25969677

  19. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  20. New treatment options in the management of fibromyalgia: role of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common, chronic pain disorder with unknown etiology, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and tenderness, and accompanied by several other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, and mood disorders. Pregabalin is the first drug approved for the treatment of FM. Pregabalin has analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic activity and has earlier demonstrated efficacy in the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and as adjuvant therapy for adult patients with partial onset seizures. Pregabalin, a lipophilic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog, is α2δ-1 ligand that binds to, and modulates, voltage-gated calcium channels. This modulation is characterized by a reduction of the excessive neurotransmitter release that is observed in certain neurological and psychotic disorders. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that pregabalin has been effective in pain management, improving sleep quality and fatigue, as well as in several domains of health related quality of life. Because of mild to moderate adverse effects it can be considered a well-tolerated therapy for FM. PMID:19337459