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Sample records for adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

  1. Stereoselective Pharmacokinetics and Chiral Inversion of Ibuprofen in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Hiroyuki; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    2-Arylpropionic acid (2-APA) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are commonly used in racemic mixtures (rac) for clinical use. 2-APA undergoes unidirectional chiral inversion of the in vivo inactive R-enantiomer to the active S-enantiomer. Inflammation causes the reduction of metabolic activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase. However, it is unclear whether inflammation affects the stereoselective pharmacokinetics and chiral inversion of 2-APA such as ibuprofen (IB). We examined the effects of inflammation on the pharmacokinetics of R-IB and S-IB after intravenous administration of rac-IB, R-IB, and S-IB to adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) rats, an animal model of inflammation. The plasma protein binding of rac-IB, glucuronidation activities for R-IB and S-IB, and P450 contents of liver microsomes in AA rats were determined. Total clearance (CLtot) of IB significantly increased in AA rats, although the glucuronidation activities for IB, and P450 contents of liver microsomes decreased in AA rats. We presumed that the increased CLtot of IB in AA rats was caused by the elevated plasma unbound fraction of IB due to decreased plasma albumin levels in AA rats. Notably, CLtot of R-IB but not S-IB significantly increased in AA rats after intravenous administration of rac-IB. These results suggested that AA could affect drug efficacies after stereoselective changes in the pharmacokinetics of R-IB and S-IB.

  2. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity.

  3. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-01-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  4. β2-adrenoceptor signaling reduction in dendritic cells is involved in the inflammatory response in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huaxun; Chen, Jingyu; Song, Shasha; Yuan, Pingfan; Liu, Lihua; Zhang, Yunfang; Zhou, Aiwu; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammation of the synovium, which leads to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. Adrenoreceptor (AR) signaling may play an important role in modulating dendritic cell (DC), which may be involved in the pathogenesis of RA. We examined the effect of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline (ISO) on DC function, the impact of the β2-AR agonist salbutamol on adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) rats, and changes in β2-AR signaling in DCs during the course of AA. ISO inhibited the expression of the surface molecules CD86 and MHC-II, inhibited the stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation by DC and TNF-α secretion, and promoted DC antigen uptake and IL-10 secretion. The effects of ISO on MHC-II expression, DC stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation, and DC antigen uptake were mediated by β2-AR. Treatment with salbutamol ameliorated the severity of AA and histopathology of the joints and inhibited proliferation of thymus lymphocytes and FLS in vivo. β2-AR signaling was weaker in AA rats compared to the control. Elevated GRK2 and decreased β2-AR expression in DC cytomembranes were observed in AA and may have decreased the anti-inflammatory effect of β2-AR signaling. Decreased β2-AR signaling may be relevant to the exacerbation of arthritis inflammation. PMID:27079168

  5. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agent PEG-sTNFRI improves the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I system in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana Isabel; Vara, Elena; López-Calderón, Asunción; Angeles Villanúa, María

    2006-04-24

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is associated with body weight loss and decreased pituitary growth hormone (GH) and hepatic insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) synthesis. Cytokines as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediate wasting associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to analyse whether the inhibition of TNF is able to revert the decrease in the body weight and the GH/IGF-I axis in arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant, and 15 days later arthritic and control rats were daily injected with polyethylene glycol linked to soluble TNF receptor p55 (PEG-sTNFRI) (1 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline for 8 days. There was a significant decrease in pituitary GH mRNA (P<0.05), hepatic IGF-I mRNA (P<0.01) and serum concentrations of IGF-I (P<0.01) in arthritic rats. The 8-day administration of PEG-sTNFRI resulted in an increase in food intake (P<0.05) and body weight gain (P<0.01) in arthritic but not in control rats. There was an increase in pituitary GH mRNA after PEG-sTNFRI treatment both in control and in arthritic rats. There was a significant increase in IGF-I serum concentrations (P<0.05) and hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression (P<0.05) in control rats treated with PEG-sTNFRI, whereas the effect of this anti-TNF agent in arthritic rats was only statistically significant in hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression (P<0.05). These data suggest that TNF seems to be involved in the decrease in GH and IGF-I synthesis in arthritic rats.

  6. Anti-bone resorption activity of deer antler aqua-acupunture, the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong) in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Kap-Sung; Choi, Byeong-Joon; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Seung-Duk; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-01-15

    Effect of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, a traditional immunosuppressive acupuncture, was evaluated to assess the reductions in bone mass, strength, and turnover in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. For measuring the above parameters, a 20-day dosing experiment was performed using 6-week-old female Lewis rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting the adjuvant into the hind paw of the Lewis rats. The age-dependent increases in the body weight, lumbar bone mineral content and density (BMC and BMD) and compressive strength were disturbed in the arthritic rats. At 10 days, the histomorphometric parameters of bone formation (BFR/BS and BFR/BV) and the serum osteocalcin levels were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls of Lewis rats. However, the BMC values corrected for body weight did not differ significantly between the arthritic and normal rats, and the bone minerals were not reduced when they were compared with the baseline controls. At 20 days, the parameters of bone minerals and strength of the lumbar body in the arthritic rats, both with and without correction for body weight, were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls. The trabecular mineralizing surface remained significantly reduced and the osteoclast numbers were increased. DAA at the doses of 10, 20, 50 and 100 microg/kg, administered by Shinsu (B23) acupuncture daily from the start of the experiment, significantly prevented the development of the chronic paw edema at 20 days. The reductions in the parameters such as bone minerals, strength, and trabecular bone formation, and the increase in osteoclast number were alleviated by this DAA. Age-dependent increases in the lumbar height, disturbed by the adjuvant injection, were also maintained. These results indicated that a 20-day-period is necessary to obtain sufficient reductions in the bone mass and strength of the lumbar body

  7. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Sida rhombifolia stems and roots in adjuvant induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Limmy, T P

    2012-04-01

    Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer anti-oxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Herbal medicine provides a foundation for various traditional medicine systems worldwide. The Sida species is one of the most important families of medicinal plants in India. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Sida rhombifolia extracts for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. The altered levels of hematological parameters were reverted to near normal levels, especially the elevated rate of erythrocyte sedimentation was significantly reduced by S. rhombifolia extracts in experimental rats. Oral administration of root and stem of S. rhombifolia extracts significantly increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological and transmission electron microscopy observations made on the hind limb tissue.

  9. Anti-arthritic Activity of Dashanga Ghana (An Ayurvedic Compound Formulation) Against Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Charles Foster Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddin, Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arthritis is the most common cause of disability, limiting the activities of adults throughout the world. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long-term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Besides this, currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a promising remedy in these cases. There is a need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. Considering this, a polyherbal Ayurvedic compound formulation (Dashanga Ghana) has been studied in experimental animals to evaluate anti-arthritic activity. Materials and Methods: Dashanga Ghana has been prepared in the laboratory by following standard guidelines. Charles Foster albino rats were used to evaluate the activity through Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model. Results and Conclusions: Dashanga Ghana is found to possess significant anti-arthritic activity. Further studies are required to identify and characterize exact active phyto-constituents and to elucidate the exact mechanism of action, which is responsible for the observed pharmacological profile. PMID:26862275

  10. UP1304, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba, Mitigates Pain and Inflammation in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though, the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share pain as the prime complaints. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side effects. Hence, the need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is an overdue. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP1304, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the botanical composition were demonstrated in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats with oral dose ranges of 50–200 mg/kg. Ibuprofen at a dose of 100 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. Ex vivo sulfated glycosaminoglycan inhibition assays were performed. Results: Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance, suppression of paw edema and ankle thickness were observed in animals treated with UP1304 compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats. These results were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment. Inhibitions of proteoglycan degradation were observed in a range of 37.5–61.7% for concentration of UP1304 at 50–200 μg/mL when compared to interleukin-1α-exposed untreated explants. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1304, for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, could potentially be considered agent of botanical origin for the improvement of arthritis associated symptoms. SUMMARY Pain is one of the cardinal signs of arthritis.Long term applications of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief are associated with cardiovascular

  11. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound, suppresses pro-inflammatory mediators and RANKL expression via modulating NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are inhabitant mesenchymal cells of synovial joints and have been recognized to play an imperative role in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking these pathological roles of FLS provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment for RA. A recent study had confirmed that majoon ushba (MU), a polyherbal unani compound, possesses anti-arthritic effects in in vivo. Toward this direction, an effort has been made to understand the effect of MU on FLS derived from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Here, we observed that MU administration (100-300 µg/ml) significantly inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 protein similar to that of the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in NFкB signaling pathway and suppressed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in MAPKs signaling pathway in AIA-FLS. In addition, the protein expression of TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and iNOS was also found reduced. MU treatment significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-17, iNOS, and COX-2), transcription factors (NFкB-p65 and AP-1), and RANKL and attenuated the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 (ELISA) in AIA-FLS. Furthermore, MU treatment significantly inhibited the level of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes release, and glycoproteins and increased antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase and catalase) in AIA-FLS. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that MU possesses anti-inflammatory effect against AIA-FLS through the decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators expression by suppressing NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways.

  12. Anti-arthritic effects of Ephedra sinica STAPF herb-acupuncture: inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and adjuvant-induced polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mi-Jung; Lee, Han-Chang; Kim, Gun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Jung; Shim, Insop; Oh, Seung-Kyu; Kang, Sung-Keel; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of water distillates of Ephedra sinica STAPF (ES), in herb-acupuncture, on the inflammatory responses of arthritis was investigated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human macrophage and adjuvant-induced arthritic rat. The luciferase reporter vectors driven by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 promoters were transiently transfected into U937 cells, which were then differentiated and stimulated by PMA and LPS, respectively, to develop an in vitro anti-inflammation assay system. The luciferase activities, observed in the activated U937 cells, were significantly inhibited by ES herb-acupuncture, compared to those of PD98509 and berberine. To evaluate ES herb-acupuncture as a novel anti-arthritic therapy, a polyarthritic rat model was developed using heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 50 mul of ES distillate was subcutaneously injected into the ST36 acupoint on each knee joint. While the articular indexes of arthritic rats were evidently decreased by ES herb-acupuncture, their body weights did not regain their initial levels. This may be due to the accelerating effects of ES on weight-loss and fat consumption. The mRNA expressions of TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 genes, which were closely stimulated in the arthritic rat joints, were found to be restored to the normal levels through the ES treatment. In the case of IL-1beta, the recovery was not significant but substantial. The anti-arthritic effect of ES herb-acupuncture was not found in the ES-treated/non-acupoint group. In conclusion, the ES herb-acupuncture into the ST36 acupoint was found to be effective in alleviating the inflammatory response and thus arthritic symptoms in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

  13. Effects of relaxin in a model of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Santora, Karen; Rasa, Cordelia; Visco, Denise; Steinetz, Bernard; Bagnell, Carol

    2005-05-01

    A reduction in the incidence and severity of rheumatoid arthritis is seen in pregnant women. Relaxin, a hormone of pregnancy, has been implicated in decreased immune responsiveness. Consequently, the effects of relaxin and estradiol valerate, alone or in combination, were assessed in the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat. Combination hormone therapy reduced adjuvant-induced paw inflammation. Radiographic analysis of the tarsal joints showed that estradiol valerate plus relaxin treatment minimized soft tissue damage and bone changes when compared to vehicle-treated arthritic controls. These results indicate that relaxin may be a factor in reducing inflammation during pregnancy.

  14. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  15. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Ameliorative effect of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary phenol, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, Samuel Joshua; Murunikkara, Vachana; Sabina, Evan Prince; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2013-02-01

    p-Coumaric acid (3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoic acid), a common dietary polyphenol, is widely distributed in cereals, fruits and vegetables with antioxidant property. Numerous studies have enlightened the ability of dietary phenols to be considered as potential therapeutics against arthritis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the ameliorative effect of plant phenolic p-coumaric acid on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The reference drug indomethacin was used for comparison purposes. Arthritis was induced in rats by a single intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the foot pad of right hind paw. p-Coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b wt) and indomethacin (3 mg/kg b wt) were administered intraperitoneally for 8 days from day 11 to 18 after adjuvant injection. An increase in the activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes, tissue marker enzymes, glycoproteins and paw thickness was observed in the arthritic rats, on the contrary, the body weight was found to be reduced in arthritic rats when compared to normal control rats. Administration of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b wt) to the arthritic rats reverted back the altered physical and biochemical parameters to near normal levels comparable to indomethacin treatment. Histopathological evaluation of ankle joints in arthritic rats also revealed the anti-inflammatory effect of p-coumaric acid by the reduction in leukocytes infiltration. Thus, the present study clearly demonstrates the anti-inflammatory potential of the p-coumaric acid against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

  17. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  18. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Protective effect of Withania somnifera root powder in relation to lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, glycoproteins and bone collagen on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rasool, M; Varalakshmi, P

    2007-04-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of Withania somnifera Linn. Dunal (family-Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Results were compared with those for Indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the right hind paw of Wistar albino rats. Withania somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg/day) and Indomethacin (3 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for 8 days (from 11th to 18th day) after adjuvant injection. The anti-arthritic effect of W. somnifera root powder was assessed by measuring changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, and glycoprotein levels in plasma and spleen of arthritic animals. In addition, cartilage degradation was also assessed by estimating bone collagen, and urinary constituents in arthritic animals. Results of the present investigation showed significant increase in the level of lipid peroxides, glycoproteins, and urinary constituents with the depletion of antioxidant status and bone collagen in arthritic animals. These biochemical alterations observed were ameliorated significantly by oral administration of W. somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg body weight) in arthritic animals. The results of this study clearly indicate that W. somnifera root powder is capable of rectifying the above biochemical changes in adjuvant arthritis.

  20. Effective treatment of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis by celastrol

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, R.; Vidal, B.; Raquel, H.; Neves-Costa, A.; Figueiredo, N.; Gupta, V.; Fonseca, J.E.; Moita, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported an increase in interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-17 levels, and a continuous activation of caspase-1 in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These results suggest that drugs targeting IL-1β regulatory pathways, in addition to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), may constitute promising therapeutic agents in early RA. We have recently used a THP-1 macrophage-like cell line to screen 2320 compounds for those that down-regulate both IL-1β and TNF secretion. Celastrol was one of the most promising therapeutic candidates identified in that study. Our main goal in the present work was to investigate whether administration of celastrol is able to attenuate inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Moreover, since IL-1β is known to play a role in the polarization of Th17 cells, we also investigate whether administration of digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Th17 cells polarization, is able to attenuate inflammation in the same rat model. We found that celastrol administration significantly suppressed joint inflammation. The histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that celastrol-treated rats had a normal joint structure with complete abrogation of the inflammatory infiltrate and cellular proliferation. In contrast, we observed that digoxin administration significantly ameliorated inflammation but only if administrated in the early phase of disease course (after 4 days of disease induction), and it was not efficient at inhibiting the infiltration of immune cells within the joint and in preventing damage. Thus, our results suggest that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties and can constitute a potential anti-inflammatory drug with therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as RA. Furthermore, we find that early inhibition of Th17 cells polarization ameliorates arthritis but it is not as effective as celastrol. PMID:22415021

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  2. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  3. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSNs) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What's more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and in vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating the NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis.

  4. Combination of carvacrol with methotrexate suppresses Complete Freund's Adjuvant induced synovial inflammation with reduced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Banji, Otilia J F; Banji, David; Soumya, N; Chilipi, Kiran Kumar; Kalpana, C H; Kranthi Kumar, C H; Annamalai, A R

    2014-01-15

    The present study evaluated the therapeutic benefit of the combination of carvacrol, an isoprenoid having potential anti-inflammatory action, with methotrexate in suppressing Complete Freund's Adjuvant induced arthritis and attenuating methotrexate induced hepatic damage. Arthritis was induced in rats with Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Animals received methotrexate (2mg/kg) intraperitonealy once a week for 5 weeks alone and along with carvacrol orally (50 and 100mg/kg) respectively from the 10th to the 42nd day. Control and carvacrol alone group were also studied. Paw volume, hypernociception, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were evaluated as arthritic markers. Hepatic marker enzymes in serum; myeloperoxidase, protein oxidation, and oxidative measures were determined in the liver homogenate. Liver histological assessments were also carried out. Methotrexate significantly controlled arthritis; however, liver damage was evident due to oxidative stress and rise in myeloperoxidase levels. Carvacrol suppressed the hyperalgesic response, significantly alleviated arthritis and reduced damage to the hepatocytes owing to a decline in the levels of myeloperoxidase and oxidative markers. High dose of the combination reduced the levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase by 24.74%, 30.2% and 28.14% compared with methotrexate treatment. Histological assessment also revealed that carvacrol minimizes methotrexate induced liver toxicity. In combination, carvacrol promoted the anti-arthritic action of methotrexate, reduced neutrophils infiltration and peroxidative damage to the liver. Therefore, carvacrol can serve as a useful adjuvant and promote the safe use of methotrexate in the management of arthritis.

  5. Esculetin reduces leukotriene B4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gąsińska, Emilia; Gajewski, Michał; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Maśliński, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) is a natural coumarin with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity. It acts as a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenases (5-LOX and 12-LOX) and decreases the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9). Because both inhibition of lipoxygenases and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases are effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated whether esculetin may be effective in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Material and methods The study was performed on male Lewis rats, in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Rats were divided into two groups: control (treated with 1% methylcellulose) and experimental (treated with esculetin – 10 mg/kg ip.). The tested compound was administered for 5 consecutive days starting on the 21st day after induction of arthritis. Each group consisted of 7 animals. After 5 days of treatment, rats were anesthetized. The concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in plasma was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results The LTB4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis is increased in comparison to rats without inflammation (362 ±34 vs. 274 ±15 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively). Five-day treatment with esculetin in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats decreases the LTB4 level to a level comparable with rats without inflammation (284 ±23 pg/ml, p < 0.01). Conclusions LTB4 is the most potent chemotactic agent influencing neutrophil migration into the joint. It is known that its level in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis is increased and correlates with disease severity. Some other lipoxygenase inhibitors have already been tested as potential drug candidates in clinical and preclinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (Zileuton, PF-4191834). Because esculetin decreases the LTB4 level in plasma of rats in adjuvant-induced arthritis, it may also be considered as an attractive drug candidate for

  6. Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Actions of Copaiba Oil Are Related to Liver Cell Modifications in Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane V; Ames, Ana P Arssufi; Lameira, Osmar A; Bersani Amado, Ciomar A; de Sá Nakanishi, Anacharis B; Bracht, Lívia; Natali, Maria R Marçal; Peralta, Rosane M; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir F

    2017-03-21

    The present study investigated the action of copaiba oil (Copaifera reticulata) on the systemic inflammation, oxidative status and liver cell metabolism of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. The later is an experimental autoimmune pathology that shares many features with the human rheumatoid arthritis. Holtzman rats were distributed into the following groups: control (healthy) rats; control rats treated with copaiba oil at the doses of 0.58 and 1.15 g · Kg(-1) , arthritic rats, and arthritic rats treated with copaiba oil (0.58 and 1.15 g · Kg(-1) ). The oil was administrated orally once a day during 18 days after arthritis induction. Both doses of copaiba oil improved the paw edema and the dose of 0.58 mg · Kg(-1) improved the swollen adrenals and lymph nodes besides decreasing the plasmatic myeloperoxidase activity (-30%) of arthritic rats. Copaiba oil (1.15 g · Kg(-1) ) abolished the increases of protein carbonyl groups and reactive oxygen species in the liver and both doses increased the liver GSH content and the catalase activity in arthritic rats. Copaiba oil (1.15 g · Kg(-1) ) decreased glycolysis (-65%), glycogenolysis (-58%) and gluconeogenesis (-30%) in the liver of arthritic animals. However, gluconeogenesis was also diminished by the treatment of control rats, which presented lower body weight gain (-45%) and diminished number of hepatocytes per liver area (-20%) associated to higher liver weight (+29%) and increased hepatocyte area (+13%). The results reveal that copaiba oil presented systemic anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions in arthritic rats. These beneficial effects, however, were counterbalanced by harmful modifications in the liver cell metabolism and morphology of healthy control rats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  8. Effect of ethanol extract of Trigonella foenum graecum (Fenugreek) seeds on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P; Kavitha, Ch N; Babu, S Manohar; Reddy, V Prabhakar; Latha, A Kanaka

    2012-08-01

    Trigonella foenum graecum is an Iranian medicinal plant used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial outcome of the plant T. foenum graecum on adjuvant-induced arthritis in albino rats. Ethanol extract of T. foenum graecum was tested against Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. In the present study, paw volume was measured on the 4th, 8th, 14th and 21st day. On day 22, animals were anaesthetized, and blood samples were collected for the estimation of haemoglobin, white blood cells (WBC), differential white blood cells, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), red blood cells (RBC), interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The animals were sacrificed, and the cartilage tissue was isolated for estimation of lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH). Administration with both doses of T. foenum graecum (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the paw oedema and restored body weight. T. foenum graecum significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the differential WBC count, ESR and WBC (5.833 ± 0.703, 6.989 ± 58.5) content and also showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in RBC and Hb (4.783 ± 0.46, 15.46 ± 0.158) content. T. foenum graecum significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α levels. It also significantly decreased the levels of LPO and increased the SOD and GSH levels in cartilage tissue. In this study, T. foenum graecum 400-mg/kg dose showed more prominent results compared to the 200-mg/kg dose of T. foenum graecum. The results obtained in this study suggest that anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of T. foenum graecum may be the possible reason behind the observed anti-arthritic activity.

  9. Green tea extract improves the oxidative state of the liver and brain in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Gonçalves, Geferson; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the possible effects of the administration of a green tea extract on the oxidative state of the liver and brain of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, a model for human rheumatoid arthritis. Daily doses of 250 mg kg(-1) (59.8 mg catechins per kg) for 23 days were administered. This treatment produced significant diminutions in protein and lipid damage in liver, brain and plasma. It also diminished the tissue ROS contents and increased the antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The antioxidant defenses, which are diminished by arthritis, were improved by the green tea treatment, as revealed by the restoration of the GSH and protein thiol levels and by the strong tendency for normalizing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes. The activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is increased by arthritis in the liver, was also almost normalized by the treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that green tea consumption is possibly beneficial for the liver and brain of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis because it attenuates the pronounced oxidative stress that accompanies the disease and, thus, diminishes the injury to lipids and proteins in both liver and brain. There are also indications that, in the liver, the green tea can contribute to normalize the metabolic functions that are substantially modified by arthritis. For example, the green tea normalized the activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme of an important metabolic route (pentose monophosphate pathway). It is expected that the green tea treatment is equally able to normalize the activity of other enzymes (e.g., glucokinase and glucose 6-phosphatase), a hypothesis to be tested by future work.

  10. A(2A) adenosine receptors are differentially modulated by pharmacological treatments in rheumatoid arthritis patients and their stimulation ameliorates adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A(2A)ARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A(2A)AR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A(2A)AR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A(2A)ARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A(2A)AR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A(2A)AR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A(2A)AR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A(2A)AR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A(2A)AR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A(2A)ARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A(2A)AR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A(2A)AR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA.

  11. Inhibitory properties of triethylphosphine goldlupinylsulfide in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghia, M; Mattioli, F; Novelli, F; Minganti, V

    1995-09-01

    A new gold coordination compound (triethylphosphine goldlupinylsulfide: TP-Au-LS) was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat, by oral administration at doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day of gold for 17 consecutive days, in comparison with auranofin and betamethasone. TP-Au-LS produced a dose dependent reduction of both the injected and uninjected hind paw volume. Gold levels in serum (measured on day 18 by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry) were also found to be dose related. At the dose of 10 mg/kg, TP-Au-LS and auranofin induced superimposable reductions of the injected paw volume; however the first drug produced higher serum gold concentrations than those achieved with the latter.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P < 0.05), respectively. The present study proves the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  13. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  14. Topical ethosomal capsaicin attenuates edema and nociception in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sarwa, Khomendra; Rudrapal, Mithun; Mazumder, Bhaskar

    2015-12-01

    In this study, topical ethosomal formulation of capsaicin was prepared and evaluated for bio-efficacy in arthritic rats. Physical and biological characterizations of prepared capsaicin-loaded nano vesicular systems were also carried out. Ethosomal capsaicin showed significant reduction of rat paw edema along with promising antinociceptive action. The topical antiarthritic efficacy of prepared formulation of capsaicin was found more than that of Thermagel, a marketed gel of capsaicin. From toxicological study, no predictable signs of toxicity such as skin irritation (of experimental rats) were observed. Based on this finding, ethosomal capsaicin could be proposed as an effective as well as a safe topical delivery system for the long-term treatment of arthritis and associated inflammo-musculoskeletal disorders. Such exciting result would eventually enlighten the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of capsaicin for topical remedy.

  15. Antioxidant and Angiostatic Effect of Spirulina platensis Suspension in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eman A. I.; Barakat, Bassant M.; Hassan, Ranya

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many degenerative diseases, mainly rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and curative properties and is also competent of acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and recently anti-angiogenic agent. In the present study, the antioxidant and the immunomodulatory effect of Spirulina platensis as well as its anti-angiogenic effect against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat model were tested. Results We found that the development of arthritis was concealed; moreover it successfully inhibited the development of macroscopic as well as microscopic and histopathological lesions in AIA rats when compared to control. Spirulina treated group showed a higher survival rate and moreover, it reduced the clinical score of RA in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Spirulina decreased serum levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, TBARS, VEGF and increased serum levels of GSH compared to the RA non-treated group. Conclusions The present study concluded that Spirulina is able to restrain the changes produced through adjuvant-induced arthritis. The suppressing effect of Spirulina could be attributed, at least in part, to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:25853428

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  17. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  18. Trikatu, an herbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by the suppression of inflammatory immune responses in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and on cultured fibroblast like synoviocytes via the inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Doss, Hari Madhuri; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-10-25

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of trikatu, an herbal compound and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Our results indicate that trikatu (1000 mg/kg/b.wt. oral) administration suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and downregulated the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) and transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B 65 (NFкB-p65) and activator protein-1 (AP-1)) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats. Consistently, the protein expression of NFкB-p65, IL-17, TNF-α, COX-2, and RANKL was also dramatically reduced in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats by trikatu treatment. In addition, trikatu suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 similar to the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes. Furthermore, trikatu alleviated the histopathology of joint of arthritic rats. Overall, these data highlights that trikatu could be a promising alternative modality for the possible treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

  19. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  20. Arthritic disease is more severe in older rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Yeom, Mijung; Choi, Hyun Mi; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    This study examined in an arthritis animal model whether elderly onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) is a more severe disease than younger onset rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by injecting 5% kaolin/carrageenan into the left tibiotarsal ankles of 18-month-old and 4-week-old rats. Various parameters were measured to evaluate the arthritic progression of kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis in the rats. Immunohistochemical staining of arthritic joints was performed to determine the degree of inflammation in old and young rats. Measurements of ankle volume and thickness, arthritic index, number of squeaks, and the paw pressure test showed the 18-month-old rats had more severe disease than the young rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model. The degree of inflammation and MMP-1 expression of arthritic joints in old rats was significantly higher than that of young rats based on histological evaluation with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunochemistry. More severe disease symptoms were found in old rats with EORA, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the molecular mechanisms will be helpful to develop clinical protocols to efficiently treat patients with EORA, which is difficult to control with current protocols.

  1. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  2. Chimeric cytotoxin IL2-PE40 delays and mitigates adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Case, J P; Lorberboum-Galski, H; Lafyatis, R; FitzGerald, D; Wilder, R L; Pastan, I

    1989-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in rats is a T-cell dependent "autoimmune" disease with close similarities to several forms of human arthritis. Injection of mycobacterial adjuvant leads to T-cell activation and proliferation, processes in which the de novo expression of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor plays a pivotal role. The subsequent massive mononuclear cell infiltration of the joints ultimately results in complete joint destruction. Because activation of the helper/inducer subset of T lymphocytes is critical to the establishment of disease, we reasoned that IL2-PE40, a cytotoxic IL-2-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein that targets the membrane-penetration and ADP-ribosylation domains of the toxin to cells bearing the IL-2 receptor, would be an effective and specific therapy. Adjuvant-injected rats were randomized to treatment with IL2-PE40, phosphate-buffered saline, or either of two control proteins related to IL2-PE40 but lacking either the receptor-binding moiety or an enzymatically active toxin domain and previously demonstrated to lack cytotoxicity in vitro. Intraperitoneal IL2-PE40 given before the establishment of overt clinical disease proved an effective and specific modifier of adjuvant arthritis by clinical, histological, and radiographic criteria. Our data suggest that IL2-PE40 may be effective in those diseases in which activated T-cells play an important role. Images PMID:2492102

  3. Fenofibrate administration to arthritic rats increases adiponectin and leptin and prevents oxidative muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Castillero, Estíbaliz; Martín, Ana Isabel; Nieto-Bona, Maria Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; López-Menduiña, María; Villanúa, María Ángeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation induces skeletal muscle wasting and cachexia. In arthritic rats, fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα (PPARA)) agonist, reduces wasting of gastrocnemius, a predominantly glycolytic muscle, by decreasing atrogenes and myostatin. Considering that fenofibrate increases fatty acid oxidation, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether fenofibrate is able to prevent the effect of arthritis on serum adipokines and on soleus, a type I muscle in which oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy. Arthritis was induced by injection of Freund's adjuvant. Four days after the injection, control and arthritic rats were gavaged daily with fenofibrate (300 mg/kg bw) or vehicle over 12 days. Arthritis decreased serum leptin, adiponectin, and insulin (P<0.01) but not resistin levels. In arthritic rats, fenofibrate administration increased serum concentrations of leptin and adiponectin. Arthritis decreased soleus weight, cross-sectional area, fiber size, and its Ppar α mRNA expression. In arthritic rats, fenofibrate increased soleus weight, fiber size, and Ppar α expression and prevented the increase in Murf1 mRNA. Fenofibrate decreased myostatin, whereas it increased MyoD (Myod1) and myogenin expressions in the soleus of control and arthritic rats. These data suggest that in oxidative muscle, fenofibrate treatment is able to prevent arthritis-induced muscle wasting by decreasing Murf1 and myostatin expression and also by increasing the myogenic regulatory factors, MyoD and myogenin. Taking into account the beneficial action of adiponectin on muscle wasting and the correlation between adiponectin and soleus mass, part of the anticachectic action of fenofibrate may be mediated through stimulation of adiponectin secretion. PMID:23781298

  4. The effects of 5-HT on articular sensory receptors in normal and arthritic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, G. J.; McQueen, D. S.; Iggo, A.; Grubb, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of intra arterial (i.a.) injections of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 1-100 micrograms) on the discharge of (a) identified articular high threshold mechanoreceptors and (b) unidentified chemosensitive receptors in the ankle joint have been studied electrophysiologically in anaesthetized normal and arthritic rats. Recordings were made from a fine branch of the medial plantar nerve. 2. 5-HT increased the mechanical responsiveness of high threshold nociceptive mechanoreceptors with C and A delta fibre afferents in both normal and adjuvant-arthritic rats. Receptors in arthritic joints were more sensitive to 5-HT than were those from normal joints. 3. 5-HT produced a complex response from both types of articular receptors following i.a. injection. Two separate components were identified: (a) a fast transient burst of activity was obtained within 10 s of this injection in 66% of units from normal animals and 45% from arthritics, followed by (b) a delayed slow longer-lasting excitation seen in 62% of the units examined from normals and 77% of units from arthritic rats. 4. Increased mechanoreceptor responsiveness produced by 5-HT was reduced or abolished by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists studied (MDL 72222, ICS 205-930, or GR 38032F, in single doses of 100 micrograms kg-1, i.a.). 5. Fast excitation showed marked tachyphylaxis and was antagonized by MDL 72222, ICS 205-930 or GR 38032F. It was unaffected by ketanserin (100 micrograms kg-1, i.a.). Delayed excitation was reduced or abolished by ketanserin but was unaffected by the 5-HT3-receptor antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2076487

  5. Acute resistance exercise reduces increased gene expression in muscle atrophy of ovariectomised arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Roberto; de Paula Souza, Aletéia; de Oliveira, Anselmo Alves; Nunes, Paulo Ricardo Prado; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2017-01-01

    Objective We studied the effect of resistance exercise (RE) on mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin in the gastrocnemius muscle of arthritic rats after loss of ovarian function (LOF). Material and methods Thirty female Wistar rats (nine weeks old, 195.3 ±17.4 grams) were randomly allocated into five groups: control group (CT-Sham; n = 6); group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 6); group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAEX; n = 6); ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis (RAOV; n = 6); and an ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAOVEX; n = 6). After 15 days of intra-articular injections with Met-BSA the animals were subjected to RE and six hours after workout were euthanised. Results The rheumatoid arthritis provoked reduction in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibres, but the CSA was lower in the RAOV when compared to the RA groups. Skeletal muscle atrogin-1 mRNA level was increased in arthritic rats (RA and RAOV), but the atrogin-1 level was higher in RAOV group when compared to other arthritic groups. The Muscle MuRF-1 mRNA level was also increased in the RAOV group. The increased atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 mRNA levels were lower in the RAOVEX group than in the RAOV group. The myostatin mRNA level was similar in all groups, except for the RAOVEX group, in which it was lower than the other groups. Conclusions LOF results in increased loss of skeletal muscle-related ubiquitin ligases (atrogin-1 and MuRF-1). However, the RE reduces the atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin mRNA levels in muscle of arthritic rats affected by LOF. PMID:28250722

  6. Co-administration of water containing magnesium ion prevents loxoprofen-induced lesions in gastric mucosa of adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Takeda, Atsushi; Itanami, Yuri; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) comprise one of the most frequently used classes of medicines in the world; however, NSAIDs have significant side effects, such as gastroenteropathy, and rheumatoid arthritis patients taking NSAIDs are more susceptible to NSAID-induced gastric lesions as compared to patients with other diseases. In Asian countries, loxoprofen has been used clinically for many years as a standard NSAID. We demonstrate the preventive effect of the co-administration of water containing magnesium ion (magnesium water, 1-200 µg/kg) on the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats. Oral administration of loxoprofen (100 mg/kg) caused hemorrhagic lesions in the gastric mucosa of AA rats 14 d after adjuvant injection, and, following loxoprofen administration, the lesion score of AA rats was significantly higher than that of normal rats. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and nitric oxide (NO) production in the gastric mucosa of AA rats were also increased by the administration of loxoprofen, and the increase in lesions and NO were prevented by the administration of aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor. The co-administration of magnesium water decreased the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen in AA rats. In addition, the co-administration of magnesium water attenuated the increase in iNOS mRNA expression and NO production in AA rats receiving loxoprofen. These results suggest that the oral co-administration of magnesium water to AA rats has a potent preventive effect on the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen, probably by inhibiting the rise in iNOS and NO levels in the gastric mucosa.

  7. Anti-arthritic activity of a classical Ayurvedic formulation Vatari Guggulu in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhavi G; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-10-01

    In India, Vatari Guggulu has been traditionally used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study was undertaken to evaluate anti-arthritic activity of alcoholic extract of Vatari Guggulu in rats. Arthritis was induced by administration of formaldehyde (2%v/v) or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the sub-plantar surface of left hind paw of the animals. The extract was administered to the rats by oral gavages in different doses. Joint swelling was measured in formaldehyde induced arthritis. Various physical, biochemical and histopathological parameters were determined in CFA induced arthritis. Vatari Guggulu extract (VGE) produced significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of joint swelling in both formaldehyde and CFA induced arthritis. The treatment also brought to normalcy the increased white blood cell (WBC) count, rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL with an enhancement of haemoglobin (Hb) levels and red blood cell (RBC) count. These effects were found to be dose dependent. These effects were comparable with standard drug indomethacin. Histo-pathological studies of the ankles of VGE treated animals exhibited significant improvements. VGE did not show any toxic symptoms even at a dose of 2000 mg/kg in acute toxicity studies on rats. Thus, Vatari Guggulu, a classical Ayurvedic formulation of the Indian System of Medicine, exhibited significant anti-arthritic activity in formaldehyde and CFA induced arthritis in rats. This study corroborates the claims of Ayurveda on Vatari Guggulu.

  8. Sinomenine decreases MyD88 expression and improves inflammation-induced joint damage progression and symptoms in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hui; Yao, Ru-Bing; Zhao, Ling-Jie; Shen, Si-Yu; Zhao, Zhi-Ming; Cai, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is the active principle of the Chinese medical plant Sinomenium acutum which is widely used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. Recently, several groups indicated that myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) might be associated with disease progression of RA. Here, we observed the effect of SIN on MyD88 expression and showed its therapeutic role in RA. First, immunohistochemical staining in clinical specimens showed that MyD88 was mainly located in characteristic pathological structures of RA synovial tissues. Second, we found that MyD88 was overexpressed in the synovial tissues of the rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Treatment with SIN markedly decreased the expression of MyD88 in AIA rats. Finally, we provided evidences that SIN suppressed inflammation response and inflammation-induced joint destructive progression and arthritis symptoms in AIA rats. Therefore, SIN is an effective therapeutic agent for RA. Targeting MyD88 signaling may provide new methods for the treatment of RA.

  9. The absorption enhancement of norisoboldine in the duodenum of adjuvant-induced arthritis rats involves the impairment of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cong; Guo, Jiao-Mei; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Lindera aggregata (Sims) Kosterm root has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of rheumatism palsy, dyspepsia and frequent urination for a long time. Norisoboldine, the main active constituent of this herb drug, possesses outstanding anti-arthritis activity. However, the in vivo disposition of norisoboldine is known to a limited extent, especially under the pathological condition of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how the absorption of norisoboldine is altered in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Comparative studies of the intestinal absorption of norisoboldine in normal and AIA rats at different pathological stages of the arthritis were performed using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion, and the effects of an inhibitor of efflux proteins were also investigated. Norisoboldine was shown to be a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as P-gp inhibitor verapamil markedly increased the permeability coefficient (Peff ) of norisoboldine by 88% in the intestine of normal rats. Compared with normal rats, AIA rats displayed increased Peff values of norisoboldine by 84% and 86% on day 5 and day 10 after the appearance of the secondary response of arthritis, respectively. Verapamil could eliminate the difference of intestinal absorption of norisoboldine between normal and AIA rats. Further studies showed that impaired expression and activity of P-gp in AIA rats play a decisive role in the absorption enhancement of norisoboldine. Notably, the impairment of P-gp function positively correlated with the severity of arthritis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. ER stress, p66shc, and p-Akt/Akt mediate adjuvant-induced inflammation, which is blunted by argirein, a supermolecule and rhein in rats.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao-Dong; Ding, Ming-Jian; Dai, De-Zai; Wu, You; Zhang, Yun; Dai, Yin

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activities of argirein and rhein on inflammatory edema in rat paw which was caused by complete adjuvant, compared with ibuprofen. We hypothesized that the adjuvant-induced inflammation is attributed to upregulation of activating transcript factor 6 (ATF6; a chaperone for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress), p66Shc (an adaptive protein modulating oxidative stress), and NADPH oxidase subunits p22phox and gp91phox in the inflamed tissues. Biomarkers were measured in the rat paw in association with monitoring swellings. The primary inflammatory edema of the injected paw occurred rapidly and sustained over a couple of days, and the secondary inflammation developed 2 weeks later. The inflammatory edema was accompanied by upregulation of cytokines including ATF6, p66Shc, p22phox, gp91phox, and MMP-2 and an increase in ratio of p-Akt/Akt in the afflicted paw. These were suppressed by either argirein and rhein or ibuprofen. These findings indicate that ER stress, upregulated p66Shc, and phosphorylated Akt are actively implicated in the inflammatory zone caused by adjuvant injection. These biomarkers were causal factors responsible for inflammation of the afflicted paw and were suppressed by a supermolecule argirein and rhein, and the anti-inflammatory activities of the two compounds were comparable to that of ibuprofen.

  11. Assessments of Immunomodulatory and Inflammatory effects against Induction of Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) crude extract Antigen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis Female Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Bagde, Swati; Singh, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Today it is well known about mechanisms of cell communication, how the cells that mediate immune response and tissue injury accumulate in tissues but the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is still unknown. This study was to evaluate immunomodulatory effects of crude Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) antigen in complete freund's adjuvant female wistar rats by studying the alterations in humoral and cell mediated immune responses and also the inflammatory effects by evaluating the changes in body weight, paw thickness, biochemical, serological, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and histopathology activities. Animals were randomly divided into six groups (n=6). CFA was induced in arthritic, drug and AA+CFA group whereas, 0.5ml amoebic antigen was induced subplantal in AA group while 0.5ml dose of amoebic antigen was given orally to AA+CFA group for 7-28th days. Indomethacin was used as a standard drug. Effects of amoebic antigen were associated with increased paw thickness and decreased body weight when compared to healthy control showed a significant difference. Oral administration of amoebic antigen has showed increased severe symptoms of arthritis in AA+CFA on comparison to healthy control rats. Significant increase in serum level of IL-6 and α TNF were found in AA group followed by AA+CFA group whereas, decrease in concentration of IL-10 was appear in AA+CFA group on comparison to arthritic and healthy control group (P<0.05). Histopathology of AA group showed severe signs of necrotic and degenerative changes on comparison to healthy control group. Thus the results demonstrated that E. histolytica alone or in combination with CFA increased bone damage, with alterations in antioxidant level in liver and kidney tissue homogenates as well as showed immunomodulatory arthritogenic properties which may contribute and raise joint inflammation.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of the ghrelin agonist growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, M Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-03-01

    Chronic arthritis induces hypermetabolism and cachexia. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone that has been proposed as a treatment to prevent cachexia. The aim of this work was to examine the effect of administration of the ghrelin agonist growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) to arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant, and 15 days later arthritic and control rats were daily injected with GHRP-2 (100 microg/kg) or with saline for 8 days. Arthritis induced an increase in serum ghrelin (P < 0.01) and a decrease in serum concentrations of leptin (P < 0.01), whereas GHRP-2 administration increased serum concentrations of leptin. GHRP-2 increased food intake in control rats but not in arthritic rats. However, in arthritic rats GHRP-2 administration ameliorated the external symptoms of arthritis, as it decreased the arthritis score (10.4 +/- 0.8 vs. 13.42 +/- 0.47, P < 0.01) and the paw volume. In addition, circulating IL-6 and nitrites/nitrates were increased by arthritis, and GHRP-2 treatment decreased the serum IL-6 levels (P < 0.01). To elucidate whether GHRP-2 is able to modulate IL-6 release directly on immune cells, peritoneal macrophage cultures were incubated with GHRP-2 or ghrelin, the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor. Both GHRP-2 (10(-7) M) and ghrelin (10(-7) M) prevented endotoxin-induced IL-6 and decreased nitrite/nitrate release from peritoneal macrophages in vitro. These data suggest that GHRP-2 administration has an anti-inflammatory effect in arthritic rats that seems to be mediated by ghrelin receptors directly on immune cells.

  13. Alterations to the middle cerebral artery of the hypertensive-arthritic rat model potentiates intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Killol; Kane, Brittany; Chang, Hilary; Naiel, Safaa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We have recently created an age-dependent hypertensive-mono-arthritic animal model from the stroke-resistant spontaneously hypertensive rat to model populations with autoimmune disease who are hypertensive and are prone to stroke. The model exhibits signs of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) subsequent to chronic inflammation and hypertension. HS is also associated with the inability of middle cerebral arteries to undergo pressure dependent constriction (PDC). We investigated alterations in the cerebrovasculature of our hypertensive mono-arthritic animals that develop stroke. Main Methods Animals were fed either a high salt diet (HSD) (4% NaCl) or Purina chow (0.58% NaCl) from weaning. Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the left hind paw at 21–28 weeks; controls received saline and histological and functional studies were performed. Results Brain damage was more prominent with the high salt, with inflammation exacerbating the damage. High salt alone significantly decreased middle cerebral artery’s (MCA’s) ability to undergo PDC. Inflammation significantly decreased the ability of cerebrovasculature to respond to pressure step in the regular salt diet. The responses to vasoactive peptides were also significantly attenuated in both inflamed groups regardless of diet. Conclusion Induction of chronic systemic inflammation increases brain damage, and affect the MCA’s vasogenic function, decreasing its ability to respond to intraluminal pressure. HSD further exacerbates organ damage associated with chronic inflammation, further compromising cerebrovascular function, and likely increasing the incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage and injury. PMID:27833798

  14. Norisoboldine alleviates joint destruction in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis by reducing RANKL, IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhi-feng; Jiao, Xiao-lan; Wang, Ting; Lu, Qian; Xia, Yu-feng; Wang, Zheng-tao; Guo, Qing-long; Chou, Gui-xin; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effects of norisoboldine (NOR), a major isoquinoline alkaloid in Radix Linderae, on joint destruction in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) and its underlying mechanisms. Methods: AIA was induced in adult male SD rats by intradermal injection of Mycobacterium butyricum in Freund's complete adjuvant at the base of the right hind paw and tail. From d 14 after immunization, the rats were orally given NOR (7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) daily for 10 consecutive days. Joint destruction was evaluated with radiological scanning and H&E staining. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were prepared from fresh synovial tissues in the AIA rats. The expression of related proteins and mRNAs were detected by ELISA, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Results: In AIA rats, NOR (15 and 30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the swelling of paws and arthritis index scores, and elevated the mean body weight. NOR (30 mg/kg) prevented both the infiltration of inflammatory cells and destruction of bone and cartilage in joints. However, NOR (15 mg/kg) only suppressed the destruction of bone and cartilage, but did not obviously ameliorate synovial inflammation. NOR (15 and 30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the serum levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13, but not the osteoprotegerin and MMP-1 levels. The mRNA levels of RANKL, IL-6, COX-2, and MMP-13 in synovium were also suppressed. Dexamethasone produced similar effects in AIA rats as NOR did, but without elevating the mean body weight. In the cultured FLS, treatment with NOR (10 and 30 mmol/L) significantly decreased the secretion of RANKL, IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13 proteins. Furthermore, the treatment selectively prevented the activation of MAPKs, AKT and transcription factor AP-1 component c-Jun, but not the recruitment of TRAF6 or the activation of JAK2/STAT3. Treatment of the cultured FLS with the specific inhibitors of p38, ERK, AKT, and AP-1

  15. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer-dexamethasone conjugates in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ling-Dong; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Xin-Ming; Huang, Jian-Geng; Alnouti, Yazen; Wang, Dong

    2010-08-02

    N-(2-Hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer has been found to be arthrotropic (joint-targeting) in the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rat model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this manuscript, we report the quantitative pharmacokinetics and biodistribution (PK/BD) of (125)I-labeled HPMA copolymer-dexamethasone conjugate (P-Dex) in AA rats. Structural parameters of the prodrug such as the molecular weight (MW) and Dex content were found to have strong impact on the PK/BD profiles of P-Dex. The increase of MW (14,000, 24,000, and 42,000 g/mol) and Dex content (0, 151, and 313 micromol/g) enhances the arthrotropism of P-Dex. For the conjugate with highest MW and Dex content (P-H-M(W)/Dex), the percentage of injected doses per gram (ID/g) of ankle synovial tissue at day seventh postadministration is 1% g(-1), which confirms P-Dex as an arthrotropic macromolecular prodrug. For liver and spleen, the ID/g values are 0.51 and 3.64% g(-1), respectively. As an antigen-presenting organ, the sequestration of the prodrug by spleen may be explained by its abnormal enlargement associated with the systemic inflammatory disease model. Gradual reduction of spleen weight due to the inflammation resolution effect of P-Dex may also contribute to the high ID/g values. Increase of Dex content and reduction of MW would increase P-Dex distribution to kidney. The highest ID/g value for kidney at day seventh postadministration (0.91% g(-1)) was found with P-L-M(w) (MW = 14,000 g/mol, Dex content =288 micromol/g), which may suggest kidney tubuli reabsorption of the conjugates. The P-Dex's distribution to heart and lung is minimum.

  16. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  17. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  18. Trichilia monadelpha bark extracts inhibit carrageenan-induced foot-oedema in the 7-day old chick and the oedema associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ainooson, G K; Owusu, G; Woode, E; Ansah, C; Annan, K

    2012-01-01

    Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Meliaceae) bark extract is used in African traditional medicine for the management of various disease conditions including inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous (TWE), alcoholic (TAE) and petroleum ether extract (TPEE) of T. monadelpha using the 7-day old chick-carrageenan footpad oedema (acute inflammation) and the adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats (chronic inflammation). TWE and TPEE significantly inhibited the chick-carrageenan footpad oedema with maximal inhibitions of 57.79±3.92 and 63.83±12 respectively, but TAE did not. The reference anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and dexamethasone) inhibited the chick-carrageenan-induced footpad oedema, with maximal inhibitions of 64.92±2.03 and 71.85±15.34 respectively. Furthermore, all the extracts and the reference anti-inflammatory agents (diclofenac, dexamethasone, methotrexate) inhibited the inflammatory oedema associated with adjuvant arthritis with maximal inhibitions of 64.41±5.56, 57.04±8.57, 62.18±2.56%, for TWE, TAE and TPEE respectively and 80.28±5.79, 85.75±2.96, 74.68±3.03% for diclofenac, dexamethasone and methotrexate respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant bark confirmed the presence of a large array of plant constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids, all of which may be potential sources of phyto-antiinflammatory agents. In conclusion, our work suggests that T. monadelpha is a potential source of antiinflammatory agents.

  19. Anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity of a cytotoxic protein NN-32 from Indian spectacle cobra (Naja naja) venom in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antony; Datta, Poulami; Das, Tanaya; Biswas, Ajoy Kumar; Gomes, Aparna

    2014-11-01

    The anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity of NN-32, a cytotoxic protein from Indian spectacle cobra snake (Naja naja) venom has been studied in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis and carrageenan induced anti inflammatory model. NN-32 treatment showed significant decrease in physical and urinary parameters, serum enzymes, serum cytokines levels as compared to arthritic control group of rats. NN-32 treatment recovered carrageenan induced inflammation as compared to control group of rats. The findings showed that the cytotoxic protein NN-32 shares anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity and thus NN-32 may target complex pathophysiological processes like cancer- arthritis-inflammation.

  20. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicities of methotrexate in healthy and collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Yang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Wang, Yan-Lin; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anchor drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but responsiveness is variable in effectiveness and toxicity. Methotrexate and its polyglutamate conjugates (MTXPGn) in red blood cells (RBC) have been associated with patient response. In the current study, 13 collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and 12 healthy rats were given subcutaneous doses of either saline or 0.3 or 1.5 mg/kg per 2 days of MTX from day 21 to 43 post-induction. Blood samples were obtained at various times to measure MTX in plasma, and MTX and MTXPGn in RBC. Effects on disease progression were indicated by body weight and paw size. After multiple-doses, RBC MTX reached steady-state (82.4 nM) within 4 days. The MTXPG2 and MTXPG3 in RBC kept increasing until the end of the study attaining 12.5 and 17.7 nM. Significant weight loss was observed after dosing of 1.5 mg/kg/2 days, whereas moderate effectiveness was observed after dosing of 0.3 mg/kg/2 days. A pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic/disease (PK/PD/DIS) model with indirect mechanisms and transduction components incorporating plasma MTX, RBC MTX, and RBC MTXPGn concentrations, and paw size was developed using naïve data pooling and ADAPT 5. The PK/PD in CIA rats dosed at 0.3 mg/kg/2 days were captured well by our proposed model. MTX showed modest (Imaxd = 0.16) but sensitive (IC50d = 0.712 nM) effectiveness on paw edema. The higher dose produced toxicity. The proposed model offers improved understanding of MTX effects on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23456770

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-arthritic, antioxidant efficacy of fucoidan from Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar.

    PubMed

    Phull, Abdul-Rehman; Majid, Muhammad; Haq, Ihsan-Ul; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Kim, Song Ja

    2017-04-01

    Seaweed and their constituents have been traditionally employed for the management of various human pathologic conditions such as edema, urinary disorders and inflammatory anomalies. The current study was performed to investigate the antioxidant and anti-arthritic effects of fucoidan from Undaria pinnatifida. A noteworthy in vitro antioxidant potential at 500μg/ml in 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay (80% inhibition), nitrogen oxide inhibition assay (71.83%), hydroxyl scavenging assay (71.92%), iron chelating assay (73.55%) and a substantial ascorbic acid equivalent reducing power (399.35μg/mg ascorbic acid equivalent) and total antioxidant capacity (402.29μg/mg AAE) suggested fucoidan a good antioxidant agent. Down regulation of COX-2 expression in rabbit articular chondrocytes in a dose (0-100μg) and time (0-48h) dependent manner, unveiled its in vitro anti-inflammatory significance. In vivo carrageenan induced inflammatory rat model demonstrated a 68.19% inhibition of inflammation whereas an inflammation inhibition potential of 79.38% was recorded in anti-arthritic complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. A substantial ameliorating effect on altered hematological and biochemical parameters in arthritic rats was also observed. Therefore, findings of the present study prospects fucoidan as a potential antioxidant that can effectively abrogate oxidative stress, edema and arthritis-mediated inflammation and mechanistic studies are recommended for observed activities.

  2. Assessment of anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic properties of Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. based on experiments in arthritic rat models and qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Subhashis; Sarkar, Sudeb; Dutta, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Soumen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The principle objective of the study was to explore the anti-arthritic properties of Acmella uliginosa (AU) (Sw.) Cass. flower in a rat model and to identify potential anti-inflammatory compounds derived from flower extracts. The synergistic role played by a combination of AU flower and Aloe vera (AV) gel crude extracts was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats induced with Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA) were used as a disease model of arthritic paw swelling. There were three experimental and two control groups, each consisting of five rats. Paw circumference and serum biochemical parameters were evaluated to investigate the role of the flower extracts in disease amelioration through a feeding schedule spanning 21 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses were performed to search for the presence of anti-inflammatory compounds in the ethanolic and n-hexane solvent extracts of the flower. Results: As a visual cue to the experimental outcomes, FCA-induced paw swelling decreased to the normal level; and hemoglobin, serum protein, and albumin levels were significantly increased in the treated animals. The creatinine level was estimated to be normal in the experimental rats after the treatment. The combination of AU and AV showed the best recovery potential in all the studied parameters, confirming the synergistic efficacy of the herbal formulation. GC/MS analyses revealed the presence of at least 5 anti-inflammatory compounds including 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, phenylmethyl ester, astaxanthin, à-N-Normethadol, fenretinide that have reported anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic properties. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that the crude flower homogenate of AU contains potential anti-inflammatory compounds which could be used as an anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic medication. PMID:27366352

  3. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect of Kerabala: a value-added ayurvedic formulation from virgin coconut oil inhibits pathogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Sandya, S; Pramod, C; Asha, S; Svenia, Jose P; Premlal, S; GrishKumar, B

    2017-02-01

    Kerabala (CB) is a novel ayurvedic formulation used for treating various inflammatory diseases. This formulation was made from virgin coconut oil and it comprises extracts of Sida cordifolia, coconut milk and sesame oil. The current study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of CB on carrageenan-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic experimental models. 5 mg/kg bwt was found to be potent dose from carrageenan model and evaluated its effect in adjuvant-induced chronic arthritic model. The antioxidant assays like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation product, nitrate level and GSH were measured in paw tissue. Hematological parameters like hemoglobin (HB) count, ESR, WBC count, plasma CRP levels were analyzed. By RT-PCR, the inflammatory markers like cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expressions were evaluated. The extracellular matrix proteins like MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by zymography and its expression by western blotting. Histopathology and cytology of paw tissue and synovium were analyzed. The result indicated that there was a significant increment in the levels of antioxidant enzymes on CB administration. The hematological markers such as ESR, WBC and plasma CRP levels were reduced by CB treatment and it also increases the HB level. The upregulated gene level expressions of inflammatory markers like COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 were down regulated by administration of CB. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression significantly reduced by CB administration. Massive influx of inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferative collagen in histological analysis of paw tissue of arthritic rat was decreased by CB administration. Synovial cytology of CB administrated group shows reduced number of reactive mesothelial cells and synovial inflammatory cells. This current study shows that ayurvedic drug CB has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and

  4. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats.

  5. Periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mônica G.; Sacchetti, Silvana B.; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Pimentel, Suzana Peres; Casarin, Renato Corrêa Viana; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Casati, Marcio Z.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated some immunological features by experimental periodontitis (EP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease interact in destructive processes in arthritic rats. Rats were assigned to the following groups: EP +RA; RA; EP; and Negative Control. RA was induced by immunizations with type-II collagen and a local immunization with Complete Freund’s adjuvant in the paw. Periodontitis was induced by ligating the right first molars. The serum level of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACCPA) were measured before the induction of EP (T1) and at 28 days after (T2) by ELISA assay. ACCPA levels were also measured in the gingival tissue at T2. The specimens were processed for morphometric analysis of bone loss, and the gingival tissue surrounding the first molar was collected for the quantification of interleukin IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α using a Luminex/MAGpix assay. Paw edema was analyzed using a plethysmometer. Periodontitis increased the RF and ACCPA levels in the serum and in the gingival tissue, respectively. Besides, the level of paw swelling was increased by EP and remained in progress until the end of the experiment, when EP was associated with RA. Greater values of IL-17 were observed only when RA was present, in spite of PE. It can be concluded that periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins level in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats; at the same time, arthritis increases periodontal destruction, confirming the bidirectional interaction between diseases. PMID:28358812

  6. Protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced arthritic rats: detailed histopathological study of the joints and white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Taty Anna; Othman, Faizah; Mohd Ramli, Elvy Suhana; Md Isa, Nurismah; Das, Srijit

    2012-01-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes contains curcumin, an active compound which possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an accepted experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. The present study aimed to observe the histological changes in the joints of experimental arthritic rats treated with curcumin. Twenty four male Sprague-Dawley (approximately 7 weeks-old) rats were randomly divided into four groups. Three groups were immunized with 150 µg collagen. All rats with established CIA, with arthritis scores exceeding 1, were orally treated with betamethasone (0.5 mg/ml/kg body weight), curcumin (110 mg/ml/kg body weight) or olive oil (1.0 ml/kg body weight) daily, for two weeks. One remaining group was kept as normal control. Treatment with 110 mg/ml/kg curcumin showed significant mean differences in the average white blood cell (WBC) count (p<0.05), cell infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion scores (p<0.05) compared to the olive oil treated group. Pannus formation scores showed that curcumin supplementation successfully suppressed the pannus formation process that occurred in the articular cartilage of the CIA joints. The mean difference for histological scores for the curcumin group was insignificant compared to the betamethasone treated group. It is concluded that supplementation of curcumin has protective effect on the histopathological and degenerative changes in the joints of CIA rats which was at par with betamethasone.

  7. Vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated serum homocysteine levels in rat adjuvant arthritis: effect of vitamin E administration.

    PubMed

    Can, Cenk; Cinar, Mehtap G; Koşay, Sezen; Evinç, Akgün

    2002-06-14

    We aimed to study the alterations in serum homocysteine levels and endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxant responses in adjuvant-induced arthritis of the rat and to determine the effects of vitamin E administration on these changes. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant into the paw. 26 days after the induction of arthritis, serum homocysteine levels and relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodiumnitroprusside in thoracic aortas were evaluated. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine were decreased in aortas from arthritic rats, whereas the responses to sodiumnitroprusside were not significantly different when compared to the aortas from control rats. A significant increase was observed in serum homocysteine levels of the arthritic rats in comparison to those of controls. Vitamin E administration (100 mg/kg/day, i.m. for 26 days) to arthritic rats resulted in a significant increase in endothelium-dependent aortic responses to acetylcholine and a significant decrease in serum homocysteine levels with respect to the non-treated arthritic rats. However, in healthy rats, vitamin E treatment significantly decreased the acetylcholine-induced relaxant responses. We conclude that adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat is associated with increased serum homocysteine levels and this is accompanied by a reduction in endothelium-dependent vascular responses in the thoracic aortas. Vitamin E treatment leads to normalization of the increased serum homocysteine levels and improves the endothelium-dependent relaxant responses in this experimental model.

  8. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic activity of flavonoids from Daphne genkwa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cui-Ping; He, Xin; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Su-Li; Li, Hui; Song, Zi-Jing; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Yang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Ping; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-rheumatoid arthritic activity of four flavonoids from Daphne genkwa (FFD) in vivo and in vitro. Flavonoids of D. genkwa were extracted by refluxing with ethanol and purified by polyamide resin. An in vivo carrageenan-induced paw edema model, tampon-granuloma model and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis mouse model were used to evaluate the anti-rheumatoid arthritic activities of FFD. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO) release and neutral red uptake (NRU) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect in vitro. In addition, antioxidant effect of FFD was determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. A high dose of FFD significantly reduced the degree of acute inflammatory paw edema in mice as a response to carrageenan administration (p<0.01). FFD displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of granuloma formation in mice (p<0.05). FFD also inhibited chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats when administered orally at the dose of 50mg/kg/day (p<0.001). In addition, FFD suppressed the production of NO and exhibited immunoregulatory function in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-related manner. Simultaneously, FFD revealed conspicuous antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 18.20μg/ml. FFD possesses significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, which could be a potential therapeutic agent for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Anti-arthritic activity of various extracts of Sida rhombifolia aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S R; Nirmal, S A; Patil, R Y; Asane, G S

    2009-01-01

    Aerial parts of the plant Sida rhombifolia Linn. (Malvaceae) were extracted successively to produce various extracts. These extracts were screened for various parameters of anti-arthritic activity, such as adjuvant-induced arthritis, motor performance, mean distance travelled, and histopathological study. Results showed that the polar constituents (ethanol and aqueous extracts) of the plant S. rhombifolia were useful in the treatment of arthritis.

  10. The protective effects of curculigoside A on adjuvant-induced arthritis by inhibiting NF-кB/NLRP3 activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huimin; Gao, Gongming; Zhang, Li; Shen, Guowei; Sun, Wenjian; Gu, Zhangping; Fan, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of curculigoside A (CA) on adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats and explore its possible mechanisms. AA was induced by intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were treated with CA(10 and 20mg/kg) from days 18 to 24 after immunization. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in serum were determined by ELISA. Moreover, the levels of super oxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined using commercial kits. In particular, NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-кB pathway were detected by Western blot. As expected, CA at 10 and 20mg/kg significantly relieved the hind paw swelling and arthritis index, reduced the levels of IL-6 IL-1β, PGE2, TNF-α, MDA and increased SOD activity in serum. In addition, CA effectively down-regulated the expression of NF-кB/NLRP3 pathway. These findings showed that CA exerted beneficial effects on rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

  11. The melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreases inflammation and muscle wasting in arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gómez‐SanMiguel, Ana Belen; Martín, Ana Isabel; Nieto‐Bona, María Paz; Fernández‐Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, María Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory diseases induce cachexia that increases mortality and morbidity of the illness. Adjuvant‐induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. Alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone has an anti‐inflammatory effect in arthritic rats and decreases muscle wasting. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether the anti‐cachectic action of alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone is mediated by the melanocortin receptor type 3 pathway. Methods Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant, and 6 days afterwards, arthritic rats were injected with the selective melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐gammaMSH ( d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH) 500 µg/kg subcutaneously. or saline twice a day, for 10 days. Results d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased the external signs of inflammation and body weight loss, but it was not able to modify the anorexigenic effect of arthritis or the increase in hypothalamic cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) expression. In contrast, d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH prevented arthritis‐induced increase in hypothalamic IL‐1β and serum corticosterone levels and the decrease in serum IGF‐I levels. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH treatment also prevented arthritis‐induced NF‐kB(p65) phosphorylation and tumour necrosis factor‐α mRNA increase in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH administration to arthritic rats increased gastrocnemius mass, its cross‐sectional area, and mean fast fibre area. Those effects of d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH were associated with a decreased expression of atrogin‐1 and muscle ring‐finger protein‐1 in the gastrocnemius. In rats treated with saline, arthritis increased the expression of autophagy marker genes LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap1 as well as the conversion of LC3b I to LC3b II by lipidation in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased gastrocnemius LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap

  12. Oral curcumin has anti-arthritic efficacy through somatostatin generation via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dou, Yannong; Zhao, Di; Wang, Ting; Bian, Difei; Tong, Bei; Xia, Ying; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has been proven to be clinically effective in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapy, but its low oral bioavailability eclipses existent evidence that attempts to explain the underlying mechanism. Small intestine, the only organ exposed to a relatively high concentration of CUR, is the main site that generates gut hormones which are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. This study aims at addressing the hypothesis that one or more gut hormones serve as an intermediary agent for the anti-arthritic action of CUR. The protein and mRNA levels of gut hormones in CUR-treated rats were analyzed by ELISA and RT-PCR. Somatostatin (SOM) depletor and receptor antagonist were used to verify the key role of SOM in CUR-mediated anti-arthritic effect. The mechanisms underlying CUR-induced upregulation of SOM levels were explored by cellular experiments and immunohistochemical staining. The data showed that oral administration of CUR (100 mg/kg) for consecutive two weeks in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats still exhibited an extremely low plasma exposure despite of a dramatic amelioration of arthritis symptoms. When injected intraperitoneally, CUR lost anti-arthritic effect in rats, suggesting that it functions in an intestine-dependent manner. CUR elevated SOM levels in intestines and sera, and SOM depletor and non-selective SOM receptor antagonist could abolish the inhibitory effect of CUR on arthritis. Immunohistochemical assay demonstrated that CUR markedly increased the number of SOM-positive cells in both duodenum and jejunum. In vitro experiments demonstrated that CUR could augment SOM secretion from intestinal endocrine cells, and this effect could be hampered by either MEK1/2 or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor. In summary, oral administration of CUR exhibits anti-arthritic effect through augmenting SOM secretion from the endocrine cells in small intestines via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways.

  13. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis via regulating inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of majoon ushba (MU) and its underlying mechanism in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. MU (1000mg/kg/b.wt) and methotrexate (3mg/kg/b.wt) were administered from day 11 to day 18th for 8days after adjuvant induction. We have found that MU treatment significantly increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) and inhibited the over production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (ELISA) in the serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17), inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)), MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and transcription factors (NF-кB and AP-1) (Real-Time PCR) was found significantly downregulated in the synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. In addition, the protein expression of NF-кB, IL-17, COX-2, and RANKL (western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis) was found reduced. On the other hand, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a bone remodeling marker was found to be elevated in synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. Furthermore, MU treatment prevented body weight loss and reduced the joint paw edema, cell infiltration, cartilage and bone degradation as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis. In conclusion, our current findings provide scientific evidence for the traditional claim of MU as an anti-arthritic drug.

  14. Anti-Arthritic Activity of Schistosoma mansoni and Trichinella spiralis Derived-Antigens in Adjuvant Arthritis in Rats: Role of FOXP3+ Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; Ghazy, Amany A.; El azzouni, Mervat Z.; Boulos, Laila M.; Younis, Layla K.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the concept of helminths therapy in a variety of autoimmune diseases. Here, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of autoclaved Schistosoma mansoni antigen (ASMA) and Trichinella spiralis antigen (ATSA) on the clinical and immunopathological features of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adjuvant arthritis was induced by subcutaneous and intradermal injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the plantar surface of the right hind paw and the root of the tail, respectively. Rats were randomly assigned to serve as normal control, untreated arthritis, ASMA or ATSA-treated arthritis groups. Antigens were given by intradermal injection in two doses, two weeks apart. The development, progression of arthritic features, and the impact on animals’ gait and body weight were followed up for 4 weeks. The associated changes in serum cytokines (IL-17, IFN-γ and IL-10), joints’ histopathology and immunohistochemistry of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) were evaluated at the end of the study. Treatment with either ASMA or ATSA attenuated the progression of clinical features of polyarthritis, improved gait and body weight gain, reduced the elevated serum IL-17 and further increased both IFN-γ and IL-10. Histopathologically, this was associated with a remarkable regression of paws’ inflammation that was limited only to the subcutaneous tissue, and a significant increase in the number of Foxp 3+ cells versus the untreated arthritis group. In conclusion, both Schistosoma mansoni and Trichinella spiralis derived antigens exerted protective effect against adjuvant arthritis with better effect achieved by ASMA treatment. This anti-arthritic activity is attributed to upregulation of the Foxp3+ Tregs, with subsequent favorable modulation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The use of autoclaved parasitic antigens excludes the deleterious effects of imposing helminthic infection by using live parasites, which may pave the way to a

  15. Antinociceptive Effect of Rat D-Serine Racemase Inhibitors, L-Serine-O-Sulfate, and L-Erythro-3-Hydroxyaspartate in an Arthritic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Laurido, Claudio; Hernández, Alejandro; Pelissier, Teresa; Constandil, Luis

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAr) activation requires the presence of D-serine, synthesized from L-serine by a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent serine racemase (SR). D-serine levels can be lowered by inhibiting the racemization of L-serine. L-serine-O-sulfate (LSOS) and L-erythro-3-hydroxyaspartate (LEHA), among others, have proven to be effective in reducing the D-serine levels in culture cells. It is tempting then to try these compounds in their effectiveness to decrease nociceptive levels in rat arthritic pain. We measured the C-reflex paradigm and wind-up potentiation in the presence of intrathecally injected LSOS (100 μg/10 μL) and LEHA (100 μg/10 μL) in normal and monoarthritic rats. Both compounds decreased the wind-up activity in normal and monoarthritic rats. Accordingly, all the antinociceptive effects were abolished when 300 μg/10 μL of D-serine were injected intrathecally. Since no in vivo results have been presented so far, this constitutes the first evidence that SR inhibitions lower the D-serine levels, thus decreasing the NMDAr activity and the consequent development and maintenance of chronic pain. PMID:22536130

  16. Effect of nabumetone treatment on vascular responses of the thoracic aorta in rat experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ulker, S; Onal, A; Hatip, F B; Sürücü, A; Alkanat, M; Koşay, S; Evinç, A

    2000-04-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drug which is known to cause less gastrointestinal damage than other NSAI drugs. This study was performed to evaluate whether nabumetone treatment might alter the vascular aberrations related to inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Nabumetone treatment (120 or 240 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), orally) was initiated on the 15th day of adjuvant inoculation and continued for 14 days. Arthritic lesions, vascular contractile and relaxant responses and gastroduodenal histopathological preparations were evaluated 29 days after adjuvant inoculation. The contractile responses of aortic rings to phenylephrine and KCl were increased in grade 2 arthritic rats. In grade 3 arthritis only the phenylephrine contractility was decreased. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were decreased in grades 2 and 3. In healthy rats, nabumetone did not change the vascular responses. After treatment of arthritic rats with nabumetone, both the contractile and relaxant response of the aortic rings returned to normal, and arthritic score and paw swelling were reduced. Gastroduodenal histopathology did not show erosions or ulcers in any of the groups. In conclusion, nabumetone improved the systemic signs and vascular alterations in experimental arthritis without showing any gastrointestinal side effects.

  17. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effect of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol on experimental inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, Samuel Joshua; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2013-02-01

    In this study, p-coumaric acid was evaluated for its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. The immunomodulatory effect of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg body weight) was assessed by evaluating its effect on cell-mediated immune responses (delayed type hypersensitivity reaction), serum immunoglobulin levels, and macrophage phagocytic index in rats. The anti-inflammatory effects of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg body weight) were investigated by examining its effect on expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in synovial tissue by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and circulating immune complexes in serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The increased cell-mediated immune responses and macrophage phagocytic index observed in control rats were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) upon treatment with p-coumaric acid implying its immunosuppressive property, whereas serum immunoglobulin levels were found to be increased in p-coumaric acid treated control rats. p-coumaric acid also showed significant (p < 0.05) anti-inflammatory effects in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by effecting a decrease in the expression of inflammatory mediator TNF-α and circulating immune complexes. Indomethacin was used as a reference drug for anti-inflammatory studies. Thus, our results show that p-coumaric acid could be considered a potential immunosuppressive agent in treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar.

    PubMed

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats.

  20. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats. PMID:25276195

  1. The Protective Effect of Yi Shen Juan Bi Pill in Arthritic Rats with Castration-Induced Kidney Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyan; Li, Jian; He, Xiaojuan; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Niu, Xuyan; Zhao, Ning; Ju, Dahong; Lu, Aiping

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have been linked to the onset, severity, and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the most common pattern in RA is kidney deficiency, which partly corresponds to a low sex hormone state. In this study, TCM kidney deficiency was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with castration surgery, and a TCM preparation, Yi Shen Juan Bi Pill (YJB), was used to treat collagen induced arthritis (CIA) rats with castration. Metabolomic technique was used to evaluate the pharmacological mechanism in castrated CIA rats treated by YJB. The results showed that castration significantly increased the severity of the arthritis in rats but was ameliorated by YJB. Its pharmacological mechanism was partially associated with lipid metabolites involving free fatty acid (FFA) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In conclusion, the experimental results demonstrate the protective effect of YJB on the TCM kidney deficiency pattern induced by androgen deficiency in CIA rats and support that YJB should be used for the clinical treatment of RA with TCM kidney deficiency pattern. PMID:22550538

  2. Anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. fruits and its chemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolu; Lu, Jincai; Xin, Hailiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yuliang; Tang, Kexuan

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. (Capparidaceae) fruits and its chemical constituents. The adjuvant arthritic rat model was developed to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of different fractions of ethanol extraction from C. spinosa L. The fraction eluted by ethanol-water (50:50, v/v) had the most significant anti-arthritic activity. The chemical constituents of this fraction were therefore studied; seven known compounds were isolated and identified as: P-hydroxy benzoic acid; 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural; bis(5-formylfurfuryl) ether; daucosterol; α-D-fructofuranosides methyl; uracil; and stachydrine.

  3. Modeling Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Abatacept and Disease Progression in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Rats - A Population Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The PK / PD of abatacept, a selective T-cell co-stimulation modulator, was examined in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a nonlinear mixed effect modeling approach. Male Lewis rats underwent collagen induction to produce rheumatoid arthritis. Two single-dose groups received either 10 mg/kg intravenous (IV) or 20 mg/kg subcutaneous (SC) abatacept, and one multiple-dose group received one 20 mg/kg SC abatacept dose and four additional 10 mg/kg SC doses. Effects on disease progression (DIS) were measured by paw swelling. Plasma concentrations of abatacept were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PK / PD data were sequentially fitted using NONMEM VI. Goodness-of-fit was assessed by objective functions and visual inspection of diagnostic plots. The PK of abatacept followed a two-compartment model with linear elimination. For SC doses, short-term zero-order absorption was assumed with F = 59.2 %. The disease progression component was an indirect response model with a time-dependent change in paw edema production rate constant (kin) that was inhibited by abatacept. Variation in the PK data could be explained by inter-individual variability in clearance (CL) and central compartment volume (V1), while the large variability of the PD data may be the result of paw edema production (kin0) and loss rate constant (kout). Abatacept has modest effects on paw swelling in CIA rats. The PK / PD profiles were well described by the proposed model and allowed evaluation of inter-individual variability on drug- and DIS-related parameters. PMID:24233383

  4. Aqueous fraction of Alstonia boonei de Wild leaves suppressed inflammatory responses in carrageenan and formaldehyde induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Akinnawo, Omowumi O; Anyasor, God'swill N; Osilesi, Odutola

    2017-02-01

    Alstonia boonie de Wild is an ethnomedical plant used as therapy against inflammatory disorders. This study evaluated the most active anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant fraction of A. boonei leaves using in vitro and in vivo models. Quantitative phytochemical analysis, anti-protein denaturation and hypotonicity-induced hemolysis of human red blood cell membrane (HRBC), radical scavenging activity assays, carrageenan and formaldehyde-induced inflammation models were carried out. Results showed that aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions of 70% methanol extract of A. boonie leaves contained high quantities of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds compared with hexane and butanol fractions. Aqueous fraction of A. boonie leaves significantly (P<0.05) inhibited heat-induced protein denaturation, stabilized hypotonicity-induced hemolysis of HRBC, scavenged DPPH, NO and H2O2 radicals in a concentration-dependent manner compared with other fractions in vitro. In addition, orally administered 50-250-mg/kg body weight (b.w.) aqueous fraction of A. boonei leaves suppressed carrageenan-induced rat paw edema thickness by 74.32%, 79.22% and 89.86% respectively at 6th h in a dose-dependent manner comparable with animals treated with standard diclofenac sodium (88.69%) in vivo. Furthermore, investigation of formaldehyde-induced inflammation in rats showed that 50-250 mg/kg b.w. aqueous fraction of A. boonei reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. Aqueous fraction of A. boonei also suppressed eosinophils, monocytes and basophils, total white blood cell, total platelet, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and modulated plasma lipid profile compared with control group. Aqueous fraction of A. boonei leaves exhibited substantial active anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Hence, an aqueous fraction of A. boonei leaves could be channeled towards pharmaceutical drug development. In addition, this study provided scientific insight to account

  5. Chrysin alleviates testicular dysfunction in adjuvant arthritic rats via suppression of inflammation and apoptosis: Comparison with celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Arab, Hany H.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.

    2014-09-01

    Long standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with testicular dysfunction and subfertility. Few studies have addressed the pathogenesis of testicular injury in RA and its modulation by effective agents. Thus, the current study aimed at evaluating the effects of two testosterone boosting agents; chrysin, a natural flavone and celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in testicular impairment in rats with adjuvant arthritis, an experimental model of RA. Chrysin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and celecoxib (5 mg/kg) were orally administered to Wistar rats once daily for 21 days starting 1 h before arthritis induction. Chrysin suppressed paw edema with comparable efficacy to celecoxib. More important, chrysin, dose-dependently and celecoxib attenuated the testicular injury via reversing lowered gonadosomatic index and histopathologic alterations with preservation of spermatogenesis. Both agents upregulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression and serum testosterone with concomitant restoration of LH and FSH. Furthermore, they suppressed inflammation via abrogation of myeloperoxidase, TNF-α and protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS besides elevation of IL-10. Alleviation of the testicular impairment was accompanied with suppression of oxidative stress via lowering testicular lipid peroxides and nitric oxide. With respect to apoptosis, both agents downregulated FasL mRNA expression and caspase-3 activity in favor of cell survival. For the first time, these findings highlight the protective effects of chrysin and celecoxib against testicular dysfunction in experimental RA which were mediated via boosting testosterone in addition to attenuation of testicular inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Generally, the 50 mg/kg dose of chrysin exerted comparable protective actions to celecoxib. - Highlights: • Chrysin and celecoxib alleviated testicular suppression in adjuvant arthritis. • They attenuated histopathological damage and preserved spermatogenesis

  6. Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus regulate inflammatory pathway and improve antioxidant status in collagen-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2013-01-01

    In view of well-established immunomodulatory properties of Lactobacillus, present investigation was carried out to evaluate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus, against inflammatory pathway and oxidative stress developed in an experimental model of arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used. Oral administration of L. casei, L. acidophilus, standard antiarthritic drug indomethacin, and vehicle were started after induced arthritis and continued up to day 28. Interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-10 levels were estimated in serum. In parallel, oxidative stress parameters were also measured from synovial effsuate. All rats were graded for arthritis score at the end of each week. L. casei, L. acidophilus, and indomethacin treatment significantly downregulated proinflammatory and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines at P<0.0001. They have significantly decreased oxidative stress in synovial effsuate (P<0.0001) and also arthritis score (P<0.05). Protection provided by L. casei and L. acidophilus was more pronounced than that of indomethacin. These lines of evidence suggest that L. casei and L. acidophilus exert potent protective effect against CIA. It further establishes effective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Lactobacillus. However, additional clinical investigations are needed to prove the efficacy of Lactobacillus in treatment/management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Mechanism of Xinfeng Capsule on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Analysis of Urinary Metabolomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-juan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the potential effects of Xinfeng capsule (XFC) on urine metabolic profiling in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS). GC-TOF/MS technology was combined with multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). These methods were used to distinguish the healthy group, untreated group, and XFC treated group and elucidate potential biomarkers. Nine potential biomarkers such as hippuric acid, adenine, and L-dopa were identified as potential biomarkers, indicating that purine metabolism, fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and energy metabolism were disturbed in AA rats. This study demonstrated that XFC is efficacious for RA and explained its potential metabolomics mechanism. PMID:26989506

  8. Investigation of the effect of phlomisoside F on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuying; Dong, Yanfeng; Dong, Hanyu; Zhang, Wen; Li, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Phlomis younghusbandii Mukerjee (Labiatae) has been reported to be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of phlomisoside F (PF), isolated from P. younghusbandii Mukerjee (Labiatae), were investigated in male Wistar rats subjected to carrageen-induced paw edema and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Arthritis scores were evaluated by a 5-point ordinal scale (scores 0–4). Expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, COX-2 and 5-LOX were determined via ELISA and western blot assays. Subsequent to establishing the edema and arthritis models, oral administration of PF (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited mean edema rate, compared with the control group in carrageenan-induced paw edema assay. In addition, administration of PF (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day) for 28 days markedly exhibited an anti-arthritic activity by offsetting the body weight loss, inhibiting the paw edema, reducing the arthritis scores and the indices of thymus and spleen, inhibiting the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and 5-LOX, and increasing the expression of IL-10, when compared with the respective control group in CFA-induced arthritis assay. In conclusion, PF is a valuable anti-arthritic constituent of P. younghusbandii, and the present study results suggest that this herb may be used in the treatment of RA. PMID:28352356

  9. Using gait analysis to assess weight bearing in rats with Freund׳s complete adjuvant-induced monoarthritis to improve predictivity: Interfering with the cyclooxygenase and nerve growth factor pathways.

    PubMed

    Ängeby Möller, Kristina; Berge, Odd-Geir; Finn, Anja; Stenfors, Carina; Svensson, Camilla I

    2015-06-05

    Lack of predictive power for drug effects has been a major criticism against animal pain models. It is therefore important to define the utility and limitations of different models. The aim of this study was to extend previous work on gait analysis as a tool to investigate pharmacological effects in monoarthritic rats, specifically to test the hypothesis that monoarthritis induced by Freund׳s complete adjuvant (FCA) provides a better estimate of overall analgesic efficacy of established, and novel, clinically effective and ineffective therapeutic approaches. Male rats injected intra-articularly into one ankle joint with FCA (1.0mg/ml) were treated with the monoclonal antibody to nerve growth factor (NGF), MEDI-578, the inhibitors of tropomyosin receptor kinases A, B and C (pan-Trk) AZ6623 or AZ7092, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) inhibitor AZD1386, or the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors naproxen, ibuprofen, valdecoxib or rofecoxib. Effects on weight bearing during locomotion were tested using video capture of print images. The apparent efficacy in this model was Trk inhibitors≥anti-NGF antibody>COX inhibitors. The TRPV1 inhibitor was ineffective. Together with previous data, the results support using gait-related parameters in the monoarthritis model. FCA as induction agent seems to provide a good overall prediction of analgesic efficacy in disorders with inflammatory joint pain.

  10. Comparative pharmacokinetic study of two boswellic acids in normal and arthritic rat plasma after oral administration of Boswellia serrata extract or Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Chenning; Wu, Yun; Ai, Yu; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2014-10-01

    Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), a Chinese herbal formula composed of 11 different herbs, has been used traditionally for the treatment of arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the pharmacokinetic profile of its anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds has not been elucidated. Boswellic acids are the bioactive compounds with potent anti-inflammatory activity isolated from Boswellia serrate which is one of the 11 herbs of HLXLD. The objective of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of the two bioactive bowsellic acids: 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic following oral administration of HLXLD or Boswellia serrata extract alone in normal and arthritic rats. An LC-MS method was developed and validated for the determination of 11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic in the comparative pharmacokinetic study. The results showed that there were significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between normal and arthritic groups. Interestingly, the absorptions of two boswellic acids were significantly higher in HLXLD than Boswellia serrata extract alone, indicating the synergistic effect of other herbal ingredients in HLXLD. This comparative pharmacokinetic study provided direct evidence supporting the notion that the efficacy of a complex mixture such as HLXLD is better than that of single components in treating human diseases.

  11. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  12. Inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and NO production in mouse macrophage and inflammatory response in rat animal models by a novel Ayurvedic formulation, BV-9238.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debendranath; Chaskar, Sunetra; Athavale, Nitin; Chitre, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic crippling disease, where protein-based tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors show significant relief, but with potentially fatal side effects. A need for a safe, oral, cost-effective small molecule or phyto-pharmaceutical is warranted. BV-9238 is an Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation containing specialized standardized extracts of Withania somnifera, Boswellia serrata, Zingiber officinale and Curcuma longa. The anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 were evaluated for inhibition of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) production, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated, RAW 264.7, mouse macrophage cell line. BV-9238 reduced TNF-α and NO production, without any cytotoxic effects. Subsequently, the formulation was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) and carrageenan-induced paw edema (CPE) rat animal models. AIA was induced in rats by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally in the paw, and BV-9238 and controls were administered orally for 21 days. Arthritic scores in AIA study and inflamed paw volume in CPE study were significantly reduced upon treatment with BV-9238. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 are due to its inhibition of TNF-α, and NO, and this formulation shows promise as an alternate therapy for inflammatory disorders where TNF-α and NO play important roles.

  13. Immune Modulation of B. terrestris Worker (a Type of Bumblebee), Extract on CFA-induced Paw Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ja; Han, Jea Woong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    To develop a composition for enhancing immunity, based on alcohol extracts of the bumblebee as an active ingredient, bumblebee ethanol extracts were evaluated for their protective effect in chronic models of inflammation, adjuvant induced rat arthritis. B. terrestris worker extract (SDIEX) and, B. hypocrita sapporoensis lava an pupa extract (SPDYBEX), significantly decreased paw edema in arthritic rats, at a dose 100 mg/kg, respectively. The cytokine levels related inflammation of COX-2, sPLA2, VEGF, and TNF-α, were decreased, compared to positive control, indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Histopathological data demonstrated decreases inflammatory activity, hind paw edema, and repaired hyaline articular cartilage in DRG over a 2 wk administration. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of SDIEX and SPDYBEX revealed the presence of cantharidin. PMID:25584147

  14. Protective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. Against Inflammation Associated with Development of Arthritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mali, Ravindra G; Mehta, Anita A

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-arthritic activity of ethanolic extract of seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. (MOEE) in adjuvant-induced arthritis in adult female Wistar rats. During the experimental period, body weight, paw edema volume (primary lesion) and arthritic index (secondary lesion) was observed. On the 21st day, serum from each animal was used for estimation of Rheumatoid Factor (RF) value and levels of selected cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1, and IL-6). Whole blood was used for measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Liver homogenate was utilized for assessment of oxidative stress and histopathology was performed to measure degree of inflammation in synovial joint. Our results suggest that, percentage reduction in body weight was less, paw edema volume and arthritic index score was decreased significantly as compared to diseased control animals. Serum levels of RF, TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6 also showed decreased levels as compared to those in the diseased control group. Treatment with MOEE also altered oxidative stress in relation to its anti-inflammatory activity. Histopathological observations showed mild or less infiltration of lymphocytes, angiogenesis and synovial lining thickening. From all above results and observations, it can be concluded that Moringa oleifera possesses promising antiarthritic property.

  15. Antinociceptive activity of Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences and quercetin in the formalin test and in an arthritic pain model in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana Laura; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Aguirre-Hernández, Eva; Moreno, Julia; Soto-Hernández, Marco; López-Muñoz, Francisco J

    2009-02-01

    Tilia species are well known around the world for their properties in traditional medicine. Antinociceptive activity of hexane, methanol and aqueous extracts from Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences was evaluated in the pain-induced functional impairment model in rats (PIFIR). A preliminar 300 mg/kg dosage of aqueous extracts i.p., but not the same dose of methanol or hexane extract, produced an antinociceptive response in rats similar to that of tramadol (17.8 mg/kg i.p.). A dose-response curve from aqueous extract allowed the determination of ED(50) = 364.97 mg/kg in comparison to ED(50) = 10.35 mg/kg for tramadol in this model. A previous HPLC-DAD analysis corroborated by an HPLC-MS technique in this study demonstrated the flavonoid composition in this Tilia aqueous extract revealing the presence of glycosides mainly derived from quercetin. Thus, Tilia aqueous extract and quercetin were tested at 30 and/or 100 mg/kg dosages i.p. in the PIFIR and formalin models producing a significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive response resembling that produced by a total and a partial agonist of 5-HT(1A) receptors like 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) and buspirone (5 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. In all the treatments, antinociceptive response was inhibited in the presence of WAY 100635 (0.12 mg/kg, i.p.). Our results support the analgesic activity of T. americana var. mexicana inflorescences attributed by folk medicine; they also indicate that quercetin is partly responsible for this pharmacological activity that is likely mediated by serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors.

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Snehal S.; Shah, Praboth V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG) is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. PMID:23930040

  17. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of grape melanin. Inhibitory effects on paw edema and adjuvant induced disease.

    PubMed

    Avramidis, N; Kourounakis, A; Hadjipetrou, L; Senchuk, V

    1998-07-01

    Natural or synthetic melanin (CAS 8049-97-6) is a high molecular weight heteropolymer, product of the enzyme tyrosinase, found to possess radical scavenging and antioxidant functions. It was of interest, therefore, to study in detail the possible anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties of a melanin isolated from grapes. The inhibitory effect of melanin on carrageenin-induced edema, as well as on edemas produced by other phlogistics, was remarkable suggesting that melanin interferes with the prostaglandin as well as the leukotriene and/or complement system mediated inflammation. Grape melanin showed potent inhibitory effect on adjuvant induced disease (AID) in rat, suppressing significantly the primary inflammation and almost totally the secondary lesions of arthritis. Melanin under the present experimental conditions not only strongly inhibited the in vitro lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomal membranes, but furthermore protected the in vivo hepatic peroxidation occurring in AID rats, demonstrating its antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The serum proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-a and the serum globulin fraction were elevated in AID rats, parameters which were more or less normalised by melanin treatment in contrast to the reduced serum levels of IL-2 which were not affected. Similarly to other lipoxygenase inhibitors and hydroxyl radical scavenger NSAIDs, melanin treatment did not affect IL-1 neither increased the splenic mitogenic responses, unlike the classical cyclooxygenase inhibitory NSAIDs. The subpopulation Th1 (T4+ or T8+) of lymphocytes is mainly responsible for cellular immune responses and thus their possible inhibition by melanin could lead to suppression of the development of AID, a model for cell-mediated immunity. The effect of melanin on T-cells is exhibited by the reduced spleen mitogenic responses to a T-cell mitogen and the reduced serum levels of IL-2 of treated rats. In conclusion, grape melanin is an

  18. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  19. Efficacy of ultrasound mediated microbubbles in diclofenac gel to enhance transdermal permeation in rheumatoid arthritis induced rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, A H; Chuang, H C; Chung, H Y

    2015-08-01

    In previous study in the literature, the effect of ultrasound on the transdermal permeation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac has been investigated. Therapeutic ultrasound can increase circulation in the inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Recently, transdermal drug delivery has been demonstrated by ultrasound (US) combining with microbubbles (MBs) contrast agent. In this study, the efficiency of US-MBs mediated diclofenac delivery for adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats was evaluated. RA was induced by injection of 100 μl Freund's complete adjuvant into the ankle joint in SD male rats (250-300g) and were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group (C); (2) penetrating diclofenac alone (D); (3) US alone (U); (4) US combined with penetrating diclofenac (DU); (5) US combined with MBs and penetrating diclofenac (DUB). The evaluations of ankle width were performed for 10 days by high frequency (40MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler mode imaging before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of arthritis induced show synovitis and neovascularity. After treatment, only a little neovascularity has been observed. The recovery rate at 10th day in the group DUB (97.7±2.7 %) was significantly higher than in the group C (1.0±2.7 %), group D (37.5±4.6 %), group U (75.5±4.2 %) and group DU (87.3±5.2 %) (p <; 0.05). Our results investigated that the treatments of US and MBs can increase skin permeability to enhance diclofenac sodium delivery and inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounded the arthritic ankle. In color Doppler imaging, after the combination treatment, the synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area was reduced quickly.

  20. Periarticular osteopenia in adjuvant induced arthritis: role of interleukin-1 in decreased osteogenic and increased resorptive potential of bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Tanihara, M; Ichikawa, Y; Osanai, A; Nakagawa, M; Ide, M; Mizushima, Y

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To clarify the local osteogenic and bone resorptive potential of periarticular bone in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA). METHODS--Formation of fibroblast colony forming units (FCFU; osteogenic precursor cells) and osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture was studied in AIA rats. Osteoclast-inducing activity in the AIA rat bone marrow was assayed by the addition of the marrow supernatant from rats with AIA to control cultures. Bone mineral density was determined by dual x ray absorptiometry. RESULTS--Marrow from AIA rats and that from animals receiving recombinant human interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta for seven days grew significantly fewer FCFU than control marrow. Formation of osteoclast-like cells was increased in bone marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially when bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of marrow supernatant. Formation of resorption lacunae on ivory slices was increased in the marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially from the right (adjuvant inoculated) tibia. AIA rat marrow supernatant promoted osteoclast-like cell formation in control culture, and this was significantly suppressed by an anti-IL-1 antibody. Rats with AIA showed a significant decrease in the bone mineral density of the periarticular regions of the tibia and femur. CONCLUSION--An uncoupled state in bone resorption-formation linkage, possibly mediated through an increase of IL-1 in the bone marrow, may contribute to the development of periarticular osteopenia in inflammatory arthritis. Images PMID:7632091

  1. Effect of genetic deletion of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 on the expression of Substance P in sensory neurons of mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Willcockson, Helen H.; Chen, Yong; Han, Ji Eun; Valtschanoff, Juli G.

    2010-01-01

    The neuropeptide Substance P (SP), expressed by nociceptive sensory afferents in joints, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Capsaicin causes neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to release SP from their central and peripheral axons, suggesting a functional link between SP and the capsaicin receptor, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The expression of both TRPV1 and SP have been reported to increase in several models of arthritis but the specific involvement of TRPV1-expressing articular afferents that can release SP is not completely understood. We here wanted to ascertain whether the increase in the number of SP-positive primary afferents in arthritis may be affected by genetic deletion of TRPV1. For this, we used immunohistochemistry to quantify the expression of SP in primary afferent neurons in wild type mice (WT) vs. TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). We found that the expression of SP in DRG 1) increased significantly over naïve level in both WT and KO mice 3 weeks after AIA, 2) was significantly higher in KO mice than in WT mice in naïve mice and 2-3 weeks after AIA, 3) was significantly higheron the side of AIA than on the contralateral, vehicle-injected side at all time points in WT mice, but not in KO mice, and 4) increased predominantly in small-size neurons in KO mice and in small- and medium-size neurons in WT mice. Since the size distribution of SP-positive DRG neurons in arthritic TRPV1-KO mice was not significantly different from that in naïve mice, we speculate that the increased expression of SP is unlikely to reflect recruitment of A-fiber primary afferents and that the higher expression of SP in KO mice may represent a plastic change to compensate for the missing receptor in a major sensory circuit. PMID:20303589

  2. Periaqueductal Grey EP3 Receptors Facilitate Spinal Nociception in Arthritic Secondary Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, R.A.R.; Leith, J.L.; Almahasneh, F.; Martindale, J.; Wilson, A.W.; Lumb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Descending controls on spinal nociceptive processing play a pivotal role in shaping the pain experience after tissue injury. Secondary hypersensitivity develops within undamaged tissue adjacent and distant to damaged sites. Spinal neuronal pools innervating regions of secondary hypersensitivity are dominated by descending facilitation that amplifies spinal inputs from unsensitized peripheral nociceptors. Cyclooxygenase–prostaglandin (PG) E2 signaling within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is pronociceptive in naive and acutely inflamed animals, but its contributions in more prolonged inflammation and, importantly, secondary hypersensitivity remain unknown. In naive rats, PG EP3 receptor (EP3R) antagonism in vlPAG modulated noxious withdrawal reflex (EMG) thresholds to preferential C-nociceptor, but not A-nociceptor, activation and raised thermal withdrawal thresholds in awake animals. In rats with inflammatory arthritis, secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of the hindpaw developed and was associated with spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs alone. In arthritic rats, blockade of vlPAG EP3R raised EMG thresholds to C-nociceptor activation in the area of secondary hypersensitivity to a degree equivalent to that evoked by the same manipulation in naive rats. Importantly, vlPAG EP3R blockade also affected responses to A-nociceptor activation, but only in arthritic animals. We conclude that vlPAG EP3R activity exerts an equivalent facilitation on the spinal processing of C-nociceptor inputs in naive and arthritic animals, but gains in effects on spinal A-nociceptor processing from a region of secondary hypersensitivity. Therefore, the spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs associated with secondary hypersensitivity is likely to be at least partly dependent on descending prostanergic facilitation from the vlPAG. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After tissue damage, sensitivity to painful stimulation develops in undamaged areas (secondary

  3. A LC-ESI-MS method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma: comparison pharmacokinetics in normal and collagen-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Leng, Dan-Dan; Gao, Fei-Fei; Jiang, Chun-Jie; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue

    2014-12-01

    To develop a simple and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its major metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma, and compare the pharmacokinetics of the two compounds in normal and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Glycyrrhetinic acid was used as the internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Inertsil ODS-3 column, using a gradient elution with the mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and water acidified with 0.1% (V/V) formic acid. Detection was achieved by ESI-MS under the negative selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. In normal and CIA rats, madecassoside (30 mg·kg(-1)) was orally administered for 21 consecutive days from the day of arthritis onset. For madecassoside, the linear range was 10-1 000 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.998 9, while for madecassic acid, the linear range was 10-500 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.996 1. The lower limit of quantification was 10 ng·mL(-1) for both analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.78% to 13.42% for madecassoside and 2.30% to 14.90% for madecassic acid, and the accuracy was between -0.95% and 6.30% for madecassoside and between -1.48% and 5.34% for madecassic acid. The average recoveries of madecassoside, madecassic acid and IS from spiked plasma samples were > 81%. The developed method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of madecassoside and madecassic acid in rats after an oral administration of madecassoside. During initial 7 days of dosing, the cmax and AUC of madecassoside were greatly decreased and Vd/F was markedly increased in CIA rats, and no significant difference was observed on the first day of dosing. In contrast, the T1/2, cmax and AUC of madecassic acid were significantly increased, and Ke of madecassic acid was greatly decreased in CIA

  4. Anti-arthritic effects and toxicity of the essential oils of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Funk, Janet L; Frye, Jennifer B; Oyarzo, Janice N; Zhang, Huaping; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2010-01-27

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa L., Zingiberaceae) rhizomes contain two classes of secondary metabolites, curcuminoids and the less well-studied essential oils. Having previously identified potent anti-arthritic effects of the curcuminoids in turmeric extracts in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), studies were undertaken to determine whether the turmeric essential oils (TEO) were also joint protective using the same experimental model. Crude or refined TEO extracts dramatically inhibited joint swelling (90-100% inhibition) in female rats with streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis when extracts were administered via intraperitoneal injection to maximize uniform delivery. However, this anti-arthritic effect was accompanied by significant morbidity and mortality. Oral administration of a 20-fold higher dose TEO was nontoxic, but only mildly joint-protective (20% inhibition). These results do not support the isolated use of TEO for arthritis treatment but, instead, identify potential safety concerns in vertebrates exposed to TEO.

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of sulfated polysaccharide fractions from Sargassum wightii and Halophila ovalis in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Neelakandan, Yuvaraj; Venkatesan, Arul

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this objective is to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of sulfated polysaccharide purified fractions isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum wightii and seagrass Halophila ovalis in male Wistar rats. Subjects and Methods: Crude sulfated polysaccharide from S. wightii and H. ovalis was subjected to anion exchange chromatography, and the chemical composition was investigated. The antinociceptive activity of purified fractions was investigated using formalin and hot plate test. Carrageenan-induced paw edema, peritonitis model, and Freund's Complete Adjuvant-induced arthritis model were employed to determine the anti-inflammatory activity. Results: In the formalin test, there was a significant reduction in licking time in both phases of the test at a dose of 10 mg/kg. In the hot plate test, the antinociceptive effect was observed only in animals treated with 5, 10 mg/kg suggesting that the analgesic effect occurs through a central action mechanism. Sw FrIV and Ho FrIV significantly inhibited paw edema induced by carrageenan, especially at 3 h after treatment and potentially decreased neutrophil migration at 10 mg/kg, respectively. In Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, a significant reduction in paw volume was observed in Sw FrIV and Ho FrIV-treated groups (10 mg/kg). Conclusion: Purified components from S. wightii and H. ovalis have strong antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect on animal model. However, to determine the molecular mechanism, it is necessary to investigate the effect of purified fractions on inhibition of nitric oxide synthase expression mediated by inhibiting the phosphorylation of various signal proteins in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PMID:27721544

  6. The surgical management of the arthritic hand.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The surgical management of the arthritic hand is very largely concerned with rheumatoid arthritis and Still's disease and less frequently with psoriatic and degenerative arthritis. In the rheumatoid hand the surgeon may be called upon to intervene at any point in the chain reaction leading to total deformity, performing synovectomies of joints or tendons to relieve pain or prevent further deformity, repairing ruptured tendons, restoring the mechanism of injured joints, and correcting deformities when they have been allowed to occur. The great variety of operations that may be necessary to achieve these ends, with varying degrees of success, are discussed with reference to a personal series of 970 cases and 2002 operations. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 7 FIG. 6 FIG. 8 PMID:420491

  7. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract has potent anti-arthritic effects on collagen-induced arthritis by modifying the T cell balance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Abdel-Hamied, Hala E; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Bakheet, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterised by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints, joint malformations, and disability. The continuous use of conventional anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with severe adverse effects. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) is considered to have protective effects against several diseases. In this study based on the mouse adjuvant-induced-arthritis (AIA) model, we examined the effects of GSPE on the key mediators of arthritic inflammation, namely T cell subsets, glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR) expressing cells, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, Th17 cells, Th1/Th2 cytokines, and inflammatory mediator gene expression. We treated BALB/c mice with 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg GSPE or saline daily (14 days) per orally (p.o.) at the onset of AIA. At the peak phase of AIA (day 14), the heparinised whole blood and ankle joints of all groups were collected and tested. GSPE-treated mice showed a substantial reduction in the levels of T cell subsets, GITR-expressing cells, and Th1 cytokines as well as the inflammatory mediators (MCP-1, MIP-2, and ICAM-1) that induce them compared with the vehicle-treated (saline) and arthritic mice. However, GSPE significantly upregulated the number of Tregs and Th2 cytokine producing cell number or it also induced Th17/Treg rebalance and orchestrated various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the gene expression of their mediators that mediate cellular infiltration into the joints. This might, contribute to its anti-arthritic activity. Our results suggest that p.o. treatment with GSPE attenuated AIA in mice might offer a promising alternative/adjunct treatment for RA.

  8. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  9. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePlus

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  10. Long-Term Treatment by Vitamin B1 and Reduction of Serum Proinflammatory Cytokines, Hyperalgesia, and Paw Edema in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zaringhalam, Jalal; Akbari, Akhtar; Zali, Alireza; Manaheji, Homa; Nazemian, Vida; Shadnoush, Mahdi; Ezzatpanah, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune system is involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of inflammation and vitamins are important sources of substances inducing nonspecific immunomodulatory effects. Given the proinflammatory role of cytokines in the inflammation and pain induction, this study aimed to assess the effects of long-term administration of vitamin B1 on the proinflammatory cytokines, edema, and hyperalgesia during the acute and chronic phases of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Methods: On the first day of study, inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaws of rats. Vitamin B1 at doses of 100, 150, and 200 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally during 21 days of the study. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin B1 were also compared to indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Inflammatory symptoms such as thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema were measured by radiant heat and plethysmometer, respectively. Serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels were checked by rat standard enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) specific kits. Results: The results indicated that vitamin B1(150 and 200 mg/kg) attenuated the paw edema, thermal hyperalgesia, and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β during both phases of CFA-induced inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Effective dose of vitamin B1(150 mg/kg) reduced inflammatory symptoms and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β compare to indomethacin during the chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion: Anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic effects of vitamin B1 during CFA-induced arthritis, more specifically after chronic vitamin B1 administration, suggest its therapeutic property for inflammation. PMID:27872694

  11. Identification of inflammation sites in arthritic joints using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Grandaunet, Berit; Dhainaut, Alvilde; Hoff, Mari; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritic diseases have prevalence between 2 and 3% and may lead to joint destruction and deformation resulting in a loss of function. Patient's quality of life is often severely affected as the disease attacks hands and finger joints. Pathology involved in arthritis includes angiogenesis, hyper-vascularization, hyper-metabolism and relative hypoxia. We have employed hyperspectral imaging to study the hemodynamics of affected- and non-affected joints and tissue. Two hyperspectral, push-broom cameras were used (VNIR-1600, SWIR-320i, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS, Norway). Optical spectra (400nm - 1700nm) of high spectral resolution were collected from 15 patients with visible symptoms of arthritic rheumatic diseases in at least one joint. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals. Concentrations of dominant chromophores were calculated based on analytical calculations of light transport in tissue. Image processing was used to analyze hyperspectral data and retrieve information, e.g. blood concentration and tissue oxygenation maps. The obtained results indicate that hyperspectral imaging can be used to quantify changes within affected joints and surrounding tissue. Further improvement of this method will have positive impact on diagnosis of arthritic joints at an early stage. Moreover it will enable development of fast, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic tool of arthritic joints

  12. Simulation of light transport in arthritic- and non-arthritic human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has high incidence rates worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patient's quality of life due to pain, swelling and stiffness of the affected joints. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve course of the disease, therefore sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are required. Optical imaging techniques have capability for early diagnosis and monitoring of arthritis. As compared to conventional diagnostic techniques optical technique is a noninvasive, noncontact and fast way of collecting diagnostic information. However, a realistic model of light transport in human joints is needed for understanding and developing of such optical diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to develop a 3D numerical model of light transport in a human finger. The model will guide development of a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) diagnostic modality for arthritis in human fingers. The implemented human finger geometry is based on anatomical data. Optical data of finger tissues are adjusted to represent either an arthritic or an unaffected finger. The geometry and optical data serve as input into a 3D Monte Carlo method, which calculate diffuse reflectance, transmittance and absorbed energy distributions. The parameters of the model are optimized based on HIS-measurements of human fingers. The presented model serves as an important tool for understanding and development of HSI as an arthritis diagnostic modality. Yet, it can be applied to other optical techniques and finger diseases.

  13. Effect of methotrexate on the mandibular development of arthritic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Philipp; Rafayelyan, Smbat; Minden, Kirsten; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe disturbances of the mandibular development. Methotrexate (MTX) is often administered as a common used remission-inducing agent to treat this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low dose MTX on the mandibular growth in arthritic rabbits. Subjects and methods: Eighteen 10-week-old female New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups with six animals in each group. After being sensitized to ovalbumin (OA), the first and the second group received intra-articular injections with OA. The first group remained untreated, the second was treated by weekly injections of MTX. Cephalograms were taken from each animal at 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 weeks of age and six mandibular distances measured. Results: All distances showed an increase between 10 and 20 per cent, whereas growth was more accentuated in the sagittal dimension. Significant differences in the overall growth could be observed between the arthritic and the control animals and less accentuated between the arthritic and the MTX animals. In contrast, existing differences between the groups were not significant during the intervals, but time had the greatest influence on mandibular growth. Conclusions: MTX seems to have a positive impact on growth in rabbits suffering from experimental arthritis of the TMJ. PMID:25518996

  14. Ramipril and haloperidol as promising approaches in managing rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Fahmy Wahba, Mariam Gamal; Shehata Messiha, Basim Anwar; Abo-Saif, Ali Ahmed

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a challenging autoimmune disorder, whose treatments usually cause severe gastrointestinal, renal and other complications. We aimed to evaluate the beneficial anti-arthritic effects of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril and a dopamine receptor blocker, haloperidol, on Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced RA in adult female albino rats. Rats were allocated into a normal control group, an arthritis control group, two reference treatment groups receiving dexamethasone (1.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/day), and two treatment groups receiving ramipril (0.9 mg/kg/day) and haloperidol (1 mg/kg/day). Serum rheumatoid factor, matrix metalloprotinease-3 (MMP-3) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein as specific rheumatoid biomarkers, serum immunoglobulin G and antinuclear antibody as immunological biomarkers, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) as immunomodulatory cytokines, serum myeloperoxidase and C-reactive protein as inflammatory biomarkers, as well as malondialdehyde and glutathione reduced (GSH) as oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed. A histopathological study on joints and spleens was performed to support the results of biochemical estimations. Ramipril administration significantly corrected all the measured biomarkers, being restored back to normal levels except for MMP-3, TNF-α and IL-10. Haloperidol administration restored all the measured biomarkers back to normal levels except for TNF-α, IL-10 and GSH. In conclusion, ACE inhibitors represented by ramipril and dopamine receptor blockers represented by haloperidol may represent new promising protective strategies against RA, at least owing to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potentials.

  15. Arthrite à pneumocoque chez un adulte immunocompétent

    PubMed Central

    Chemsi, Hicham; Chadli, Maryama; Sekhsokh, Yassine

    2015-01-01

    Les infections à pneumocoques sont avant tout respiratoires, ORL et méningées. Les infections ostéoarticulaires à pneumocoque ont la particularité de survenir dans moins de 20% des cas chez l'adulte sain. Habituellement, un ou plusieurs facteurs favorisants sont retrouvés. Toutefois, nous rapportons lors de cette observation le cas d'une arthrite à Streptococcus pneumoniae chez un adulte immunocompétent sans facteurs prédisposant. Patient âgé de 66 ans, diabétique de type II, a été hospitalisé pour une décompensation acido-cétosique et une monoarthrite du genou droit. Ce patient était fébrile (39°C) et présentait un genou droit inflammatoire en flexion avec rougeur et chaleur locale et un choc rotulien. Une ponction articulaire avec d'autres examens ont été réalisés pour confirmation d'une arthrite septique à pneumocoque. Le résultat de la ponction articulaire réalisée a montré un liquide jaune citron trouble avec 480 000 leucocytes/mm3 à prédominance polynucléaires neutrophiles. L'examen direct a montré des coccis à Gram positif en diplocoque, la culture a permis d'isoler un Streptococcus pneumoniae sensible à la pénicilline G. L’évolution clinique et biologique de l'arthrite du genou était favorable. Un déficit immunitaire, un asplénisme anatomique ou fonctionnel peuvent être en cause. L'alcoolisme est un facteur favorisant mais le mécanisme n'est pas clairement élucidé. La présence de matériel prothétique, peut favoriser une localisation septique. Ces facteurs de risque doivent être systématiquement recherchés, notamment en cas d'infection grave ou récidivante, une antibioprophylaxie ou une vaccination pouvant être proposées chez les sujets à haut risque. PMID:26327976

  16. PGNAA of human arthritic synovium for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, E.; Yanch, J.C.; Shortkroff, S.

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), is a proposed new therapy modality for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease afflicting the joints. The synovium, which is the membrane lining the joint, becomes inflamed and represents the target tissue for therapy. When a joint is unresponsive to drug treatment, physical removal of the synovium, termed synovectomy, becomes necessary. Existing options include surgery and radiation synovectomy. BNCS has advantages over these options in that it is noninvasive and does not require the administration of radioactive substances. Previous studies have shown that the uptake of {sup 10}B by human arthritic synovium ex vivo is high, ranging from 194 to 545 ppm with an unenriched boron compound. While tissue samples remain viable up to 1 week, ex vivo conditions do not accurately reflect those in vivo. This paper presents results from experiments assessing the washout of boron from the tissue and examines the implications for in vivo studies.

  17. An exploratory investigation of causal thinking of arthritics.

    PubMed

    Lowery, B J; Jacobsen, B S; Murphy, B B

    1983-01-01

    Research in academic achievement situations suggests that the causes people give for achievement events are linked to subsequent behaviors, emotions, and expectations. An attributional analysis of the causes arthritics gave for their condition tested the limits of the attributional model in the situation of chronic illness. Results indicated that the assumption that causal thinking occurs needs further testing. Fifteen percent of the subjects did not give causes. Those not giving causes were significantly more anxious, more depressed, and more hostile than those who had constructed causes. In terms of the dimensions of attribution theory, the results suggest that when causes are given, they do not easily fit within the classification scheme currently proposed. Suggestions for testing of the attributional model in clinical situations are offered.

  18. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  19. Amelioration of adjuvant-induced arthritis by ursolic acid through altered Th1/Th2 cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Khan, Beenish; Bani, Sarang; Suri, K A; Satti, N K; Qazi, G N

    2006-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the activity of ursolic acid (UA) on proinflammatory (Th1) and anti-inflammatory (Th2) cytokines in the peripheral blood of arthritic balb/c mice. Ursolic acid is ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and is a constituent of numerous plants which are having diversified phylogenetic origin and taxonomic position. We applied Cytometric bead array (CBA) technology for simultaneously measurement of these cytokines in adjuvant inflammatory arthritis induced mice treated with ursolic acid in graded oral doses. Cytometric bead array uses the sensitivity of amplified fluorescence detection by flowcytometer to measure soluble analytes in a particle based immune assay. This assay can accurately quantitate five cytokines in a 50 microl sample volume. The T-helper (Th1) deviated cells produce detectable level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), while the Th2 deviated cells produce significant amount of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-5 (IL-5). Oral administration of UA at doses of 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 mg kg(-1) per oral dose inhibited the presence of IL-2, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in the peripheral blood.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Damre, A S; Kulkami, K R; Saraf, M N

    2002-07-01

    Saussurea lappa, Argyreia speciosa and Achyranthes aspera are well known Indian medicinal plants used in the indigenous systems of medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. The ethanolic extracts of the plants at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o. were screened for their effect on acute and chronic inflammation induced in mice and rats. S. lappa and A. speciosa were found to significantly inhibit paw edema induced by carrageenan and Freund's complete adjuvant and to prevent accumulation of inflammatory cells in carrageenan-induced peritonitis at doses of 50-200 mg/kg. A. aspera inhibited these inflammatory responses at doses of 100-200 mg/kg. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extracts of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera possess anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity and support the rationale behind the traditional use of these plants in inflammatory conditions.

  1. Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens): no evidence for anti-inflammatory activity in the treatment of arthritic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, L. W.; Znamirowska, M.; Paul, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens), an herbal product being marketed in Canada as a home remedy for the relief of arthritic disease, was screened for efficacy with standard preclinical screening methods. At doses 100 times or greater than the recommended daily dose for humans, Devil's Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hind foot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil's Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil's Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type. PMID:6407745

  2. Enhancing Methotrexate Tolerance with Folate Tagged Liposomes in Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Lager, Franck; Le Roux, Delphine; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Charvet, Celine; Renault, Gilles; Loureiro, Ana; Almeida, Catarina R; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Moreira, Alexandra; Stockinger, Hannes; Burnet, Michael; Carmo, Alexandre M; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Bismuth, Georges; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexate is the first line of treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Since many patients become unresponsive to methotrexate treatment, only very expensive biological therapies are effective and increased methotrexate tolerance strategies need to be identified. Here we propose the encapsulation of methotrexate in a new liposomal formulation using a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein conjugated to a linker and folate to enhance their tolerance and efficacy. In this study we aim to evaluate the efficiency of this system to treat rheumatoid arthritis, by targeting folate receptor β present at the surface of activated macrophages, key effector cells in this pathology. The specificity of our liposomal formulation to target folate receptor β was investigated both in vitro as in vivo using a mouse model of arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice strain). In both systems, the liposomal constructs were shown to be highly specific and efficient in targeting folate receptor β. These liposomal formulations also significantly increase the clinical benefit of the encapsulated methotrexate in vivo in arthritic mice, together with reduced expression of CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases by joint-infiltrating macrophages. Thus, our formulation might be a promising cost effective way to treat rheumatoid arthritis and delay or reduce methotrexate intolerance.

  3. Oligoclonal immunoglobulins and smooth muscle antibodies in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, O J; Fyrand, O; Brath, H K; Olsen, E

    1980-04-01

    In twelve synovial fluid/serum pairs from patients with various types of seronegative polyarthritis, homogeneous gamma-bands by agarose gel electrophoresis were found in seven of the synovial fluids and in only one of the sera. In six of the fluids with gamma-bands, smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) were also present, usually in a titre identical to that in serum. In fluids with no gamma-bands, no SMA were detected. In forty synovial fluid/serum pairs from paitients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, no gamma-bands were detected in the synovial fluids, and SMA were present in only three pairs. Absorption and inhibition experiments did not give evidence that the SMA activity in seronegative polyarthritis was confined to the gamma-bands in the synovial fluids. The SMA activity in the fluids seemed to be directed against both actin and 'non-actin' muscular antigens. The association between locally produced oligoclonal immunoglobulins and possible locally produced SMA with differnet electrophoretic mobility suggests that in some of thes patients there is a local synovial production of oligoclonal antibodies with different specificities. Thus, even if the results may indicate a local virus infection in some arthritic joints, they may also be dur to an unspecific local stimulation of B cells or to a specific antigen stimulation combined with an unspecific co-activation of other antibody-producing cells.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of a methanol extract from Vitellaria paradoxa stem bark

    PubMed Central

    Foyet, Harquin Simplice; Tsala, David Emery; Zogo Essono Bodo, J.C; Carine, Azanfack Name; Heroyne, Lissia Toussoumna; Oben, Eyong Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitellaria paradoxa is a traditional medicinal plant of Cameroon. Several studies on this plant have focused on the cosmetic profile of its fruits. The present study focuses on the anti-inflammatory potency of stem barks extract of this plant. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of V. paradoxa (VPME) stem barks on inflammatory response in rats. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of VPME were evaluated in acute and chronic (28 days) inflammation induced in Wistar albino rats. The effects on hyperalgesia and locomotors activity were also quantified. The relative weight of lymphoid organs was obtained as well as some hematological parameters. Results: In the carrageenan-induced inflammation, VPME (75 mg/kg) exhibited a significant (66.67%) inhibition after 1 h. On the complete Freund's adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis, VPME showed a significant protective effect with 8.12% inflammation against 25.00% for the control group after 2 days of the treatment. The extract (75 and 150 mg/kg) significantly reduced the score of arthritis with a maximum obtained on day 19th of the experimentation. There was a significant increase in the reaction time of rats on the hot plate as well as the exploratory activities of the animals in the open field. This extract significantly prevented weight, hemoglobin and red blood cells losses, and spleen hypertrophy. A protective action against skin destruction and cartilage erosion was evident. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the extract revealed the presence of catechins. Conclusions: These findings suggested that V. paradoxa may contribute to the reduction of the inflammatory response. PMID:26692752

  5. Peptide vaccination in Montanide adjuvant induces and GM-CSF increases CXCR3 and cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression by tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; King, Laura K; Nunnley, Lenora D; Mullins, Irene M; Slingluff, Craig L; Mullins, David W

    2013-11-01

    T cell infiltration of melanoma is associated with enhanced clinical efficacy and is a desirable endpoint of immunotherapeutic vaccination. Infiltration is regulated, in part, by chemokine receptors and selectin ligands on the surface of tumor-specific lymphocytes. Therefore, we investigated the expression of two homing molecules--CXCR3 and CLA - on vaccine-induced CD8 T cells, in the context of a clinical trial of a melanoma-specific peptide vaccine. Both CXCR3 and CLA have been associated with T cell infiltration of melanoma. We demonstrate that a single subcutaneous/intradermal administration of peptide vaccine in Montanide adjuvant induces tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are predominantly positive for CXCR3, with a subpopulation of CXCR3(+)CLA(+) cells. Addition of GM-CSF significantly enhances CXCR3 expression and increases the proportion of CLA-expressing cells. Concurrent with CXCR3 and CLA expression, vaccine-induced CD8 cells express high levels of Tbet, IFN-γ, and IL-12Rβ1. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that peptide vaccination in adjuvant induces CD8 T cells with a phenotype that may support infiltration of melanoma.

  6. Spaceflight-Relevant Challenges of Radiation and/or Reduced Weight Bearing Cause Arthritic Responses in Knee Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Willey, J S; Kwok, A T; Moore, J E; Payne, V; Lindburg, C A; Balk, S A; Olson, J; Black, P J; Walb, M C; Yammani, R R; Munley, M T

    2016-10-01

    acute degenerative and pre-arthritic changes in the knee articular cartilage of rats. A return to normal weight bearing resulted in some recovery from cartilage degradation. However, radiation delivered as both a single challenge and when combined with HLU resulted in chronic cartilage damage. These findings suggest that radiation exposure during spaceflight leads to and/or impairs recovery of cartilage upon return to reloading, generating long-term joint problems for astronauts.

  7. Ferulic acid ethyl ester diminished Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced incapacitation through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Valmor Macedo; Gomes, Bruno de Sousa; Neto, Benedito de Sousa; Ferreira, Alana Rodrigues; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Carvalho e Martins, Maria do Carmo; Oliveira, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid ethyl ester (FAEE) is a derivate from ferulic acid which reportedly has antioxidant effect; however, its role on inflammation was unknown. In this study, we investigated the orally administered FAEE anti-inflammatory activity on experimental inflammation models and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. CFA-induced arthritis has been evaluated by incapacitation model and radiographic knee joint records at different observation time. FAEE (po) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.001) within the 1st to 5th hours at 50 and 100 mg/kg doses. FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg, po inhibited leukocyte migration into air pouch model (p < 0.001), and myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities (p < 0.001) increased total thiol concentration and decreased the TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations, NO, and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. In the CFA-induced arthritis, FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the edema and the elevation paw time, a joint disability parameter, since second hour after arthritis induction (p < 0.001). FAEE presented rat joint protective activity in radiographic records (p < 0.001). The data suggest that the FAEE exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte migration, oxidative stress reduction, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Salicylates in the treatment of arthritic disease. How safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Altman, R D

    1988-11-01

    Despite the adverse effects of aspirin, many physicians still consider it to be the drug of choice for initial treatment of arthritic disorders. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are better tolerated than aspirin but have similar, although milder, side effects. The nonacetylated salicylates appear to have fewer adverse effects than either aspirin or the NSAIDs and therefore may warrant greater consideration as first-line therapy for arthritis.

  9. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  10. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of Yucca schidigera: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheeke, P R; Piacente, S; Oleszek, W

    2006-03-29

    Yucca schidigera is a medicinal plant native to Mexico. According to folk medicine, yucca extracts have anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory effects. The plant contains several physiologically active phytochemicals. It is a rich source of steroidal saponins, and is used commercially as a saponin source. Saponins have diverse biological effects, including anti-protozoal activity. It has been postulated that saponins may have anti-arthritic properties by suppressing intestinal protozoa which may have a role in joint inflammation. Yucca is also a rich source of polyphenolics, including resveratrol and a number of other stilbenes (yuccaols A, B, C, D and E). These phenolics have anti-inflammatory activity. They are inhibitors of the nuclear transcription factor NFkappaB. NFkB stimulates synthesis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which causes formation of the inflammatory agent nitric oxide. Yucca phenolics are also anti-oxidants and free-radical scavengers, which may aid in suppressing reactive oxygen species that stimulate inflammatory responses. Based on these findings, further studies on the anti-arthritic effects of Yucca schidigera are warranted.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of yucca schidigera: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cheeke, PR; Piacente, S; Oleszek, W

    2006-01-01

    Yucca schidigera is a medicinal plant native to Mexico. According to folk medicine, yucca extracts have anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory effects. The plant contains several physiologically active phytochemicals. It is a rich source of steroidal saponins, and is used commercially as a saponin source. Saponins have diverse biological effects, including anti-protozoal activity. It has been postulated that saponins may have anti-arthritic properties by suppressing intestinal protozoa which may have a role in joint inflammation. Yucca is also a rich source of polyphenolics, including resveratrol and a number of other stilbenes (yuccaols A, B, C, D and E). These phenolics have anti-inflammatory activity. They are inhibitors of the nuclear transcription factor NFkappaB. NFkB stimulates synthesis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which causes formation of the inflammatory agent nitric oxide. Yucca phenolics are also anti-oxidants and free-radical scavengers, which may aid in suppressing reactive oxygen species that stimulate inflammatory responses. Based on these findings, further studies on the anti-arthritic effects of Yucca schidigera are warranted. PMID:16571135

  12. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  13. Enhanced gene transfer to arthritic joints using adeno-associated virus type 5: implications for intra-articular gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaansen, J; Tas, S; Klarenbeek, P; Bakker, A; Apparailly, F; Firestein, G; Jorgensen, C; Vervoordeldonk, M; Tak, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Gene therapy of the joint has great potential as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The vector chosen is of crucial importance for clinical success. Objective: To investigate the tropism and transduction efficiency in arthritic joints in vivo, and in synovial cells in vitro, using five different serotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) encoding ß-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein genes. Methods: rAAV was injected into the ankle joints of rats with adjuvant arthritis after the onset of disease. Synovial tissue was examined at different time points for ß-galactosidase protein and gene expression by in situ staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, respectively. In addition, the ability of rAAV to transduce primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with RA was investigated in vitro. Results: Intra-articular injection of the rAAV5 serotype resulted in the highest synovial transduction, followed by much lower expression using rAAV2. Expression of the transgene was already detectable 7 days after injection and lasted for at least 4 weeks. Only background staining was seen for serotypes 1, 3, and 4. Importantly, there was a minimal humoral immune response to rAAV5 compared with rAAV2. Additionally, it was found that both rAAV2 and rAAV5 can efficiently transduce human fibroblast-like synoviocytes obtained from patients with RA. Conclusion: Intra-articular rAAV mediated gene therapy in RA might be improved by using rAAV5 rather than other serotypes. PMID:15878906

  14. Treatment Algorithm for Patients with Non-arthritic Hip Pain, Suspect for an Intraarticular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, R. Wejnold; Dippmann, C.; Dahl, L.; Stürup, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The amount of patients referred with longstanding, non-arthritic hip pain is increasing, as are the treatment options. Left untreated hip dysplasia, acetabular retroversion and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) may lead to osteoarthritis (OA). Finding the right treatment option for the right patient can be challenging in patients with non-arthritic hip pain. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the radiographic findings seen in patients with longstanding hip pain, suspect for an intraarticular pathology, and provide a treatment algorithm allocating a specific treatment option for each clinical condition. Material and Methods: A review of the literature was performed using Public Medline searches of MeSH terms combined with synonyms for femoroacetabular impingement, acetabular retroversion, periacetabular osteotomy and hip arthroscopy. Results: Radiographic findings associated with acetabular retroversion described in the literature were the crossover sign, the posterior wall sign and the ischial spine sign, while Wiberg’s lateral center-edge angle (CE-angle) together with Leqeusne’s acetabular index indicate hip dysplasia. A Tönnis index >2 indicates osteoarthritis, however unsatisfying results are documented following joint preserving surgery with a Tönnis index >1. Furthermore, ischial spine sign in combination with the posterior wall sign indicates total acetabular retroversion prone to periacetabular osteotomy in contrast to focal retroversion prone to hip arthroscopy. These findings were used creating a treatment algorithm for intraarticular pathologies in patients with longstanding hip pain. Conclusion: Based on the radiographic findings, the algorithm presented in this study can be a helpful tool in the decision-making for the treatment of patients with non-arthritic hip pain, suspect for intraarticular pathologies. PMID:27583059

  15. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S.; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  16. Saposin C coupled lipid nanovesicles specifically target arthritic mouse joints for optical imaging of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyang; Flick, Matthew J; Frederick, Malinda; Chu, Zhengtao; Mason, Rachel; DeLay, Monica; Thornton, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting approximately 1% of the population and is characterized by cartilage and bone destruction ultimately leading to loss of joint function. Early detection and intervention of disease provides the best hope for successful treatment and preservation of joint mobility and function. Reliable and non-invasive techniques that accurately measure arthritic disease onset and progression are lacking. We recently developed a novel agent, SapC-DOPS, which is composed of the membrane-associated lysosomal protein saposin C (SapC) incorporated into 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DOPS) lipid nanovesicles. SapC-DOPS has a high fusogenic affinity for phosphatidylserine-enriched microdomains on surfaces of target cell membranes. Incorporation of a far-red fluorophore, CellVue Maroon (CVM), into the nanovesicles allows for in vivo non-invasive visualization of the agent in targeted tissue. Given that phosphatidylserine is present only on the inner leaflet of healthy plasma membranes but is "flipped" to the outer leaflet upon cell damage, we hypothesized that SapC-DOPS would target tissue damage associated with inflammatory arthritis due to local surface-exposure of phosphatidylserine. Optical imaging with SapC-DOPS-CVM in two distinct models of arthritis, serum-transfer arthritis (e.g., K/BxN) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) revealed robust SapC-DOPS-CVM specific localization to arthritic paws and joints in live animals. Importantly, intensity of localized fluorescent signal correlated with macroscopic arthritic disease severity and increased with disease progression. Flow cytometry of cells extracted from arthritic joints demonstrated that SapC-DOPS-CVM localized to an average of 7-8% of total joint cells and primarily to CD11b+Gr-1+ cells. Results from the current studies strongly support the application of SapC-DOPS-CVM for advanced clinical and research applications including: detecting early arthritis

  17. Femorotibial offset. A morphologic feature of the natural and arthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, D G; Aukerman, R

    1999-11-01

    Eccentric wear identified in retrieval studies of failed total knee arthroplasties may reflect unrecognized intrinsic morphologic characteristics of the knee. This study identifies a previously unreported morphologic offset between the center of the tibia and femur using computed tomography scans in 38 preoperative arthritic knees and 38 controls. There is a statistically significant offset between femur and tibia centers in patients and control subjects. There is no significant difference between patients and control subjects in either AP or mediolateral translation of centers. The clinical relevance of this observation is that it may prompt strategies to address morphologic offset, thereby reducing eccentric wear in total knee arthroplasty.

  18. Targeting of viral interleukin-10 with an antibody fragment specific to damaged arthritic cartilage improves its therapeutic potency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously demonstrated that a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) specific to collagen type II (CII) posttranslationally modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to target anti-inflammatory therapeutics specifically to inflamed arthritic joints. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the superior efficacy of anti-inflammatory cytokines when targeted to inflamed arthritic joints by the anti-ROS modified CII (anti-ROS-CII) scFv in a mouse model of arthritis. Methods Viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10) was fused to anti-ROS-CII scFv (1-11E) with a matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) cleavable linker to create 1-11E/vIL-10 fusion. Binding of 1-11E/vIL-10 to ROS-CII was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, and immune-staining of arthritic cartilage, whereas vIL-10 bioactivity was evaluated in vitro by using an MC-9 cell-proliferation assay. Specific in vivo localization and therapeutic efficacy of 1-11E/vIL-10 was tested in the mouse model of antigen-induced arthritis. Results 1-11E/vIL-10 bound specifically to ROS-CII and to damaged arthritic cartilage. Interestingly, the in vitro vIL-10 activity in the fusion protein was observed only after cleavage with MMP-1. When systemically administered to arthritic mice, 1-11E/vIL-10 localized specifically to the arthritic knee, with peak accumulation observed after 3 days. Moreover, 1-11E/vIL-10 reduced inflammation significantly quicker than vIL-10 fused to the control anti-hen egg lysozyme scFv (C7/vIL10). Conclusions Targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokines potentiates their anti-arthritic action in a mouse model of arthritis. Our results further support the hypothesis that targeting biotherapeutics to arthritic joints may be extended to include anti-inflammatory cytokines that lack efficacy when administered systemically. PMID:25029910

  19. Penetration and effect of topically applied dimethylsulfoxide or indomethacin on adjuvant arthritis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.D.; Horn, P.A.; McCreary, L.D.

    1983-07-01

    The present study, using /sup 14/C-DMSO, established the systemic and local load and distribution of topically applied DMSO in adjuvant arthritic rats. Under equivalent conditions, the antiinflammatory effects (systemic and local) of topical DMSO treatments were compared with a topical treatment of a control vehicle or of indomethacin, a known effective antiinflammatory agent. No significant systemic or local antiinflammatory effect of topical DMSO was seen in the adjuvant arthritic rats. Indomethacin, applied topically, had a significant systemic antiinflammatory effect; however, no significant local antiinflammatory effect of indomethacin was observed.

  20. Can an anterior quadriceps release improve range of motion in the stiff arthritic knee?

    PubMed

    Tarabichi, Samih; Tarabichi, Yasir

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesize that tethering adhesions of the quadriceps muscle are the major pathological structures responsible for a limited range of motion in the stiff arthritic knee. Forty-two modified quadriceps muscle releases were performed on 24 patients with advanced osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee arthroplasty. The ranges of motion were documented intraoperatively both before and immediately after the release. Passive flexion improved significantly in all patients (mean, 32.4 degrees of improvement, P < .001) following a modified quadriceps release, despite any presence of osteophytes or severe deformities. These results strongly implicate adhesions of the quadriceps muscle to the underlying femur, which prevent the distal excursion of the quadriceps tendon, as the restrictive pathology preventing deep flexion in patients with osteoarthritis.

  1. Maximal adjuvant activity of nasally delivered IL-1α requires adjuvant responsive CD11c+ cells and does not correlate with adjuvant-induced in vivo cytokine production1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Afton L.; Johnson, Brandi T.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Gunn, Michael D.; Hou, Baidong; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Staats, Herman F.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1 has been shown to have strong mucosal adjuvant activities, but little is known about its mechanism of action. We vaccinated IL-1R1 bone marrow chimeric mice to determine if IL-1R1 expression on stromal cells or hematopoietic cells was sufficient for the maximal adjuvant activity of nasally delivered IL-1α as determined by the acute induction of cytokine responses and induction of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor (LF)-specific adaptive immunity. Cytokine and chemokine responses induced by vaccination with IL-1α were predominantly derived from the stromal cell compartment and included G-CSF, IL-6, IL-13, MCP-1, and KC. Nasal vaccination of Il1r1−/− mice given wild-type bone marrow (WT→KO) and WT→WT mice with LF + IL-1α induced maximal adaptive immune responses, while vaccination of wild-type mice given Il1r1−/− bone marrow (KO→WT) resulted in significantly decreased production of LF-specific serum IgG, IgG subclasses, lethal toxin-neutralizing antibodies, and mucosal IgA compared to WT→KO and WT→WT mice (p < 0.05). IL-1α adjuvant activity was not dependent upon mast cells. However, the ability of IL-1α to induce serum LF-specific IgG2c and lethal toxin-neutralizing antibodies was significantly impaired in CD11c-Myd88−/− mice when compared to WT mice (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that CD11c+ cells must be directly activated by nasally administered IL-1α for maximal adjuvant activity and that, while stromal cells are required for maximal adjuvant-induced cytokine production, the adjuvant-induced stromal cell cytokine responses are not required for effective induction of adaptive immunity. PMID:22345651

  2. Drug targeting to arthritic region via folic acid appended surface-engineered multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kayat, Jitendra; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing and investigating folate anchored carbon nanotubes for targeting an anti-arthritic drug, Methotrexate (MTX) to inflammatory arthritic region. The folic acid (FA) was conjugated to amidated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (1)H NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The MTX was loaded into the pristine and functionalized-MWCNTs and extensively characterized in vitro and in vivo studies. The drug entrapment efficiency was found high in folate conjugated MWCNTs. In vitro drug release in PBS (pH 7.4) from pristine MWCNTs and folate conjugated MWCNTs formulation was found to be 66.35 ± 2.3 and 56.88 ± 1.9% in 24 h, respectively. Folate conjugated MWCNTs significantly increased (p < 0.005) the percentage inhibition of arthritis, biological half-life and volume of distribution of MTX as compared to MTX-loaded naked MWCNTs as well as free MTX. In in vivo biodistribution studies, MTX was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) in arthritic joints from folate functionalized MWCNTs as compared to free drug as well as drug-loaded naked MWCNTs. The present outcomes highlights the propensity of drug-loaded functionalized MWCNTs to alter the pharmacokinetics as well as sustained and targeted drug delivery system as well.

  3. One-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty for arthritic knees with stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amber; Bhosale, Pradeep B; Suryawanshi, Ashish V; Purohit, Shaligram

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate the outcome of one-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for patients with arthritic knees and tibiofemoral stress fractures. METHODS. Records of 11 men and 18 women aged 47 to 78 (mean, 66) years who underwent fixed-bearing posterior-stabilised TKA for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis of the knee with tibial (n=31) and femoral (n=3) stress fractures were reviewed. All the tibial fractures involved the proximal half. There were 7 associated fibular stress fractures. Of the 31 knees with tibial stress fractures, 26 and 5 manifested varus and valgus deformity, respectively. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 51 (range, 24-96) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 23.2 to 1.9 degrees varus. The mean Knee Society knee score improved from 38.5 (range, 15- 63) to 89.6 (range, 80-95) [p<0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 25.5 (range, 0-40) to 86.5 (range, 60-100) [p<0.05]. All fractures were united at the last follow-up. No complications were encountered. CONCLUSION. One-stage long-stem TKA restores limb alignment and facilitates fracture healing, with excellent outcome.

  4. Distribution of lymphatic vessels in normal and arthritic human synovial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Edwards, J; Banerji, S; Prevo, R; Jackson, D; Athanasou, N

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Synovial tissues from 5 normal controls, 14 patients with RA, and 16 patients with OA were studied. Lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using antibodies directed against the lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and recognised blood vessel endothelial markers (factor VIII, CD34, CD31). Results: Lymphatic vessels were found in all zones of the normal, OA, and RA synovial membrane. Few lymphatic vessels were seen in the sublining zone in normal and OA synovium which did not show villous hypertrophy. However, in both RA synovium and OA synovium showing villous hypertrophy and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, numerous lymphatic vessels were seen in all zones of the synovial membrane, including the sublining zone of the superficial subintima. Conclusions: Lymphatic vessels are present in normal and arthritic synovial tissues and are more numerous and prominent where there is oedema and an increase in inflammatory cells in the subintima, particularly in RA. This may reflect increased transport of hyaluronan and leucocyte trafficking in inflamed synovial tissues. PMID:14644866

  5. Resolvin D3 is dysregulated in arthritis and reduces arthritic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Hildur H.; Dalli, Jesmond; Norling, Lucy V.; Colas, Romain A.; Perretti, Mauro; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation is a unifying component of many chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Resolvins (Rv) are a new family from the endogenous specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) that actively stimulate resolution of inflammation. Herein, using lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics with murine joints we found a temporal regulation of endogenous SPM during self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. The SPMs present in self-resolving arthritic joints include the D-series resolvins, e.g. Resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, RvD3 and RvD4. Of note, RvD3 levels were reduced in inflamed joints from mice with delayed-resolving arthritis when compared to self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. RvD3 was also reduced in serum from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients compared to healthy controls. RvD3 administration reduced joint leukocytes as well as paw joint eicosanoids, clinical scores and edema. Together, these findings provide evidence for dysregulated endogenous RvD3 levels in inflamed paw joints and its potent actions in reducing murine arthritis. PMID:27534559

  6. Transdermal potential and anti-arthritic efficacy of ursolic acid from niosomal gel systems.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mahvish; Imam, Syed Sarim; Aqil, Mohd; Amir, Mohd; Mir, Shaukat R; Mujeeb, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize niosomes by experimental design for enhanced transdermal delivery of ursolic acid for the effective treatment of arthritis. The experimental design (3 factor 3 levels, Box-Behnken design) was used to study individual and combined effects of different formulation variables. The variables cholesterol (X1), span 60 (X2) and phospholipid (X3) were taken as independent factors and their effect was observed on size (Y1) entrapment efficiency (Y2), and transflux (Y3). The formulation composition with span 60 (85mg), cholesterol (12.3mg), and phospholipid (65mg) was found to fulfil requisites of optimized ursolic acid niosome formulation (URNF). URNF had shown vesicle size of 665.45nm, entrapment efficiency of 92.74% with transflux of 17.25μg/cm(2)/h. The in vivo bioactivity showed that the prepared URNF-gel was able to provide good anti-arthritic activity due to enhanced permeation of UA through the skin and results were found to be comparable to standard gel (Omni gel). The radiographical image confirmed that, the developed URNF-gel was found to be effective to treat arthritis. Thus niosomal gel of ursolic acid would be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for safe and efficient treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders.

  7. Quantification of arthritic bone degradation by analysis of 3D micro-computed tomography data

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Hoffmann, Bianca; Irmler, Ingo M.; Straßburger, Maria; Figge, Marc Thilo; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2017-01-01

    The use of animal models of arthritis is a key component in the evaluation of therapeutic strategies against the human disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we present quantitative measurements of bone degradation characterised by the cortical bone profile using glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI) induced arthritis. We applied micro-computed tomography (μCT) during three arthritis experiments and one control experiment to image the metatarsals of the hind paws and to investigate the effect of experimental arthritis on their cortical bone profile. For measurements of the cortical profile we automatically identified slices that are orthogonal to individual metatarsals, thereby making the measurements independent of animal placement in the scanner. We measured the average cortical thickness index (CTI) of the metatarsals, as well as the thickness changes along the metatarsal. In this study we introduced the cortical thickness gradient (CTG) as a new measure and we investigated how arthritis affects this measure. We found that in general both CTI and CTG are able to quantify arthritic progression, whilst CTG was found to be the more sensitive measure. PMID:28290525

  8. Measuring intranodal pressure and lymph viscosity to elucidate mechanisms of arthritic flare and therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Wood, Ronald W; Perry, Seth W; Brown, Edward B; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with episodic flares in affected joints; the etiology of RA is largely unknown. Recent studies in mice demonstrated that alterations in lymphatics from affected joints precede flares. Thus, we aimed to develop novel methods for measuring lymph node pressure and lymph viscosity in limbs of mice. Pressure measurements were performed by inserting a glass micropipette connected to a pressure transducer into popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) or axillary lymph nodes (ALN) of mice; subsequently, we determined that the lymphatic pressures of water were 9 and 12 cm, respectively. We are also developing methods for measuring lymph viscosity in lymphatic vessels afferent to PLN, which can be measured by multiphoton fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (MP-FRAP) of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) injected into the hind footpad. These results demonstrate the potential of lymph node pressure and lymph viscosity measurements, and future studies to test these outcomes as biomarkers of arthritic flare are warranted.

  9. Bacopa monniera (L.) wettst inhibits type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Viji, V; Kavitha, S K; Helen, A

    2010-09-01

    Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst is an Ayurvedic herb with antirheumatic potential. This study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Bacopa monniera in treating rheumatoid arthritis using a type II collagen-induced arthritis rat model. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was administered after the development of arthritis from day 14 onwards. The total duration of experiment was 60 days. Paw swelling, arthritic index, inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, myeloperoxidase and serum anti-collagen IgG and IgM levels were analysed in control and experimental rats. Arthritic induction significantly increased paw edema and other classical signs of arthritis coupled to upregulation of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, neutrophil infiltration and increased anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels in serum. BME significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms. BME was effective in inhibiting cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activities in arthritic rats. Decreased neutrophil infiltration was evident from decreased myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological data where an improvement in joint architecture was also observed. Serum anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels were consistently decreased. Thus the study demonstrates the potential antiarthritic effect of Bacopa monniera for treating arthritis which might confer its antirheumatic activity.

  10. Pulsed radiofrequency reduced complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical hyperalgesia via the spinal c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hung; Yang, Chien-Hui; Juang, Sin-Ei; Huang, Hui-Wen; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Sheen-Chen, Shyr-Ming; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment involves the pulsed application of a radiofrequency electric field to a nerve. The technology offers pain relief for patients suffering from chronic pain who do not respond well to conventional treatments. We tested whether PRF treatment attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced inflammatory pain. The profile of spinal c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) phosphorylation was evaluated to elucidate the potential mechanism. Injection of CFA into the unilateral hind paw of rats induced mechanical hyperalgesia in both the ipsilateral and contralateral hind paws. We administered 500-kHz PRF treatment in 20-ms pulses, at a rate of 2 Hz (2 pulses per second) either to the sciatic nerve in the mid-thigh, or to the L4 anterior primary ramus just distal to the intervertebral foramen in both the CFA group and no-PRF group rats. Tissue samples were examined at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days following PRF treatments. Behavioral studies showed that PRF applied close to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) significantly attenuated CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia compared to no-PRF group (P < .05). And western blotting revealed significant attenuation of the activation of JNK in the spinal dorsal horn compared to no-PRF group animals (P < .05). Application of PRF close to DRG provides an effective treatment for CFA-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia by attenuating JNK activation in the spinal dorsal horn.

  11. A diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy for arthritic pain relief and a monitoring method for the diclofenac binding capacity of HSA site II in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Nao; Takamura, Norito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Nishio, Toyotaka; Chosa, Etsuo; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2013-03-01

    Diclofenac suppository, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is used widely in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with severe arthritic pain. As the binding percentage of diclofenac to serum proteins is high, its free (unbound) concentration after rectal administration is low. To increase temporarily the free concentration of diclofenac and to enhance its analgesic effect by inhibiting the protein binding of diclofenac, the analgesic effect of diclofenac was examined before and after the start of an inhibitor administration to RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain, and the protein binding capacity of diclofenac was evaluated. Binding experiments were performed by ultrafiltration, and arthritic pain was recorded by the face scale. Free fractions of diazepam and diclofenac were augmented by increasing 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA; the active metabolite of the NSAID nabumetone) concentrations. The free fraction of diazepam increased after the start of nabumetone administration to RA patients, and arthritic pain relief was observed. These results suggest that 6-MNA has an inhibitory effect on the protein binding of diclofenac and the free fraction of diazepam can be used to evaluate the binding capacity of diclofenac. It is considered that diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy and the method for protein binding monitoring by diazepam can positively benefit RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain.

  12. PTHrP Overexpression Partially Inhibits a Mechanical Strain-Induced Arthritic Phenotype in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dean; Taboas, Juan M.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cell-based tissue engineering strategies are currently in clinical use and continue to be developed at a rapid pace for the repair of cartilage defects. Regardless of the repair methodology, chondrocytes within newly regenerated cartilage remain susceptible to the abnormal inflammatory and mechanical environments that underlie osteoarthritic disease, likely compromising the implant’s integration, function, and longevity. The present study investigates the use of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) overexpression for chondroprotection. Design Bovine articular chondrocytes were transfected with human PTHrP (hPTHrP) constructs (1-141 or 1-173) and subjected to injurious cyclic tensile strain (CTS; 0.5 Hz and 16% elongation) for 48 hours. mRNA expression of matrix remodeling, inflammatory signaling, hypertrophic, and apoptotic genes were examined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production were measured using the Griess assay and enzyme immunoassay, respectively. Results CTS induced an arthritic phenotype in articular chondrocytes as indicated by increased gene expression of collagenases and aggrecanases and increased production of NO and PGE2. Additionally, CTS increased collagen type X (Col10a1) mRNA expression, whereas overexpression of either hPTHrP isoform inhibited CTS-induced Col10a1 gene expression. However, hPTHrP 1-141 augmented CTS-induced NO and PGE2 production, and neither hPTHrP isoform had any significant effect on apoptotic genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that chondrocytes overexpressing PTHrP resist mechanical strain-induced hypertrophic-like changes. Therapeutic PTHrP gene transfer may be considered for chondroprotection applications in newly regenerated cartilage. PMID:21087676

  13. RNA-Seq analysis of chikungunya virus infection and identification of granzyme A as a major promoter of arthritic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Wayne A.; Ellis, Jonathan J.; Cumming, Helen E.; Poo, Yee Suan; Hertzog, Paul J.; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Hueston, Linda; Le Grand, Roger; Tang, Bing; Gardner, Joy; Mahalingam, Suresh; Bird, Phillip I.

    2017-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus causing epidemics of acute and chronic arthritic disease. Herein we describe a comprehensive RNA-Seq analysis of feet and lymph nodes at peak viraemia (day 2 post infection), acute arthritis (day 7) and chronic disease (day 30) in the CHIKV adult wild-type mouse model. Genes previously shown to be up-regulated in CHIKV patients were also up-regulated in the mouse model. CHIKV sequence information was also obtained with up to ≈8% of the reads mapping to the viral genome; however, no adaptive viral genome changes were apparent. Although day 2, 7 and 30 represent distinct stages of infection and disease, there was a pronounced overlap in up-regulated host genes and pathways. Type I interferon response genes (IRGs) represented up to ≈50% of up-regulated genes, even after loss of type I interferon induction on days 7 and 30. Bioinformatic analyses suggested a number of interferon response factors were primarily responsible for maintaining type I IRG induction. A group of genes prominent in the RNA-Seq analysis and hitherto unexplored in viral arthropathies were granzymes A, B and K. Granzyme A-/- and to a lesser extent granzyme K-/-, but not granzyme B-/-, mice showed a pronounced reduction in foot swelling and arthritis, with analysis of granzyme A-/- mice showing no reductions in viral loads but reduced NK and T cell infiltrates post CHIKV infection. Treatment with Serpinb6b, a granzyme A inhibitor, also reduced arthritic inflammation in wild-type mice. In non-human primates circulating granzyme A levels were elevated after CHIKV infection, with the increase correlating with viral load. Elevated granzyme A levels were also seen in a small cohort of human CHIKV patients. Taken together these results suggest granzyme A is an important driver of arthritic inflammation and a potential target for therapy. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00281294 PMID:28207896

  14. Therapeutic efficacy of undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in comparison to glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic horses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Skaggs, P; Stocker, A; Zyrkowski, G; Burke, R; Wegford, K; Goad, J T; Rohde, K; Barnett, D; DeWees, W; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2009-12-01

    The present investigation evaluated arthritic pain in horses receiving daily placebo, undenatured type II collagen (UC-II) at 320, 480, or 640 mg (providing 80, 120, and 160 mg active UC-II, respectively), and glucosamine and chondroitin (5.4 and 1.8 g, respectively, bid for the first month, and thereafter once daily) for 150 days. Horses were evaluated for overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, physical examination, and liver and kidney functions. Evaluation of overall pain was based upon a consistent observation of all subjects during a walk and a trot in the same pattern on the same surface. Pain upon limb manipulation was conducted after the walk and trot. It consisted of placing the affected joint in severe flexion for a period of 60 sec. The limb was then placed to the ground and the animal trotted off. The response to the flexion test was then noted with the first couple of strides the animal took. Flexion test was consistent with determining clinically the degree of osteoarthritis in a joint. Horses receiving placebo showed no change in arthritic condition, while those receiving 320 or 480 or 640 mg UC-II exhibited significant reduction in arthritic pain (P < 0.05). UC-II at 480 or 640 mg dose provided equal effects, and therefore, 480 mg dose was considered optimal. With this dose, reduction in overall pain was from 5.7 +/- 0.42 (100%) to 0.7 +/- 0.42 (12%); and in pain upon limb manipulation from 2.35 +/- 0.37 (100%) to 0.52 +/- 0.18 (22%). Although glucosamine and chondroitin treated group showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in pain compared with pretreated values, the efficacy was less compared with that observed with UC-II. In fact, UC-II at 480 or 640 mg dose was found to be more effective than glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic horses. Clinical condition (body weight, body temperature, respiration rate, and pulse rate), and liver (bilirubin, GGT, and ALP) and kidney (BUN and creatinine) functions remained unchanged, suggesting that

  15. Protective Effect of High Molecular Weight Protein Sub-fraction of Calotropis procera Latex in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Ramos, Marcio V.; Vasconcelos, Mirele da Silveira; Kumar, Vijay L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteins present in the latex of Calotropis procera have been shown to produce anti-inflammatory effect and to afford protection in various disease models. Objectives: To determine the efficacy of high molecular weight protein sub-fraction (LPPI) of latex of C. procera in ameliorating joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a preclinical model of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and the effect of two doses of LPPI (5 and 25 mg/kg) and diclofenac (5 mg/kg) was evaluated on joint swelling, stair climbing ability, motility, and dorsal flexion pain on day 3. The rats were sacrificed on day 3 to measure tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Evaluation of joint histology was also made. Results: Intra-articular injection of FCA produced joint swelling and difficulty in stair climbing ability, motility, and pain on flexion of the joint as revealed by scores obtained for these functional parameters. LPPI produced a dose-dependent decrease in joint swelling and improved joint functions. Arthritic rats also revealed altered oxidative homeostasis where joint tissue GSH levels were decreased and TBARS levels were increased as compared to normal rats. The levels of these oxidative stress markers were near normal in arthritic rats treated with LPPI. Moreover, treatment with LPPI also maintained the structural integrity of the joint. The protective effect of LPPI was comparable to the standard anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that LPPI fraction comprising high molecular weight proteins could be used for the alleviation of arthritic symptoms. SUMMARY High molecular weight protein sub-fraction of latex of Calotropis procera (LPPI) reduced joint swelling and hyperalgesia in arthritic ratsLPPI produced a significant improvement in stair climbing ability and motility

  16. Adjuvant-induced joint inflammation causes very rapid transcription of beta-preprotachykinin and alpha-CGRP genes in innervating sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bulling, D G; Kelly, D; Bond, S; McQueen, D S; Seckl, J R

    2001-04-01

    Neuropeptides synthesized in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been implicated in neurogenic inflammation and nociception in experimental and clinical inflammatory arthritis. We examined the very early changes in response to adjuvant injection in a rat model of unilateral tibio-tarsal joint inflammation and subsequent monoarthritis. Within 30 min of adjuvant injection ipsilateral swelling and hyperalgesia were apparent, and marked increases in beta-preprotachykinin-A (beta-PPT-A) and alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-encoding mRNAs were observed in small-diameter L5 DRG neurones innervating the affected joint. This response was augmented by recruitment of additional small-diameter DRG neurones expressing beta-PPT-A and CGRP transcripts. The increased mRNA was paralleled by initial increases in L5 DRG content of the protein products, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Within 15 min of adjuvant injection there were increases in electrical activity in sensory nerves innervating a joint. Blockade of this activity prevented the rapid induction in beta-PPT-A and CGRP mRNA expression in DRG neurones. Increased expression of heteronuclear (intron E) beta-PPT-A RNA suggests that increases in beta-PPT-A mRNA levels were, at least in part, due to transcription. Pre-treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide had no effect upon the early rise in neuropeptide mRNAS: This and the rapid time course of these changes suggest that increased sensory neural discharge and activation of a latent modulator of transcription are involved.

  17. Long-term anti-arthritic and anti-osteoporotic effects of raloxifene in established experimental postmenopausal polyarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, C; Lagerquist, M; Håkansson, C; Ohlsson, C; Carlsten, H

    2008-01-01

    Both oestrogen deficiency and the inflammatory disease contribute to the generalized bone loss seen in postmenopausal rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Oestradiol and the selective oestrogen receptor modulator raloxifene have been shown to ameliorate the disease in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well-established animal model for human RA. The aim of this study was to investigate whether raloxifene-treatment would be beneficial in long-term treatment of established CIA, both regarding anti-arthritic and anti-osteoporotic properties. Female dilute brown agouti mice were ovariectomized and CIA was induced. Raloxifene or vehicle treatment was administered 5 days per week, and the clinical arthritis score was evaluated continuously. At termination, bone mineral density was analysed, paws were collected for histological examination and sera were analysed for markers of bone and cartilage turnover, as well as antibodies to type II collagen and levels of interleukin (IL)-6. Treatment with raloxifene is beneficial in long-term treatment of established CIA. It hampers the disease severity and frequency, protects the joints from destruction and protects against the development of osteoporosis. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 was down-regulated in raloxifene-treated mice compared with controls. The serum levels of antibodies to collagen were not affected by raloxifene-treatment. Long-term treatment with raloxifene has both anti-arthritic and anti-osteoporotic effects in established experimental postmenopausal polyarthritis. PMID:18435803

  18. Treatment with anti-NAP monoclonal antibody reduces disease severity in murine model of novel angiogenic protein-induced or ovalbumin-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, N B; Krishnamurthy, J; Salimath, B P

    2013-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Synovial angiogenesis contributes to inflammation in RA. In this study we have developed an arthritic model in rats using a novel angiogenic protein (NAP), isolated from human synovial fluid of RA patients. We produced anti-NAP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the same in adjuvant-induced or NAP-induced arthritis as a model of human RA. The treatment of arthritic rats with anti-NAP mAbs resulted in effective amelioration of paw oedema, radiological arthritic characteristics, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and NAP, compared to that of untreated arthritic animals. Further, profiling of angiogenic markers such as synovial microvessel density, angiogenesis, CD31, VEGF and fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) by immunohistochemistry both in arthritic and anti-NAP mAb-treated animals revealed the efficacy of mAb as an anti-angiogenic functional antibody. Therefore, NAP may be an attractive target to design anti-angiogenic and anti-arthritic therapies to control the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  19. Topical dermal application of essential oils attenuates the severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Komeh-Nkrumah, Steva A.; Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at examining the effect of an ointment containing essential oils (EO) on the severity of adjuvant arthritis (AA), an experimental model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in Lewis rats and to define the underlying mechanisms. At the onset of AA, rats received topical application twice daily of ointment containing 20% EO or placebo ointment. The synovial fluid (SF) and synovium-infiltrating cells (SIC) of rats were tested for pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. The hind paws and skin were examined histologically. The activity/level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and anti-mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65) antibodies was tested. Arthritic rats treated with ointment containing EO developed less severe clinical arthritis compared to the controls, and this activity was attributable to EO and not the carrier oil. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, and the activity of MMPs in SF and SIC-lysate were significantly (p<0.05) reduced in EO-treated arthritic rats compared to the controls. However, the levels of anti-Bhsp65 antibodies were unaffected by treatment. Thus, topical dermal delivery of EO-containing ointment downmodulates the severity of AA in Lewis rats by inhibiting defined mediators of inflammation. Such ointments should be tested in patients with RA and other arthritic conditions. PMID:21544881

  20. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  1. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  2. Non-invasive dual fluorescence in vivo imaging for detection of macrophage infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in inflammatory arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Yoon, Tae Won; Hasty, Karen A; Stuart, John M; Yi, Ae-Kyung

    2016-05-01

    Detection and intervention at an early stage is a critical factor to impede arthritis progress. Here we present a non-invasive method to detect inflammatory changes in joints of arthritic mice. Inflammation was monitored by dual fluorescence optical imaging for near-infrared fluorescent (750F) matrix-metalloproteinase activatable agent and allophycocyanin-conjugated anti-mouse CD11b. Increased intensity of allophycocyanin (indication of macrophage accumulation) and 750F (indication of matrix-metalloproteinase activity) showed a biological relationship with the arthritis severity score and the histopathology score of arthritic joints. Our results demonstrate that this method can be used to detect early stages of arthritis with minimum intervention in small animal models.

  3. In vivo quantification of lymph viscosity and pressure in lymphatic vessels and draining lymph nodes of arthritic joints in mice.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Wood, Ronald W; Brown, Edward B; Rahimi, Homaira; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Schwarz, Edward M

    2014-03-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with episodic flares. In TNF-Tg mice, a model of inflammatory-erosive arthritis, the popliteal lymph node (PLN) enlarges during the pre-arthritic 'expanding' phase, and then 'collapses' with adjacent knee flare associated with the loss of the intrinsic lymphatic pulse. As the mechanisms responsible are unknown, we developed in vivo methods to quantify lymph viscosity and pressure in mice with wild-type (WT), expanding and collapsed PLN. While no differences in viscosity were detected via multiphoton fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (MP-FRAP) of injected FITC-BSA, a 32.6% decrease in lymph speed was observed in vessels afferent to collapsed PLN (P < 0.05). Direct measurement of intra-lymph node pressure (LNP) demonstrated a decrease in expanding PLN versus WT pressure (3.41 ± 0.43 vs. 6.86 ± 0.56 cmH2O; P < 0.01), which dramatically increased to 9.92 ± 1.79 cmH2O in collapsed PLN. Lymphatic pumping pressure (LPP), measured indirectly by slowly releasing a pressurized cuff occluding indocyanine green (ICG), demonstrated an increase in vessels afferent to expanding PLN versus WT (18.76 ± 2.34 vs. 11.04 ± 1.47 cmH2O; P < 0.01), which dropped to 2.61 ± 0.72 cmH2O (P < 0.001) after PLN collapse. Herein, we document the first in vivo measurements of murine lymph viscosity and lymphatic pressure, and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic transport are compensatory mechanisms to prevent synovitis via increased drainage of inflamed joints. Furthermore, the decrease in lymphatic flow and loss of LPP during PLN collapse are consistent with decreased drainage from the joint during arthritic flare, and validate these biomarkers of RA progression and possibly other chronic inflammatory conditions.

  4. The Pattern of Use of Oral NSAIDs with or without Co-prescription of Gastroprotective Agent for Arthritic Knee by Korean Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Chun; Moon, Young-Wan; Seo, Seung Suk; Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Ju Hong; Choi, Choong-Hyeok

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for arthritic knees in clinical practice, particularly focusing on the co-prescription of gastroprotective agents for patients with risk factors for adverse gastrointestinal (GI) events. Materials and Methods Each cross-sectional cohort was a group of outpatients visiting 111 physicians who had prescribed NSAIDs for the patients' arthritic knees for more than three consecutive months. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by each patient and physician. Results Nine hundred and forty five patients (48%) of the whole 1,960 patients belonged to the group with a high or very high risk for NSAID-induced gastropathy determined by northern California Health Maintenance Organization guidelines. Overall, only less than half of the patients were given co-prescription of gastroprotective agents, regardless of the presence or absence of GI symptoms and irrespective of the level of risk for NSAID-induced gastropathy. Conclusions The physician prescribing NSAIDs for arthritic knees should monitor any GI symptoms and the patient monitor anylevel for NSAIDinduced gastropathy, and be willing to add gastroprotective agents as necessary in order to prevent serious adverse GI events. PMID:22570835

  5. Chemotherapy of arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, B. B.

    1963-01-01

    Arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant has been used for the study of compounds of known value in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in man. The development of the arthritic syndrome in treated and control rats was followed by measuring the changes in foot thickness of both hind-feet with a micrometer. This method allowed the effect of anti-inflammatory compounds to be expressed quantitatively. Anti-inflammatory activity was readily observed in certain steroids, pyrazolidines, salicylates and sodium aurothiomalate. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were inactive. The inhibition obtained by daily treatment with the steroid paramethasone disappeared when treatment was withdrawn. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14066137

  6. Protoporphyrin IX distribution after intra-articular and systemic application of 5-aminolevulinic acid in healthy and arthritic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Hendrich, Christian; Birngruber, Reginald; Lehnert, Christiane; Seara, Jose; Siebert, Werner E.; Diddens, Heyke C.

    1996-04-01

    Arthroscopic synovectomy, which is limited today to the large joints, is an important early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is potentially to be a less invasive method of removing the synovial membrane. Therefore, in a rabbit model of RA, the accumulation of the photosensitizer Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) after intra-articular and systemic application of ALA into arthritic rabbit knee joints was studied in skin, patella, synovial tissue, and meniscus by fluorescence microscopy. PPIX fluorescence was measured in biopsies taken at different times after application of neutral and acid ALA solutions. Significant PPIX fluorescence was observed in the synovial membrane and skin 2 and 4 hours after application. Using intra-articular application, ALA solutions prepared with pH 5.5 were at least as efficient as neutral solutions in sensitizing the synovial membrane. Skin also showed PPIX within 4 hours after application. After 24 hours, a marginal PPIX fluorescence was detected in these tissues. On the other hand, in cartilage and meniscus significant PPIX accumulation was still observed 24 hours after ALA injection. Systemic application of ALA also showed a good accumulation of PPIX. Further experiments are needed to show whether accumulation of the photosensitizer and tissue selectivity are sufficient for a successful treatment of rheumatoid synovitis.

  7. Layer-by-layer assembled magnetic prednisolone microcapsules (MPC) for controlled and targeted drug release at rheumatoid arthritic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, Chakkarapani; Latha, Subbiah; Selvamani, Palanisamy; Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Johansson, Christer; Takeda, Ryoji; Takemura, Yasushi; Ota, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    We report here in about the formulation and evaluation of Magnetic Prednisolone Microcapsules (MPC) developed in order to improve the therapeutic efficacy relatively at a low dose than the conventional dosage formulations by means of magnetic drug targeting and thus enhancing bioavailability at the arthritic joints. Prednisolone was loaded to poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) doped calcium carbonate microspheres confirmed by the decrease in surface area from 97.48 m2/g to 12.05 of m2/g by BET analysis. Adsorption with oppositely charged polyelectrolytes incorporated with iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed through zeta analysis. Removal of calcium carbonate core yielded MPC with particle size of 3.48 μm, zeta potential of +29.7 mV was evaluated for its magnetic properties. Functional integrity of MPC was confirmed through FT-IR spectrum. Stability studies were performed at 25 °C±65% relative humidity for 60 days showed no considerable changes. Further the encapsulation efficiency of 63%, loading capacity of 18.2% and drug release of 88.3% for 36 h and its kinetics were also reported. The observed results justify the suitability of MPC for possible applications in the magnetic drug targeting for efficient therapy of rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Simultaneous dual frequency 1H and 19F open coil imaging of arthritic rabbit knee at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Franklin D; Wallace, Kirk D; Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Pham, Christine T N; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of sensitive magnetic resonance techniques with a selective site-targeted nanoparticle contrast agent has a demonstrated utility for molecular imaging studies. By detecting a unique signature of the contrast agent, this approach can be employed to identify specific bio-molecular markers and observe cellular-level processes within a large and complex organism (e.g., in vivo rabbit). The objective of the present investigation was to design, fabricate and characterize a radio-frequency (RF) coil for the dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) simultaneous collection of both nuclei images in a 3T field, in order to facilitate studies of arthritic knee degradation in rabbits. The coil supports both transmit and receive modes. The supporting activities included: 1) establishing a technical database for calculating the required coil parameters, 2) selection of a favorable coil geometry, and 3) adaption of existing RF measurement techniques to the design, development and electrical evaluation of the coil. The coil is used in conjunction with a Philips Medical Systems clinical MRI scanner, requiring all RF simultaneous dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) coils to operate in both transmit and receive modes. A commercial version of SPICE (simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis) was used to estimate significant operational parameters prior to fabricating the imaging coil. Excellent images were obtained with the fabricated coil and no operational problems were observed that would limit the use of other coil geometries and field strengths.

  9. The nonpsychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malfait, A M; Gallily, R; Sumariwalla, P F; Malik, A S; Andreakos, E; Mechoulam, R; Feldmann, M

    2000-08-15

    The therapeutic potential of cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychoactive component of cannabis, was explored in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was elicited by immunizing DBA/1 mice with type II collagen (CII) in complete Freund's adjuvant. The CII used was either bovine or murine, resulting in classical acute CIA or in chronic relapsing CIA, respectively. CBD was administered after onset of clinical symptoms, and in both models of arthritis the treatment effectively blocked progression of arthritis. CBD was equally effective when administered i.p. or orally. The dose dependency showed a bell-shaped curve, with an optimal effect at 5 mg/kg per day i.p. or 25 mg/kg per day orally. Clinical improvement was associated with protection of the joints against severe damage. Ex vivo, draining lymph node cells from CBD-treated mice showed a diminished CII-specific proliferation and IFN-gamma production, as well as a decreased release of tumor necrosis factor by knee synovial cells. In vitro effects of CBD included a dose-dependent suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, both mitogen-stimulated and antigen-specific, and the blockade of the Zymosan-triggered reactive oxygen burst by peritoneal granulocytes. It also was found that CBD administration was capable of blocking the lipopolysaccharide-induced rise in serum tumor necrosis factor in C57/BL mice. Taken together, these data show that CBD, through its combined immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory actions, has a potent anti-arthritic effect in CIA.

  10. Evaluation of bone targeting salmon calcitonin analogues in rats developing osteoporosis and adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Krishna H; Asghar, Waheed; Newa, Madhuri; Jamali, Fakhreddin; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of the peptide hormone calcitonin have been used in medicine as biologic drug therapies for decades, to treat pathological conditions of excessive bone turnover, such as osteoporosis, where more bones are removed than replaced during bone remodeling. Osteoporosis and other chronic skeletal diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, exact a substantial and growing toll on aging populations worldwide however they respond poor to synthetic biologic drug therapy, due in part to the rapid half-life of elimination, which for calcitonin is 43 minutes. To address those shortcomings, we have developed and synthesized bone-targeting variants of calcitonin as a targeted drug delivery strategy, by conjugation to bisphosphonate drug bone-seeking functional groups in highly specific reaction conditions. To evaluate their in vivo efficacy, bisphosphonate-mediated bone targeting with PEGylated (polyethylene glycol conjugated) and non-PEGylated salmon calcitonin analogues were synthesized and dose escalation was performed in female rats developing Osteoporosis. The bone-targeting calcitonin analogues were also tested in a separate cohort of male rats developing adjuvant-induced arthritis. Ovariectomized female rats developing Osteoporosis were administered daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 5, 10 and 20 IU/kg of calcitonin for 3 months. Adjuvant arthritis was developed in male rats by administering Mycobacterium butyricum through tail base injection. Daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 20 IU/kg of calcitonin was administered and the rats were measured for visible signs of inflammation to a 21 day endpoint. In both studies, the effect of drug intervention upon bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by measuring the trabecular bone volume percentage and BMD at the proximal tibial metaphysis using in vivo micro-computed tomography. With dose escalation studies, only bone targeting analogue dosed groups

  11. Cardamonin (2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-methoxychalcone) isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. inhibits CFA-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Voon, Fui-Ling; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Idris, Mohamad Fauzi; Akira, Ahmad; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Ming-Tatt, Lee

    2017-01-05

    Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. had been traditionally used as herbs to treat pain and rheumatism. Cardamonin (2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-methoxychalcone) is a compound isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf.. Previous study had shown the potential of cardamonin in inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in vitro. Thus, the possible therapeutic effect of cardamonin in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints is postulated. This study was performed to investigate the anti-arthritic properties of cardamonin in rat model of induced RA, particularly on the inflammatory and pain response of RA. Rheumatoid arthritis paw inflammation was induced by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in Sprague Dawley rats. Using four doses of cardamonin (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0mg/kg), anti-arthritic activity was evaluated through the paw edema, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia responses. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was carried out to evaluate the plasma level of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Histological slides were prepared from the harvested rat paws to observe the arthritic changes in the joints. Behavioral, biochemical, and histological studies showed that cardamonin demonstrated significant inhibition on RA-induced inflammatory and pain responses as well as progression of joint destruction in rats. ELISA results showed that there was significant inhibition in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in plasma of the cardamonin-treated RA rats. Overall, cardamonin possesses potential anti-arthritic properties in CFA-induced RA rat model.

  12. Comparative therapeutic efficacy and safety of type-II collagen (UC-II), glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic dogs: pain evaluation by ground force plate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Lindley, J; Konemann, M; Minniear, J; Carroll, B A; Hendrick, C; Goad, J T; Rohde, K; Doss, R; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2012-10-01

    The investigation was conducted on client-owned moderately arthritic dogs with two objectives: (i) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of type-II collagen (UC-II) alone or in combination with glucosamine hydrochloride (GLU) and chondroitin sulphate (CHO), and (ii) to determine their tolerability and safety. Dogs in four groups (n = 7-10), were treated daily for a period of 150 days with placebo (Group-I), 10 mg active UC-II (Group-II), 2000 mg GLU + 1600 mg CHO (Group-III), and UC-II + GLU + CHO (Group-IV). On a monthly basis, dogs were evaluated for observational pain (overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, and pain after physical exertion) using different numeric scales. Pain level was also measured objectively using piezoelectric sensor-based GFP for peak vertical force and impulse area. Dogs were also examined every month for physical, hepatic (ALP, ALT and bilirubin) and renal (BUN and creatinine) functions. Based on observations, significant (p < 0.05) reduction in pain was noted in Group-II, III, and IV dogs. Using GFP, significant increases in peak vertical force (N/kg body wt) and impulse area (N s/kg body wt), indicative of a decrease in arthritis associated pain, were observed in Group-II dogs only. None of the dogs in any group showed changes in physical, hepatic or renal functions. In conclusion, based on GFP data, moderately arthritic dogs treated with UC-II (10 mg) showed a marked reduction in arthritic pain with maximum improvement by day 150. UC-II, GLU and CHO operate through different mechanisms of action, and were well tolerated over a period of 150 days.

  13. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  14. Effect of Brand's glucosamine with essence of chicken on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsi, Daniel; Khow, Agatha; Iino, Taeko; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2003-10-24

    The anti-arthritic effects of glucosamine incorporated in a chicken-meat extract known as Brand's Glucosamine with Essence of Chicken versus glucosamine or Essence of Chicken (EOC) alone were investigated on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in dark agouti (DA) rats. Four groups of rats received basic food (control), 1.2% glucosamine (GLU), 0.8% EOC and 1.2% GLU + 0.8% EOC (GLU + EOC) admixed with basic food for 25 days following CIA. Foot pads were isolated on day 25 for histopathological evaluation. Clinical assessment of hind paw swelling as measured by foot pad volumes and histopathological scoring based on the degree of edema, periosteal new bone formation, periostitis and inflammatory cell infiltration of the isolated foot pad were performed. Arthritic rats given GLU + EOC showed significant reduction in left hind paw swelling following onset of arthritis. Correspondingly, a lesser degree of edema, periosteal new bone formation, periostitis and inflammatory cell infiltration was seen in histological sections of the left hind foot pads of these rats. A similar trend of reduced hind paw swelling was observed in the right hind paws of the same rats and those fed with EOC. Rats fed with GLU alone did not demonstrate these beneficial effects. The present findings demonstrate that a combination of glucosamine and EOC is effective in reducing the histopathological severity of arthritis, probably due to its ability to reduce the inflammatory conditions in CIA.

  15. Clinical and Experimental Observations with Regard to the Injection of Certain Agents (Pregl’s Solution) into Chronic Arthritic Joints

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    observations, he concluded, warranted “further investigation and a more general use of Pregl’s solution in treating chronic effusion of arthritic and traumatized joints.” J.E.M. Thomson, MD is shown. Photograph is reproduced with permission and ©American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Fifty Years of Progress, 1983. References Heck CV. Commemorative Volume 1933–1983 Fifty Years of Progress. Chicago, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 1983. Heck CV. Fifty Years of Progress: In Recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Chicago, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 1983. James E. M. Thomson 1889–1962. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1963;45:206–208. Thomson JEM. Clinical and experimental observations with regard to the injection of certain agents (Pregl's solution) into chronic arthritic joints. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1933;15:483–490. PMID:18196381

  16. Inhibitory effect of amygdalin on lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA expression and carrageenan-induced rat arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Hye-Jung; Kim, Chang-Ju; Shim, Insop; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2008-10-01

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glycoside plant compound found in the seeds of rosaceous stone fruits. We evaluated the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of amygdalin, using an in vitro lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cell line and a rat model with carrageenan-induced ankle arthritis. One mM amygdalin significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNAs in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells. Amygdalin (0.005, 0.05, and 0.1 mg/kg) was intramuscularly injected immediately after the induction of carrageenan-induced arthritic pain in rats, and the anti-arthritic effect of amygdalin was assessed by measuring the weight distribution ratio of the bearing forces of both feet and the ankle circumference, and by analyzing the expression levels of three molecular markers of pain and inflammation (c-Fos, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta) in the spinal cord. The hyperalgesia of the arthritic ankle was alleviated most significantly by the injection of 0.005 mg/kg amygdalin. At this dosage, the expressions of c-Fos, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta in the spinal cord were significantly inhibited. However, at dosage greater than 0.005 mg/kg, the painrelieving effect of amygdalin was not observed. Thus, amygdalin treatment effectively alleviated responses to LPStreatment in RAW 264.7 cells and carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats, and may serve as an analgesic for relieving inflammatory pain.

  17. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Xin; Yu, Rong; Zeng, Guang; Yuan, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Hui-Yong; Cai, Xiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans.

  18. Intrathecal curcumin attenuates pain hypersensitivity and decreases spinal neuroinflammation in rat model of monoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Dai, Lin; Zhao, Lin-Xia; Zhu, Xiang; Cao, Su; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a major component of turmeric and reportedly has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Neuroinflammation has been recognized to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various diseases in the central nervous system. Here we investigated the anti-nociceptive and anti-neuroinflammatory effect of curcumin on arthritic pain in rats. We found that repeated oral treatment with curcumin, either before or after complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) injection, dose-dependently attenuated CFA-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, but had no effect on joint edema. Repeated intrathecal injection of curcumin reversed CFA-induced pain hypersensitivity. Furthermore, such a curcumin treatment reduced CFA-induced activation of glial cells and production of inflammatory mediators [interleukin-1β (IL-1β), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and monocyte inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1α)] in the spinal cord. Curcumin also decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced production of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, MCP-1, and MIP-1α in cultured astrocytes and microglia. Our results suggest that intrathecal curcumin attenuates arthritic pain by inhibiting glial activation and the production of inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord, suggesting a new application of curcumin for the treatment of arthritic pain. PMID:25988362

  19. Evaluation of Hyaluronic Acid Dilutions at Different Concentrations Using a Quartz Crystal Resonator (QCR) for the Potential Diagnosis of Arthritic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ahumada, Luis Armando Carvajal; González, Marco Xavier Rivera; Sandoval, Oscar Leonardo Herrera; Olmedo, José Javier Serrano

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to demonstrate through experimental means the capacity of the quartz crystal resonator (QCR) to characterize biological samples of aqueous dilutions of hyaluronic acid according to their viscosity and how this capacity may be useful in the potential diagnosis of arthritic diseases. The synovial fluid is viscous due to the presence of hyaluronic acid, synthesized by synovial lining cells (type B), and secreted into the synovial fluid thus making the fluid viscous. In consequence, aqueous dilutions of hyaluronic acid may be used as samples to emulate the synovial fluid. Due to the viscoelastic and pseudo-plastic behavior of hyaluronic acid, it is necessary to use the Rouse model in order to obtain viscosity values comparable with viscometer measures. A Fungilab viscometer (rheometer) was used to obtain reference measures of the viscosity in each sample in order to compare them with the QCR prototype measures. PMID:27879675

  20. Evaluation of Hyaluronic Acid Dilutions at Different Concentrations Using a Quartz Crystal Resonator (QCR) for the Potential Diagnosis of Arthritic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Luis Armando Carvajal; González, Marco Xavier Rivera; Sandoval, Oscar Leonardo Herrera; Olmedo, José Javier Serrano

    2016-11-22

    The main objective of this article is to demonstrate through experimental means the capacity of the quartz crystal resonator (QCR) to characterize biological samples of aqueous dilutions of hyaluronic acid according to their viscosity and how this capacity may be useful in the potential diagnosis of arthritic diseases. The synovial fluid is viscous due to the presence of hyaluronic acid, synthesized by synovial lining cells (type B), and secreted into the synovial fluid thus making the fluid viscous. In consequence, aqueous dilutions of hyaluronic acid may be used as samples to emulate the synovial fluid. Due to the viscoelastic and pseudo-plastic behavior of hyaluronic acid, it is necessary to use the Rouse model in order to obtain viscosity values comparable with viscometer measures. A Fungilab viscometer (rheometer) was used to obtain reference measures of the viscosity in each sample in order to compare them with the QCR prototype measures.

  1. Effect of ethanol extract of an ayurvedic preparation (Pathyadya Churna) on arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Madhavi G.; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the anti-arthritic activity of Pathyadya Churna ethanol extract (PCE) in rats. Materials and Methods: Formaldehyde (2% v/v) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA 0.l mL) was injected in the left hind paw of male Wistar rats to develop arthritis. These rats were treated with three doses (135, 270, and 540 mg/kg) of PCE and one dose (10 mg/kg) of indomethacin. Anti-arthritic activity of the extract was assessed by noting paw volumes, rheumatoid factor (RF), blood parameters, and histological changes. Results: PCE treatment reduced paw swelling in arthritis caused by both formaldehyde and CFA. In CFA-treated rats, a significant decrease (P < 0.001) was seen in hemoglobin (13.92 g/dL to 9.97 g/dL), red blood cell count (7.32 million/mm3 to 6.58 million/mm3), and packed cell volume (44.04% to 30.56%). There were also significant (P < 0.001) elevations in white blood cell count (8220/–11,420/mm3), platelets (2.46–4.15 lakhs/mL), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (3.76–8.03/60 min), RF (7.17–26.77 IU/mL), triglycerides (71.69–96.60 mg/dL), total cholesterol (96.85–145.05 mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein (53.11–109.60 mg/dL), and very low-density lipoprotein (14.34–19.32 mg/dL). In CFA-induced arthritic rats, high-density lipoprotein decreased significantly (29.40 mg/dL to 16.13 mg/dL). Marked changes were noted in the histology of ankles. Treatment with PCE significantly reversed all these hematological and histological changes in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: PCE has a significant anti-arthritic activity in rats and is free from toxic effects. PMID:27127317

  2. Inhibition of cartilage and bone destruction in adjuvant arthritis in the rat by a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Considerable evidence has associated the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with the degradation of cartilage and bone in chronic conditions such as arthritis. Direct evaluation of MMPs' role in vivo has awaited the development of MMP inhibitors with appropriate pharmacological properties. We have identified butanediamide, N4- hydroxy-2-(2-methylpropyl)-N1-[2-[[2-(morpholinyl)ethyl]-,[S- (R*,S*)] (GI168) as a potent MMP inhibitor with sufficient solubility and stability to permit evaluation in an experimental model of chronic destructive arthritis (adjuvant-induced arthritis) in rats. In this model, pronounced acute and chronic synovial inflammation, distal tibia and metatarsal marrow hyperplasia associated with osteoclasia, severe bone and cartilage destruction, and ectopic new bone growth are well developed by 3 wk after adjuvant injection. Rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant on day 0. GI168 was was administered systemically from days 8 to 21 by osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously. GI168 at 6, 12, and 25 mg/kg per d reduced ankle swelling in a dose-related fashion. Radiological and histological ankle joint evaluation on day 22 revealed a profound dose related inhibition of bone and cartilage destruction in treated rats relative to rats receiving vehicle alone. A significant reduction in edema, pannus formation, periosteal new bone growth and the numbers of adherent marrow osteoclasts was also noted. However, no significant decrease in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration of synovium and marrow hematopoietic cellularity was seen. This unique profile of antiarthritic activity indicates that GI168 is osteo- and chondro-protective, and it supports a direct role for MMP in cartilage and bone damage and pannus formation in adjuvant- induced arthritis. PMID:7629505

  3. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo evaluation of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Samira; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Rameshrad, Maryam; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-04-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite (TA-loaded HAp) nanocomposites in the arthritic rat model. The HAp nanocomposites were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method and the drug was subsequently incorporated into the nanocomposites using an impregnation method. The physicochemical properties as well as cytotoxicity of the prepared nanoformulation were examined as well. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the prepared nanoformulation, the various parameters such as paw volume, haematological parameters and histological studies were assessed in the arthritic rats. The nanocomposites with the particle size of 70.45 nm, pore size of 2.71 nm and drug loading of 41.94% were obtained in this study. The specific surface area (aBET) as well as the volume of nitrogen adsorbed on one gram of HAp to complete the monolayer adsorption (Vm) were decreased after the drug loading process. The prepared nanoformulation revealed the slower drug release profile compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, the obtained data from MTT assay showed that the TA-loaded nanocomposites had a lower cytotoxic effect on NIH-3T3 and CAOV-4 cell lines as compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites demonstrated favorable effects on the paw volume as well as the haematological and histopathological abnormalities in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Therefore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites are potentially suggested for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis after further required evaluations.

  4. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  5. Are ventromedial medulla neuronal properties modified by chronic peripheral inflammation? A single-unit study in the awake, freely moving polyarthritic rat.

    PubMed

    Montagne-Clavel, J; Olivéras, J L

    1994-09-19

    In the present work, we recorded the neuronal properties of the ventromedial medulla, a brainstem structure involved in the descending spinal control systems related to nociception, in awake, freely moving healthy and polyarthritic rats. These animals were rendered polyarthritic with a subcutaneous administration of the Freund's adjuvant into the tail, and studied at 20 and 30 days post-inoculation. At the ventromedial medulla level, the single-unit activities were recorded by means of a chronically implanted device supporting a 50 microns platinum-iridium wire as the recording electrode. With a total of 308 recorded neurons, we determined that in both healthy rats, i.e. animals having received mineral oil only and arthritic rats, there were ventromedial medulla units with common physiological properties, but also changes. In agreement with the results from anesthetized arthritic rats at spinal and thalamic levels, the systematic analysis of the responses to light touch and mechanical shock revealed that the 'multimodal, multireceptive' units, excited by innocuous and noxious stimuli, were much more responsive to both modalities in arthritic rats. Approximately 7% of these neurons displayed a 'paroxysmal' spontaneous activity, also reported in the literature for other structures. In addition, we recorded a significant number of neurons inhibited or excited-inhibited by innocuous and noxious cutaneous stimulations, and a few with a regular spontaneous activity, also responding, which has never been the case in healthy rats. We conclude that a peripheral chronic inflammation, such as arthritis, can produce changes of the ventromedial medulla neuronal properties, as compared to healthy animals. Consequently, in addition to its classical role in the spinal control of nociception, the ventromedial medulla is able to develop some form of plasticity in the case of persistent pain of peripheral origin.

  6. Effects of cichoric acid extract from Echinacea purpurea on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Li, Weizu; Wang, Yuchan; Zhang, Xiaosu; Yu, Deqiang; Yin, Yanyan; Xie, Zhongwen; Yuan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Cichoric acid extract (CAE) from Echinacea purpurea L. was used to investigate the anti-arthritic effect by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. The hind paw swelling volume and the body weight were measured and recorded. All the drug solutions were administered orally to rats for a total of 28 days. On day 28, the rats were anaesthetized and decapitated. The thymus and spleen were weighed for the determination of the organ index. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) in the serum was measured using commercially available ELISA kits. Total and phosphor-NF-κB and Cox-2 protein expression in synovial tissues were determined by histological slides quantification and western blot analysis. Our data showed that administration of all doses of CAE (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) significantly decreased the paw swelling, restored body weight gain and decreased the organ index of the thymus and spleen compared with that of the CIA group. CAE (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced the levels of TNFα, IL-1β and PGE-2 in serum compared with the CIA group. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that CAE has obvious anti-arthritic activity. In addition, CAE (32 mg/kg) significantly decreased the levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), TNFα and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in synovium tissues of the ankle joint compared with the CIA group. Furthermore, CAE administration significantly decreased the protein expression of phosphor-NF-κB and Cox-2 in synovium tissues of the knee joint compared with the CIA group. The results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of CAE may account for its anti-arthritic effect, and CAE could be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  7. In vivo hypoxia PET imaging quantifies the severity of arthritic joint inflammation in line with overexpression of HIF and enhanced ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Kerstin; Kuehn, Anna; Mahling, Moritz; Guenthoer, Philipp; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik; Laufer, Stefan; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Reischl, Gerald; Röcken, Martin; Pichler, Bernd J; Kneilling, Manfred

    2017-02-09

    Hypoxia is essential for the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is associated with the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS), due to enhanced infiltration of immune cells. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring hypoxia non-invasively in vivo in arthritic ankles with positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the hypoxia tracers (18)F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and (18)F-fluoroazomycinarabinoside (FAZA). Additionally, we quantified temporal dynamics of hypoxia and ROS stress using L-012, a ROS-sensitive chemiluminescence optical imaging (OI) probe, and analyzed the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Methods: Mice underwent non-invasive in vivo PET/MRI to measure hypoxia or OI to analyze ROS expression. Additionally, we performed ex vivo pimonidazole-/HIF-1α-immunohistochemistry and HIF-1α/2α-western blot/mRNA-analysis of inflamed and healthy ankles to confirm our in vivo results. Results: Mice diseased from experimental RA exhibited a 3-fold enhancement in hypoxia tracer uptake, even in the very early disease stages, and a 45-fold elevation in ROS-expression in inflamed ankles compared with the ankles of healthy controls. We further found strong correlations of our non-invasive in vivo hypoxia PET data with pimonidazole and expression of HIF-1α in arthritic ankles. The strongest hypoxia tracer uptake was observed as soon as day 3, whereas the most pronounced ROS stress was evident on day 6 after the onset of experimental RA, indicating that tissue hypoxia can precede ROS stress in RA. Conclusion: Collectively, for the first time, we have demonstrated that non-invasive measurement of hypoxia in inflammation using (18)F-FAZA/(18)F-FMISO-PET imaging represent a promising new tool for uncovering and monitoring rheumatic inflammation in vivo. Further, as hypoxic inflamed tissues are associated with overexpression of HIFs, specific inhibition of HIFs

  8. [Usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 1, MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1, hyaluronic acid and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and patients with arthritic complaints].

    PubMed

    Czeczuga, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disease that can affect skin, nervous system, heart and joints. Lyme arthritis can develope in about 60% of "not treated" Lyme disease patients, 10% of patients may develope chronic arthritis. Lyme arhritis symptoms (especially chronic arthritis) is similar to rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to establish the usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), hialuronic acid (HA) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with arthritic complaints. Plasma levels of MMP-3, HA and anti-CCP were significantly higher in RA group than in Lyme arthritis group and patients with arthritic complaints. There were no significant differences in serum levels of MMP-3, MMP-9, TIMP-1, HA, anti-CCP between Lyme arthritis patients and patients with arthritic complaints and these parameters are not usefull in differential diagnoses of Lyme arthritis.

  9. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins' expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA.

  10. Use of a whole-slide imaging system to assess the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joint sections of arthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, J X; Liang, Q Q; Wang, Y J; Mooney, R A; Boyce, B F; Xing, L

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joints of arthritic mice using a whole-slide imaging system. Joints and long bone sections were cut from paraffin blocks of two mouse models of arthritis: meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) and TNF transgene (TNF-Tg)-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MLI-OA mice were fed a high fat diet to accelerate OA development. TNF-Tg mice were treated with lymphatic growth factor VEGF-C virus to stimulate lymphangiogenesis. Sections were double immunofluorescence stained with anti-podoplanin and alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The area and number of lymphatic capillaries and mature lymphatic vessels were determined using a whole-slide imaging system and its associated software. Lymphatic vessels in joints were distributed in soft tissues mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads and muscles. In long bones, enriched lymphatic vessels were present in the periosteal areas adjacent to the blood vessels. Occasionally, lymphatic vessels were observed in the cortical bone. Increased lymphatic capillaries, but decreased mature lymphatic vessels, were detected in both OA and RA joints. VEGF-C treatment increased lymphatic capillary and mature vessel formation in RA joints. Our findings suggest that the lymphatic system may play an important role in arthritis pathogenesis and treatment.

  11. A kinematic and kinetic analysis of the sit-to-stand transfer using an ejector chair: implications for elderly rheumatoid arthritic patients.

    PubMed

    Munro, B J; Steele, J R; Bashford, G M; Ryan, M; Britten, N

    1998-03-01

    Twelve elderly female rheumatoid arthritis patients (mean age = 65.5 +/- 8.6 yr) were assessed rising from an instrumented Eser Ejector chair under four conditions: high seat (540 mm), low seat (450 mm), with and without the ejector mechanism operating. Sagittal plane motion, ground reaction forces, and vertical chair arm rest forces were recorded during each trial with the signals synchronised at initial subject head movement. When rising from a high seat, subjects displayed significantly (p < 0.05) greater time to seat off; greater trunk, knee and ankle angles at seat off; increased ankle angular displacement; decreased knee angular displacement; and decreased total net and normalised arm rest forces compared to rising from a low seat. When rising using the ejector mechanism, time to seat off and trunk and knee angle at seat off significantly increased, whereas trunk and knee angular displacement, and total net and normalised arm rest forces significantly decreased compared to rising unassisted. Regardless of seat height or ejector mechanism use, there were no significant differences in the peak, or time to peak horizontal velocity of the subjects' total body centre of mass, or net knee and ankle moments. It was concluded that increased seat height and use of the ejector mechanism facilitated sit-to-stand transfers performed by elderly female rheumatoid arthritic patients. However, using the ejector chair may be preferred by these patients compared to merely raising seat height because it does not necessitate the use of a footstool, a possible obstacle contributing to falls.

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and some other pharmacological effects of 3,4-trans-2,2-dimethyl-3-phenyl-4-[p-(β-pyrrolidinoethoxy)-phenyl]-7- methoxy-chroman (Centchroman)

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, B. N.; Srimal, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    1. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and other pharmacological activities of a new chroman derivative, Centchroman, have been described. 2. Centchroman was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory action in the carrageenin-induced oedema test in mice and rats. It inhibited granuloma formation in the cotton pellet test. The anti-arthritic activity was also evident in formaldehyde-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. 3. Centchroman had a lower ulcerogenic index than phenylbutazone. 4. The mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action of Centchroman seemed to be independent of endogenous adrenocortical hormones or of its weak oestrogenic activity. 5. Centchroman antagonized phenylquinone writhing and bradykinin-induced bronchospasm but was devoid of any antipyretic activity. PMID:4787565

  14. Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced hyperalgesia: a human perception.

    PubMed

    Gould, H J

    2000-03-01

    Much of our current understanding about chronic pain and the mechanisms of nociception has been derived from animal models (Bennett GJ. Animal models of neuropathic pain. In: Gebhart, GF, Hammond DL, Jensen TS, editors. Progress in pain research and management, vol. 2, Proceedings of the 7th World Congress of Pain. Seattle, WA: IASP Press, 1994. pp. 495-510; Dubner R, Methods of assessing pain in animals. In: Wall PD, Melzack R, editors. Textbook of pain, vol. 3. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 1994. pp. 293-302). It has been argued in some cases that animals do not perceive 'pain' as humans do, and thus extrapolation of the results of studies in animals is invalid. Clearly, the animal models used in the laboratory do not approach the complexity of chronic pain encountered in the clinical setting. Human pain perception is more complex since it encompasses lesion variability, as well as psychosocial, cultural, developmental, and environmental variables. Where parallels exist, it is possible to gain insight into certain aspects of human pain syndromes that are likely to lead to improved therapeutic opportunities for individual patients. One such model that is frequently used in animals to study pain associated with inflammation is the subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). For ethical reasons, however, little information is available from humans concerning pain associated with this form of inflammation. Due to an inadvertent subcutaneous injection of CFA into the terminal phalanx of this investigator, a study with an N of 1, was conducted to compare the subjective effects of CFA-induced inflammation with objective measurements.

  15. Electron capture gas-liquid chromatographic study of metabolites produced by some arthritic transudate-associated organisms in vitro and in vivo in rabbit models.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Melton, A R

    1978-10-01

    Computerized, frequency-pulsed, modulated electron capture gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the acid metabolites produced in vitro in fetal calf serum and in vivo in an animal chamber model. Several strains of Diplostreptococcus agalactiae, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus serogroups A, B, and G were studied. All of these organisms have been reported to be associated with arthritic transudates in humans. Metabolites were detected by this method from derivatized extracts of both spent fetal calf serum and chamber fluids. Since there was little host response to the organisms cultured in the chambers, it is highly probable that the products detected represent metabolites produced in an in vivo type of environment. The metabolic patterns were reproducible and exhibited many similarities in vitro and in vivo. Production of the acids detected was reproducible, and these acids were useful identification markers. The data support published reports (J. B. Brooks, C. C. Alley, and J. A. Liddle, Anal. Chem. 46: 1930-1934, 1974; J. B. Brooks, G. Choudhary, R. B. Craven, D. Edman, C. C. Alley, and J. A. Liddle, J. Clin. Microbiol. 5:625-628, 1977; J. B. Brooks, R. B. Craven, A. R. Melton, and C. C. Alley, in H. H. Johnson and W. B. Newson, ed., Second International Symposium on Rapid Methods and Automation on Microbiology, 1976; J. B. Brooks, R. B. Craven, D. Schlossberg, C. C. Alley, and F. M. Pitts, J. Clin. Microbiol. 8:203-208, 1978; J. B. Brooks, D. S. Kellogg, C. C. Alley, H. B. Short, and H. H. Handsfield, J. Infect. Dis. 129:660-668, 1974) that bacterial metabolites might be detectable in diseased body fluids. The growth characteristics of the organisms in the animal model and fetal calf serum are discussed, and a moderately priced computer for performing data manipulations is evaluated.

  16. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  17. Enzyme and combination therapy with cyclosporin A in the rat developing adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovenská, E; Svík, K; Stancíková, M; Rovenský, J

    1999-01-01

    Recent knowledge of the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the mechanism of drug effects have enabled the use of new drugs and drug combinations in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. This study investigates the efficacy of both enzyme therapy and combined therapy with cyclosporin in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were administered either cyclosporin A (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg/day per os), a mixture of enzymes (Phlogenzym (PHL); 45 mg/kg twice daily intrarectally), or a combination of 2.5 mg cyclosporin A and 90 mg PHL for a period of 40 days from the adjuvant application. Levels of serum albumin, changes in hind paw swelling and bone erosions were measured in rats as variables of inflammation and arthritis-associated destructive changes. Treatment with 5 mg of cyclosporin A, as well as with the combination therapy with cyclosporin A plus PHL, significantly inhibited both the inflammation and destructive arthritis-associated changes. However, 2.5 mg of cyclosporin A and PHL alone inhibited these disease markers, although to a lesser extent and at a later stage of arthritis development. The results show the inhibitory effect of enzyme therapy on rat adjuvant arthritis, as well as the efficacy of a low dose of cyclosporin A given in combination with enzyme therapy, which may be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Tudawe, Dulanthi; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Chiew, Gan Seng; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2014-05-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  19. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  20. Effect of persistent monoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint region on acute mustard oil-induced excitation of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis neurons in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Bereiter, David A; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, Dominique F

    2005-09-01

    The effect of persistent inflammation of the temporomandibular (TMJ) region on Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) evoked by acute noxious stimulation of the same or opposite TMJ was assessed in male and cycling female rats. Two weeks after inflammation of the TMJ by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 25 microg) the selective small fiber excitant, mustard oil (MO, 20%), was injected into the arthritic or opposite TMJ under barbiturate anesthesia. MO stimulation of the arthritic TMJ increased Fos-LI ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to MO compared to naïve subjects in superficial laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C2) junction independent of sex hormone status. Unexpectedly, MO stimulation of the opposite TMJ in arthritic rats also produced a greater Fos-LI response ipsilateral to MO than naïve animals. Fos-LI produced in the dorsal paratrigeminal region (dPa5) and Vc/C2 junction after MO stimulation of the normal TMJ was significantly greater in proestrous than diestrous females or male monoarthritic rats. In contrast to naïve animals, Fos-LI was produced in deep laminae at the Vc/C2 junction ipsilateral to MO in CFA-treated animals independent of the site of prior CFA inflammation or sex hormone status. These results indicated that persistent monoarthritis of the TMJ region enhanced the excitability of trigeminal brainstem neurons to subsequent TMJ injury that occurred bilaterally in multiple regions of the lower trigeminal brainstem complex and depended on sex hormone status.

  1. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-17

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA.

  2. Curcumin-loaded colloidal carrier system: formulation optimization, mechanistic insight, ex vivo and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Zrien; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated the topical delivery potential of nanoemulsion gel loaded with curcumin (CR). CR nanoemulsion (CR-NE) was prepared by spontaneous emulsification method using oil (Labrafac PG/glyceryl triacetate), surfactant:cosurfactant (Smix) (tween 80/polyethylene glycol [PEG] 400) and water. The pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed and thermodynamic stability testing was performed. Droplet size and zeta potential were evaluated using photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron spectroscopy. Six formulations selected with an average droplet size ≤70±2.72 nm showed a fourfold increase in skin permeation as compared to crude CR solution in oil. The formulation CR-NE4 having a flux of 117.04±2.32 µg/cm2/h and with maximum retention (42.87%) was selected, characterized (droplet size =41.13±3.34 nm and zeta potential =−33.1±1.45 mV), and incorporated into gel using carbopol-980 (1% w/v). Skin dynamics analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed maximum deposition of CR up to a depth of 86.98 µm and was in concordance with differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies that confirmed lipid bilayer disruption, enhancing permeation. A 28-day anti-arthritic evaluation (body weight, paw edema, tibiotarsal joint thickness, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and histopathology) on Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritic rat model after topical application of CR-NE gel in Wistar rats demonstrated substantial reversal of arthritic symptoms. Thus, CR-NE gel possesses potential for therapeutic effects locally in inflammatory arthritic disorders with improved topical bioavailability. PMID:26170665

  3. Comparative antigen-induced gene expression profiles unveil novel aspects of susceptibility/resistance to adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming T; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-12-01

    Lewis (LEW) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype (RT.1(l)) display differential susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). LEW are susceptible while WKY are resistant to AIA. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis of these disparate outcomes, we compared the gene expression profiles of the draining lymph node cells (LNC) of these two rat strains early (day 7) following a potentially arthritogenic challenge. LNC were tested both ex vivo and after restimulation with the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65. Biotin-labeled fragment cRNA was generated from RNA of LNC and then hybridized with an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray chip. The differentially expressed genes (DEG) were compared by limiting the false discovery rate to <5% and fold change ≥2.0, and their association with quantitative trait loci (QTL) was analyzed. This analysis revealed overall a more active immune response in WKY than LEW rats. Important differences were observed in the association of DEG with QTL in LEW vs. WKY rats. Both the number of upregulated DEG associated with rat arthritis-QTL and their level of expression were relatively higher in LEW when compared to WKY rat; however, the number of downregulated DEG-associated with rat arthritis-QTL as well as AIA-QTL were found to be higher in WKY than in LEW rats. In conclusion, distinct gene expression profiles define arthritis-susceptible versus resistant phenotype of MHC-compatible inbred rats. These results would advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and might also offer potential novel targets for therapeutic purposes.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiarthritic Activity of Anthraquinone Derivatives in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Ajay D.; Panchal, Prashant V.; Harle, Uday N.; Nanda, Rabindra K.; Shaikh, Haidarali M.

    2014-01-01

    Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO) and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid) was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin) and AEC significantly (P < 0.001) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant (P < 0.001) decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant (P < 0.001) inhibition in inflammation and arthritis. PMID:25610704

  5. The effects of pre-emptive low-dose X-ray irradiation on MIA induced inflammatory pain in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Suk-Chan; Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun; Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Wonho

    2013-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of pre-emptive low-dose irradiation on the development of inflammatory pain and to characterize the potential mechanisms underlying this effect in osteoarthritis (OA) animal model. Whole-body X-irradiations with 0.1, 0.5, 1 Gy or sham irradiations were performed for 3 days before the induction of ostearthritis with monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) (40 µl, in saline) into the right knee joint in male Sprague Dawley rats. Behavioral tests for arthritic pain including evoked and non-evoked pain were conducted before and after MIA injection and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression level was measured by western blot. Low-dose radiation significantly prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and reduction in weight bearing that is regarded as a behavioral signs of non-evoked pain following MIA injection. Low-dose radiation significantly inhibited the increase in iNOS expression after MIA injection in spinal L3-5 segments in rat. These data suggest that low-dose X-irradiation is able to prevent the development of arthritic pain through modulation of iNOS expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, low-dose radiotherapy could be substituted in part for treatment with drugs for patients with chronic inflammatory disease in clinical setting.

  6. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  7. The Rheumatoid Arthritic At Home

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    Most management of rheumatoid arthritis must take place in the patient's own home with only intermittent professional help. With good planning and instruction it is possible to create in the home a milieu appropriate not only for possible inducement of remission, but also for continuing care during even protracted disability. The mainstay of treatment in all stages of this disease is the achievement of a right balance between rest and activity. In the initial stages, proper rest and support, including splinting of the joints with other simple measures, will greatly relieve pain and help control the inflammatory process. A variety of therapeutic exercises can reduce the likelihood of secondary immobility and promote restoration of strength and function. For the patient in whom the disease has become chronic and disabling a wide variety of self-help devices can be prescribed, together with appropriate home modifications. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Figs. 4 & 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:21307997

  8. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity.

  9. Prenatal Dexamethasone Exposure Increases the Susceptibility to Autoimmunity in Offspring Rats by Epigenetic Programing of Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanhong; Ouyang, Juan; Xie, Renfeng; Wang, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Prenatal glucocorticoids (GC) can induce long term effects on offspring health. However, reports and related studies regarding the prolonged effects of prenatal GC on the development of autoimmunity are limited. Here, we aimed to explore the immunological effects of dexamethasone (DEX) exposure on young adults and whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is involved in this process. Methods. Wistar rats were given DEX during pregnancy. Susceptibility to autoimmunity in offspring was assessed using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) animal models. To reveal the possible mechanism, glucocorticoid response, GR expression, and methylation status were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results. Our results showed that the DEX-treated rats had greater susceptibility to EAE (100% versus 62.5%, P < 0.05) and AIA (63.6% versus 0%, P < 0.05) than saline control group. Glucocorticoid response and GR expression were decreased in DEX rats. Significant difference was also found in the methylation levels of GR exon 1-10 to exon 1-11 region. Conclusions. Prenatal DEX administration increases the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, which is potentially mediated by programming GR methylation status and glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:28078304

  10. In vivo and in vitro effects of dexamethasone on leukocyte migration in the rat adjuvant arthritis model

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, T.R.; Mirkovich, A.; Maloney, P.; Goodwin, D.A.

    1982-12-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and mononuclear cells were isolated from the blood of dexamethasone-treated normal rats, in vitro mononuclear cell migration was inhibited and PMN migration was stimulated in comparison to controls. Inflammogen-induced PMNs showed inhibited cell migration due to dexamethasone treatment. Gamma camera imaging was then used to detect cells in vivo after labeling with /sup 111/In. When the dexamethasone-treated blood cells were injected into adjuvant arthritis diseased rats, mononuclear cells showed depressed migration into the inflamed paws, while PMNs showed stimulated migration into the inflamed paws in comparison to controls. When the recipient adjuvant arthritic animals were treated with dexamethasone, both normal mononuclear cell and normal PMN migration to the inflamed paws were inhibited.

  11. The studies of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and pharmacokinetics of Oxytropis falcate Bunge extraction after transdermal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-peng; Qu, Min-ming; Chen, Hong-xuan; Liu, Dan; Xiao, Yan-yu; Chen, Jun; Lu, Tu-lin; Cai, Bao-chang

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activities of anti-inflammatory and analgesic of the total flavonoids extraction from Oxytropis falcate Bunge (FEO) after transdermal administration. The pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of FEO in rat, furthermore, was studied. Firstly, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the FEO were studied by xylene-induced ear edema, adjuvant-induced joint inflammation law in rats, acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests in mice. Secondly, we developed a sensitive and specific HPLC method to analyze 2', 4'-dihydroxychalcone (TFC, the mainly ingredient of FEO) in rat plasma to study the pharmacokinetic of TEC. The results showed FEO has anti-inflammatory and analgesic property in a dose-dependent manner, and that the high dose group (90.6 mg/kg) of FEO appeared more significantly effective than the positive drug. From the pharmacokinetic studies of TFC in rats, we got the main pharmacokinetic parameters of TFC, providing a basis for the future studies in clinic.

  12. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  13. Differential contributions of vasopressin V1A and oxytocin receptors in the amygdala to pain-related behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Bryce; Ji, Guangchen

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes in the amygdala account for emotional-affective aspects of pain and involve neuropeptides such as calcitonin gene-related peptide and corticotropin-releasing factor. Another neuropeptide system, central arginine vasopressin, has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, but its role in pain-related emotional expression and neuroplasticity remains to be determined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginine vasopressin in the amygdala contributes to pain-related emotional-affective responses, using stereotaxic applications of arginine vasopressin and antagonists for G-protein coupled vasopressin V1A and oxytocin receptors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. In normal animals, arginine vasopressin increased audible and ultrasonic vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior (decreased open-arm preference in the elevated plus maze). The facilitatory effects were blocked by a selective V1A antagonist (SR 49059, Relcovaptan) but not by an oxytocin receptor antagonist (L-371,257). L-371,257 had some facilitatory effects on vocalizations. Arginine vasopressin had no effect in arthritic rats (kaolin/carrageenan knee joint pain model). SR 49059 inhibited vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus maze) in arthritic, but not normal, rats and conveyed anxiolytic properties to arginine vasopressin. Arginine vasopressin, SR 49059, and L-371,257 had no significant effects on spinal reflexes. We interpret the data to suggest that arginine vasopressin through V1A in the amygdala contributes to emotional-affective aspects of pain (arthritis model), whereas oxytocin receptors may mediate some inhibitory effects of the vasopressin system. PMID:27837170

  14. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Polyphenolic-Enriched Red Raspberry Extract in an Antigen Induced Arthritis Rat Model†

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    The red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. Here we sought to investigate the cartilage protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using: 1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and, 2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents) and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/Kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  16. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Xin; Fan, Arthur Yin; Zhou, An-Nan; Moudgil, Kamal D.; Ma, Zhong-Ze; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Fong, Harry HS; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) and its modifications have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for about one hundred years to alleviate pain and inflammation. Aim To investigate the effects of HLXL on complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced multiple-joint arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods Male Lewis rats, 190–210g, were immunized subcutaneously at the base of the tail with 200 µl of heat-killed M. tuberculosis in mineral oil (5 mg/ml). HLXL (2.30g/kg and 4.60g/kg) or vehicle control (n=8 per group) was administered orally (i.g.) once a day between days 16–25 post-CFA injection. The rats were observed for signs of arthritis with arthritic changes (erythema, edema, induration) being scored on a scale of 0 to 4 of increasing severity using a standard scoring system. The maximum arthritis score per rat was 16. A plethysmometer was used to measure edema volume in each paw. Adverse effects of HLXL were monitored by closely observing the animals for unusual behavioral changes. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in local tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on day 25 post-CFA. Results HLXL significantly decreased arthritis scores between days 23–25 in the 2.30g/kg group and 21–25 in the 4.60g/kg group (p<0.05). It reduced paw edema on days 22 and 24 in the 2.30g/kg group and on days 20, 22 and 24 in the 4.60g/kg group compared to control (p<0.05). Local tissue TNF-α and IL-1β levels on day 25 post-CFA injection were significantly (p<0.05) lower in rats treated with HLXL than in control rats. No observable adverse effects were found. Conclusion The data suggest that HLXL produces significant anti-arthritic effects that may be mediated by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, and it appears to be safe. PMID:19100323

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  18. Green tea protects rats against autoimmune arthritis by modulating disease-related immune events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ro; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Wu, Qing-Li; Satpute, Shailesh R; Tan, Ming T; Simon, James E; Berman, Brian M; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2008-11-01

    Green tea, a product of the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. The polyphenolic compounds from green tea (PGT) possess antiinflammatory properties. We investigated whether PGT can afford protection against autoimmune arthritis and also examined the immunological basis of this effect using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AA can be induced in Lewis rats (RT.1(l)) by immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb), and arthritic rats raise a T cell response to the mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). Rats consumed green tea (2-12 g/L) in drinking water for 1-3 wk and then were injected with Mtb to induce disease. Thereafter, they were observed regularly and graded for signs of arthritis. Subgroups of these rats were killed at defined time points and their draining lymph node cells were harvested and tested for T cell proliferative and cytokine responses. Furthermore, the sera collected from these rats were tested for anti-Bhsp65 antibodies. Feeding 8 g/L PGT to Lewis rats for 9 d significantly reduced the severity of arthritis compared with the water-fed controls. Interestingly, PGT-fed rats had a lower concentration of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 but a greater concentration of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 than controls. PGT feeding also suppressed the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response. Thus, green tea induced changes in arthritis-related immune responses. We suggest further systematic exploration of dietary supplementation with PGT as an adjunct nutritional strategy for the management of RA.

  19. A Novel Selective Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis Inhibitor Relieves Pyrexia and Chronic Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kuwabara, Harumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Kubota, Kazufumi; Imamura, Yuichiro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Tengeiji, Atsushi; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a terminal prostaglandin in the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Inhibition of PGE2 production may relieve inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. We report here the profile of a novel selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound A [N-[(1S,3S)-3-carbamoylcyclohexyl]-1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide], in animal models of pyrexia and inflammation. The compound selectively suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells and rat macrophages. In the lipopolysaccharide-induced pyrexia model, this compound selectively reduced PGE2 production in cerebrospinal fluid and showed an anti-pyretic effect. In the adjuvant-induced arthritis model, compound A therapeutically decreased foot swelling in the established arthritis. Our data demonstrates that selective suppression of PGE2 synthesis shows anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting that selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitors can be applied as an alternative treatment to nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selective inhibitors.

  20. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis. PMID:11207665

  1. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  2. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression model for effects of anakinra in Lewis rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Dubois, Debra C; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2011-12-01

    A population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression (PK/PD/DIS) model was developed to characterize the effects of anakinra in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and explore the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rheumatoid arthritis. The CIA rats received either vehicle, or anakinra at 100 mg/kg for about 33 h, 100 mg/kg for about 188 h, or 10 mg/kg for about 188 h by subcutaneous infusion. Plasma concentrations of anakinra were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Swelling of rat hind paws was measured. Population PK/PD/DIS parameters were computed for the various groups using non-linear mixed-effects modeling software (NONMEM® Version VI). The final model was assessed using visual predictive checks and nonparameter stratified bootstrapping. A two-compartment PK model with two sequential absorption processes and linear elimination was used to capture PK profiles of anakinra. A transduction-based feedback model incorporating logistic growth rate captured disease progression and indirect response model I captured drug effects. The PK and paw swelling versus time profiles in CIA rats were fitted well. Anakinra has modest effects (I ( max ) = 0.28) on paw edema in CIA rats. The profiles are well-described by our PK/PD/DIS model which provides a basis for future mechanism-based assessment of anakinra dynamics in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Analgesic Effect of Intra-Articular Injection of Temperature-Responsive Hydrogel Containing Bupivacaine on Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taemin; Seol, Dong Rim; Hahm, Suk-Chan; Ko, Cheolwoong; Kim, Eun-Hye; Chun, Keyoungjin; Kim, Junesun; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the analgesic effects of slow-releasing bupivacaine from hydrogel on chronic arthritic pain in rats. Osteoarthritis (OA) was induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) injection into the right knee joint. Hydrogel (HG: 20, 30, and 50 μL) and temperature-sensitive hydrogel containing bupivacaine (T-gel: 20, 30, and 50 μL) were injected intra-articularly 14 days after MIA injection. Behavioral tests were conducted. The rats showed a significant decrease in weight load and paw withdrawal threshold (PWT). Intra-articular 0.5% bupivacaine (10 and 20 μL) significantly reversed MIA-induced decreased PWT, with no effect on weight load. In normal rats, hydrogel did not produce significant changes in PWT but at 30 and 50 μL slightly decreased weight bearing; T-gel did not cause any changes in both the weight load and PWT. In OA rats, T-gel at 20 μL had a significant analgesic effect for 2 days, even though T-gel at 50 μL further reduced the weight load, demonstrating that intra-articular T-gel (20 μL) has long-lasting analgesic effects in OA rats. Thus, T-gel designed to deliver analgesics into the joint cavity could be an effective therapeutic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:26881207

  4. Characterization of the Immunogenicity and Allergenicity of Two Cow's Milk Hydrolysates--A Study in Brown Norway Rats.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, K L; Barkholt, V; Madsen, C B

    2015-05-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas based on hydrolysed milk proteins are used in the diet for cow's milk allergic infants. For a preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity and allergenicity of new protein ingredients for such hypoallergenic infant formulas as well as for the investigation of which characteristics of hydrolysates that contribute to allergenicity, in vivo models are valuable tools. In this study, we examine the immunogenicity and allergenicity of two hydrolysates in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model, using i.p. dosing, which allows for the use of small quantities. Intact BLG, hydrolysed BLG and a hydrolysed whey product suitable for use in extensively hydrolysed formulas were thoroughly characterized for protein chemical features and administered to BN rats by i.p. immunization with or without adjuvant. Sera were analysed for specific IgG and IgE for evaluation of sensitizing capacity, immunogenicity and antibody-binding capacity. For evaluation of eliciting capacity a skin test was performed. The study showed that the hydrolysates had no residual allergenicity, lacking the capacity to sensitize and elicit reactions in the BN rats. Dosing with or without adjuvant induced a large difference in immunogenicity. Only antibodies from rats sensitized to intact BLG with adjuvant were able to bind the hydrolysates, and the whey-based hydrolysate only showed immunogenicity when dosed with adjuvant. This study showed that hydrolysates can be evaluated by an i.p. animal model, but that the choice of in vitro tests used for evaluation of antibody responses may greatly influence the result as well as may the use of adjuvant.

  5. Monocyte migration to arthritis in the rat utilizes both CD11/CD18 and very late activation antigen 4 integrin mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In human and experimental models of arthritis, blood monocytes migrate into the inflamed synovium and joint space. The mechanisms required for monocyte migration across the vascular endothelium in joints is poorly defined. Radiolabeled rat blood monocytes were used to measure monocyte migration to the inflamed joints of rats with adjuvant arthritis, and the role of monocyte adhesion molecules was analyzed. Monocyte accumulation in the inflamed joints was maximal 14-21 d after immunization with adjuvant, when arthritis had fully developed. Blocking mAbs to lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), Mac- 1, and very late activation antigen 4 (VLA-4) were used to evaluate the role of these integrins in the migration. Migration to the joints was not inhibited by treatment of the animals with mAb to LFA-1, Mac-1, or VLA-4 alone, and was partially (50%) inhibited in only the most arthritic joint, the talar joint, by the combination of mAb to LFA-1 plus Mac-1. In contrast, this combination inhibited migration to dermal inflammation induced by C5ades Arg, endotoxin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and polyinosine-cytosine by 60-70%. When mAbs to LFA-1 and VLA-4 were combined, migration to all the inflamed joints was strongly inhibited (80-98%, depending on the joint). Treatment with the combination of the three mAbs to LFA-1, Mac-1, and VLA-4 completely eliminated monocyte migration to all joints and dermal inflammation. The results show that 51Cr blood monocytes can be used to quantify monocyte migration to arthritic joints in the rat. LFA-1 alone or VLA-4 alone is sufficient to mediate most of this migration, and either LFA-1 or VLA-4 is required for monocyte migration to joint inflammation. These results indicate that both the VLA-4 and LFA-1 integrins should be therapeutic targets for suppression of monocyte infiltration of joints in arthritis. PMID:7532681

  6. Teratogenicity of N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-all-trans-retinamide in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kenel, M F; Krayer, J H; Merz, E A; Pritchard, J F

    1988-01-01

    N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-all-trans-retinamide (HPR) has potential efficacy in the treatment of dermatologic, arthritic, and neoplastic disorders. The teratogenicity of such a compound is of special concern in light of the known adverse effects of retinoids, in general, on the developing conceptus. In these studies, Sprague-Dawley rats and New Zealand White rabbits were treated orally from gestation days 6 to 15 and 6 to 18, respectively, with 0, 20, 125, or 800 mg/kg/day of HPR. In rat fetuses, low incidences of hydrocephaly (mid- and high-dosage groups) were observed. Fetal tissue (ng/g) and maternal plasma (ng/ml) concentrations of HPR, its major metabolite (N-[4-methoxyphenyl] retinamide [MPR]) and retinol were determined in separate groups of similarly-treated rats 3 h following the last dose on gestation day 15. Fetal tissue concentrations of HPR and MPR were approximately one-half maternal plasma concentrations. A dose related reduction in maternal plasma and fetal tissue concentrations of retinol were also observed. In mid- and high-dosage rabbit fetuses, a dose-related increase in the incidence of dome-shaped head was observed. Subsequent skeletal evaluation revealed delays in skull bone ossification and a widening of the frontal and frontoparietal sutures. Microphthalmia was also observed in two high-dosage fetuses. A dose-dependent and statistically significant reduction in maternal plasma retinol levels was observed across all dosage groups.

  7. Inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats neonatally treated with capsaicin: effects on two classes of nociceptive neurons in the superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Williams, G M; Ruda, M A; Dubner, R

    1994-11-01

    To address the mechanisms of hyperalgesia and dorsal horn plasticity following peripheral tissue inflammation, the effects of adjuvant-induced inflammation of the rat hindpaw on behavioral nociception and nociceptive neuronal activity in the superficial dorsal horn were examined in neonatally capsaicin-treated rats 6-8 weeks of age. Capsaicin treatment resulted in an 82% loss of unmyelinated fibers in L5 dorsal roots, a dramatic reduction of substance P-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord, and a significant decrease in the percentage of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons that responded to C-fiber stimulation and noxious heating of the skin. The thermal nociceptive threshold was significantly increased in capsaicin-treated rats, but behavioral hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli still developed in response to inflammation. Following inflammation, there was a significant decrease in mechanical threshold and an increase in response duration to mechanical stimuli in both vehicle- and capsaicin-treated rats, suggesting that a state of mechanical hyperalgesia was also induced. The capsaicin treatment appears to have differential effects on nociceptive specific (NS) and wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons in inflamed rats. Expansion of the receptive fields of nociceptive neurons, a measure of the effect of inflammation-induced CNS plasticity, was less extensive for NS than for WDR neurons in capsaicin-treated rats. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, a smaller population of NS neurons, but a similar percentage of WDR neurons, had background activity in inflamed capsaicin-treated rats. C-fiber strength electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve produced expansion of the receptive fields in a greater portion of NS neurons (53%, P < 0.05) in capsaicin- than in vehicle-treated rats (32%). There was no difference in stimulation-induced expansion of the receptive fields for WDR neurons between vehicle- or capsaicin-treated rats. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801

  8. Molecular changes after shockwave therapy in osteoarthritic knee in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Sun, Y.-C.; Wu, C.-T.; Weng, L.-H.; Wang, F.-S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the molecular changes of DKK-1, MMP13, Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in anterior cruciate ligament transected (ACLT) osteoarthritic (OA) knee in rats. 27 male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Group I was the control one and received sham knee arthrotomy but no ACLT or ESWT. Group II underwent ACLT, but no ESWT. Group III underwent ACLT and received ESWT. The animals were killed at 12 weeks, and the harvested knee specimens were subjected to histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs of the knees were obtained at 0 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, radiographs of group II showed more arthritic changes with formation of osteochondral fragments, whereas very subtle arthritis was noted in groups I and III. In histopathological examination, group II showed a significant increase of Mankin score and a decrease of subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed a significant decrease of Mankin score and an increase of subchondral bone, with the data comparable to group I. In immunohistochemical analysis, group II showed significant increases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and decreases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin in articular cartilage and subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed significant decreases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and increases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin, with the data comparable to group I. In conclusion, the application of ESWT causes molecular changes that are consistent with the improvement in subchondral bone remodeling and chondroprotective effect in ACLT OA knees in rats.

  9. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, J P; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M; Donaldson, L F

    2010-02-17

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive-cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  10. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.P.; Leith, J.L.; Lumb, B.M.; Donaldson, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive–cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  11. Effects of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate in a dietary bar formulation on inflammation, interleukin-1beta, matrix metalloprotease-9, and cartilage damage in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chou, May M; Vergnolle, Nathalie; McDougall, Jason J; Wallace, John L; Marty, Stephanie; Teskey, Val; Buret, Andre G

    2005-04-01

    This study examined the effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) alone and CS plus glucosamine sulfate (GS) in a dietary bar formulation on inflammatory parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis and on the synthesis of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Following 25 days pretreatment with dietary bars containing either CS alone, CS plus GS, or neither CS nor GS, rats were either sham injected or injected with Freund's complete adjuvant into the tail vein. Rats were fed their respective bars for another 17 days after inoculation. Parameters of disease examined included clinical score (combination of joint temperature, edema, hyperalgesia, and standing and walking limb function), incidence of disease, levels of IL-1beta in the serum and paw joints, levels of MMP-9 in the paw joints, paw joint histology, and joint cartilage thickness. Treatment with CS plus GS, but not CS alone, significantly reduced clinical scores, incidences of disease, joint temperatures, and joint and serum IL-1beta levels. Treatment with CS alone and CS plus GS inhibited the production of edema and prevented raised levels of joint MMP-9 associated with arthritis. Similarly, CS alone and CS plus GS treatment also prevented the development of cartilage damage associated with arthritis. Combination CS plus GS treatment in a dietary bar formulation ameliorates clinical, inflammatory, and histologic parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The benefits of CS and GS in combination are more pronounced than those of CS alone. The reduction of arthritic disease by CS plus GS is associated with a reduction of IL-1beta and MMP-9 synthesis.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  13. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  14. Antihyperalgesic effect of systemic dexmedetomidine and gabapentin in a rat model of monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Shi; Xu, Hua; Xu, Bo; Sun, Shan; Deng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2009-04-06

    The present study investigated the effects of systemic administration of dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha2 adrenergic receptor (alpha2AR) agonist, and gabapentin either alone or in combination on thermal hyperalgesia evoked by ankle joint inflammation. Monoarthritis of rat ankle joint was induced by an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) from a thermal stimulus was measured in awake rats. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of dexmedetomidine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 microg/kg) or gabapentin (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently increased the PWL of the hindpaw ipsilateral to CFA-injected joint. The PWLs of the non-injected and normal saline (NS)-injected hindpaws were not significantly affected by the two agents at the most doses tested except the highest dose of dexmedetomidine (20 microg/kg). Although low dose of dexmedetomidine (2.5 microg/kg) or gabapentin (25 mg/kg) alone did not affect or lightly increased PWLs of the hindpaw ipsilateral to CFA-injected joint, a combination of dexmedetomidine and gabapentin (2.5 microg/kg+25 mg/kg, or 5 microg/kg+50 mg/kg) significantly reversed CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia for 60 min without sedation/motor impairment. These results provide the first identification that co-application of dexmedetomidine and gabapentin may synergistically antagonize inflammatory pain, and this might prove to be beneficial in the treatment of arthritic pain.

  15. Effects of milnacipran, duloxetine and indomethacin, in polyarthritic rats using the Randall-Selitto model.

    PubMed

    Mico, Juan Antonio; Berrocoso, Esther; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Bardin, Laurent; Depoortère, Ronan

    2011-09-01

    Milnacipran, a serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is efficacious in rodents in various models of acute or chronic pain (traumatic, neuropathic, inflammatory, visceral). However, its activity against arthritic pain has never been explored. Here, we assessed the activity of acute treatment with milnacipran in a polyarthritic rat model. Rats were injected in the tail base with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce a state of polyarthritis. Analgesic effects of acute treatment with intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran were then evaluated, using the Randall-Selitto model, against two levels of pressure applied to both hind paws (a lower one, addressing mechanical allodynia and a higher one, addressing mechanical hyperalgesia). The other SNRI duloxetine and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin were tested as positive controls. Milnacipran was significantly and dose dependently active against the decrease of paw withdrawal threshold produced by complete Freund's adjuvant for low (minimum effective dose=5 mg/kg, range tested: 2.5-10 mg/kg) and high (minimum effective dose=10 mg/kg, range tested: 5-20 mg/kg)-pressure levels. Duloxetine (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was significantly active against low pressure only. Indomethacin (3 mg/kg per os) was efficacious against both pressure levels. These rodent data suggest that milnacipran should be efficacious in painful conditions associated with chronic inflammatory states, such as arthritis.

  16. Sinomenine reduces iNOS expression via inhibiting the T-bet IFN-γ pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bingjie; Zeng, Yanying; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Huijiuan; Yang, Xiaofan; Wang, Song; Ji, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    Sinomenine is a bioactive alkaloid isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. It is widely used as an immunosuppressive drug for treating rheumatic and arthritic diseases. In our previous studies, we found that sinomenine reduced cellular infiltration within the spinal cord and alleviated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of sinomenine treatment in EAE rats. In EAE rats, treatment with sinomenine exerted an anti-inducible NO synthase (anti-iNOS) effect, which is related to the reductions of Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and its transcription factor, T-bet, in spinal cords. Moreover, sinomenine treatment of splenocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and recombinant rat interleukin 12 reduced the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ in vitro and also reduced the capability of supernatants of splenocyte culture to induce iNOS expression by primary astrocytes. However, sinomenine had no direct inhibitory effect on iNOS produced by astrocytes cultured with IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. In conclusion, the anti-iNOS effect of sinomenine on EAE is mediated via the suppression of T-bet /IFN-γ pathway. PMID:23554784

  17. Sinomenine reduces iNOS expression via inhibiting the T-bet IFN-γ pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bingjie; Zeng, Yanying; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Huijiuan; Yang, Xiaofan; Wang, Song; Ji, Xiaohui

    2012-11-01

    Sinomenine is a bioactive alkaloid isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. It is widely used as an immunosuppressive drug for treating rheumatic and arthritic diseases. In our previous studies, we found that sinomenine reduced cellular infiltration within the spinal cord and alleviated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of sinomenine treatment in EAE rats. In EAE rats, treatment with sinomenine exerted an anti-inducible NO synthase (anti-iNOS) effect, which is related to the reductions of Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and its transcription factor, T-bet, in spinal cords. Moreover, sinomenine treatment of splenocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and recombinant rat interleukin 12 reduced the expression of T-bet and IFN-γ in vitro and also reduced the capability of supernatants of splenocyte culture to induce iNOS expression by primary astrocytes. However, sinomenine had no direct inhibitory effect on iNOS produced by astrocytes cultured with IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. In conclusion, the anti-iNOS effect of sinomenine on EAE is mediated via the suppression of T-bet /IFN-γ pathway.

  18. Characterization and evaluation of triamcinolone, raloxifene, and their dual-loaded microspheres as prospective local treatment system in rheumatic rat joints.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Yigit; Kurum, Baris; Karahan, Siyami; Tezcaner, Aysen; Ozen, Seza; Keskin, Dilek

    2014-08-01

    In this study, injectable microspheres were developed for the local treatment of joint degeneration in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Microspheres loaded with triamcinolone (TA), a corticosteroid drug, and/or raloxifene (Ral), a cartilage regenerative drug, were prepared with a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polycaprolactone (PCL). Microspheres were optimized for particle size, structural properties, drug release, and loading properties. In vitro release of Ral was very slow because of the low solubility of the drug and hydrophobic nature of PCL. However, when coloaded with TA, both drugs were released at higher amounts compared with their single forms. Smallest particle sizes were obtained in dual drug-loaded microspheres. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed biocompatibility of microspheres. In vivo bioefficacy of these microspheres was also examined in adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. In vivo histological studies of control groups showed development of RA with high median lesion score (5.0). Compared with control and intra-articular free drug injections, microsphere treatment groups showed lower lesion scores and better healing outcomes in histological evaluations. Results suggest that a controlled delivery system of TA and RAL by a single injection in inflamed joints holds promise for healing and suppressing inflammation.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of an ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Hilleria latifolia (Lam.) H. Walt. (Phytolaccaceae).

    PubMed

    Abotsi, W K M; Ainooson, G K; Woode, E

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of the perennial herb Hilleria latifolia (Lam.) H. Walt. (Family: Phytolaccaceae) are used in Ghanaian traditional medicine for the treatment of several inflammatory-related disorders. The present study examined the anti-inflammatory effect of an ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Hilleria latifolia (HLE) in acute and chronic inflammation models. Since free radicals and reactive oxygen species are implicated in inflammatory diseases, the antioxidant potential of HLE was also investigated in in vitro experimental models. HLE (10-300 mg kg(-1), p.o.), either preemptively or curatively, significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced foot oedema in 7-day old chicks. Similarly, the NSAID diclofenac (10-100 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and the steroidal anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone (0.3-3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) dose-dependently reduced the oedema in both pre-emptive and curative treatments. In the Freund's adjuvant induced-arthritis model in rats, HLE as well as the positive controls, dexamethasone and methotrexate, showed significant anti-arthritic properties when applied to established adjuvant arthritis. HLE (10-300 mg kg(-1), p.o.) significantly reduced oedema in the ipsilateral paw of rats but failed to prevent systemic arthritic spread. The DMARD methotrexate (0.1-1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and dexamethasone (0.3-3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced significantly the total polyarthritic oedema as well as the spread of the arthritis from the ipsilateral to the contralateral paws of the treated animals. The extract (0.03-1.00 mg ml(-1)) exhibited Fe(3+) reducing activity, scavenged DPPH and prevented lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that the extract exerts in vivo anti-inflammatory activity after oral administration and also has antioxidant properties which may contribute to its activity.

  20. Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, D.C.; Zhang, L.P.; Ma, F.; Abshire, S.M.; McIlwrath, S.L.; Stinchcomb, A.L.; Westlund, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current arthritis treatments often have side-effects attributable to active compounds as well as route of administration. Cannabidiol (CBD) attenuates inflammation and pain without side-effects, but CBD is hydrophobic and has poor oral bioavailability. Topical drug application avoids gastrointestinal administration, first pass metabolism, providing more constant plasma levels. Methods This study examined efficacy of transdermal CBD for reduction in inflammation and pain, assessing any adverse effects in a rat complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced monoarthritic knee joint model. CBD gels (0.6, 3.1, 6.2 or 62.3 mg/day) were applied for 4 consecutive days after arthritis induction. Joint circumference and immune cell invasion in histological sections were measured to indicate level of inflammation. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in response to noxious heat stimulation determined nociceptive sensitization, and exploratory behaviour ascertained animal’s activity level. Results Measurement of plasma CBD concentration provided by transdermal absorption revealed linearity with 0.6–6.2 mg/day doses. Transdermal CBD gel significantly reduced joint swelling, limb posture scores as a rating of spontaneous pain, immune cell infiltration and thickening of the synovial membrane in a dose-dependent manner. PWL recovered to near baseline level. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord (CGRP, OX42) and dorsal root ganglia (TNFα) revealed dose-dependent reductions of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Results showed 6.2 and 62 mg/day were effective doses. Exploratory behaviour was not altered by CBD indicating limited effect on higher brain function. Conclusions These data indicate that topical CBD application has therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects. PMID:26517407

  1. Celecoxib, but not indomethacin, ameliorates the hypertensive and perivascular fibrotic actions of cyclosporine in rats: Role of endothelin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Gowelli, Hanan M.

    2015-04-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine (CSA) is used with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in arthritic conditions. In this study, we investigated whether NSAIDs modify the deleterious hypertensive action of CSA and the role of endothelin (ET) receptors in this interaction. Pharmacologic, protein expression, and histopathologic studies were performed in rats to investigate the roles of endothelin receptors (ET{sub A}/ET{sub B}) in the hemodynamic interaction between CSA and two NSAIDs, indomethacin and celecoxib. Tail-cuff plethysmography measurements showed that CSA (20 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 10 days) increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR). CSA hypertension was associated with renal perivascular fibrosis and divergent changes in immunohistochemical signals of renal arteriolar ET{sub A} (increases) and ET{sub B} (decreases) receptors. While these effects of CSA were preserved in rats treated concomitantly with indomethacin (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}), celecoxib (10 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor, tachycardic, and fibrotic effects of CSA and normalized the altered renal ET{sub A}/ET{sub B} receptor expressions. Selective blockade of ET{sub A} receptors by atrasentan (5 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) abolished the pressor response elicited by CSA or CSA plus indomethacin. Alternatively, BQ788 (ET{sub B} receptor blocker, 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}) caused celecoxib-sensitive elevations in SBP and potentiated the pressor response evoked by CSA. Together, the improved renovascular fibrotic and endothelin receptor profile (ET{sub A} downregulation and ET{sub B} upregulation) mediate, at least partly, the protective effect of celecoxib against the hypertensive effect of CSA. Clinically, the use of celecoxib along with CSA in the management of arthritic conditions might provide hypertension-free regimen. - Highlights: • Chronic CSA causes hypertension and renal perivascular fibrosis in rats.

  2. An insect cell derived respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F nanoparticle vaccine induces antigenic site II antibodies and protects against RSV challenge in cotton rats by active and passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Raghunandan, Rama; Lu, Hanxin; Zhou, Bin; Xabier, Mimi Guebre; Massare, Michael J; Flyer, David C; Fries, Louis F; Smith, Gale E; Glenn, Gregory M

    2014-11-12

    Post-infectious immunity to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection results in limited protection as evidenced by the high rate of infant hospitalization in the face of high titer, maternally derived RSV-specific antibodies. By contrast, RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein antigenic site II humanized monoclonal antibodies, palivizumab and motavizumab, have been shown to reduce RSV-related hospitalization in infants. Immunogenicity and efficacy studies were conducted in cotton rats comparing a recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine with palivizumab and controlled with live RSV virus intranasal immunization and, formalin inactivated RSV vaccine. Active immunization with RSV F nanoparticle vaccine containing an alum adjuvant induced serum levels of palivizumab competing antibody (PCA) greater than passive administration of 15 mg/kg palivizumab (human prophylactic dose) in cotton rats and neutralized RSV-A and RSV-B viruses. Immunization prevented detectable RSV replication in the lungs and, unlike passive administration of palivizumab, in the nasal passage of challenged cotton rats. Histology of lung tissues following RSV challenge showed no enhanced disease in the vaccinated groups in contrast to formalin inactivated 'Lot 100' vaccine. Passive intramuscular administration of RSV F vaccine-induced immune sera one day prior to challenge of cotton rats reduced viral titers by 2 or more log10 virus per gram of lung and nasal tissue and at doses less than palivizumab. A recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine protected lower and upper respiratory tract against both RSV A and B strain infection and induced polyclonal palivizumab competing antibodies similar to but potentially more broadly protective against RSV than palivizumab.

  3. A UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides and four alkaloids in rat plasma: application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan and single herb extract.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yu; Wu, Yun; Wang, Fenrong; Ma, Wen; Bian, Qiaoxia; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and reliable ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides (paeoniflorin, alibiflorin and oxypaeoniflorin) and four alkaloids (tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine), the main active ingredients of Radix Paeoniae Rubra extract (RPE) and Corydalis yanhusuo extract (CYE) in Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), and to compare the pharmacokinetics of these active ingredients in normal and arthritic rats orally administrated with HLXLD or RPE/CYE alone. The analytes and internal standard (IS) (geniposide) were separated on a XBridge C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) using gradient elution with the mobile phase consisting of methanol and 0.01% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min. The detection of the analytes was performed on Acquity UPLC-MS/MS system with an electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode via polarity switching between negative (for monoterpene glycosides) and positive (for alkaloids) ionization mode. The lower limits of quantification were 2.5, 1, 0.5, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02 and 0.01 ng/ml for paeoniflorin, alibiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy of analytes were well within acceptance criteria (15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 83.1%. The validated method has been successfully applied to determination of the analytes. Results showed that there were remarkable differences in pharmacokinetic properties of the analytes between herbal formula and single herb group, normal and arthritic group.

  4. Boswellic acids: A leukotriene inhibitor also effective through topical application in inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Khajuria, A; Taneja, S C; Johri, R K; Singh, J; Qazi, G N

    2008-06-01

    Boswellic acids (BA), a natural mixture isolated from oleo gum resin of Boswellia serrata comprised of four major pentacyclic triterpene acids: beta-boswellic acid (the most abundant), 3-acteyl-beta-boswellic acid, 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, and 3-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, is reported to be effective as anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-tumor, anti-asthmatic and in Chron's disease. It inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators in the body, specifically leukotrienes via inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase, the key enzyme of leukotriene synthesis, is the scientifically proved mechanism for its anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic activity. All previous work on BA for its biological activity has been done through the systemic application but no pre-clinical data reported for its anti-inflammatory activity by topical application. We here by report anti-inflammatory activity of BA through this route by applying different acute and chronic models of inflammation i.e., arachidonic acid and croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rats paw edema and adjuvant-induced developing arthritis in rats. The results of the study revealed that the effect observed through this route is in accordance to the study conducted with the systemic route, thus establishing that BA when used through topical application is as effective as through the systemic route.

  5. Blocking the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptor inhibits pain behaviour in two rat models of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Lilian N; Mapp, Paul I; Chapman, Victoria; Walsh, David A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) mediates nociceptor sensitisation by nerve growth factor (NGF), but it is unknown whether selective TrkA inhibition will be an effective strategy for treating osteoarthritis (OA) pain. We determined the effects of a TrkA inhibitor (AR786) on pain behaviour, synovitis and joint pathology in two rat OA models. Methods Knee OA was induced in rats by intra-articular monosodium-iodoacetate (MIA) injection or meniscal transection (MNX) and compared with saline-injected or sham-operated controls. Pain behaviour was assessed as weight-bearing asymmetry and paw withdrawal threshold to punctate stimulation. Oral doses (30 mg/kg) of AR786 or vehicle were administered twice daily in either preventive (day −1 to –27) or treatment (day 14–28) protocols. Effect maintenance was evaluated for 2 weeks after treatment discontinuation. Alterations in knee structure (cartilage, subchondral bone and synovium) were examined by macroscopic visualisation of articular surfaces and histopathology. Results Preventive AR786 treatment inhibited pain behaviour development and therapeutic treatment attenuated established pain behaviour. Weight-bearing asymmetry increased 1 week after treatment discontinuation, but remained less than in vehicle-treated arthritic rats, whereas paw withdrawal thresholds returned to levels of untreated rats within 5 days of treatment discontinuation. AR786 treatment reduced MIA-induced synovitis and did not significantly affect osteochondral pathology in either model. Conclusions Blocking NGF activity by inhibiting TrkA reduced pain behaviour in two rat models of OA. Analgesia was observed both using preventive and treatment protocols, and was sustained after treatment discontinuation. Selective inhibitors of TrkA therefore hold potential for OA pain relief. PMID:26286016

  6. Saponin-based adjuvants induce cross-presentation in dendritic cells by intracellular lipid body formation

    PubMed Central

    den Brok, Martijn H.; Büll, Christian; Wassink, Melissa; de Graaf, Annemarie M.; Wagenaars, Jori A.; Minderman, Marthe; Thakur, Mayank; Amigorena, Sebastian; Rijke, Eric O.; Schrier, Carla C.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2016-01-01

    Saponin-based adjuvants (SBAs) are being used in animal and human (cancer) vaccines, as they induce protective cellular immunity. Their adjuvant potency is a factor of inflammasome activation and enhanced antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs), but how antigen cross-presentation is induced is not clear. Here we show that SBAs uniquely induce intracellular lipid bodies (LBs) in the CD11b+ DC subset in vitro and in vivo. Using genetic and pharmacological interference in models for vaccination and in situ tumour ablation, we demonstrate that LB induction is causally related to the saponin-dependent increase in cross-presentation and T-cell activation. These findings link adjuvant activity to LB formation, aid the application of SBAs as a cancer vaccine component, and will stimulate development of new adjuvants enhancing T-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27819292

  7. Intranasal administration of a synthetic lipopeptide without adjuvant induces systemic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Benmohamed, Lbachir; Krishnan, Radhika; Auge, Catherine; Primus, James F; Diamond, Don J

    2002-01-01

    Parenteral injection of a lipopeptide containing a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope from the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immunodominant matrix protein pp65 efficiently induces systemic CTL responses in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. In this study, we demonstrate that intranasal (i.n.) administration of this lipopeptide, covalently linked to a universal T helper (Th) epitope (PADRE), also induces potent systemic CTL responses. Immune responses were substantially reduced when the unlipidated peptide analogue was used (P<0·01). The induced CTL were CD8+, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted and CMV specific. Moreover, i.n. administration of this lipidated peptide elicited both systemic and local mucosal CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses, as well as antigen-specific delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) immune responses. In contrast, mice receiving the unlipidated peptide analogue developed substantially reduced Th or DTH responses (P<0·05). These results highlight the usefulness and potential of lipopeptides delivered via mucosal routes as painless, safe, and non-invasive vaccines. PMID:11972639

  8. Nanoemulsion-based mucosal adjuvant induces apoptosis in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowska, Beata U.; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Coulter, Alexa D.; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Gamian, Andrzej; Myc, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Nanoemulsions (NEs) are adjuvants that enhance antigen penetration of the nasal mucosa, increase cellular uptake of antigens by both epithelial and dendritic cells, and promote the migration of antigen-loaded dendritic cells to regional lymph nodes within 24-hours of vaccine administration. The objective of this study was to elucidate cell death caused by W805EC NE and identify caspases and genes associated with death pathways. Consistent with this aim, we show that exposure of human epithelial cells (EC), both RPMI 2650 and FaDu, to NE results in the activation of caspases (1, 3/7, 6, 8, and 9) and the expression of genes involved in apoptotic as well as authophagy and necrosis pathways. Interestingly, the NE activates caspase 8 which promotes “immunogenic apoptosis”. The rescue assay was employed to investigate the fate of RPMI 2650 cells treated with W805EC NE. After four hour treatment with as little as 0.03% of NE no cells were rescued at 72 hours. Remarkably, immediately after four-hour treatment, the cells morphologically resembled untreated cells and most of the cells were alive. Altogether, these results suggest that NE induces death of human ECs through multiple pathways. Epithelial cell death caused by W805EC may have further implications on antigen uptake, processing, and presentation by DC's. PMID:25817825

  9. Repeated 100 Hz TENS for the Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Hyperalgesia and Suppression of Spinal Release of Substance P in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Tian, Jin-Bin; Luo, Fei; Jiang, Yu-Hui; Deng, Zu-Guo; Xiong, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Shu

    2007-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been shown to be an effective measure for pain relief. The aim of the present study was to determine the optimal intensity and interval of repeated 100 Hz TENS for the treatment of chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia in a monoarthritic pain model of the rat, and to assess the changes of the spinal substance P (SP) release in response to TENS treatment. A reliable, reproducible chronic monoarthritic pain model was produced by intra-articular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) at single ankle joint. The efficacy of 100 Hz TENS treatments with different frequencies and intensities was compared. In the acute period (within 3 weeks) of monoarthritis, twice-a-week schedule of TENS reduced the swelling of the inflamed ankle significantly. In the stable period (4–9 weeks), however, once-a-week schedule produced a significantly better therapeutic effect on both inflammation and arthritic hyperalgesia than that of twice- or five-times-a-week schedule. Using three levels of intensity of TENS, we found that the weaker (1-1-2 mA) stimulation produced significantly better therapeutic effects. Repeated TENS produced a reduction of SP content in spinal perfusate in parallel with the progressive reduction of the arthritic pain scores. Our results suggest that (i) consecutive TENS treatments produced cumulative effect for chronic hyperalgesia, (ii) for chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia, a weaker intensity and more sparsely arranged treatment schedule may produce better therapeutic effect and (iii) a decrease in SP release may serve as one of the possible neurochemical mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of multiple TENS treatments on chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:17342243

  10. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met) diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05). High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet. PMID:27738392

  11. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  12. The effects of Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil on pain-related behavior and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hye Rim; Chung, Hyun Joo; Park, Eui Ho; Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Su Jin; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2015-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil (COE) has been widely used to treat allergic diseases and was suggested to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. This study evaluated the effects of COE on pain-related behavior and pro-inflammatory cytokines in rats with carrageenan (CGN)-induced arthritis. Reduced dynamic weight load on inflamed joint in voluntarily walking rats was used as the behavior test for arthritic pain; 10% COE-treated group was significantly attenuated pain (6-8 h post-CGN injection) compared to VEH (mineral oil)-treated group. In addition, the protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 (6-8 h), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (8 h) within the synovial membrane, as well as IL-1β, COX-2 (6-8 h), and IL-6 (5-7 h) within the meniscus, of 10% COE-treated group were significantly reduced. The current results implicate that COE has anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects on arthritis in rats.

  13. Neonatal local noxious insult affects gene expression in the spinal dorsal horn of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Dubner, Ronald; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-09-22

    Neonatal noxious insult produces a long-term effect on pain processing in adults. Rats subjected to carrageenan (CAR) injection in one hindpaw within the sensitive period develop bilateral hypoalgesia as adults. In the same rats, inflammation of the hindpaw, which was the site of the neonatal injury, induces a localized enhanced hyperalgesia limited to this paw. To gain an insight into the long-term molecular changes involved in the above-described long-term nociceptive effects of neonatal noxious insult at the spinal level, we performed DNA microarray analysis (using microarrays containing oligo-probes for 205 genes encoding receptors and transporters for glutamate, GABA, and amine neurotransmitters, precursors and receptors for neuropeptides, and neurotrophins, cytokines and their receptors) to compare gene expression profiles in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn (LDH) of adult (P60) male rats that received neonatal CAR treatment within (at postnatal day 3; P3) and outside (at postnatal 12; P12) of the sensitive period. The data were obtained both without inflammation (at baseline) and during complete Freund's adjuvant induced inflammation of the neonatally injured paw. The observed changes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. This study revealed significant basal and inflammation-associated aberrations in the expression of multiple genes in the LDH of adult animals receiving CAR injection at P3 as compared to their expression levels in the LDH of animals receiving either no injections or CAR injection at P12. In particular, at baseline, twelve genes (representing GABA, serotonin, adenosine, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, opioid, tachykinin and interleukin systems) were up-regulated in the bilateral LDH of the former animals. The baseline condition in these animals was also characterized by up-regulation of seven genes (encoding members of GABA, cholecystokinin, histamine, serotonin, and neurotensin systems) in the LDH ipsilateral to the neonatally-injured paw. The

  14. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Background Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). Methods An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. Results This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. Conclusion SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints. PMID:27583436

  15. Influence of six medicinal herbs on collagenase-induced osteoarthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nirmal, Pallavi; Koppikar, Soumya; Bhondave, Prashant; Narkhede, Aarti; Nagarkar, Bhagyashri; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Wagh, Narendrakumar; Kulkarni, Omkar; Harsulkar, Abhay; Jagtap, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal herbs have been effectively used for their anti-inflammatory activity, but their exact role has not yet been documented in scientific literature for the management of Osteoarthritis (OA). Since Sida cordifolia L., Piper longum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc., Ricinus communis L., Vitex negundo L. and Tribulus terrestris L. have been widely used in traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory activity, to evaluate anti-osteoarthritic activity of these herbs, we used a collagenase type II-induced osteoarthritis (CIOA) rat model. Arthritis was induced in wistar rats by intra-articular injection of collagenase type II. Powders of herbs were given orally for 20 days as a suspension in water (270 mg/kg b. wt.). The effects of the treatment in the rats were monitored by physiological parameters like body weight, knee diameter, paw retraction, paw volume, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release, radiography and histopathology of knee joint. Selected herbs have significantly prevented body weight loss and knee swelling compared to arthritic control (CIOA). All test groups, including indomethacin (standard drug, 3 mg/kg), significantly reduced paw volume compared to CIOA. GAG release in the serum was significantly lowered in herb treated groups compared to indomethacin. The anterior posterior radiographs of S. cordifolia and P. longum treated groups showed a protective effect against OA. Histopathology revealed protection in the structure of the articular cartilage and in chondrocyte pathology as well as reduced clefting. Treatment with herbs has shown chondroid matrix within normal limits. From the results, we observed that S. cordifolia and P. longum possess potent anti-osteoarthritic activity.

  16. SKLB023 Blocks Joint Inflammation and Cartilage Destruction in Arthritis Models via Suppression of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation in Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Li, Xiuxia; Pei, Heying; Xiang, Mingli; Chen, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common arthritis and is mainly characterized by symmetric polyarticular joint disorders. Our previous study demonstrated a novel small molecule compound (Z)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(4-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene) methyl) phenoxy) acet-amide (SKLB023) showed potently anti-arthritic effects in a rat arthritis model, however, the underlying mechanisms for this are largely unknown. Both NF-κB and macrophages were reported to play important roles in the pathologic processes of RA. The purposes of this study were to indicate whether NF-κB and macrophages contributed to anti-arthritic effects of SKLB023 in two experimental arthritis models. Our results showed that SKLB023 could significantly improve joint inflammation and cartilage destruction both in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. We further found that the binding activation of NF-κB to DNA in joint tissues and RAW264.7 macrophages were suppressed by SKLB023. SKLB023 also inhibited the NF-κB activity in peritoneal macrophages by luciferase assay. Furthermore, the number of macrophages in synovial tissues was decreased after the treatment of different doses of SKLB023. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in plasma, and the levels of TNF-α, NO, and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages were down-regulated by SKLB023. Finally, SKLB023 attenuated the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in vivo and suppressed the phosphorylations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These observations identify a novel function for SKLB023 as an inhibitor of NF-κB in macrophages of RA, highlighting that SKLB023 was a potential therapeutic strategy for RA. PMID:23431370

  17. The effects of intra-articular resiniferatoxin on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngkyung; Kim, Eun-hye; Lee, Kyu Sang; Lee, Koeun; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Sook Hyun; Ko, Cheolwoong; Yooon, Young Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether an intra-articular injection of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor agonist, resiniferatoxin (RTX) would alleviate behavioral signs of arthritic pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). We also sought to determine the effect of RTX treatment on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the spinal cord. Knee joint inflammation was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 8 mg/50 µl) and weight bearing percentage on right and left hindpaws during walking, paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation, and paw withdrawal latency to heat were measured to evaluate pain behavior. Intra-articular administration of RTX (0.03, 0.003 and 0.0003%) at 2 weeks after the induction of knee joint inflammation significantly improved reduction of weight bearing on the ipsilateral hindlimb and increased paw withdrawal sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli. The reduction of pain behavior persisted for 3~10 days according to each behavioral test. The MIA-induced increase in CGRP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord was decreased by RTX treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The present study demonstrated that a single intra-articular administration of RTX reduced pain behaviors for a relatively long time in an experimental model of OA and could normalize OA-associated changes in peptide expression in the spinal cord. PMID:26807032

  18. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 μg, 100 μg and 150 μg) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 μg) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to

  19. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  20. Studies on synthesis, stability, release and pharmacodynamic profile of a novel diacerein-thymol prodrug.

    PubMed

    Dhaneshwar, Suneela; Patel, Vriha; Patil, Dipmala; Meena, Gourav

    2013-01-01

    Involvement of oxidative stress, leading to chondrocyte senescence and cartilage ageing has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). New efforts to prevent the development and progression of OA include strategies and interventions aimed at reducing oxidative damage in articular cartilage using antioxidants as adjuncts to conservative therapy. Diacerein is an anthraquinone derivative with a marked disease modifying effect on OA owing to IL-1 β inhibition. In the present work an attempt was made at design and development of a co-drug of diacerein with antioxidant thymol. Structural elucidation was carried out by spectral analysis. When release kinetics of prodrug was studied in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and small intestinal homogenates of rats, 91% and 94% diacerein was available respectively at the end of 4.5 h. Chemical linkage of thymol with diacerein improved its lipophilicity and hence bioavailability. Screening of prodrug in Freud's adjuvant-induced arthritis and ulcerogenic potential by Rainsford's cold stress model exhibited significant reduction in paw volume, joint diameter and ulcer index with superior anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic activities than the standards. Results of histopathology of tibio-tarsal joint indicated that animals treated with diacerein exhibited moderate synovitis while thymol and physical mixture-treated animals showed mild synovitis. Interestingly in prodrug-treated animals synovitis was not observed. The results of this study underline the promising potential of co-drug of diacerein and thymol in the management of OA.

  1. Anti-IL-17A therapy protects against bone erosion in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Shi-Juan; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Davis, Nicole; Hong, Kyu; Vu, Anna; Kwan, Sylvia; Fayadat-Dilman, Laurence; Asio, Agelio; Bowman, Edward P

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by a subset of memory T cells and other innate immune cells. It is associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to IL-17A expression in RA synovial fluid. The severe bone erosive rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (rAIA) and mouse collagen-induced arthritis (mCIA) models were used to address the therapeutic efficacy of anti-IL-17A treatment with a focused investigation on bone protection. In the rAIA model, treatment with anti-IL-17A completely alleviated arthritis, lowered the level of receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), and inhibited structural damage to the bones. In the mCIA model, IL-17A neutralization coincident with arthritis development or in mice with established arthritis diminished joint swelling by inhibiting disease initiation and progression. Intriguingly, even the few joints that became outwardly severely inflamed in the presence of an anti-IL-17A antagonist had diminished joint histopathology scores compared to severely inflamed, control-treated mice. The bone-preserving property correlated with decreased RANKL message in severely inflamed paws of arthritic mice. These data identify IL-17A as a key factor in inflammation-mediated bone destruction and support anti-IL-17A therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bone diseases such as RA.

  2. The abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602 reduces nociception in a rat model of acute arthritis via the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55.

    PubMed

    Schuelert, Niklas; McDougall, Jason J

    2011-08-01

    Cannabinoids classically act via CB₁ and CB₂ receptors to modulate nociception; however, recent findings suggest that some cannabinoids bind to atypical receptors. One such receptor is GPR55 which is activated by the abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602. This study investigated whether the synthetic GPR55 agonist O-1602 can alter joint nociception in a rat model of acute joint inflammation. Acute (24 h) inflammatory joint pain was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of 2% kaolin and 2% carrageenan. Single unit extracellular recordings were made from arthritic joint afferents in response to mechanical rotation of the knee. Peripheral administration of O-1602 significantly reduced movement-evoked firing of nociceptive C fibres and this effect was blocked by the GPR55 receptor antagonist O-1918. Co-administration of the CB₁ and CB₂ antagonists (AM281 and AM630 respectively) had no effect on O-1602 responses. This study clearly shows that atypical cannabinoid receptors are involved in joint nociception and these novel targets may be advantageous for the treatment of inflammatory pain.

  3. The effects of sinomenine on intestinal absorption of paeoniflorin by the everted rat gut sac model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kelvin; Liu, Zhong Qiu; Jiang, Zhi Hong; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Xu, Hong-Xi; Liu, Liang

    2006-02-20

    Paeoniflorin and sinomenine, derived from the root of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. (family Ranunculaceae) and the stem of Sinomenium acutum Rehder & Wilson (family Menispermaceae), respectively, have been, and are currently, widely used for treatment of rheumatic and arthritic diseases in China and Japan. Our previous studies demonstrated that sinomenine could significantly improve the bioavailability of paeoniflorin in rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The present study aims to investigate the intestinal kinetic absorptive characteristics of paeoniflorin as well as the absorptive behavior influenced by co-administration of sinomenine using an in vitro everted rat gut sac model. The results showed a good linear correlation between the paeoniflorin absorption in sac contents and the incubation time from 0 to 90 min. However, the concentration dependence showed that a non-linear correlation exists between the paeoniflorin absorption and its concentrations from 10 to 160 microM, and the absorption was saturated at about 80 microM of the drug. Sinomenine at 16 and 136 microM concentrations could significantly enhance the absorption of paeoniflorin (20 microM) by 1.5- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Moreover, two well-known P-glycoprotein inhibitors, verapamil and quinidine, could significantly elevate the absorption of paeoniflorin by 2.1- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Furthermore, sinomenine in a pattern, which influenced paeoniflorin's absorption, manifested as similar to that of P-glycoprotein inhibitors. In conclusion, sinomenine significantly enhance the intestinal absorption of paeoniflorin, subsequently improve the bioavailability of paeoniflorin. The mechanism underlying the improvement of paeoniflorin's bioavailability was proposed that sinomenine could decrease the efflux transport of paeoniflorin by P-glycoprotein.

  4. Local ASIC3 modulates pain and disease progression in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent data have suggested a relationship between acute arthritic pain and acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) on primary afferent fibers innervating joints. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of ASIC3 in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA) which is considered a degenerative rather than an inflammatory disease. Methods We induced OA via intra-articular mono-iodoacetate (MIA) injection, and evaluated pain-related behaviors including weight bearing measured with an incapacitance tester and paw withdrawal threshold in a von Frey hair test, histology of affected knee joint, and immunohistochemistry of knee joint afferents. We also assessed the effect of ASIC3 selective peptide blocker (APETx2) on pain behavior, disease progression, and ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents. Results OA rats showed not only weight-bearing pain but also mechanical hyperalgesia outside the knee joint (secondary hyperalgesia). ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents was significantly upregulated approximately twofold at Day 14. Continuous intra-articular injections of APETx2 inhibited weight distribution asymmetry and secondary hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents. Histology of ipsilateral knee joint showed APETx2 worked chondroprotectively if administered in the early, but not late phase. Conclusions Local ASIC3 immunoreactive nerve is strongly associated with weight-bearing pain and secondary hyperalgesia in MIA-induced OA model. APETx2 inhibited ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents regardless of the time-point of administration. Furthermore, early administration of APETx2 prevented cartilage damage. APETx2 is a novel, promising drug for OA by relieving pain and inhibiting disease progression. PMID:22909215

  5. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been considered as an approach to addressing the consequences of different inflammatory disorders. The spore-forming probiotic strain Bacillus coagulans has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects in both animals and humans. The prebiotic inulin also potentially affects the immune system as a result of the change in the composition or fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Objective In the present study, an in vivo model was conducted to investigate the possible influences of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin, both in combination and/or separately, on the downregulation of immune responses and the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using arthritis-induced rat model. Design Forty-eight healthy male Wistar rats were randomly categorized into six experimental groups as follows: 1) control: normal healthy rats fed with standard diet, 2) disease control (RA): arthritis-induced rats fed with standard diet, 3) prebiotic (PRE): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin, 4) probiotic (PRO): RA+ 109 spores/day B. coagulans by orogastric gavage, 5) synbiotic (SYN): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin and 109 spores/day B. coagulans, and 6) treatment control: (INDO): RA+ 3 mg/kg/day indomethacin by orogastric gavage. Feeding with the listed diets started on day 0 and continued to the end of study. On day 14, rats were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis activity was evaluated by the biochemical parameters and paw thickness. Biochemical assay for fibrinogen (Fn), serum amyloid A (SAA), and TNF-α and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (α1AGp) was performed on day 21, 28, and 35 (7, 14 and 21 days post RA induction), respectively. Results Pretreatment with PRE, PRO, and SYN diets significantly inhibits SAA and Fn production in arthritic rats (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, was seen in the PRE, PRO, and SYN groups (P

  6. Comparison of drug and cell-based delivery: engineered adult mesenchymal stem cells expressing soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II prevent arthritis in mouse and rat animal models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda N; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe; Mosca, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNFα and blocks TNFα-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNFα-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNFα-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNFα generated from either implanted TNFα-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNFα, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1α, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNFα complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNFα and IL1α, but not interferon γ, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation

  7. Therapeutic Treatment of Arthritic Mice with 15-Deoxy Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) Ameliorates Disease through the Suppression of Th17 Cells and the Induction of CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benevides, Luciana; Pinto, Larissa G.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2016-01-01

    The prostaglandin, 15-deoxy Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), is a lipid mediator that plays an important role in the control of chronic inflammatory disease. However, the role of prostanoid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not well determined. We demonstrated the therapeutic effect of 15d-PGJ2 in an experimental model of arthritis. Daily administration of 15d-PGJ2 attenuated the severity of CIA, reducing the clinical score, pain, and edema. 15d-PGJ2 treatment was associated with a marked reduction in joint levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Although the mRNA expression of ROR-γt was profoundly reduced, FOXP3 was enhanced in draining lymph node cells from 15d-PGJ2-treated arthritic mice. The specific and polyclonal CD4+ Th17 cell responses were limited during the addition of prostaglandin to cell culture. Moreover, in vitro 15d-PGJ2 increased the expression of FOXP3, GITR, and CTLA-4 in the CD4+CD25− population, suggesting the induction of Tregs on conventional T cells. Prostanoid addition to CD4+CD25− cells selectively suppressed Th17 differentiation and promoted the enhancement of FOXP3 under polarization conditions. Thus, 15d-PGJ2 ameliorated symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis by regulating Th17 differentiation, concomitant with the induction of Tregs, and, consequently, protected mice from diseases aggravation. Altogether, these results indicate that 15d-PGJ2 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in RA. PMID:27872515

  8. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic effects of piperine in human interleukin 1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in rat arthritis models

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jun Soo; Oh, Da Hee; Choi, Hyun Mi; Sur, Bong-Jun; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Jung Yeon; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Soo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory, nociceptive, and antiarthritic effects of piperine, the active phenolic component in black pepper extract. Methods The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of piperine was tested on interleukin 1β (IL1β)-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived form patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The levels of IL6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were investigated by ELISA and RT-PCR analysis. The analgesic and antiarthritic activities of piperine were investigated on rat models of carrageenan-induced acute paw pain and arthritis. The former were evaluated with a paw pressure test, and the latter by measuring the squeaking score, paw volume, and weight distribution ratio. Piperine was administrated orally to rats at 20 and 100 mg/kg/day for 8 days. Results Piperine inhibited the expression of IL6 and MMP13 and reduced the production of PGE2 in a dose dependant manner at concentrations of 10 to 100 μg/ml. In particular, the production of PGE2 was significantly inhibited even at 10 μg/ml of piperine. Piperine inhibited the migration of activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not nuclear factor (NF)κB, into the nucleus in IL1β-treated synoviocytes. In rats, piperine significantly reduced nociceptive and arthritic symptoms at days 8 and 4, respectively. Histological staining showed that piperine significantly reduced the inflammatory area in the ankle joints. Conclusions These results suggest that piperine has anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antiarthritic effects in an arthritis animal model. Thus, piperine should be further studied with regard to use either as a pharmaceutical or as a dietary supplement for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:19327174

  9. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of glycosaminoglycan derived from Gryllus bimaculatus (a type of cricket, insect) on adjuvant-treated chronic arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Han, Jea Woong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Lee, Byung Mu

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus, Gb) were investigated in a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritic rat model. This GAG produced a significant anti-edema effect as evidenced by inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor, and interfered with atherogenesis by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels of (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), (2) interleukin-6, (3) prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells, and (4) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in normal splenocytes, in a dose-dependent manner. This GAG was also found to induce nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVEC cells and elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity levels. Histological findings demonstrated the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) dorsal root ganglion, which was linked to the paw treated with Gb GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Further, combined indomethacin (5 mg/kg)-Gb GAG (10 mg/kg) inhibited more effectively CFA-induced paw edema at 3 h and 2 or 3 d after treatment to levels comparable to only the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Ultraviolet (UV)-irritated skin inflammation also downregulated nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in transfected HaCaT cells. Data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of GAG obtained from cricket (Gb) may be useful for treatment of inflammatory diseases including chronic arthritis.

  11. Dose-response characteristics of Clematis triterpenoid saponins and clematichinenoside AR in rheumatoid arthritis rats by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based serum and urine metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Guo, Lin-Xiu; Li, Yi; Chang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Jian-Qun; Liu, Li-Fang; Xin, Gui-Zhong

    2017-03-20

    Clematidis Radix et Rhizoma is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used for treating arthritic disease. Clematis triterpenoid saponins (TS) and clematichinenoside AR (C-AR) have been considered to be responsible for its antiarthritic effects. However, the underling mechanism is still unclear because of their low bioavailability. To address of this issue, metabolomics tools were performed to determine metabolic variations associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and responses to Clematis TS, C-AR and positive drug (Triptolide, TP) treatments. This metabolomics investigation of RA was conducted in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical tools were used to identify the alteration of serum and urine metabolites associated with RA and responses to drug treatment. As a result, 45 potential metabolites associated with RA were identified. After treatment, a total of 24 biomarkers were regulated to normal like levels. Among these, PC(18:0/20:4), 9,11-octadecadienoic acid, arachidonic acid, 1-methyladenosine, valine, hippuric acid and pantothenic acid etc, were reversed in Clematis TS and C-AR groups. Tetrahydrocortisol was regulated to normal levels in Clematis TS and TP groups, while 3,7,12-trihydroxycholan-24-oic acid was regulated in C-AR and TP groups. Biomarkers like citric acid, p-cresol glucuronide, creatinine, cortolone were reversed in TP group.

  12. Pathogen-Mimicking Polymeric Nanoparticles based on Dopamine Polymerization as Vaccines Adjuvants Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Fan, Qingze; Wang, Lianyan; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-06

    Aiming to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines, a novel antigen delivery and adjuvant system based on dopamine polymerization on the surface of poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple mechanisms of immunity enhancement is developed. The mussel-inspired biomimetic polydopamine (pD) not only serves as a coating to NPs but also functionalizes NP surfaces. The method is facile and mild including simple incubation of the preformed NPs in the weak alkaline dopamine solution, and incorporation of hepatitis B surface antigen and TLR9 agonist unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motif with the pD surface. The as-constructed NPs possess pathogen-mimicking manners owing to their size, shape, and surface molecular immune-activating properties given by CpG. The biocompatibility and biosafety of these pathogen-mimicking NPs are confirmed using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Pathogen-mimicking NPs hold great potential as vaccine delivery and adjuvant system due to their ability to: 1) enhance cytokine secretion and immune cell recruitment at the injection site; 2) significantly activate and maturate dendritic cells; 3) induce stronger humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. Furthermore, this simple and versatile dopamine polymerization method can be applicable to endow NPs with characteristics to mimic pathogen structure and function, and manipulate NPs for the generation of efficacious vaccine adjuvants.

  13. A nontoxic chimeric enterotoxin adjuvant induces protective immunity in both mucosal and systemic compartments with reduced IgE antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Mi-Na; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Fumiko; Tamura, Shinichi; Van Ginkel, Frederik W; Miyauchi, Akira; Takagi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Hamabata, Takashi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; McGhee, Jerry R; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    A novel nontoxic form of chimeric mucosal adjuvant that combines the A subunit of mutant cholera toxin E112K with the pentameric B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was constructed by use of the Brevibacillus choshinensis expression system (mCTA/LTB). Nasal immunization of mice with tetanus toxoid (TT) plus mCTA/LTB elicited significant TT-specific immunoglobulin A responses in mucosal compartments and induced high serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A anti-TT antibody responses. Although TT plus native CT induced high total and TT-specific immunoglobulin E responses, use of the chimera molecule as mucosal adjuvant did not. Furthermore, all mice immunized with TT plus mCTA/LTB were protected from lethal systemic challenge with tetanus toxin. Importantly, the mice were completely protected from influenza virus infection after nasal immunization with inactivated influenza vaccine together with mCTA/LTB. These results show that B. choshinensis-derived mCTA/LTB is an effective and safe mucosal adjuvant for the induction of protective immunity against potent bacterial exotoxin and influenza virus infection.

  14. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens.

  15. THE PROSTAGLANDIN E2 RECEPTOR, EP2, IS UPREGULATED IN THE DRG AFTER PAINFUL CERVICAL FACET JOINT INJURY IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Kras, Jeffrey V.; Dong, Ling; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This study implemented immunohistochemistry to assay prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP2 expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rats after painful cervical facet joint injury. Objective The objective of this study was to identify if inflammatory cascades are induced in association with cervical facet joint distraction-induced pain by investigating the time course of EP2 expression in the DRG. Summary of Background Data The cervical facet joint is a common source of neck pain and non-physiological stretch of the facet capsular ligament can initiate pain from the facet joint via mechanical injury. PGE2 levels are elevated in painful inflamed and arthritic joints, and PGE2 sensitizes joint afferents to mechanical stimulation. Although in vitro studies suggest the EP2 receptor subtype contributes to painful joint disease the EP2 response has not been investigated for any association with painful mechanical joint injury. Methods Separate groups of male Holtzman rats underwent either a painful cervical facet joint distraction injury or sham procedure. Bilateral forepaw mechanical allodynia was assessed, and immunohistochemical techniques were used to quantify EP2 expression in the DRG at days 1 and 7. Results Facet joint distraction induced mechanical allodynia that was significant (p<0.024) at all time points. Painful joint injury also significantly elevated total EP2 expression in the DRG at day 1 (p=0.009), which was maintained also at day 7 (p<0.001). Neuronal expression of EP2 in the DRG was only increased over sham levels at day 1 (p=0.013). Conclusions Painful cervical facet joint distraction induces an immediate and sustained increase of EP2 expression in the DRG, implicating peripheral inflammation in the initiation and maintenance of facet joint pain. The transient increase in neuronal EP2 suggests, as in other painful joint conditions, that after joint injury non-neuronal cells may migrate to the DRG, some of which likely express EP2

  16. Medicinal plants with potential anti-arthritic activity

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Manjusha; Kumar, Vipin; Malhotra, Hitesh; Singh, Surender

    2015-01-01

    Ethno Pharmacological Relevance: Traditional medicinal plants are practiced worldwide for treatment of arthritis especially in developing countries where resources are meager. This review presents the plants profiles inhabiting throughout the world regarding their traditional usage by various tribes/ethnic groups for treatment of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last six decades. Plants/their parts/extracts/polyherbal formulations, toxicity studies for arthritis have been included in the review article. The profiles presented also include information about the scientific name, family, dose, methodology along with mechanism of action and toxicity profile. Research status of 20 potential plant species has been discussed. Further, geographical distribution of research, plants distribution according to families has been given in graphical form. Results: 485 plant species belonging to 100 families, traditionally used in arthritis are used. Among 100 plant families, malvaceae constitute 16, leguminasae 7, fabaceae 13, euphorbiaceae 7, compositae 20, araceae 7, solanaceae 12, liliaceae 9, apocynaceae, lauraceae, and rubiaceae 10, and remaining in lesser proportion. It was observed in our study that majority of researches are carried mainly in developing countries like India, China, Korea and Nigeria. Conclusion: This review clearly indicates that list of medicinal plants presented in this review might be useful to researchers as well as practioners. This review can be useful for preliminary screening of potential anti-arthritis plants. Further toxicity profile given in the review can be useful for the researchers for finding the safe dose. PMID:26401403

  17. Biomechanics of the natural, arthritic, and replaced human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The human ankle joint complex plays a fundamental role in gait and other activities of daily living. At the same time, it is a very complicated anatomical system but the large literature of experimental and modelling studies has not fully described the coupled joint motion, position and orientation of the joint axis of rotation, stress and strain in the ligaments and their role in guiding and stabilizing joint motion, conformity and congruence of the articular surfaces, patterns of contact at the articular surfaces, patterns of rolling and sliding at the joint surfaces, and muscle lever arm lengths. The present review article addresses these issues as described in the literature, reporting the most recent relevant findings. PMID:24499639

  18. Frequency-domain optical tomographic imaging of arthritic finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Blaschke, Sabine; Netz, Uwe J; Zwaka, Paul A; Illing, Gerd; Muller, Gerhard A; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    We are presenting data from the largest clinical trial on optical tomographic imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-domain imaging techniques we show that sensitivities and specificities of 0.85 and higher can be achieved in detecting RA. This is accomplished by deriving multiple optical parameters from the optical tomographic images and combining them for the statistical analysis. Parameters derived from the scattering coefficient perform slightly better than absorption derived parameters. Furthermore we found that data obtained at 600 MHz leads to better classification results than data obtained at 0 or 300 MHz.

  19. No evidence of rat hepatitis E virus excretion into urine of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Johne, Reimar; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-08-31

    To investigate whether rat hepatitis E virus (rat HEV) is excreted into the urine of rats, we infected three Wistar and six nude rats with rat HEV and examined the rat HEV RNA in serum, fecal and urine samples. We detected rat HEV RNA in the serum and fecal samples of all rats but not in the urine. Our results suggest that in rats, rat HEV is not transmitted via urine.

  20. Morin, a Bioflavonoid Suppresses Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Inflammatory Immune Response in RAW 264.7 Macrophages through the Inhibition of Inflammatory Mediators, Intracellular ROS Levels and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies had reported that morin, a bioflavanoid exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effect against adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In this current study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of morin against monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells, an in vitro model for acute gouty arthritis. For comparison purpose, colchicine was used as a reference drug. We have observed that morin (100–300 μM) treatment significantly suppressed the levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 and VEGF), inflammatory mediators (NO and PEG2), and lysosomal enzymes (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D) in MSU-crystals stimulated macrophage cells. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), and NF-κBp65 was found downregulated in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells by morin treatment, however, the mRNA expression of hypoxanthine phospho ribosyl transferse (HPRT) was found to be increased. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that morin treatment decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells. The western blot analysis clearly showed that morin mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the MSU crystal-induced COX-2 and TNF-α protein expression through the inactivation of NF-κB signaling pathway in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells similar to that of BAY 11–7082 (IκB kinase inhibitor). Our results collectively suggest that morin can be a potential therapeutic agent for inflammatory disorders like acute gouty arthritis. PMID:26709520

  1. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ... Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > From Insects or Animals > Rat Bite Fever Health Issues Listen ...

  2. What is Desert RATS?

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mission manager and test coordinators for the 2011 mission explain why Desert RATS was started 14 years ago, questions being studied in this year's activities, technologies being tested and the...

  3. [Fatal rat bites].

    PubMed

    Yanai, O; Goldin, L; Hiss, J

    1999-04-15

    We present a rare case of infant death due to blood loss resulting from multiple rat bites. Domestic dogs and cats cause most animal bites. Bites of a house rat usually cause bacterial infection, successfully treated with antibiotics. There is little information about death due to house rat bites. Since the wounds they cause tend to occur post-mortem, they are usually wedged, clean and without subcutaneous bleeding. An 11-week-old, malnourished infant girl was bitten to death while sleeping in her mother's bed in a rat-infested home. The infant's clothing was covered with blood, parts of her face were missing and marks of gnawing were present on her neck and extremities. There was subcutaneous bleeding around the wounds indicating that they were inflicted while the child was alive. Autopsy findings revealed profound blood loss. We conclude that a combination of low socio-economic status, severe failure to thrive, and poor hygiene in a rat-infested environment contributed to the fatal outcome in this attack.

  4. Activity of Plumbago zeylanica Linn. root and Holoptelea integrifolia Roxb. bark pastes in acute and chronic paw inflammation in Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dushyant; Ganguly, Kuntal; Hegde, H. V.; Patil, P. A.; Roy, Subarna; Kholkute, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The pastes prepared from roots of Plumbago zeylanica Linn. and barks of Holoptelea integrifolia Roxb. are widely used by traditional healers for the treatment of arthritis in rural northern Karnataka. Objective: The present study was undertaken to scientifically evaluate the safety and efficacy of traditionally used formulations in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: The study, approved by IAEC was carried out in male Wistar rats and dermal toxicity in rabbits. Carrageenan model was used to assess effect on acute inflammation. Paw volume were measured at 1, 2, 4, and 6th hour postchallenge. Chronic inflammation was developed by using Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). Paw volume, ankle joint circumference, and body weight were assessed on 1st, 4th, 8th, 14th, 17th, and 21st day. Paste was applied once every day to the inflamed area of the paw of respective groups of animals, continuously for 14 days. Statistics: The data were analyzed by one way analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's post hoc test. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The formulations did not show any dermal toxicity and found to be safe. Both the pastes significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed, carrageenan-induced paw edema at 6th hour and Holoptelea integrifolia appears to be more effective than Plumbago zeylanica. Significant reduction was observed in paw volume, ankle joint circumference and animal body weight gained. Conclusions: The tested formulations (P. zeylanica root and H. integrifolia bark pastes) showed significant antiinflammatory activity. The present findings therefore support its utility in arthritic pain, inflammation and the claim of traditional practitioners. PMID:24812473

  5. Oral anti-inflammatory activity of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of cannabis, in acute carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rat paw.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Colleoni, Mariapia; Conti, Silvia; Parolaro, Daniela; Franke, Chiara; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Giagnoni, Gabriella

    2004-03-01

    Cannabidiol, the major non-psychoactive component of marijuana, has various pharmacological actions of clinical interest. It is reportedly effective as an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic in murine collagen-induced arthritis. The present study examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effects of cannabidiol, administered orally (5-40 mg/kg) once a day for 3 days after the onset of acute inflammation induced by intraplantar injection of 0.1 ml carrageenan (1% w/v in saline) in the rat. At the end of the treatment prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was assayed in the plasma, and cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, production of nitric oxide (NO; nitrite/nitrate content), and of other oxygen-derived free radicals (malondialdehyde) in inflamed paw tissues. All these markers were significantly increased following carrageenan. Thermal hyperalgesia, induced by carrageenan and assessed by the plantar test, lasted 7 h. Cannabidiol had a time- and dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesic effect after a single injection. Edema following carrageenan peaked at 3 h and lasted 72 h; a single dose of cannabidiol reduced edema in a dose-dependent fashion and subsequent daily doses caused further time- and dose-related reductions. There were decreases in PGE2 plasma levels, tissue COX activity, production of oxygen-derived free radicals, and NO after three doses of cannabidiol. The effect on NO seemed to depend on a lower expression of the endothelial isoform of NO synthase. In conclusion, oral cannabidiol has a beneficial action on two symptoms of established inflammation: edema and hyperalgesia.

  6. Rat on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  7. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  8. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups.

  9. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  10. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  11. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  12. Osteoarthritis-dependent changes in antinociceptive action of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channel blockers: An in vivo electrophysiological study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rahman, W; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-04

    Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are not traditionally recommended for osteoarthritis (OA) pain therapy, but given the large peripheral drive that follows OA development there is a rationale for their use. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of the Nav1.7- and Nav1.8-selective antagonists, ProTxII and A-803467 respectively, on the evoked activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. These studies allow examination of the roles of these channels in suprathreshold stimuli, not amenable to behavioral threshold measures. Spinal administration of ProTxII significantly reduced neuronal responses evoked by mechanical punctate (von Frey (vF) 8-60g) and noxious thermal (45 and 48°C) stimuli in MIA rats only. A-803467 significantly inhibited neuronal responses evoked by vF 8-60g and 48°C heat after spinal administration; significantly inhibited responses evoked by brush, vFs 26-60g and 40-48°C stimuli after systemic administration; significantly inhibited the electrically evoked Aδ-, C-fiber, post-discharge, Input and wind-up responses and the brush, vFs 8-60g and 45-48°C evoked neuronal responses after intra plantar injection in the MIA group. In comparison A-803467 effects in the sham group were minimal and included a reduction of the neuronal response evoked by vF 60g and 45°C heat stimulation after spinal administration, no effect after systemic administration and an inhibition of the evoked response to 45°C heat after intra plantar injection only. The observed selective inhibitory effect of ProTxII and A-803467 for the MIA-treated group suggests an increased role of Nav1.7 and 1.8 within nociceptive pathways in the arthritic condition, located at peripheral and central sites. These findings demonstrate the importance of, and add to, the mechanistic understanding of these channels in

  13. Osteoarthritis-dependent changes in antinociceptive action of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channel blockers: An in vivo electrophysiological study in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, W.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are not traditionally recommended for osteoarthritis (OA) pain therapy, but given the large peripheral drive that follows OA development there is a rationale for their use. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of the Nav1.7- and Nav1.8-selective antagonists, ProTxII and A-803467 respectively, on the evoked activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. These studies allow examination of the roles of these channels in suprathreshold stimuli, not amenable to behavioral threshold measures. Spinal administration of ProTxII significantly reduced neuronal responses evoked by mechanical punctate (von Frey (vF) 8–60 g) and noxious thermal (45 and 48 °C) stimuli in MIA rats only. A-803467 significantly inhibited neuronal responses evoked by vF 8–60 g and 48 °C heat after spinal administration; significantly inhibited responses evoked by brush, vFs 26–60 g and 40–48 °C stimuli after systemic administration; significantly inhibited the electrically evoked Aδ-, C-fiber, post-discharge, Input and wind-up responses and the brush, vFs 8–60 g and 45–48 °C evoked neuronal responses after intra plantar injection in the MIA group. In comparison A-803467 effects in the sham group were minimal and included a reduction of the neuronal response evoked by vF 60 g and 45 °C heat stimulation after spinal administration, no effect after systemic administration and an inhibition of the evoked response to 45 °C heat after intra plantar injection only. The observed selective inhibitory effect of ProTxII and A-803467 for the MIA-treated group suggests an increased role of Nav1.7 and 1.8 within nociceptive pathways in the arthritic condition, located at peripheral and central sites. These findings demonstrate the importance of, and add to, the mechanistic

  14. War on Rats, 1972 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Dept. of Environmental Services, Washington, DC.

    The City of Washington, D.C., with federal funding, declared war on one of the city's most pressing problems--rats. The War on Rats Program, in conjunction with Operation Clean Sweep, made a city-wide survey of rat infestations and recorded the areas of heavy rat infestation. After the problem areas had been identified, community organizations…

  15. Do rats have orgasms?

    PubMed Central

    Pfaus, James G.; Scardochio, Tina; Parada, Mayte; Gerson, Christine; Quintana, Gonzalo R.; Coria-Avila, Genaro A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although humans experience orgasms with a degree of statistical regularity, they remain among the most enigmatic of sexual responses; difficult to define and even more difficult to study empirically. The question of whether animals experience orgasms is hampered by similar lack of definition and the additional necessity of making inferences from behavioral responses. Method Here we define three behavioral criteria, based on dimensions of the subjective experience of human orgasms described by Mah and Binik, to infer orgasm-like responses (OLRs) in other species: 1) physiological criteria that include pelvic floor and anal muscle contractions that stimulate seminal emission and/or ejaculation in the male, or that stimulate uterine and cervical contractions in the female; 2) short-term behavioral changes that reflect immediate awareness of a pleasurable hedonic reward state during copulation; and 3) long-term behavioral changes that depend on the reward state induced by the OLR, including sexual satiety, the strengthening of patterns of sexual arousal and desire in subsequent copulations, and the generation of conditioned place and partner preferences for contextual and partner-related cues associated with the reward state. We then examine whether physiological and behavioral data from observations of male and female rats during copulation, and in sexually-conditioned place- and partner-preference paradigms, are consistent with these criteria. Results Both male and female rats display behavioral patterns consistent with OLRs. Conclusions The ability to infer OLRs in rats offers new possibilities to study the phenomenon in neurobiological and molecular detail, and to provide both comparative and translational perspectives that would be useful for both basic and clinical research. PMID:27799081

  16. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  17. Postural development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lelard, T; Jamon, M; Gasc, J-P; Vidal, P-P

    2006-11-01

    Mammals adopt a limited number of postures during their day-to-day activities. These stereotyped skeletal configurations are functionally adequate and limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by the central nervous system. The temporal pattern of emergence of these configurations in altricial mammals is unknown. We therefore carried out an X-ray study in unrestrained rats from birth (P0) until postnatal day 23 (P23). The X-rays showed that many of the skeletal configurations described in adult rodents were already present at birth. By contrast, limb placement changed abruptly at around P10. These skeletal configurations, observed in anesthetized pups, required the maintenance of precise motor control. On the other hand, motor control continued to mature, as shown by progressive changes in resting posture and head movements from P0 to P23. We suggest that a few innate skeletal configurations provide the necessary frames of reference for the gradual construction of an adult motor repertoire in altricial mammals, such as the rat. The apparent absence of a requirement for external sensorial cues in the maturation of this repertoire may account for the maturation of postural and motor control in utero in precocial mammals (Muir et al., 2000 for a review on the locomotor behavior of altricial and precocial animals).

  18. Male rat sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems.

  19. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Kilham Rat Virus Infection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, James F.; Hetrick, Frank M.

    1970-01-01

    The Kilham rat virus (RV) was found to produce mortality in newborn rats after intracerebral, intravenous, or subcutaneous administration of virus. Both infectious virus and viral hemagglutinins were detected in a variety of tissues and in the blood and urine of experimentally infected rats. Contact control rats housed with infected littermates did not develop disease but did produce antibody to RV. Horizontal virus transmission was also evidenced by the seroconversion of antibody-negative mothers whose litters were infected with RV. The level of maternal antibody was found to be the determining factor in the susceptibility or refractiveness of newborn rats to RV infection. If the mother had no detectable hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody titer (less than 10) or a low antibody titer (10 or 20), her offspring were highly susceptible to RV. However, the litters of rats with HI titers of 40 or greater were afforded protection when challenged with RV; the higher the maternal antibody level the more solid was the protection conferred. Vertical transmission of RV was also demonstrated. Litters born of mothers infected with RV several days before delivery died within 7 to 9 days of a disease identical to that seen in infected newborns and virus was recovered from a variety of tissues. Results of mother-litter exchange experiments also indicated vertical transmission (rather than transmission through milk) occurs, since litters of infected mothers developed the disease when nursed by normal mothers, whereas litters of normal mothers remained normal although they were nursed by infected mothers. PMID:16557835

  20. Online tools for understanding rat physiology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rat models have been used to investigate physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms for decades. With the availability of the rat genome and other online resources, tools to identify rat models that mimic human disease are an important step in translational research. Despite the large number of papers published each year using rat models, integrating this information remains a problem. Resources for the rat genome are continuing to grow rapidly, while resources providing access to rat phenotype data are just emerging. An overview of rat models of disease, tools to characterize strain by phenotype and genotype, and steps being taken to integrate rat physiological data is presented in this article. Integrating functional and physiological data with the rat genome will build a solid research platform to facilitate innovative studies to unravel the mechanisms resulting in disease. PMID:20056729

  1. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  2. Autoshaping in micrencephalic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.H.; Oakley, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    An autoshaping procedure in which the illumination of a lever was predictive of food reinforcement was used to compare learning in rats with micrencephaly induced by irradiation on the 16th day of gestation and in sham-irradiated controls. Both groups showed equivalent levels of lever-directed activity, and the micrencephalic animals differentiated as well as the control animals between the predictive lever and a nonpredictive lever. The micrencephalic animals were able to redistribute their lever-directed activity when the significance of the levers was reversed and did so more readily than the control animals. Results support the claim that association learning survives either traumatic or developmental neocortical damage and have implications for remedial procedures following both head injury and developmental cerebral pathology in humans.

  3. Spatial integration with rats.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, V D; Rodrigo, T; Mackintosh, N J

    2006-11-01

    Rats were trained to find the hidden platform in a Morris pool, whose location was defined by reference to a small number of landmarks around the circumference of the pool. In each of three experiments, an experimental group was trained on alternate trials with two different subsets of three of the available landmarks, with the two subsets sharing one landmark in common. When tested with landmarks drawn from both of their training configurations, but without the landmark common to the two sets, they had no difficulty in locating the platform. In Experiment 1, they performed at least as well as a group trained with all the available landmarks present on every trial. In Experiment 2, they performed significantly better than a group trained with two different subsets of landmarks that shared no one landmark in common.

  4. The rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tischler, A S

    1989-01-01

    Adult adrenal medullary cells, in many strains of rats, develop diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and neoplasia under a variety of conditions. Both endogenous and exogenous factors affect the development of these proliferative changes. The former include the animals' strain, age, and sex. The latter include drugs and other environmental agents, diet, and perhaps stress. Adrenal medullary neoplasms which arise under diverse circumstances often closely resemble each other both morphologically and functionally, and exhibit characteristics of immature chromaffin cells. Recent data indicate that normal, mature-appearing epinephrine- and norepinephrine-type chromaffin cells are able to divide, and suggest that signals which regulate chromaffin cell function also regulate cell proliferation. Prolongation of these signals or superimposed abnormalities might initiate pathological proliferative states. It remains to be determined whether the mechanisms which promote or prevent cell proliferation in the adult adrenal are related to those involved in normal development.

  5. Social facial touch in rats.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jason; Mende, Carolin; Brecht, Michael

    2011-12-01

    We know much about how rats use their whiskers to discriminate simple tactile properties, but little about how they are used in natural settings. Here we studied whisker motion during social interactions between rats in order to gain a better understanding of natural whisker use in this model system for sensorimotor integration. In the first set of experiments, an intruder was placed in a second rat's home cage. Anogenital sniffing immediately ensued; later in the trial, facial interactions occurred at least as frequently. Whereas much previous work has focused on the importance of anogenital sniffing during social interactions, these facial interactions were accompanied by some of the most intense whisker behaviors described to date. Whisker trimming increased biting but reduced boxing. In addition, whiskers were more protracted and whisking amplitude was larger in aggressive than in nonaggressive interactions. In a second set of experiments, rats interacted facially across a gap. As rats approached each other, whisking amplitude decreased and whiskers were more protracted. Whisker trimming disrupted facial alignment and reduced the frequency of interactions, indicating that whisker use, and possibly whisker protraction, is important for rats to orient themselves with respect to one another. We also found that females whisked with smaller amplitude when interacting with males than with females, and that they held their whiskers less protracted than males. The natural whisker use described here should further our understanding of this important somatosensory system during social interactions.

  6. Management of an outbreak of rat theilovirus.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Melissa C

    2010-05-01

    Rat theilovirus is a commonly reported infection in research rat colonies. The author's institution experienced an outbreak of rat theilovirus in a breeding colony of unique outbred rats. To manage this outbreak, the institution chose to use a 'test and cull' strategy because this approach is reported to be successful in mouse colonies infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, a related virus. Here the author describes the outbreak and subsequent management of rat theilovirus. The strategy successfully cleared the virus from the rat colony.

  7. Intranasal immunization of young mice with a multigene HIV-1 vaccine in combination with the N3 adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bråve, Andreas; Hallengärd, David; Schröder, Ulf; Blomberg, Pontus; Wahren, Britta; Hinkula, Jorma

    2008-09-19

    One of the major challenges for the development of an HIV vaccine is to induce potent virus-specific immune responses at the mucosal surfaces where transmission of virus occurs. Intranasal delivery of classical vaccines has been shown to induce good mucosal antibody responses, but so far for genetic vaccines the success has been limited. This study shows that young individuals are sensitive to nasal immunization with a genetic vaccine delivered in a formulation of a lipid adjuvant, the Eurocine N3. Intranasal delivery of a multiclade/multigene HIV-1 genetic vaccine gave rise to vaginal and rectal IgA responses as well as systemic humoral and cellular responses. As electroporation might become the preferred means of delivering genetic vaccines for systemic HIV immunity, nasal delivery by droplet formulation in a lipid adjuvant might become a means of priming or boosting the mucosal immunity.

  8. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general.

  9. Candidate multi-epitope vaccines in aluminium adjuvant induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Lu, Y; Chen, Y

    2000-10-01

    Some neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 envelope proteins were identified to induce antibodies which could effectively inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro. But only very low levels of these antibodies were determined in the HIV-1 infected individuals. To increase the levels of protective antibodies in vivo, we suggested multi-epitope vaccine as a new strategy to induce high level of neutralization antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity. A synthesized epitope peptide MP (CG-GPGRAFY-G-ELDKWA-G-RILAVERYLKD) containing three neutralizing epitopes (GPGRAFY, ELDKWA, RILAVERYLKD) was conjugated to carrier protein KLH, and then used for immunization in mouse together with aluminium adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant (FA). The candidate MP-KLH multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium adjuvant could induce antibody response very strongly to the epitope peptide C-(RILAVERYLKD-G)2 and the immunosuppressive peptide (P1) (LQARILAVERYLKDQQL) (antibody titer: 1:51200), strongly to the epitope peptide C-(ELDKWA-G)4 and the C-domain peptide (P2) (1:12800), and moderately to the epitope peptide C-(GPGRAFY)4 and the V3 loop peptide (1:1600). The immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies in sera could recognize P1, P2, V3 loop peptides and rsgp41 (aa 539-684). These results are similar with that in the case of PI-BSA in FA, and suggest that the multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium could induce high levels of antibodies of predefined multi-epitope specificity, which provides experimental evidence for the new strategy to develop an effective neutralizing antibody-based multi-epitope vaccine against HIV-1.

  10. Using 3 TLR ligands as a combination adjuvant induces qualitative changes in T cell responses needed for antiviral protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Egelston, Colt; Gagnon, Susan; Sui, Yongjun; Belyakov, Igor M.; Klinman, Dennis M.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    TLR ligands are promising candidates for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants that can elicit protective immunity against emerging infectious diseases. Adjuvants have been used most frequently to increase the quantity of an immune response. However, the quality of a T cell response can be more important than its quantity. Stimulating certain pairs of TLRs induces a synergistic response in terms of activating dendritic cells and eliciting/enhancing T cell responses through clonal expansion, which increases the number of responding T cells. Here, we have found that utilizing ligands for 3 TLRs (TLR2/6, TLR3, and TLR9) greatly increased the protective efficacy of vaccination with an HIV envelope peptide in mice when compared with using ligands for only any 2 of these TLRs; surprisingly, increased protection was induced without a marked increase in the number of peptide-specific T cells. Rather, the combination of these 3 TLR ligands augmented the quality of the T cell responses primarily by amplifying their functional avidity for the antigen, which was necessary for clearance of virus. The triple combination increased production of DC IL-15 along with its receptor, IL-15Rα, which contributed to high avidity, and decreased expression of programmed death–ligand 1 and induction of Tregs. Therefore, selective TLR ligand combinations can increase protective efficacy by increasing the quality rather than the quantity of T cell responses. PMID:20101095

  11. 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), a main metabolite of serotonin, is responsible for complete Freund's adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytrptamine, 5-HT) in the modulation of pain has been widely studied. Previous work led to the hypothesis that 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), a main metabolite of serotonin, might by itself influence pain thresholds. Results In the present study, we investigated the role of 5-HIAA in inflammatory pain induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the hind paw of mice. Wild-type mice were compared to mice deficient of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT-/- mice) using behavioral tests for hyperalgesia and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine tissue levels of 5-HIAA. Wild-type mice reproducibly developed thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema for 5 days after CFA injection. 5-HTT-/- mice treated with CFA had reduced thermal hyperalgesia on day 1 after CFA injection and normal responses to heat thereafter. The 5-HIAA levels in spinal cord and sciatic nerve as measured with HPLC were lower in 5-HTT-/- mice than in wild-type mice after CFA injection. Pretreatment of wild-type mice with intraperitoneal injection of para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA), a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, resulted in depletion of the 5-HIAA content in spinal cord and sciatic nerve and decrease in thermal hyperalgesia in CFA injected mice. The application of exogenous 5-HIAA resulted in potentiation of thermal hyperalgesia induced by CFA in 5-HTT-/- mice and in wild-type mice pretreated with p-CPA, but not in wild-type mice without p-CPA pretreatment. Further, methysergide, a broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist, had no effect on 5-HIAA-induced potentiation of thermal hyperalgesia in CFA-treated wild-type mice. Conclusion Taken together, the present results suggest that 5-HIAA plays an important role in modulating peripheral thermal hyperalgesia in CFA induced inflammation, probably via a non-serotonin receptor mechanism. PMID:21447193

  12. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  13. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  14. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  15. Hematopoiesis in antiorthostatic, hypokinesic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinesia showed the following effects which are comparable to those seen in man during or after space flight: weight loss, reduced food and water consumption, transient increases in peripheral hematocrit and RBC count, decreasing MCV and reduced reticulocyte count. In addition, the hemoglobin P50 was shifted to the right. A significant shortening of RBC t1/2 was only seen after suspension. Changes in leukocyte and platelet numbers in suspended rats were also comparable to those in man during space flight, but leukocyte PHA sensitivity in rats showed no consistent alteration. The results demonstrate that this model reproduces many of the hematological effects of space flight and has potential as a tool in understanding the hematopoietic response to zero gravity.

  16. Using rats for vision research.

    PubMed

    Reinagel, P

    2015-06-18

    A wide variety of species are used for the study of visual neuroscience. This is beneficial because fundamental mechanisms and theoretical principles of vision are likely to be highly conserved, while different species exhibit different visual capacities and present different technical advantages for experiments. Eight years ago my laboratory adopted the hooded rat as our primary preparation for vision research. To some this may be surprising, as nocturnal rodents have often been presumed to have poor vision and weak visual behavior. This commentary will provide my personal perspective on how I came to work with rats; discuss an example research project for which rats have been advantageous; and comment on the opportunities and challenges of the preparation.

  17. Voluntary Sleep Loss in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oonk, Marcella; Krueger, James M.; Davis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Animal sleep deprivation (SDEP), in contrast to human SDEP, is involuntary and involves repeated exposure to aversive stimuli including the inability of the animal to control the waking stimulus. Therefore, we explored intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), an operant behavior, as a method for voluntary SDEP in rodents. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG) recording electrodes and a unilateral bipolar electrode into the lateral hypothalamus. Rats were allowed to self-stimulate, or underwent gentle handling-induced SDEP (GH-SDEP), during the first 6 h of the light phase, after which they were allowed to sleep. Other rats performed the 6 h ICSS and 1 w later were subjected to 6 h of noncontingent stimulation (NCS). During NCS the individual stimulation patterns recorded during ICSS were replayed. Results: After GH-SDEP, ICSS, or NCS, time in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased. Further, in the 24 h after SDEP, rats recovered all of the REM sleep lost during SDEP, but only 75% to 80% of the NREM sleep lost, regardless of the SDEP method. The magnitude of EEG slow wave responses occurring during NREM sleep also increased after SDEP treatments. However, NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA) responses were attenuated following ICSS, compared to GH-SDEP and NCS. Conclusions: We conclude that ICSS and NCS can be used to sleep deprive rats. Changes in rebound NREM sleep EEG SWA occurring after ICSS, NCS, and GH-SDEP suggest that nonspecific effects of the SDEP procedure differentially affect recovery sleep phenotypes. Citation: Oonk M, Krueger JM, Davis CJ. Voluntary sleep loss in rats. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1467–1479. PMID:27166236

  18. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats.

  19. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route.

  20. In vivo tropisms and kinetics of rat theilovirus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats.

    PubMed

    Drake, Michael T; Besch-Williford, Cindy; Myles, Matthew H; Davis, Justin W; Livingston, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Rat theilovirus (RTV) is a cardiovirus related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. While RTV is a prevalent viral pathogen of rats used in biomedical research, the pathogenesis and characterization of RTV infections is not well understood. In the studies reported herein, we used immunohistochemistry to identify viral antigens in enterocytes of the small intestines of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Fecal viral shedding in immunocompromised and immunocompetent rats following oral gavage with RTV1 was high for the first 2 weeks of infection with persistent shedding of high viral loads being observed in immunocompromised nude rats but not in immunocompetent rats. RTV was also detected in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen of immunocompromised rats but not immunocompetent rats. In addition, the magnitude of serum antibody responses differed between immunocompetent rat strains with Brown Norway and SD rats having a significantly higher antibody response than CD or Fischer 344 rats. These data suggest that RTV1 has a tropism for the epithelial cells of the small intestine, immunocompetent rats have differing serum antibody responses to RTV infection, and sustained fecal shedding and extraintestinal dissemination of RTV1 occurs in rats deficient in T cell-dependent adaptive immunity. RTV infection in immunocompromised and immunocompetent rats has merit as a model for further studies of theilovirus pathogenesis following oral viral exposure.

  1. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long-Evans Rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola M A; Fox, James G

    2015-12-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well.

  2. Cloning of rat homeobox genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Yasuhiko; Mizuta, Ikuko; Ogasawara, Naotake

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation of nine rat cognates of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox gene clusters and a rat homologue of mouse IPF1 homeobox, RHbox No. 13A. The sequences of nine cloned homeoboxes are highly similar to those of the mouse and human homeoboxes in the Hox clusters. The restriction enzyme sites and map distances between each of the homeoboxes on the rat genome are nearly identical to those of mouse and human. Thus, we conclude that the isolated homeoboxes are the rat homologues of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox clusters. A novel homeobox RHbox No. 13A is different from the Drosophila Antennapedia (Antp) sequence but is highly similar to the XlHbox8 (Xenopus laevis) and HtrA2 (Helobdella triserialis) homeoboxes. Forty-two amino acids of the last two-thirds of the RHbox No. 13A, XlHbox8, and mouse IPF1 homeodomains completely matched. In addition, these four homeodomains contain a unique His residue in the recognition helix of a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. This His residue is not found in any of the previously published mammalian homeodomain sequences except mouse IPF1. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan S. W.; Graff, Matthew M.; Bresee, Chris S.; Man, Yan B.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  4. Dithiobiuret toxicity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Raising the daily dose of dithiobiuret (DTB) in male rats from 0.5 to 1 to 5 mg/kg shortened the latency to the onset of flaccid muscle tone and associated diminished performance in a treadmill test from 7 to 5 to 3 days, respectively. Concomitant with the development of flaccid muscle tone gastrocnemius muscle contractions elicited by high frequency motor nerve stimulation were lower in peak tension and tended to fade more rapidly in DTB-treated rats than in control rats. Remarkably, rats treated with highly daily doses (10-16 mg/kg) of DTB were resistant to the expected development of DTB-induced flaccid muscle tone, and tetanic contractile abnormalities but a corresponding refractoriness to body weight loss, decreased fed and water intake, diuresis, and depression in water balance was not present. This nonselectivity of the refractory responses supported the results of a histopathological study indicating that DTB-induced neuromuscular toxicity was unlikely to be secondary to effect on other organ systems. It is not known whether the ultimate neurotoxin is DTB or a metabolite. In this regard, two pathways for the metabolism of DTB were proposed based on the results of thin-layer chromatography of urine samples from rats treated with either /sup 14/C- or /sup 35/S-DTB. One pathway involved the reversible oxidation of DTB to the disulfide-containing compound thiuret, and the other involved the replacement of a sulfur atom with oxygen to form monothiobiuret. Thiuret, but not monothiobiuret, possessed comparable toxicity to STB. This further suggested that redox cycling between DTB and thiuret could be an important contributing factor to the toxicity of DTB.

  5. Sexual dimorphism in hybrids rats.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Pinos, Helena; Fernández, Rosa; Collado, Paloma; Pasaro, Eduardo; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio

    2006-12-06

    Laboratory rat strains descend from Wistar rats as a consequence of artificial selection. Previously we reported that the medial posterior division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTMP) was sexually dimorphic in Wistar and Long-Evans strains while the medial anterior division (BSTMA) and the locus coeruleus (LC) only showed sex differences in the ancestor Wistar strain. The lateral posterior division (BSTLP) was isomorphic in both strains. The present work studies the number of neurons in the BSTMP, BSTMA, BSTLP and LC of male and female Wistar and Long-Evans rats (F(0)) and their hybrid F(1) and F(2) generations. The BSTMP is sexually dimorphic in the F(0), F(1) and F(2) generations while sex differences in the LC are only seen in F(0) Wistar rats but not in the F(0) Long-Evans or the F(1) and F(2) hybrid generations. Sex differences in the BSTMA are seen in F(0) Wistar but not in F(0) Long-Evans rats and completely disappear in the F(2) generations. The number of neurons in the LC of both males and females decreased in heterozygotic individuals (F(1)) but increased in homozygotic (F(2)). However, the number of neurons in the BSTMP changes significantly over the generations, although the ratio of neurons (female/male) is stable and unaffected in homo- or heterozygosis. Thus, the mechanism that regulates the neuronal female/male ratio would be different from the one that controls the number of neurons. The facts that sex differences in the BSTMP are not affected by homo- or heterozygosis and that they are seen in several mammalian orders suggest the existence of a "fixed" type of brain sex differences in the Mammalia Class.

  6. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  7. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise.

    PubMed

    Muths, E; Reichman, O J

    1996-08-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly "stronger" bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  8. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  9. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  10. Wound Healing Delay in the ZDSD Rat

    PubMed Central

    A. SUCKOW, MARK; A. GOBBETT, TROY; G. PETERSON, RICHARD

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of diabetic delayed wound healing are essential to the development of strategies to improve clinical approaches for human patients. The Zucker diabetic Sprague Dawley (ZDSD) rat has proved to be an accurate model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes and we evaluated the utility of the ZDSD rat as a model for delayed wound healing associated with diabetes and obesity. Groups of ZDSD and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were placed on a diabetogenic diet and evaluated two weeks later for hyperglycemia, as a sign of diabetes. Rats with blood glucose levels of >300 mg/dl were considered diabetic and those with blood glucose of <180 mg/dl were considered non-diabetic. All SD rats were non-diabetic. A full-thickness excisional skin wound was created in anesthetized rats using a punch biopsy and wound diameter measured on days 1, 4, 7, 9 and 11. Blood glucose levels and body weights were measured periodically before and after wounding. Diabetic ZDSD rats had significantly greater blood glucose levels than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats within 10 days of being placed on the diabetogenic diet. Furthermore, diabetic ZDSD rats initially weighed more than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats, however, by the end of the study there was no significant difference in body weight between the ZDSD groups. By day nine, wounds in ZDSD rats were significantly larger than those in SD rats and this persisted until the end of the study at day fourteen. Wounds from all groups were characterized histologically by abundant fibroblast cells, collagen deposition and macrophages. These results demonstrate delayed wound healing in both diabetic and non-diabetic ZDSD rats and suggest that obesity or metabolic syndrome are important factors in wound healing delay. PMID:28064221

  11. Histomorphometric analysis of rat skeleton following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Doty, S. B.; Maese, A. C.; Walsh, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in orbit for 7 days aboard the space shuttle. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae of flight rats and compared with data derived from ground-based control rats. Trabecular bone mass was not altered during the 1st wk of weightlessness. Strong trends were observed in flight rats for decreased periosteal bone formation in the tibial diaphysis, reduced osteoblast size in the proximal tibia, and decreased osteoblast surface and number in the lumbar vertebra. For the most part, histological indexes of bone resorption were normal in flight rats. The results indicate that 7 days of weightlessness are not of sufficient duration to induce histologically detectable loss of trabecular bone in rats. However, cortical and trabecular bone formation appear to be diminished during the 1st wk of spaceflight.

  12. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.T.; Cao, L.; Nelson, J.L.; Foley-Nelson, T.; Fischer, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  13. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Cao, L; Nelson, J L; Foley-Nelson, T; Fischer, J E

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  14. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs.

  15. Toxicity and repellency to rats of actidione

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Traub, R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Newman, D.

    1950-01-01

    The antibiotic actidione was found to be highly repellent to laboratory rats and to significantly reduce gnawing attacks upon treated paperboards. Rats refused to accept food or water containing this material even under conditions of acute starvation and died of starvation and thirst,rather than accept water containing l.0 mg. of actidione per liter. The compound is highly toxic to .rats with the minimum .lethal dose by oral administration being approximately l.0 mg./Kg body weight. Paperboard treated with the compound resisted gnawing attacks by specially trained and motivated rats for periods of two hundred hours, although similar .untreated boards were pierced within thirty-to sixty minutes.

  16. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs. PMID:27436999

  17. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  18. Immunochemistry of Rat Lung Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Memorial Institute 1640 (RPMI) tissue culture medium. The extra tissue surrounding the organs is dissected free and discarded; this procedure is done in a...concentration of 0.5 x 106 cells/ml in a total volume of 3 ml/culture using the following medium: Roswell Park Memorial Institute 1640 (RPMI 1640...test tubes containing sterile Roswel] Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) tissue culture medium 1640. Lymphocytes from rat spleens were isolated, counted and

  19. Methanethiol metabolism in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, R.F.; Draves, K.

    1983-03-01

    Methanethiol is associated with hepatic failure in humans and the synergistic action of methanethiol, ammonia and octanoate is sufficient to account for the coma of experimental hepatic necrosis. The sulfur atom of methanethiol is eliminated from the body as urinary sulfate at a rate which is approximated by a hyperbola such that 94% is excreted within 21 h after administration. Rats in octanoate or hepatic coma excreted only little sulfate in their urine.

  20. Do rats learn conditional independence?

    PubMed Central

    Timberlake, William

    2017-01-01

    If acquired associations are to accurately represent real relevance relations, there is motivation for the hypothesis that learning will, in some circumstances, be more appropriately modelled, not as direct dependence, but as conditional independence. In a serial compound conditioning experiment, two groups of rats were presented with a conditioned stimulus (CS1) that imperfectly (50%) predicted food, and was itself imperfectly predicted by a CS2. Groups differed in the proportion of CS2 presentations that were ultimately followed by food (25% versus 75%). Thus, the information presented regarding the relevance of CS2 to food was ambiguous between direct dependence and conditional independence (given CS1). If rats learnt that food was conditionally independent of CS2, given CS1, subjects of both groups should thereafter respond similarly to CS2 alone. Contrary to the conditionality hypothesis, subjects attended to the direct food predictability of CS2, suggesting that rats treat even distal stimuli in a CS sequence as immediately relevant to food, not conditional on an intermediate stimulus. These results urge caution in representing indirect associations as conditional associations, accentuate the theoretical weight of the Markov condition in graphical models, and challenge theories to articulate the conditions under which animals are expected to learn conditional associations, if ever. PMID:28386451

  1. Pathophysiology of the Belgrade rat

    PubMed Central

    Veuthey, Tania; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The Belgrade rat is an animal model of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) deficiency. This strain originates from an X-irradiation experiment first reported in 1966. Since then, the Belgrade rat’s pathophysiology has helped to reveal the importance of iron balance and the role of DMT1. This review discusses our current understanding of iron transport homeostasis and summarizes molecular details of DMT1 function. We describe how studies of the Belgrade rat have revealed key roles for DMT1 in iron distribution to red blood cells as well as duodenal iron absorption. The Belgrade rat’s pathology has extended our knowledge of hepatic iron handling, pulmonary and olfactory iron transport as well as brain iron uptake and renal iron handling. For example, relationships between iron and manganese metabolism have been discerned since both are essential metals transported by DMT1. Pathophysiologic features of the Belgrade rat provide us with a unique and interesting animal model to understand iron homeostasis. PMID:24795636

  2. Sorafenib inhibits liver regeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper Jarlhelt; Knudsen, Anders Riegels; Kannerup, Anne-Sofie; Sasanuma, Hideki; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Ladekarl, Morten; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2013-01-01

    Background Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative properties, approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The effect of Sorafenib on liver regeneration in healthy rats was investigated. Methods Sixty Wistar rats received either Sorafenib (group S; 15 mg/kg) or placebo for 14 days prior to resection and until sacrifice. After a 70% partial hepatectomy, the rats were euthanized on post-operative days (POD) 2, 4 or 8. Hepatocyte proliferation was estimated by immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 antigen using stereological methods on sections prepared by systematic uniform random sampling. Results Seven animals (12%) died after surgery. Death rates were similar in treated rats and controls. At hepatectomy, the body weight was significantly lower in group S rats. The liver weight and regeneration rates were lower in group S rats on PODs 2, 4 and 8. Hepatocyte proliferation was significantly lower in group S animals on PODs 2 and 4. Alanine aminotransferase ALAT was significantly higher in the Sorafenib-treated group on PODs 2, 4 and 8. Alkaline phosphatase ALP and bilirubin levels were similar in the two groups, although bilirubin was elevated in group S rats on POD 8. Conclusion In this rat model, Sorafenib did not increase post-hepatectomy mortality, but was associated with a significant impaired liver weight gain, regeneration rates and hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:23461776

  3. PBPK MODELING OF DELTAMETHRIN IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin is cleared nearly twice as rapidly in human liver microsomes compared to rat liver microsomes. A species difference such as this could influence the toxic potency of deltamethrin between rats and humans. PBPK modeling is a tool that can be ut...

  4. Spatial Memory in Rats after 25 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Babb, Stephanie J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the time course of spatial-memory decay in rats using an eight-arm radial maze. It is well established that performance remains high with retention intervals as long as 4 h, but declines to chance with a 24-h retention interval (Beatty, W. W., & Shavalia, D. A. (1980b). Spatial memory in rats: time course of working memory and…

  5. Same-Different Categorization in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Castro, Leyre; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Same-different categorization is a fundamental feat of human cognition. Although birds and nonhuman primates readily learn same-different discriminations and successfully transfer them to novel stimuli, no such demonstration exists for rats. Using a spatial discrimination learning task, we show that rats can both learn to discriminate arrays of…

  6. The rat cortex in stereotaxic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Schober, W

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of Nissl-preparations the cortex of albino rats has been mapped cytoarchitectonically. 13 frontal sections through the cortex are illustrated with coordinates. Therewith exists a stereotaxic atlas of the cortex of the rat and one can realize exactly experimental investigations in the different cortical areas.

  7. Anticariogenic effects of tea in rats.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S; Elvin-Lewis, M; Beck, F M; Beck, E X

    1984-05-01

    Teas varying in fluoride and tannin concentration were evaluated in rats for anticariogenic activity. There was a direct correlation between fluoride in tea and the inhibition of sulcal caries in rats, whereas no relationship was observed between tannin and this type of lesion. Teas also had a significant effect on caries progression and imparted a black stain to the teeth.

  8. Cryopreservation and orthotopic transplantation of rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, Martina; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The number of rat strains increased considerably in the last decade and will increase continuously during the next years. This requires enough space for maintaining vital strains and techniques for cryobanking, which can be applied not only in specialised rat resource centres but also in regular animal houses. Here we describe an easy and fast method for the cryopreservation and transplantation of frozen-thawed ovaries of the rat. With dimethyl sulfoxide as cryoprotectant rat ovaries can be stored at -196 degrees C for unlimited time. For revitalisation thawed ovaries have to be orthotopically transplanted into appropriate ovarectomised recipients. Reestablishment of the reproductive cycle in the recipients can be confirmed by vaginal cytology shortly after transplantation. The recipients are able to produce 2-3 litters after mating with males of an appropriate strain. Cyropreservation of ovaries thus can be considered a reliable method to preserve scientifically and economically important stocks and strains of rats that are currently not required.

  9. Experimental oxalate urolith formation in rats.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, G H; Belling, G B; Bulman, F H

    1979-06-01

    Urinary calculi composed of calcium oxalate were produced in male hooded Wistar rats fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet over 16 weeks. This basic diet was modified by doubling the phosphate content or loading with vitamin C or D3 in three treatment groups. The number of rats developing oxalate stones was not altered by the addition of vitamin D3 or phosphate, but there was a significant increase in total weight of stone formed and histological evidence of extensive renal damage in rats on the high vitamin D3 diet. The addition of vitamin C to the vitamin B6 deficient rats resulted in a reduction in the number of rats with uroliths and a fall in urinary oxalate excretion, while similarly loaded vitamin B6 supplemented controls were free of oxalate calculi. It is concluded that the oxalate urolithiasis induced by vitamin B6 deficiency was exacerbated by added vitamin D3 and reduced by vitamin C.

  10. Social exclusion intensifies anxiety-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunchan; Noh, Jihyun

    2015-05-01

    Social connection reduces the physiological reactivity to stressors, while social exclusion causes emotional distress. Stressful experiences in rats result in the facilitation of aversive memory and induction of anxiety. To determine the effect of social interaction, such as social connection, social exclusion and equality or inequality, on emotional change in adolescent distressed rats, the emotional alteration induced by restraint stress in individual rats following exposure to various social interaction circumstances was examined. Rats were assigned to one of the following groups: all freely moving rats, all rats restrained, rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats and freely moving rats with a restrained rat. No significant difference in fear-memory and sucrose consumption between all groups was found. Change in body weight significantly increased in freely moving rats with a restrained rat, suggesting that those rats seems to share the stressful experience of the restrained rat. Interestingly, examination of the anxiety-like behavior revealed only rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats to have a significant increase, suggesting that emotional distress intensifies in positions of social exclusion. These results demonstrate that unequally excluded social interaction circumstances could cause the amplification of distressed status and anxiety-related emotional alteration.

  11. Identity Matching-to-Sample with Olfactory Stimuli in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Tracy; Pitts, Raymond C.; Galizio, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Identity matching-to-sample has been difficult to demonstrate in rats, but most studies have used visual stimuli. There is evidence that rats can acquire complex forms of olfactory stimulus control, and the present study explored the possibility that identity matching might be facilitated in rats if olfactory stimuli were used. Four rats were…

  12. Rat Control Lesson Plan for Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media Learning Corp., Rochester, NY.

    This teacher guide was developed to assist teachers of elementary children in their preparation to teach some lessons on rat control. The overall objectives include determining the level of student understanding about rats, developing student attitudes toward rats, developing the student's ability to identify the rat's weapons, identifying those…

  13. Is fructose sweeter than glucose for rats?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, I

    1996-11-01

    Because it is generally thought that the intensity of the taste of fructose is greater than that of glucose for rats, it seemed surprising when sham-fed rats drank substantially less of a mixture of 6% fructose plus saccharin than of a mixture of 6% glucose plus saccharin. At least 3 different factors contribute to this effect. First, the taste of fructose is less attractive to rats than is the taste of glucose; sham-fed rats strongly preferred glucose over fructose (no saccharin was used in this experiment). The second factor is experience. Rats having substantial previous experience with glucose, but not with fructose, consistently preferred glucose over fructose. Conversely, rats having substantial previous experience with fructose, but not with glucose, initially showed no consistent preference but subsequently tended to prefer glucose. The third factor is an interaction between saccharin and the type of sugar. Rats given only one solution at a time drink approximately as much fructose as glucose when the solutions contain no saccharin. The addition of 0.25% saccharin to 6% glucose stimulated intake, whereas the addition of the same amount of saccharin to 6% fructose did not stimulate intake. As a result, rats ingested substantially more of a mixture of 0.25% saccharin plus 6% glucose than they did of a comparable mixture of saccharin and fructose, even though rats ingest similar amounts of fructose and glucose without saccharin in single-bottle tests. Because the differential effect of saccharin on intake appeared within 2 h in naive rats, and did not greatly change over a 3-day period, it is probably not attributable to conditioning. These results suggest that these sugars have qualitatively different tastes.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  15. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance.

  16. Variation in rat sciatic nerve anatomy: implications for a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Asato, F; Butler, M; Blomberg, H; Gordh, T

    2000-03-01

    We discovered a variation of rat sciatic nerve anatomy as an incidental finding during the anatomical exploration of the nerve lesion site in a rat neuropathic pain model. To confirm the composition and distribution of rat sciatic nerve, macroscopic anatomical investigation was performed in both left and right sides in 24 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In all rats, the L4 and L5 spinal nerves were fused tightly to form the sciatic nerve. However, the L6 spinal nerve did not fuse with this nerve completely as a part of the sciatic nerve, but rather sent a thin branch to it in 13 rats (54%), whereas in the remaining 11 rats (46%), L6 ran separately along with the sciatic nerve. Also, the L3 spinal nerve sent a thin branch to the L4 spinal nerve or sciatic nerve in 6 rats (25%). We conclude that the components of sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats vary from L3 to L6; however, the major components are L4 and L5 macroscopically. This finding is in contrast to the standard textbooks of rat anatomy which describe the sciatic nerve as having major contributions from L4, L5, and L6.

  17. Naturally occurring anti-tissue antibodies in rat sera

    PubMed Central

    Weir, D. M.; Pinckard, R. N.; Elson, C. J.; Suckling, Deirdre E.

    1966-01-01

    Seventy per cent of normal rat sera have been shown to contain heat labile serum component(s) active against various rat organ homogenates as demonstrated by haemolytic complement fixation and passive haemagglutination tests. The main antigenic activity in rat liver has been found in the mitochondrial fractions. It was also demonstrated by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique that both guinea-pig complement and high molecular weight rat globulins were fixed to rat organ sections. Chemotactic activity has also been observed with rat serum and rat liver mitochondria and it is suggested that these naturally occurring antibodies may be implicated in the removal of tissue breakdown products. PMID:5338951

  18. Hepatotoxicity of acetaldehyde in rats.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M; Urch, T; Breining, H; Pentz, R

    1987-11-01

    The ability of acetaldehyde to initiate hepatotoxicity as evidenced by enzyme leakage, hepatic fat accumulation and histological alterations was studied in rats. Neither oral nor intraperitoneal treatment with acetaldehyde had any hepatotoxic effect, even following aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition by disulfiram. This is probably due to the inability of exogenously added acetaldehyde to penetrate liver cell membranes. In contrast, acetaldehyde derived metabolically from ethanol was capable of inducing moderate hepatotoxicity when it accumulated upon pretreatment with disulfiram. Acetaldehyde may thus be partly responsible for alcohol-induced liver damage.

  19. Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Colaço, Bruno; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-03-15

    Mammary cancer is one of the most common cancers, victimizing more than half a million of women worldwide every year. Despite all the studies in this field, the current therapeutic approaches are not effective and have several devastating effects for patients. In this way, the need to better understand the mammary cancer biopathology and find effective therapies led to the development of several rodent models over years. With this review, the authors intended to provide the readers with an overview of the rat models used to study mammary carcinogenesis, with a special emphasis on chemically-induced models.

  20. MR imaging of stem cell apoptosis in arthritic joints with a caspase-activatable contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Ye, Deju; Lenkov, Olga D.; Donig, Jessica; Martin, John E.; Castillo, Rostislav; Derugin, Nikita; Sennino, Barbara; Rao, Jianghong; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    About 43 million individuals in the U.S. encounter cartilage injuries due to trauma or osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain and functional disability. Matrix associated stem cell implants (MASI) represent a promising approach for repair of cartilage defects. However, limited survival of MASI creates a significant bottleneck for successful cartilage regeneration outcomes and functional reconstitution. We report a new approach for non-invasive detection of stem cell apoptosis with MR imaging, based on a caspase-3 sensitive nano-aggregation MRI probe (C-SNAM). C-SNAM self-assembles into nanoparticles after hydrolysis by caspase-3, leading to 90% amplification of 1H MR and prolonged in vivo retention. Following intra-articular injection, C-SNAM causes significant MR signal enhancement in apoptotic MASI compared to viable MASI. Our results indicate that C-SNAM functions as an imaging biomarker for stem cell apoptosis in MASI. This concept could be applied to a broad range of cell transplants and target sites. PMID:25597243

  1. Arthroscopic decompressive medial release of the varus arthritic knee: Expanding the functional envelope.

    PubMed

    Leon, H O; Blanco, C E; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present the rationale and technique for treating medial knee osteoarthritis by dynamically unloading the medial compartment of the knee. Recent advances in kinematic studies indicate a dynamic linkage between differing degrees of freedom in the knee joint. Both the adduction moment and the foot progression angle are important determinants of medial compartment loading. The medially osteoarthritic knee has progressive compromise of free motion in more than 1 plane. Arthroscopic decompressive medial release unloads the medial compartment by release of the medial capsule and medial collateral ligament in the presence of intact cruciate ligaments, which may allow a decreased adduction moment and decrease of the external rotation restraint in extension found in more severely osteoarthritic knees. A case series of 38 patients with medial gonarthrosis was treated by this technique at the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital in Havana, Cuba. All patients had good results without postoperative valgus instability or significant complications. We feel that this technique warrants further clinical and biomechanical study for its use in isolation or in combination with high tibial osteotomy or minimally invasive selective osteotomy for the treatment of medial gonarthrosis of the knee. A minimally invasive, selective approach to biomechanical factors in osteoarthritis may be combined with other modulating techniques in efforts to forestall or prevent the need for total joint replacement.

  2. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  3. Subchondral cysts (geodes) in arthritic disorders: pathologic and radiographic appearance of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Resnick, D; Niwayama, G; Coutts, R D

    1977-05-01

    A comprehensive study of femoral heads of patients and cadavers with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease allows insight into the radiographic and pathologic appearance of subchondral radiolucencies in these disorders. The term geode, rather than cyst or pseudocyst, may be a more appropriate decription of these lesions. In osteoarthritis, goedes occur on the pressure segment of the femoral head in association with loss of articular space; in rheumatoid arthritis, they are initially noted at the chondro-osseous junction and subsequently involve the entire femoral head. In osteonecrosis, geodes appear in the necrotic segment of the femoral head. In calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, geodes resemble those in osteoarthritis but are larger, more numerous, and more widespread.

  4. [Baropodometric walking analysis in healthy elderly and in arthritic patients before and after knee prosthesis implantation].

    PubMed

    Marsico, V; Moretti, B; Patella, V; De Serio, S; Simone, C

    2002-01-01

    Standing and walking are complex activities which require integral skeletal-muscular and central nervous systems. Body is usually, evenly distributed between both the lower limbs with 40% on the ball of the foot and 60% on the heel, therefore, the body's centre of gravity falls between the feet in correspondence to Chopart's articulation. Some diseases can influence standing and walking including cardiovascular diseases (chronic edema, claudication, cardiopathies etc.) neurosensorial ones (cataract, Menière's disease, Parkinson's disease etc.) and orthopedic ones (kyphosis, scoliosis, hallux valgus, metatarsalgia, osteoarthritis etc.). In this study arthritis was considered the main cause of changes in posture and deambulation. An electric baropodometer with a modular platform 240 cm long and 40 cm wide was used which provided the pressure information for each in three distinct phases: static, dynamic and postural Baropodometric step analysis was performed on ten healthy, elderly subjects and ten elderly subjects with arthritis of the knee. The latter group was evaluated both pre- and post prosthetic knee surgery. The data revealed that the ten healthy subjects with arthritis who, prior to surgery presented unequal weight distribution on the diseased side which was slowly redistributed after surgery.

  5. The effect of pressure gradient and thermolactyl control gloves in arthritic patients with swollen hands.

    PubMed

    Oosterveld, F G; Rasker, J J

    1990-06-01

    In this study the effect of pressure gradient gloves was compared with that of control gloves by eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diffusely and symmetrically swollen hands. In the morning at fixed times, grip strength, circumference of PIP joints and proximal phalanges, nocturnal pain and morning stiffness in the hands were measured. Significant improvement of circumference of PIP joints (P less than 0.001) and proximal phalanges (P less than 0.01) were found. On wearing the control gloves, some improvement was also found, but only the circumference of PIP joints decreased significantly (P less than 0.05). Nocturnal pain and morning stiffness diminished significantly on wearing both types of glove. Grip strength improved, but not significantly with both. No significant differences were detected between the effects of wearing the two types of glove. No correlation was found between the decreased swelling in the hands as measured by PIP joint circumference or circumference of the proximal phalanges and the decreased nocturnal pain or morning stiffness. This study provided no explanation for the beneficial effect of the gloves. It was shown that for some patients with painful and swollen hands, wearing gloves at night may give relief.

  6. [Role of slow-acting anti-arthritic agents in osteoarthritis (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine, hyaluronic acid)].

    PubMed

    Aubry-Rozier, B

    2012-03-14

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the major causes of pain and of outpatient's clinics. 15 years ago, physiopathology of OA and its potential therapeutic targets were announced to be better understood, but the results of therapeutic trials were finally not as convincing as expected. Slow Acting Drugs (SADs) are part of the treatments evaluated in OA. Even if evidence based medicine is low, positive effects of SADs have been observed. We can reasonably propose these treatments for a short test period. It can sometimes enable us to decrease the dosage of others treatment such as NSAIDs. In any case, the physician must properly inform the patient about products available in Switzerland and must be aware of degrees of purity and costs of the products available on the intemet.

  7. Laser therapy for the treatment of arthritic knees: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, F.; Liboro, R.; Saraga, F.

    2010-02-01

    In a follow-up clinical study to our previously published 2006 SPIE conference proceeding, we analyzed a cross-section of patients treated for a variety of knee problems that present at our Meditech Laser Rehabilitation Clinics on a daily basis. Of the 98 patients with knee pathologies included in this study, 63% presented with degenerative osteoarthritis. On average 11 treatments, each 30-45 minutes in duration, were administered for the individual patient resulting in a significant improvement rate in excess of 92%. Laser Therapy is active at both the cellular and systemic levels activating a variety of mechanisms including cartilage regeneration, DNA synthesis, improved microcirculation and an analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect.

  8. Molecular Mimicry between Chikungunya Virus and Host Components: A Possible Mechanism for the Arthritic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vijayalakshmi; Desai, Anita; Krishna, Shankar Susarla; Vasanthapuram, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a reemerging pathogen causes a self limited illness characterized by fever, headache, myalgia and arthralgia. However, 10–20% affected individuals develop persistent arthralgia which contributes to considerable morbidity. The exact molecular mechanisms underlying these manifestations are not well understood. The present study investigated the possible occurrence of molecular mimicry between CHIKV E1 glycoprotein and host human components. Methodology Bioinformatic tools were used to identify peptides of CHIKV E1 exhibiting similarity to host components. Two peptides (A&B) were identified using several bioinformatic tools, synthesised and used to validate the results obtained in silico. An ELISA was designed to assess the immunoreactivity of serum samples from CHIKV patients to these peptides. Further, experiments were conducted in a C57BL/6J experimental mouse model to investigate if peptide A and peptide B were indeed capable of inducing pathology. Findings The serum samples showed reactivity of varying degrees, indicating that these peptides are indeed being recognized by the host immune system during CHIKV infection. Further, these peptides when injected into C57BL/6J mice were able to induce significant inflammation in the muscles of C57BL/6J mice, similar to that observed in animals that were injected with CHIKV alone. Additionally, animals that were primed initially with CHIKV followed by a subsequent injection of the CHIKV peptides exhibited enhanced inflammatory pathology in the skeletal muscles as compared to animals that were injected with peptides or virus alone. Collectively these observations validate the hypothesis that molecular mimicry between CHIKV E1 protein and host proteins does contribute to pathology in CHIKV infection. PMID:28125580

  9. Patellofemoral Joint Arthroplasty: Our Experience in Isolated Patellofemoral and Bicompartmental Arthritic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, L.; Schirò, M.; Atzori, F.; Ferrero, G.; Massè, A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated patellofemoral (PF) arthritis is rare, and there is no complete agreement about the best surgical treatment. The operative treatments are total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral replacement (PFR). The incidence of many early complications of PF arthroplasty has decreased with the introduction of newer designs. Nowadays, the main cause of revision surgery is the progression of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In the past, PF arthroplasty was contraindicated in patients with evidence of osteoarthritis or pain in medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartments. The improvement in implant designs and surgical techniques has allowed the addition of a monocompartmental arthroplasty for the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. In this work, we evaluate our first experience with PF arthroplasty and its combination with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS From May 2014 to March 2016, we treated 14 patients. An isolated PF arthroplasty was performed in six knees (five patients), and a combined PF and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed in nine cases. We observed a significant improvement in the clinical and functional Knee Society Scores (KSSs) after surgery in our patients. RESULTS We obtained good results in our cases both for clinical and functional KSSs. Patellar clunk was recorded in one case. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION We are going toward a new attitude in which partial osteoarthritic changes could be treated with partial resurfacing prosthetic solutions such as unicompartmental, bi–unicompartmental or PFR alone, or unicompartmental combined, which respects the cruciates and achieves maximal bone preservation, which is vital, particularly, for young patients. PMID:27891054

  10. Imaging of hemodynamic effects in arthritic joints with dynamic optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Lasker, Joseph M.; Fong, Christopher J.; Dwyer, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Optical probing of hemodynamics is often employed in areas such as brain, muscular, and breast-cancer imaging. In these studies an external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters, e.g. oxy or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, are determined. In this work we present the first application of this method for characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal-interphalangeal (PIP) finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff placed around the forearm we elicited a controlled vascular response. We observed pronounced differences between the hemodynamic effect occurring in healthy volunteers and patients affected by RA.

  11. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of arthritic disorders: reviews and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lakes, E H; Allen, K D

    2016-11-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool to understand behavioral changes in preclinical arthritis models. While observational scoring and spatiotemporal gait parameters are the most widely performed gait analyses in rodents, commercially available systems can now provide quantitative assessments of spatiotemporal patterns. However, inconsistencies remain between testing platforms, and laboratories often select different gait pattern descriptors to report in the literature. Rodent gait can also be described through kinetic and kinematic analyses, but systems to analyze rodent kinetics and kinematics are typically custom made and often require sensitive, custom equipment. While the use of rodent gait analysis rapidly expands, it is important to remember that, while rodent gait analysis is a relatively modern behavioral assay, the study of quadrupedal gait is not new. Nearly all gait parameters are correlated, and a collection of gait parameters is needed to understand a compensatory gait pattern used by the animal. As such, a change in a single gait parameter is unlikely to tell the full biomechanical story; and to effectively use gait analysis, one must consider how multiple different parameters contribute to an altered gait pattern. The goal of this article is to review rodent gait analysis techniques and provide recommendations on how to use these technologies in rodent arthritis models, including discussions on the strengths and limitations of observational scoring, spatiotemporal, kinetic, and kinematic measures. Recognizing rodent gait analysis is an evolving tool, we also provide technical recommendations we hope will improve the utility of these analyses in the future.

  12. Ostéo-arthrites tuberculeuses inhabituelles multifocales chez une patiente immunocompétente

    PubMed Central

    Koné, Samba; Gbané-Koné, Mariam; Bana, Abdoulaye; Touré, Stanislas André; Kouassi, Adelaide Natacha; Koffi, Akué Gérard; Eti, Edmond; Kouakou, N‘zue Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Les formes multifocales de la tuberculose, surviennent habituellement chez des sujets immunodéprimés. Dans les formes multifocales, certaines localisations osseuses sont rares. Les auteurs rapportent le cas d'une patiente de 58 ans, immunocompétente qui présentait une tuberculose multifocale associant une atteinte pulmonaire et des localisations osseuses et articulaires inhabituelles (l’épaule, la cheville et le pied homolatéral, la branche illio-pubienne). Le diagnostic a été histologique (biopsie ostéo-articulaire) et bactériologique (mise en évidence des BAAR dans les crachats). Le traitement a été médico-chirurgical. PMID:26113943

  13. Comparative anti-inflammatory effects of anti-arthritic herbal medicines and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joshua J; Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Kye S; Bae, Soochan

    2014-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen, are widely used over-the-counter drugs to treat arthritis, but they are often associated with side effects. Herbal medicines have been used to treat various diseases such as arthritis, but the scientific profiles are not well understood. In this study, we examined, in comparison with ibuprofen, the inhibitory effects on various inflammatory markers of the most commonly used herbal medicines to treat arthritis, boswellia (Boswellia sapindales), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), guggul (Commiphora wightii), and neem (Azadirachta indica). To elicit inflammatory response, we exposed mouse myoblast C2C12 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which are cytokines activated during an inflammatory response, were determined. The optimal non-toxic concentration was determined by exposing different concentrations of drugs (from 0.01 to 10 mg/mL). Cell death measurement revealed that the drug concentrations lower than 0.05 mg/mL were non-toxic concentrations for each drug, and these doses were used for the main experiments. We found that neem and licorice showed robust anti-inflammatory responses compared with ibuprofen. However, boswellia and guggul did not demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory responses. We concluded that neem and licorice are more effective than ibuprofen in suppressing LPS-induced inflammation in C2C12 cells.

  14. Salvage of a post-traumatic arthritic wrist using the scaphoid as an osteochondral graft.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A

    2014-09-01

    The authors describe a case of post-traumatic wrist arthritis with an osteochondral defect in the scaphoid fossa of the radius. The patient was treated with proximal row carpectomy, radial styloidectomy and reconstruction of the defect using the proximal half of the scaphoid as an autologous osteochondral graft. Pain relief was achieved while wrist motion and strength were improved. The carpal bones are a source of osteochondral grafts and can be used to expand the indications of motion-preserving wrist salvage procedures.

  15. Electroencephalographic changes in albino rats subjected to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercier, J.; Assouline, G.; Fondarai, J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty one albino Wistar rats were subjected to stress for 7 hours. There was a significant difference in the slopes of regression lines for 7 nonulcerous rats and those for 14 ulcerous rats. Nonulcerous rats subjected to stress showed greater EEG curve synchronization than did ulcerous rats. If curve synchronization can be equated to a relaxed state, it may therefore be possible to explain the protective action of hypnotics, tranquilizers and analgesics on ulcers.

  16. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). Results We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Conclusion Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations

  17. Carbohydrate-conditioned odor preferences in rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas, F; Sclafani, A

    1995-06-01

    The effectiveness of odor cues to support nutrient-conditioned flavor preferences in rats was studied. When the rats drank fluid, the CS+ odor was paired with intragastric (IG) infusions of Polycose, and the CS- odor with IG water. In Experiment 1, rats trained with almond and anise odors presented with plain drinking water failed to acquire a CS+ odor preference. In contrast, rats in Experiment 2 formed a strong aversion to anise (or almond) paired with lithium chloride, which indicated that the odors were distinguishable to the rats. Experiment 3 showed that providing unique tastes (bitter or sour) in combination with the odors during training potentiated odor conditioning. The rats displayed a strong preference for the odor+taste CS+ and for the odor component alone. Experiment 4 showed that with another pair of odor (peppermint and vanilla), CS+ preferences could be conditioned in the absence of taste cues during training. These results demonstrate that rats can acquire strong nutrient-conditioned odor preferences.

  18. Cardiac lesions in rats fed rapeseed oils.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, K M; Corner, A H; Davey, K; Kramer, J K; Mahadevan, S; Sauer, F D

    1975-01-01

    Fully refined rapeseed oils containing different amounts of erucic acid (1.6%, 4.3% and 22.3%) were fed, at 20% by weight of diet, to weanling male and female Sprague-Dawley rats for periods up to 112 days. Transient myocardial lipidosis characterized by accumulation of fat droplets in myocardial fibers was marked in male and female rats fed oxidized and unoxidized rapeseed oil containing 22.3% erucic acid, moderate with rapeseed oil containing 4.3% erucic acid and very slight in rats fed rapeseed oil containing 1.6% erucic acid. Peak intensity of myocardial lipidosis occurred at three to seven days and regressed thereafter. Focal myocardial necrosis and fibrosis occurred in male rats fed rapeseed oils containing different levels of erucic acid for 112 days. The incidence of myocardial necrosis and fibrosis was markedly lower in female rats, and the incidence of these lesions in either sex was not affected by the state of oxidation of these oils. In a second experiment, male rats were fed diets containing crude, partially refined or fully refined rapeseed oils. There was no correlation between the number of foci of myocardial necrosis and fibrosis and the state of refinement of the oils, but there were generally fewer lesions in rats fed those oils having the lowest levels of erucic acid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:1170010

  19. Grapefruit juice modulates bone quality in rats.

    PubMed

    Deyhim, Farzad; Mandadi, Kranthi; Faraji, Bahram; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2008-03-01

    Hypogonadism and oxidative stress increase the risk for developing osteoporosis. The objective of this research was to evaluate the efficacy of drinking grapefruit juice on bone quality in orchidectomized (ORX) and non-ORX rats. Fifty-six 90-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into four groups--non-ORX rats (sham), sham + grapefruit juice, ORX, and ORX + grapefruit juice--and treated for 60 days. Thereafter, all rats were sacrificed to determine the plasma antioxidant status, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and indices of bone turnover, bone quality, and calcium and magnesium concentrations in the bone, urine, and feces. Orchidectomy decreased (P < .05) antioxidant status, bone quality, and bone mineral contents and increased (P < .05) indices of bone turnover, urinary deoxypridinoline, calcium, and magnesium, and fecal calcium excretions. In contrast to the ORX group, ORX rats that drank grapefruit juice had an increase (P < .05) in antioxidant status, bone density, and bone mineral contents, delayed femoral fracture, and slowed down (P < .05) bone turnover rate and tended to have a decrease (P = .08) in urinary deoxypridinoline. In sham-treated animals, drinking grapefruit juice increased (P < .05) bone density and tended to increase the femoral strength. The concentration of IGF-I in the plasma was not affected across treatments. In conclusion, drinking grapefruit juice positively affected bone quality by enhancing bone mineral deposition in ORX rats and by improving bone density in non-ORX rats via an undefined mechanism.

  20. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  1. Photoperiodic response in the male laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Wallen, E P; DeRosch, M A; Thebert, A; Losee-Olson, S; Turek, F W

    1987-08-01

    Normally photoperiodic laboratory rats can be induced to respond reproductively to a change in the length of the day by various experimental manipulations. One such paradigm that results in significant gonadal regression involves the treatment of rats with exogenous testosterone during exposure to short days. Studies were undertaken to assess various aspects of this model system including 1) the testicular response of testosterone-treated rats exposed to various photoperiods, 2) the time course for testicular regression under a short photoperiod, and 3) the role of the pineal gland as a mediator of the effects of day length on the neuroendocrine-gonadal axis. Photoperiods ranging in length from 2 to 22 h/24 h had no effect on testicular size in untreated rats. In contrast, while near normal testicular weights were maintained in laboratory rats treated with testosterone and exposed to 10 or more h of light per day, testicular regression occurred in rats implanted with testosterone-filled capsules and exposed to photoperiods of 8 or fewer h of light per day. Maximal testicular regression was reached in about 9 wk in testosterone-treated rats exposed to 6L:18D. Removal of the pineal gland totally blocked the inhibitory effects of exposure to short day lengths in testosterone-treated rats. These studies define some of the characteristics of an extant, but dormant, system for photoperiodic time measurement in the common laboratory rat and implicate a role for the pineal gland in this system. These experiments offer evidence that neuroendocrine factors that regulate continuous vs. seasonal reproductive patterns are malleable. Such flexibility in the photoperiodic response may also contribute to the evolution of seasonal to non-seasonal species and vice versa.

  2. Antidepressant effect of taurine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Caletti, Greice; Olguins, Danielly B; Pedrollo, Elis F; Barros, Helena M T; Gomez, Rosane

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that diabetic individuals present more depressive behaviors than non-diabetic individuals. Taurine, one of the most abundant free amino acids in the central nervous system, modulates a variety of biological functions and acts as an agonist at GABAA receptors. Our objective was to assess the antidepressant effect of taurine in diabetic rats. Additionally, we studied the effect of taurine on weight gain, water and food intake, and blood glucose levels in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (CTR) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ) groups and were administered daily 0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg of taurine (n = 10 per subgroup) intraperitoneally. After 28 days of treatment, the animals were exposed to the forced swimming test, and their behaviors were recorded. Weight gain, water and food intake, and blood glucose levels were measured weekly. Our results showed that STZ rats had a higher immobility duration than CTR rats, and taurine decreased this depressive-like behavior in STZ rats at doses of 25 and 100 mg/kg. Both of these doses of taurine also decreased water intake and improved weight gain in STZ rats. All doses of taurine decreased the water intake in CTR rats. Taurine, at a dose of 100 mg/kg, decreased food intake and blood glucose levels in STZ rats. Because taurine is a GABA agonist and both amino acids are lower in the plasma of diabetic and depressive individuals, we hypothesize that taurine may represent a new adjuvant drug for the treatment of depression in diabetic individuals.

  3. Coping style and stress hormone responses in genetically heterogeneous rats: comparison with the Roman rat strains.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morán, Sira; Palència, Marta; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate for the first time the stress-induced hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone and prolactin responses of the National Institutes of Health genetically heterogeneous rat stock (N/Nih-HS rats) in comparison with responses of the relatively high and low stress-prone Roman Low- (RLA-I) and High-Avoidance (RHA-I) rat strains. The same rats were also compared (experiment 1) with respect to their levels of unconditioned anxiety (elevated zero-maze test), novelty-induced exploratory behavior, conditioned fear and two-way active avoidance acquisition. In experiment 2, naive rats from these three strains/stocks were evaluated for "depressive-like" behavior in the forced swimming test. N/Nih-HS and RLA-I rats showed significantly higher post-stress ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin levels than RHA-I rats. N/Nih-HS rats also presented the highest context-conditioned freezing responses, extremely poor two-way avoidance acquisition and very low novelty-induced exploratory behavior. Experiment 2 showed that, compared to RHA-I rats, N/Nih-HS and RLA-I rats displayed significantly less struggling (escape-directed) and increased immobility responses in the forced swimming test. Factor analysis of data from experiment 1 showed associations among behavioral and hormonal responses, with a first factor comprising high loadings of elevated zero-maze variables and lower loadings of conditioned fear, two-way avoidance acquisition and hormonal measures, while a second factor mainly grouped conditioned fear and two-way avoidance acquisition with novelty-induced exploration and post-stress prolactin. Thus, regarding their anxiety/fearfulness, passive coping style, "depressive-like" and stress-induced hormonal responses the N/Nih-HS rats resemble the phenotype profiles of the relatively high-anxious and stress-prone RLA-I rat strain.

  4. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  5. Origins of blood acetate in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, B M; Williamson, D H

    1977-01-01

    A novel enzymimc cycling assay for the determination of acetate in biological material is described. Measurements of the acetate concentration in blood and liver samples from rats of various ages and nutritional states with this assay are reported. The contribution of the intestine, the liver and the rest of the body to maintaining the concentration of acetate in the circulation is examined. Evidence is presented that the gut flora constitute the main source of acetate in blood of fed adult rats, though endogenous production of acetate is of significance in other situations. The streptozotocin-diabetic rat has an elevated blood acetate concentration. PMID:597244

  6. Hypothalamic thermosensitivity in capsaicin-desensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cormarèche-Leydier, M; Shimada, S G; Stitt, J T

    1985-01-01

    In rats, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin desensitization reduces hypothalamic warm thermosensitivity. We locally heated and cooled the hypothalamus using water-perfused thermodes while observing thermoregulatory variables. In untreated rats, a small dose of capsaicin had profound effects on thermoregulation. However, desensitizing rats to capsaicin had no effect on hypothalamic thermosensitivity for metabolic rate or changes in body temperature due to displacements of hypothalamic temperature. Contrary to current opinion, we conclude that capsaicin desensitization does not alter hypothalamic thermosensitivity to warm or cold. PMID:4020699

  7. Malignant neoplasms in rats fed lasiocarpine.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M. S.; Reddy, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Lasiocarpine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid, was fed at a dietary concentration of 50/10(6) for 55 weeks, to 20 male F-344 rats. Malignant tumours developed in 17/20 animals between 48 and 59 weeks. Forty-five percent (9/20) developed angiosarcomas of the liver and 35% (7/20) had hepatocellular carcinomas. Other tumours included malignant adnexas tumour of the skin (1 rat) and lympohoma (1 rat). Lung metastases were observed in 4 animals with angiosarcoma of the liver and one animal with hepatocellular carcinoma. From one animal, angiosarcoma was successfully transplanted through 4 generations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:204322

  8. Establishment of a novel dwarf rat strain: cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masami; Watanabe, Minoru; Yokomi, Izuru; Matsumoto, Naoki; Sudo, Katsuko; Satoh, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Tsuneo; Seki, Azusa; Amano, Hitoshi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Ryu, Kakei; Shibata, Shunichi; Nagayama, Motohiko; Tanuma, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Rats with dwarfism accompanied by skeletal abnormalities, such as shortness of the limbs, tail, and body (dwarf rats), emerged in a Jcl-derived Sprague-Dawley rat colony maintained at the Institute for Animal Experimentation, St. Marianna University Graduate School of Medicine. Since the dwarfism was assumed to be due to a genetic mutation based on its frequency, we bred the dwarf rats and investigated their characteristics in order to identify the causative factors of their phenotypes and whether they could be used as a human disease model. One male and female that produced dwarf progeny were selected, and reproduction was initiated by mating the pair. The incidence of dwarfism was 25.8% among the resultant litter, and dwarfism occurred in both genders, suggesting that it was inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. At 12 weeks of age, the body weights of the male and female dwarf rats were 40% and 57% of those of the normal rats, respectively. In soft X-ray radiographic and histological examinations, shortening and hypoplasia of the long bones, such as the tibia and femur, were observed, which were suggestive of endochondral ossification abnormalities. An immunohistochemical examination detected an aggrecan synthesis disorder, which might have led to delayed calcification and increased growth plate thickening in the dwarf rats. We hypothesized that the principal characteristics of the dwarf rats were systemically induced by insufficient cartilage calcification in their long bones; thus, we named them cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

  9. Derivation of embryonic stem cells from Brown Norway rats blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyang; Lv, Zhuo; Liu, Lei; Wang, Liu; Tong, Man; Zhou, Qi

    2010-07-01

    Knockout Brown Norway (BN) rat could be a useful disease model for human disorders, however, a failure to derive embryonic stem (ES) cells disturbs the further development of the model. In this study, we reported a case of successful derivation of the BN rat ES cells with the derivation efficiency comparable to that of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The BN rat ES cells expressed the key transcription factors, and were able to form embryonic bodies (EBs) when being differentiated in vitro. After injecting the BN rat ES cells into the SD rat blastocysts, high-contribution chimeric rats were generated and could survive to their adulthood. Our success in generating pluripotent rat ES cells will benefit the generation of the knockout rats in the future.

  10. Milk composition of rats feeding restricted litters.

    PubMed Central

    Grigor, M R; Allan, J; Carne, A; Carrington, J M; Geursen, A

    1986-01-01

    Milk samples were taken from rats feeding ten pups and from both the suckled and non-suckled glands of rats feeding two pups. The lipid, protein and lactose concentrations were similar in the milks from the secreting glands, but the fluid from the non-suckled glands contained less lactose and lipid but significantly higher total protein and transferrin concentrations. The fatty acid compositions of the milk from the three sources were very similar. The mammary tissue from the rats feeding ten pups had a higher DNA content/g wet wt. than either the suckled or non-suckled mammary tissue of the rats feeding two pups. The specific activities of several lipogenic enzymes were significantly lower in the non-suckled mammary tissue. PMID:3707536

  11. Hypergravity induced prolactin surge in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megory, E.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Acute initial exposure to hypergravity (HG) was previously found to induce prolonged diestrous in rats, which was followed by return to normal estrous cycling upon more prolonged exposure to continuous HG. Bromergocryptine was found to prevent this prolonged diestrous. In this study it is found that in female rats 20 h of 3.14 G exposure (D-1 1200 h until D-2 0800 h) can induce prolactin surge at D-2 1600 h. Shorter exposure time (8 h), or exposure during a different part of the estrous cycle (19 h: from D-1 0700 h until D-2 0200 h) could not elicit this prolactin surge. Similar exposure of male rats of HG did not alter significantly their prolactin levels. It is possible that the hypothalamus of male and female rats responds differently to stimulation by HG.

  12. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  13. 2011 Desert RATS Sights and Sounds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Watch scenes from the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test, as NASA scientists and engineers drive the Space Exploration Vehicle, assemble equipment in the Habitat D...

  14. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  15. Rat sperm motility analysis: methodologic considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample c...

  16. How rats combine temporal cues.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Keen, Richard; MacInnis, Mika L M; Church, Russell M

    2005-05-31

    The procedures for classical and operant conditioning, and for many timing procedures, involve the delivery of reinforcers that may be related to the time of previous reinforcers and responses, and to the time of onsets and terminations of stimuli. The behavior resulting from such procedures can be described as bouts of responding that occur in some pattern at some rate. A packet theory of timing and conditioning is described that accounts for such behavior under a wide range of procedures. Applications include the food searching by rats in Skinner boxes under conditions of fixed and random reinforcement, brief and sustained stimuli, and several response-food contingencies. The approach is used to describe how multiple cues from reinforcers and stimuli combine to determine the rate and pattern of response bouts.

  17. Thyroid function in hemidecorticate rats.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, C O; Tosello, D O; Fernandez, G A; Merzel, J

    1988-01-01

    1. Thyroid function was evaluated in hemidecorticate (HD) and control (C) rats by determining serum T3 and T4 levels and the development of incisors and mandibles and through analysis of various histological features of the thyroid such as follicle size, colloid droplet content and [3H]-glycine uptake by follicular cells. 2. HD animals presented normal levels of circulating T3 but significantly lower T4 levels. 3. There was slight atrophy of the gland in HD animals and fewer colloid droplets were present in the cytoplasm of the follicular cells in this group, indicating a reduction in the breakdown of thyroglobulin. [3H]-glycine uptake by HD indicated that the rate of thyroglobulin biosynthesis was not altered in the experimental animals. 4. The growth of mandibles (weight) and incisors (weight and length) was reduced in HD compared to the control animals. 5. These results suggest that hemidecortication causes mild hypothyroidism (trophoprivic type) probably by affecting hypothalamic function.

  18. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-05

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders.

  19. Neptunium-237 inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Buschbom, R L

    1986-12-01

    Groups of rats were exposed to aerosols of 237Np nitrate to determine clearance rates, retention and distribution at various intervals after inhalation. Initial lung burdens (ILB) after 237Np inhalation by three treatment groups were 0.12, 0.19 and 0.37 mu Ci/kg, respectively. Radiochemical analyses of animals killed at 4, 8, 14, 28 and 90 d, as well as data for others maintained until they became moribund, showed that their lung clearance followed a three-compartment model, clearance half-times for which were 1, 35, and 10,000 d, respectively. Only 3% of the ILB was retained after 90 d; 12% of that burden had translocated to the skeleton at 750 d; the half-time for skeletal retention was 2500 d. A single tumor was the only malignancy detected in the lungs of the 35 animals allowed to survive the early phase of the study.

  20. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  1. Can You Find the Rat Holes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Using its rock abrasion tool, otherwise known as 'Rat,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity dotted the slope of 'Endurance Crater' with dimples that give scientists a glimpse into its layered geologic history. This image from the rover's navigation camera, taken on sol 169 (July 15, 2004), highlights the prolific work of the robotic 'rodent.' How many Rat holes can you identify? You will be able to check your answer against an image to be posted soon with all the holes identified.

  2. Ultrasonic Vocalizations by Adult Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    during aggression in rats and some other myomorph species (e.g., Acomys cahirinus, Apcdemus sylvati- cus). Other species (e.g., MusM muau_...which occur when the young are handled. The author reports that, unlike rats, other rodent species (e.g., lab mice, Acomys cahirinus, Clethrionomys gajj... Acomys was removed from the mother’s cage, and during exploratory behavior in Apodemus gyiL vaticus. i1 Sewell, G.D. Ultrasonic signals from rodents

  3. Quantity Discrimination in Domestic Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura; Montrose, V. Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Quantity discrimination involves distinguishing which of two quantities is greater. This discrimination between larger and smaller quantities has only been demonstrated in rats post extensive training. We tested whether domestic rats could perform quantity discrimination without explicit training. We found that rats could distinguish the greater amount in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. Rats could not distinguish between 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. We also found that as the ratio between quantities became finer the choice of the larger quantity decreased. We conclude that rats can perform quantity discrimination without extensive training and that their quantity discrimination ability is influenced by the ratio between quantities. Abstract Quantity discrimination is a basic form of numerical competence where an animal distinguishes which of two amounts is greater in size. Whilst quantity discrimination in rats has been investigated via training paradigms, rats’ natural quantity discrimination abilities without explicit training for a desired response have not been explored. This study investigated domestic rats’ ability to perform quantity discrimination. Domestic rats (n = 12) were examined for their ability to distinguish the larger amount under nine quantity comparisons. One-sample t-tests identified a significant preference for the larger quantity in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. No preference between quantities was found for comparisons of 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. Overall, this study drew two key conclusions. Firstly, that domestic rats are capable of performing quantity discrimination without extensive training. Secondly, as subjects adhered to Weber’s law, it was concluded that the approximate number system underpins domestic rats’ ability to perform spontaneous quantity discrimination. PMID:27527223

  4. A digital rat atlas of sectional anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Liu, Qian; Bai, Xueling; Liao, Yinping; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a digital rat alias of sectional anatomy made by milling. Two healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat weighing 160-180 g were used for the generation of this atlas. The rats were depilated completely, then euthanized by Co II. One was via vascular perfusion, the other was directly frozen at -85 °C over 24 hour. After that, the frozen specimens were transferred into iron molds for embedding. A 3% gelatin solution colored blue was used to fill the molds and then frozen at -85 °C for one or two days. The frozen specimen-blocks were subsequently sectioned on the cryosection-milling machine in a plane oriented approximately transverse to the long axis of the body. The surface of specimen-blocks were imaged by a scanner and digitalized into 4,600 x2,580 x 24 bit array through a computer. Finally 9,475 sectional images (arterial vessel were not perfused) and 1,646 sectional images (arterial vessel were perfused) were captured, which made the volume of the digital atlas up to 369.35 Gbyte. This digital rat atlas is aimed at the whole rat and the rat arterial vessels are also presented. We have reconstructed this atlas. The information from the two-dimensional (2-D) images of serial sections and three-dimensional (3-D) surface model all shows that the digital rat atlas we constructed is high quality. This work lays the foundation for a deeper study of digital rat.

  5. Hindlimb unweighting affects rat vascular capacitance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Tamhidi, L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired stroke volume and, therefore, cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. We hypothesized that a decreased venous filling pressure due to increased venous compliance may be an important contributing factor in this response. We used a constant flow, constant right atrial pressure cardiopulmonary bypass procedure to measure total systemic vascular compliance (C(T)), arterial compliance (C(A)), and venous compliance (C(V)) in seven control and seven 21-day hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats. These compliance values were calculated under baseline conditions and during an infusion of 0.2 microg*kg(-1)*min(-1) norepinephrine (NE). The change in reservoir volume, which reflects changes in unstressed vascular volume (DeltaV(0)) that occurred upon infusion of NE, was also measured. C(T) and C(V) were larger in HLU rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion (P < 0.05). Infusion of NE decreased C(T) and C(V) by 20% in both HLU and control rats (P < 0.01). C(A) was also significantly decreased in both groups of rats by NE (P < 0.01), but values of C(A) were similar between HLU and control rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion. Additionally, the NE-induced DeltaV(0) was attenuated by 53% in HLU rats compared with control rats (P < 0.05). The larger C(V) and attenuated DeltaV(0) in HLU rats could contribute to a decreased filling pressure during orthostasis and thus may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in stroke volume and cardiac output seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  6. Hypergravity suppresses bone resorption in ovariectomized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Tesshu; Kawaguchi, Amu; Okabe, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Nakamichi, Yuko; Nakamura, Midori; Uehara, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2011-04-01

    The effects of gravity on bone metabolism are unclear, and little has been reported about the effects of hypergravity on the mature skeleton. Since low gravity has been shown to decrease bone volume, we hypothesized that hypergravity increases bone volume. To clarify this hypothesis, adult female rats were ovariectomized and exposed to hypergravity (2.9G) using a centrifugation system. The rats were killed 28 days after the start of loading, and the distal femoral metaphysis of the rats was studied. Bone architecture was assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and bone mineral density was measured using peripheral quantitative CT (pQCT). Hypergravity increased the trabecular bone volume of ovariectomized rats. Histomorphometric analyses revealed that hypergravity suppressed both bone formation and resorption and increased bone volume in ovariectomized rats. Further, the cell morphology, activity, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts exposed to hypergravity were evaluated in vitro. Hypergravity inhibited actin ring formation in mature osteoclasts, which suggested that the osteoclast activity was suppressed. However, hypergravity had no effect on osteoblasts. These results suggest that hypergravity can stimulate an increase in bone volume by suppressing bone resorption in ovariectomized rats.

  7. Interpretation of male rat renal tubule tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P

    1993-01-01

    Based on an analysis of recent scientific studies, a Technical Panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Assessment Forum recently advised EPA risk assessors against using information on certain male rat renal tubule tumors to assess human risk under conditions specified in a new Forum report. Risk assessment approaches generally assume that chemicals producing tumors in laboratory animals are a potential cancer hazard to humans. For most chemicals, including classical rodent kidney carcinogens such as N-ethyl-N-hydroxyethylnitrosamine, this extrapolation remains appropriate. Some chemicals, however, induce accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g), a low molecular weight protein, in the male rat kidney. The alpha 2u-g accumulation initiates a sequence of events that appears to lead to renal tubule tumor formation. Female rats and other laboratory mammals administered the same chemicals do not accumulate low molecular weight protein in the kidney, and they do not develop renal tubule tumors. Because humans appear to be more like other laboratory animals than like the male rat, in this special situation, the male rat is not a good model for assessing human risk. The Forum report stresses the need for full scrutiny of a substantial set of data to determine when it is reasonable to presume that renal tumors in male rats are linked to a process involving alpha 2u-g accumulation and to select appropriate procedures for estimating human risks under such circumstances. PMID:7517352

  8. Oxalate metabolism in magnesium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Rattan, V; Thind, S K; Jethi, R K; Sidhu, H; Nath, R

    1993-06-01

    Male weanling rats were maintained on magnesium-deficient diet for 30 d and compared with pair-fed control rats fed magnesium-supplemented diet. Magnesium deficiency led to slow growth and finally to a significant decrease in body weight (P < 0.001) accompanied by a significant hypomagnesaemia, hypomagnesuria and hyperoxaluria (P < 0.001 in each case) in experimental rats as compared to the control rats. Magnesium deficiency altered the glyoxylate metabolism in the liver and kidney mitochondria by significantly decreasing glyoxylate oxidation (by 26 per cent in liver and 17 per cent in kidney) and activity of alpha-ketoglutarate:glyoxylate carboligase enzyme (by 35 per cent in liver and 27 per cent in kidney) in the experimental animals. A significant increase in the specific activities of glycolic acid oxidase (P < 0.001) and glycolic acid dehydrogenase (P < 0.01) and a significant decrease in alanine transaminase (P < 0.01) was also observed in magnesium-deficient rats. No change in liver and kidney lactate dehydrogenase was observed. Thus magnesium deficiency in rats leads to accumulation of glyoxylate in the tissues, a part of which is converted into oxalate, thereby promoting hyperoxaluria.

  9. Sexually Dimorphic Risk Mitigation Strategies in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pellman, Blake A.; Schuessler, Bryan P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The scientific understanding of fear and anxiety—in both normal and pathological forms—is presently limited by a predominance of studies that use male animals and Pavlovian fear conditioning-centered paradigms that restrict and assess specific behaviors (e.g., freezing) over brief sampling periods and overlook the broader contributions of the spatiotemporal context to an animal’s behavioral responses to threats. Here, we use a risky “closed economy” system, in which the need to acquire food and water and the need to avoid threats are simultaneously integrated into the lives of rats, to examine sex differences in mitigating threat risk while foraging. Rats lived for an extended period (∼2 months) in enlarged chambers that consisted of a safe, bedded nest and a risky foraging area where footshocks could be delivered unpredictably. We observed that male and female rats used different strategies for responding to the threat of footshock. Whereas male rats increased the size of meals consumed to reduce the overall time spent foraging, female rats sacrificed their metabolic needs in order to avoid shocks. Ovarian hormone fluctuations were shown to exert slight but reliable rhythmic effects on risky decision-making in gonadally intact female rats. However, this did not produce significant differences in approach–avoidance trade-offs between ovariectomized and intact female groups, suggesting that male–female sex differences are not due to the activational effects of gonadal hormones but, rather, are likely to be organized during early development. PMID:28197550

  10. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  11. Hypergravity modulates behavioral nociceptive responses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumei, Y.; Shimokawa, R.; Toda, K.; Kawauchi, Y.; Makita, K.; Terasawa, M.; Ohya, K.; Shimokawa, H.

    Hypergravity (2G) exposure elevated the nociceptive threshold (pain suppression) concomitantly with evoked neuronal activity in the hypothalamus. Young Wistar male rats were exposed to 2G by centrifugal rotation for 10 min. Before and after 2G exposure, the nociceptive threshold was measured as the withdrawal reflex by using the von Frey type needle at a total of 8 sites of each rat (nose, four quarters, upper and lower back, tail), and then rats were sacrificed. Fos expression was examined immunohistochemically in the hypothalamic slices of the 2G-treated rats. When rats were exposed to 2G hypergravity, the nociceptive threshold was significantly elevated to approximately 150 to 250% of the 1G baseline control levels in all the examination sites. The 2G hypergravity remarkably induced Fos expression in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus. The analgesic effects of 2G hypergravity were attenuated by naloxone pretreatment. Data indicate that hypergravity induces analgesic effects in rats, mediated through hypothalamic neuronal activity in the endogenous opioid system and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  12. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  13. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  14. Effects of BCL-2 over-expression on B cells in transgenic rats and rat hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Iscache, Anne-Laure; Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Pedros, Christophe; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Buelow, Roland; Anegon, Ignacio

    2011-10-01

    The rat is an important biomedical experimental model that benefited from the recent development of new transgenic and knockout techniques. With the goal to optimize rat mAb production and to analyze the impact of Bcl-2 on B-cell development, we generated bcl-2 transgenic rats. Transgenic rats showed Bcl-2 over-expression in B cells, increased B cell numbers in lymphoid organs, elevated production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and prolonged B-cell survival in vitro. Transgenic rats remained healthy, reproduced normally and did not develop autoimmunity. Fusions with bcl-2 transgenic splenocytes did not result in increased hybridoma generation. A comparison of on- and off-rates of 39 mAbs generated with bcl-2 transgenic and wild-type animals revealed no significant differences. Over-expression of Bcl-2 in hybridomas did not change cell proliferation but resulted in increased Ig production. Bcl-2 transgenic rats will be a useful tool for the generation of rat mAbs, the analysis of B cells in different pathophysiological models, such as autoimmunity, cancer or organ transplantation, and the study of rat B-cell biology.

  15. Endothelial dysfunction in cold-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Shanjun; Zhu, Jijun; van der Giet, Markus; Tepel, Martin

    2002-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can be observed in preatherosclerotic conditions. However, its pathogenetic role in hypertension is still controversial. Endothelial-dependent changes of blood pressure (BP) and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were evaluated in cold-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were exposed to cold stress for 8 weeks. Exposure to cold stress significantly increased the systolic BP in rats. The infusion of acetylcholine significantly lowered mean arterial BP in control rats by 48 +/- 2% and by 32 +/- 1% in cold-induced hypertensive rats. The acetylcholine-induced reduction of mean arterial BP was significantly attenuated in cold-induced hypertensive rats (control rats, 45 +/- 2 mm Hg; cold-induced hypertensive rats, 34 +/- 3 mm Hg; P < .05). Administration of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester for 1 week significantly increased BP in control rats, whereas no effect could be observed in cold-induced hypertensive rats. In cold-induced hypertensive rats eNOS in aortic vessels was significantly reduced compared to control rats. In this nongenetic, nonsurgical animal model of cold-induced hypertensive rats an endothelial dysfunction can be observed due to reduced eNOS.

  16. Social Structure Predicts Genital Morphology in African Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seney, Marianne L.; Kelly, Diane A.; Goldman, Bruce D.; Šumbera, Radim; Forger, Nancy G.

    2009-01-01

    Background African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) exhibit a wide range of social structures, from solitary to eusocial. We previously found a lack of sex differences in the external genitalia and morphology of the perineal muscles associated with the phallus in the eusocial naked mole-rat. This was quite surprising, as the external genitalia and perineal muscles are sexually dimorphic in all other mammals examined. We hypothesized that the lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats might be related to their unusual social structure. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genitalia and perineal muscles in three African mole-rat species: the naked mole-rat, the solitary silvery mole-rat, and the Damaraland mole-rat, a species considered to be eusocial, but with less reproductive skew than naked mole-rats. Our findings support a relationship between social structure, mating system, and sexual differentiation. Naked mole-rats lack sex differences in genitalia and perineal morphology, silvery mole-rats exhibit sex differences, and Damaraland mole-rats are intermediate. Conclusions/Significance The lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats is not an attribute of all African mole-rats, but appears to have evolved in relation to their unusual social structure and reproductive biology. PMID:19829697

  17. Rat leucocyte response to the bites of rat fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J A; Jerse, A E; Azad, A F

    1989-09-01

    The host response to bites of the oriental rat flea, Xenopyslla cheopis Rothschild, was investigated by examining rat blood leucocyte kinetics, histopathology, and the effect that the host response had upon subsequent flea feeding and longevity. Test rats were subjected to controlled exposures of fleas, and leucocyte data from test rats were compared to those of unexposed controls. Of the five leucocyte types examined, only the basophil appeared to play a role in the host blood response to flea bites. Significant increases in blood basophil levels occurred 2-3 d after exposure but subsided to control levels within a week. However, flea feeding did not produce histopathology at the flea feeding sites nor did the basophilic blood response of rats affect subsequent feeding or longevity of the fleas.

  18. Reduced T cell response in carcinogen-sensitive Donryu rats compared with carcinogen-resistant DRH rats.

    PubMed

    Mise-Omata, S; Sugiura, T; Higashi, K; Yamashita, U

    1999-12-01

    Carcinogen-resistant DRH rats were developed from carcinogen-sensitive Donryu rats, which showed a high incidence of hepatic tumors when they were exposed to 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-amino-azobenzene (3'-MeDAB4) or other aminoazo hepatocarcinogens. In order to study the mechanism of the difference of carcinogenesis, we studied the immunological competence of Donryu rats compared with that of DRH rats. Anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antibody and KLH-specific delayed hypersensitivity (DTH) responses after immunization with KLH were reduced in Donryu rats compared with DRH rats. Proliferative responses of spleen cells to KLH and nonspecific mitogens such as conconavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were significantly lower in Donryu rats than in DRH rats. Upon the cross-linking of T cell receptor (TCR) complex using anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (Mab), spleen cells from Donryu rats proliferated poorly. Two other strains of rats, SD and Wistar, exhibited high responsiveness, comparable to that of DRH rats, indicating that the responsiveness of Donryu rats was impaired. The production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) upon stimulation with Con A and the responsiveness of Con A blasts to exogenous IL-2 were also attenuated in Donryu rats. In contrast to T cell responsiveness, natural killer (NK) cell activity of spleen was increased in Donryu rats. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD4 and CD8 on T cells was decreased in Donryu rats, though the expression of other T cell markers such as CD2, CD3 and CD5 was not different. These results indicate that Donryu rats, which have been used in many years for cancer research in Japan, have impaired immunological surveillance mechanisms. This is likely to be one of the factors accounting for the high sensitivity to chemical carcinogens and the high susceptibility to transplanted tumor cells of Donryu rats.

  19. National BioResource Project-Rat and related activities.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Takizawa, Akiko; Okajima, Ryoko; Maedomari, Naoki; Kumafuji, Kenta; Tagami, Fumi; Neoda, Yuki; Otsuki, Mito; Nakanishi, Satoshi; Yamasaki, Ken-ichi; Voigt, Birger; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2009-07-01

    In order to establish a system to facilitate the systematic collection, preservation, and provision of laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) and their derivates, the National BioResource Project-Rat (NBRP-Rat) was launched in July 2002. By the end of 2008, more than 500 rat strains had been collected and preserved as live animals, embryos, or sperm. These rat resources are supplied to biomedical scientists in Japan as well as in other countries. This review article introduces NBRP-Rat and highlights the phenome project, recombinant inbred strains, BAC clone libraries, and the ENU-mutant archive, named the Kyoto University Rat Mutant Archive (KURMA). The future direction of rat resources are also discussed.

  20. Effect of simulated weightlessness on energy metabolism in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Sykes, H. A.; Crownover, J. C.; Schatte, C. L.; Simmons, J. B., II; Jordan, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Results of measurements of food uptake and body weight changes occurring in rats suspended from a harness so that the antigravity muscles were not used for locomotion are presented. The rats were tested in pairs, with both in a harness but only one suspended off its hind legs; this section lasted 7 days. A second phase of the experiment involved feeding the nonsuspended rat the same amount of food the experimental rat had consumed the previous day. All rats experienced decreased in body weight and food intake in the first stage, while in the second stage the suspended rat lost more weight. The total oxygen uptake, CO2 output, and rate of C-14O2 production were depressed in the suspended rats, then returned to normal levels once the rats were back on the ground. It is concluded that the gross metabolic processes are unaffected by simulated weightlessness.

  1. Expression of oxytocin receptor in diabetic rat penis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wang, T; Guo, S; Rao, K; Liu, J; Ye, Z

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) expressed in the rat penis and mediated the contractility of the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo, and OTR could maintain penile detumescence; however, the expression of OTR in diabetic rat penis remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression of OTR in diabetic rat penis. The experimental rats were randomly divided into control group and STZ-diabetic rats group. The expressions of mRNA and protein were examined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry respectively. Erectile function was evaluated by measuring intracavernous pressure following electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves. mRNA and protein expression of OTR significantly increased in diabetic rats group compared with the control group. Erectile function of diabetic rats group significantly decreased compared with the control group. Our data showed that the expression of OTR significantly increased in diabetic rats group and OTR may involve in the development of diabetic erectile dysfunction.

  2. High prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus in wild rats in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guan, Dawei; Su, Juan; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Li, Tian-Cheng; Ke, Chang Wen

    2013-08-30

    Serum samples from a total of 713 wild rats captured in Zhanjiang city in China from December 2011 to September 2012 were investigated for the prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) by exploring rat HEV-specific antibodies and RNA. By an ELISA based on recombinant rat HEV-like particles (HEV-LPs), 23.3% (166/713) of the rats were positive for anti-HEV IgG, and 8.3% (59/713) were positive for anti-HEV IgM. The IgG-positive rates in Rattus norvegicus, Bandicota indica, Rattus flavipectus, Rattus rattoides losea, and Rattus rattus hainanus, were 27.8% (64/230), 23.0% (40/174), 19.9% (34/171), 21.5% (26/121), and 11.8% (2/17), while the IgM-positive rates were 8.3% (19/230), 6.9% (12/174), 8.2% (14/171), 10.7% (13/121), and 5.9% (1/17), respectively. The IgG-positive rate of the rats captured in rural areas, 24.1% (84/348), was higher than that in the central area of Zhanjiang city, 15.1% (32/212). The highest IgG-positive rates, as high as 45.3% (39/86), were detected in wild rats trapped in the garbage dump. Twelve of the 59 IgM-positive serum samples were positive for HEV RNA, which was detected in all of the wild rat species except R. rattus hainanus. A phylogenetic analysis of the partial genome of rat HEV ORF1 indicated that all of the 12 HEV strains belong to rat HEV, and no other genotype HEV were detected. The rat HEV from Zhangjiang city could be classified into three separated clusters, suggesting that the infection due to rat HEV with a variety of genome entities occurs extensively among wild rats in China.

  3. The Metabolism of Tetralin in Fischer 344 Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    would die from the disease. The relevance of nephropathy observed in male rats exposed to various hydrocarbons to the occurrence of renal neoplasia in man...hydrocarbons develop dose-related nephropathies which are not observed in female rats and control rats or in the males and females of other animal...then held for long-term, post-exposure evaluation revealed tubular degeneration consistent with "old-rat nephropathy " (explained below). C. Chronic

  4. Behavioral Toxicological Studies of Pesticides in Laboratory Rats,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Behavior, *Toxicology, *Pesticides, *Rats, Symposia, Laboratory tests, Toxicity, Insecticides, Exposure( General ), Dosage, Perception, Motor reactions, Learning, Military psychology , Military medicine

  5. Nigella Sativa reverses osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis poses a significant public health issue. It is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to increased risk of fracture. There is a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. About 33% of women over 50 will experience bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Nigella Sativa (NS) has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone and joint diseases. The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of Nigella Sativa on osteoporosis produced by ovariectomy in rats. Methods Female Wistar rats aged 12–14 months were divided into three groups: sham-operated control (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized supplemented with nigella sativa (OVX-NS) orally for 12 weeks; 4 weeks before ovariectomy and 8 weeks after. After 12 weeks, plasma levels of calcium (Ca+2), phosphorous (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrates, nitric oxide surrogate, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Histological examination of the liver and the tibia was conducted. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia was also performed. Results OVX rats showed significant decrease in plasma Ca+2, accompanied by a significant increase in plasma ALP, amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, MDA, nitrates, TNF-α and IL-6. These changes were reversed by NS supplementation in OVX-NS group to be near SHAM levels. Histological examination of the tibias revealed discontinuous eroded bone trabeculae with widened bone marrow spaces in OVX rats accompanied by a significant decrease in both cortical and trabecular bone thickness compared to Sham rats. These parameters were markedly reversed in OVX-NS rats. Histological examination of the liver showed mononuclear cellular infiltration and congestion of blood vessels at the portal area in OVX rats which were not found

  6. Microdialysis of triamcinolone acetonide in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Cioli; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Webb, Alistair I; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare plasma and muscle concentrations of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in the rat by microdialysis. Microdialysis experiments were carried out at steady state in rats after an initial I.V. bolus 50 mg/kg of the phosphate ester of TA (TAP) followed by 23 mg/kg/h infusion. In vivo recovery was calculated by retrodialysis. The concentration determined at steady state in microdialysate, corrected for recovery, was 2.73 +/- 0.42 microg/mL compared to 21.9 +/- 2.3 microg/mL in plasma. The pharmacokinetics of TA in plasma was described by an open two-compartment model with a terminal half-life of 2.7 h. The clearance of TA in rats determined by compartmental analysis was 0.94 L/h/kg. The measured microdialysate levels of TA in muscle, corrected for recovery, were comparable to the predicted free drug levels in the peripheral compartment. Protein binding in rat plasma, measured by ultrafiltration, was 90.1%. The microdialysis in vivo recovery in muscle was similar to the in vitro recovery under stirred conditions. The results show the applicability of microdialysis to measure free tissue concentrations of TA in rats.

  7. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  8. Radioimmunoimaging of pneumocystis carinii infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Shane, L.B.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Lipszyc, H.; Walzer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinil pneumonia (PCP) is seen in patients with impaired immunity due to chemotherapeutic suppression or to a primary disorder, congenital or AIDS. Although radiogallium imaging has been helpful in the workup of PCP, it is non-specific. Since there is no early specific non-invasive method to diagnose PCP, the authors are developing an imaging technique using radiolabeled antibodies. Fulminant PCP was induced in rats by injecting cortisone, 20mg 2-3 times/wk for 8 wks. PC cells isolated from rat lung were injected into rabbits. The antiserum thus derived was separated and purified using Protein-A bound sepharose column with identification of IgG by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both rabbit antipneumocystis antibodies and purified IgG(Sigma) were iodinated with I-131 to a high specific activity (3-5..mu..Ci/ug) using a lactoperoxidase method. /sup 131/I-labeled specific and non-specific IgG were injected into rats with PC infection and imaged with an Anger camera. After sacrifice, I-131 activity/gram tissue (lung, liver, heart) was determined and expressed as organ ratios. An increased uptake of specific antibody in lungs of rats with PCP was demonstrated by organ counting and imaging. This increase was not seen in normal controls or rats injected with non-specific IgG. These data provide a basis for radioimmunoimaging of infectious diseases.

  9. The queer life of a lab rat.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The laboratory rat is an important, if neglected, actor in the history of sexuality. From the 1920s and 1940s, a series of reports emerged from American psychology laboratories detailing instances of spontaneous "reversals" in sexual behavior within their rat colonies. Frank Beach, then at the American Museum of Natural History, developed a model for the "nature" of sexuality that stressed that all organisms had the neurological capacity to perform behavior of either sex. Beach enrolled his emerging specialty, behavioral endocrinology, in support of Alfred Kinsey's controversial findings. Both scientists highlighted the multitude of potential sexual outlets pursued by organisms and the prevalence of nonprocreative sexual behaviors. This article draws on elements of queer theory to elucidate how the landscape of the comparative psychologist's rat colony with its organisms, apparatus, practices, and rituals served an integral function in the redefinition of sex in the 20th century. Queer theory calls into question easy proclamations about what counts as natural or normal by drawing attention to the presumed binaries that frequently govern the classification of sex. The maintenance of the colony required the careful management of sex with its obstruction devices, hypersexualized indicator animals, segregation cages, and castrated rats injected with hormones. Moreover, Beach's own writings indicate how his own domestic life became entangled with the sex lives of the rats. An irony animates this Rockefeller-funded sexology: Research funded to elucidate the mechanisms underlying heterosexuality came to question its innateness and universality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  11. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  12. Distal interstitial epididymitis in young rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Guenther; Belote, Duane A; Suttie, Andrew W; Buetow, Bernard S; Muhumuza, Luke

    2015-04-01

    A sporadic, diffuse, interstitial mixed cell epididymitis of unknown etiology was noted in the epididymal cauda and distal corpus of young control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats from 2 different suppliers were examined as part of routine toxicology studies. The incidence of this finding was 5/5 (study 1), 2/7 (study 2), and 2/7 (study 3). Although 2 of these studies partially overlapped temporally, none of the affected animals from any study was maintained concurrently with affected animals from any of the other 2 studies, and infectious causes, control article toxicity, or autoimmune processes were considered unlikely etiologies. Inflammation similar to that noted in the epididymides of these young rats was not present in other tissues and was not noted in study cohorts sacrificed at ages older than approximately 11 weeks or in rats of similar age from other concurrent studies. Similar findings were noted sporadically in historical control data, and consequently an age-related finding of unknown etiology and occurring in sporadic clusters is reported in SD rats ≤11 weeks old.

  13. Thalidomide decreases intrahepatic resistance in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Yi-Tsau; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Chau, Ga-Yang; Loong, Che-Chuan; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2009-03-13

    Increased intrahepatic resistance (IHR) within cirrhotic liver is caused by increased endotoxemia, cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), vasoconstrictor thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)), and disrupted microvasculatures. We evaluated the effects of thalidomide-related inhibition of TNF-alpha upon the hepatic microcirculation of cirrhosis in rats. Portal venous pressure (PVP), hepatic TNF-alpha, expression of thromboxane synthase (TXS), and leukocyte common antigen (LCA) were measured in bile-duct-ligated (BDL) rats receiving 1 month of thalidomide (BDL-thalido rats). Portal perfusion pressure (PPP), IHR, and hepatic TXA(2) production were measured in the isolated liver perfusion system. Intravital microscopy was used to examine hepatic microvascular disruptions. In BDL-thalido rats, PVP, PPP, IHR, hepatic TXA(2) and TNF-alpha, hydroxyproline content, expression of TXS and LCA, and LPS-induced leukocyte recruitment were significantly decreased. Conversely, hepatic microvascular density and perfused sinusoids were significantly increased. Thalidomide decreased PVP and IHR by reducing hepatic TXA(2) and improving hepatic microvascular disruptions in rats with biliary cirrhosis.

  14. Diabetic rat testes: morphological and functional alterations.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Esposito, R; Pisanti, F A; Vietri, M T; Galdieri, M

    2009-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a consequence of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the histological and molecular alterations in the testes of rats injected with streptozotocin at prepuperal (SPI rats) and adult age (SAI rats) to understand whether diabetes affects testicular tissue with different severity depending on the age in which this pathological condition starts. The testes of diabetic animals showed frequent abnormal histology, and seminiferous epithelium cytoarchitecture appeared altered as well as the occludin distribution pattern. The early occurrence of diabetes increased the percentage of animals with high number of damaged tubules. The interstitial compartment of the testes was clearly hypertrophic in several portions of the organs both in SPI and SAI rats. Interestingly, fully developed Leydig cells were present in all the treated animals although abnormally distributed. Besides the above-described damages, we found a similar decrease in plasma testosterone levels both in SPI and SAI rats. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications, and in our experimental models we found that manganese superoxide dismutase was reduced in diabetic animals. We conclude that in STZ-induced diabetes, the altered spermatogenesis, more severe in SPI animals, is possibly due to the effect of OS on Leydig cell function which could cause the testosterone decrease responsible for the alterations found in the seminiferous epithelium of diabetic animals.

  15. Left ventricular volumetric conductance catheter for rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Takaki, M; Yamaguchi, H; Tachibana, H; Suga, H

    1996-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) volume (V) is an essential parameter for assessment of the cardiac pump function. Measurement of LVV in situ by a conductance catheter method has been widely used in dogs and humans but not yet in small experimental animals such as rats. We instituted a miniaturized six-electrode conductance catheter (3-F) for rat LVV measurement and its signal processing apparatus. We compared stroke volumes (SVs) simultaneously measured with this conductance catheter introduced into the LV through the apex and an electromagnetic flow probe placed on the ascending aorta during gradual decreases in LVV by an inferior vena caval occlusion. A high and linear correlation (r = 0.982) was obtained between these differently measured by SVs pooled from six rats. In another group of three rats, LV pressure was simultaneously measured with a 3-F catheter-tip micromanometer introduced into the LV through the apex. We obtained the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume (P-V) relationship (Emax) by a gradual ascending aortic occlusion. After administration of propranolol, Emax obviously decreased with no change in volume intercept of the P-V relationship. The conductance volumetry proved to be useful in rats.

  16. Photoperiodic control of reproduction in olfactory-bulbectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R J; Zucker, I

    1981-05-01

    30-day-old male rats were (1) sham-operated or subjected to (2) removal of the olfactory bulbs, (3) olfactory bulbectomy and blinding (4) olfactory bulbectomy and pinealectomy or (5) olfactory bulbectomy, blinding and pinealectomy. Animals were exposed from 30 to 110 days of age to long-day (14 h of light per day) or short-day (8 h of light per day) photoperiods. The reproductive system of neurologically-intact rats was not affected by exposure to short days. Nor did bulbectomy affect the reproductive system of rats exposed to long days. However, bulbectomized, short-day rats had significantly lower body weights, reduced testicular and seminal vesicle weights and lower plasma testosterone levels than did bulbectomized, long-day rats. The effects of short-day exposure on bulbectomized rats were prevented by pinealectomy. Short-day exposure and blinding exerted similar effects in bulbectomized rats. The testes of rats from all groups contained elongated spermatids; blinding and short-day treatment had no effect on spermatogenesis. Neither mating behavior nor the number of young sired was influenced by photoperiod in bulbectomized or intact rats. Removal of the olfactory bulbs unmasks photoperiodic responsiveness in rats; the antigonadal effects of short-day exposure are mediated by the pineal gland in bulbectomized rats as in species traditionally designated photoperiodic. The mechanisms by which bulbectomy renders rats responsive to short days are considered.

  17. On the rat model of human osteopenias and osteoporoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Harold M.; Jee, Webster S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea that rats cannot model human osteopenias errs. The same mechanisms control gains in bone mass (longitudinal bone growth and modeling drifts) and losses (BMU-based remodeling), in young and aged rats and humans. Furthermore, they respond similarly in rats and man to mechanical influences, hormones, drugs and other agents.

  18. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  19. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  20. Chronotoxicity of nedaplatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yimin; Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Kawai, Yoshiko; Sudoh, Toshiaki; Gemba, Munekazu; Fujimura, Akio

    2004-07-01

    Chronotoxicologic profiles of nedaplatin, a platinum compound, were evaluated in rats maintained under a 12 light/12 dark cycle with light from 07:00h to 19:00 h. Nedaplatin (5 mg/kg) was injected intravenously, once a week for 5 weeks at 08:00h or 20:00h. The suppression of body weight gain and reduction of creatinine clearance were significantly greater with the 20:00h than 08:00h treatment. Accumulation of nedaplatin in the renal cortex and bone marrow were also greater with 20:00 h treatment. There were significant relationships between the nedaplatin content in the kidney and bone marrow and degree of injury to each. These results suggest that the nedaplatin-induced toxicity depends on its dosing-time, and it is greater with treatment at 20:00 h, during the active phase. The dosing-time dependency in the accumulation of nedaplatin in the tissue of the organs might be involved in this chronotoxicologic phenomenon.

  1. Establishment of rat embryonic stem cells and making of chimera rats.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shinobu; Kawamata, Masaki; Teratani, Takumi; Shimizu, Taku; Tamai, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Hiromasa; Hayashi, Katsuyuki; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2008-07-30

    The rat is a reference animal model for physiological studies and for the analysis of multigenic human diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, neurological disorders, and cancer. The rats have long been used in extensive chemical carcinogenesis studies. Thus, the rat embryonic stem (rES) cell is an important resource for the study of disease models. Attempts to derive ES cells from various mammals, including the rat, have not succeeded. Here we have established two independent rES cells from Wister rat blastocysts that have undifferentiated characters such as Nanog and Oct3/4 genes expression and they have stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA) -1, -3, -4, and TRA-1-81 expression. The cells were successfully cultured in an undifferentiated state and can be possible over 18 passages with maintaining more than 40% of normal karyotype. Their pluripotent potential was confirmed by the differentiation into derivatives of the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Most importantly, the rES cells are capable of producing chimera rats. Therefore, we established pluripotent rES cell lines that are widely used to produce genetically modified experimental rats for study of human diseases.

  2. Origins of albino and hooded rats: implications from molecular genetic analysis across modern laboratory rat strains.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Nakanishi, Satoshi; Ochiai, Masako; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Voigt, Birger; Serikawa, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    Albino and hooded (or piebald) rats are one of the most frequently used laboratory animals for the past 150 years. Despite this fact, the origin of the albino mutation as well as the genetic basis of the hooded phenotype remained unclear. Recently, the albino mutation has been identified as the Arg299His missense mutation in the Tyrosinase gene and the hooded (H) locus has been mapped to the ∼460-kb region in which only the Kit gene exists. Here, we surveyed 172 laboratory rat strains for the albino mutation and the hooded (h) mutation that we identified by positional cloning approach to investigate possible genetic roots and relationships of albino and hooded rats. All of 117 existing laboratory albino rats shared the same albino missense mutation, indicating they had only one single ancestor. Genetic fine mapping followed by de novo sequencing of BAC inserts covering the H locus revealed that an endogenous retrovirus (ERV) element was inserted into the first intron of the Kit gene where the hooded allele maps. A solitary long terminal repeat (LTR) was found at the same position to the ERV insertion in another allele of the H locus, which causes the so called Irish (h(i)) phenotype. The ERV and the solitary LTR insertions were completely associated with the hooded and Irish coat patterns, respectively, across all colored rat strains examined. Interestingly, all 117 albino rat strains shared the ERV insertion without any exception, which strongly suggests that the albino mutation had originally occurred in hooded rats.

  3. Benzimidazole derivatives with atypical antiinflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Lazer, E S; Matteo, M R; Possanza, G J

    1987-04-01

    A number of substituted 2-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)sulfonyl]-1H-benzimidazoles (4) have demonstrated antiinflammatory activity that appears to have a mechanism distinct from typical cyclooxygenase inhibiting nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Several of these compounds inhibit adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats at 25 mg/kg while showing no activity in the carrageenan paw edema model at up to 100 mg/kg. Two compounds, 4a and 4b, showed no significant inhibition of cyclooxygenase in vitro at concentrations as high as 5 X 10(-5) M. All compounds 4 active in adjuvant-induced arthritis were also found to inhibit release of lysosomal enzymes from neutrophils, raising the possibility that their antiinflammatory effect is at least partially mediated by an effect on neutrophil function.

  4. Neighborhood Sanitation: Rat Complaints and Rat Control on the Near West Side, Newark, New Jersey and North Hill, Akron, Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margulis, Harry L.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses suggest that monthly rate of change in rat complaints is best explained by procedures which increase agency visibility, time-dependent cycles dictated by agency operation and intervention, and dynamics of a rat population. Effective rat control occurs when blocks are environmentally improved and annual cycle links weakened. (Author/MA)

  5. Opportunity Leaves a Trail of 'Rat' Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool, known informally as the 'Rat,' has nibbled seven holes into the slope of 'Endurance Crater.' This image from the rover's navigation camera was released previously (PIA06716) without the Rat holes labeled so that viewers could try to find the holes themselves. Here, the holes have been identified. Starting from the uppermost pictured (closest to the crater rim) to the lowest, the Rat hole targets are: 'Tennessee,' 'Cobblehill,' 'Virginia,' 'London,' 'Grindstone,' 'Kettlestone,' and 'Drammensfjorden.' These holes were drilled on sols 138 (June 13, 2004), 143 (June 18), 145 (June 20), 148 (June 23), 151 (June 26), 153 (June 28) and 161 (July 7), respectively. Each hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

  6. Placentophagia in Weanling Female Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kaitlyn M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Placentophagia is common in parturient mammals and offers physiological and behavioral advantages for mothers. In natural environments, weanlings are often present during the birth of younger siblings, but it is unknown if weanling rats are placentophagic or prefer placenta over other substances. To examine this, primiparous rats were remated during the postpartum estrus and weanling females remained in the nest during their mother’s next parturition. Continuous observation revealed that 58% of weanlings were placentophagic. To determine if this placentophagia occurs away from parturient mothers, weanling females still living in their natal nest were offered placenta, liver, or cake frosting in a novel chamber. They ingested more placenta and liver than frosting. Thus, many weanling female laboratory rats are placentophagic during birth of younger siblings but do not selectively prefer placenta when tested outside their natal nest. Consequences of placentophagia by weanlings are unknown, but it may promote their alloparenting or postpartum mothering. PMID:24604548

  7. Circadian rhythms of pineal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Binkley, S A

    1983-01-01

    In pineal glands melatonin is synthesized daily. Melatonin synthesis in rats kept in most light-dark cycles occurs during the subjective night. This rhythm, which persists in constant dark, is a circadian rhythm which may be a consequence of another circadian rhythm in the pineal gland, of N-acetyltransferase activity (NAT). The NAT rhythm has been studied extensively in rats as a possible component of the system timing circadian rhythms. The NAT rhythm is driven by neural signals transmitted to the pineal gland by the sympathetic nervous system. Environmental lighting exerts precise control over the timing of the NAT rhythm. In rats, there is enough data to describe a daily time course of events in the pineal gland and to describe a pineal "life history." Hypothetical schemes for generation of the NAT rhythm and for its control by light are presented.

  8. Promotion of rat hepatocarcinogenesis by praziquantel.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Joong, K D; Hakoi, K; Thamavit, W; Pairojkul, C; Hoshiya, T; Hasegawa, R; Ito, N

    1991-10-01

    Praziquantel, the widely used anti-helminthic agent, was investigated for hepatocarcinogenesis-promoting potential using a medium-term liver bioassay system for carcinogens. F344 male rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 200 mg/kg) and then starting 2 weeks later, received praziquantel in the diet at concentrations of 1.5 or 0.5%, or intragastrically at a dose of 1,500 mg/kg once a week for 6 weeks. Control groups received DEN or praziquantel alone. All rats were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy at week 3 and killed at week 8. Development of glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci in the liver was significantly increased in terms of both number and area with the 1.5% dose, while only area was affected by the 0.5% dose. The results thus indicate that praziquantel at high dose has promoting potential in rat hepatocytic tumorigenesis.

  9. Toxicological studies on tienilic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Oker-Blom, C; Mäkinen, J; Gothoni, G

    1980-07-01

    The subacute oral toxicity of tienilic acid in male and female Sprague--Dawley rats has been studied. Animals were given tienilic acid 0, 30, 120 and 480 mg/kg body weight as a 3% gum arabic suspension for 28 days. At 30 mg tienilic acid blood pressure and serum uric acid decreased. At the two higher dose-levels a slight decrease in hemoglobin and an increase in S-GPT was noticed and there was a significant increase in the liver weight and serum magnesium concentration of male rats, while the liver weight of female rats increased only slightly. On microscopic examination, unicellular necrosis of small groups of liver cells was noted, together with focal round-cell infiltration and some stasis of the two higher dose-levels in some animals. Tienilic acid had no noticeable effects on other organs or parameters.

  10. Body temperature regulation and thermoneutrality in rats.

    PubMed

    Poole, S; Stephenson, J D

    1977-04-01

    Various concepts of thermoneutrality were considered for a proposed study of the role of hypothalamic amines in temperature regulation of rats. The classic definition, the ambient temperature over which metabolic rate is minimum and constant, gave a range of approximately 28 to 32 degrees C. However, within this temperature range rats were inactive, the inactivity apparently representing a behavioural response to heat stress and itself responsible for the reduced metabolic rate; certain thermoregulatory effectors were also activated to increase heat loss. Therefore an alternative range, 18.0 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.D.) to 28.1 +/- 1.0 degrees C, was defined in which rats displayed normal activity, behavioural thermoregulations being absent.

  11. Immunologically induced peliosis hepatis in rats.

    PubMed

    Husztik, E; Lázár, G; Szabó, E

    1984-06-01

    Peliosis hepatis has been induced immunologically with anti-rat glomerular basal membrane rabbit serum in rats pre-sensitized with a rare earth metal complex, neodymium pyrocatechin disulphonate (NPD). This is the first experimental evidence that peliosis hepatis may develop as a result of an immunological process. It is noteworthy that in this experimental form of peliosis hepatis and in that observed earlier in rats treated with basic polyglutamic acid derivatives, severe defibrination was detected and, as in most human cases, not only the liver but other organs were also involved in the peliotic lesions. Since the rare earth metal compounds, among them the pyrocatechin disulphonate complex of neodymium, depress the reticulo-endothelial activity, a role of the reticulo-endothelial system in the pathogenesis of this experimental form of peliosis hepatis is suggested.

  12. Weight control and restraint of laboratory rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Van Breda Kolff, K.

    1979-01-01

    The use of restrained and confined rats in some procedures used in combustion toxicology introduces the problems of obtaining rats of the appropriate size for the apparatus, and of identifying any artifacts resulting from the use of restraint alone. Feeding studies indicate that controlled feeding of fast-growing strains such as the Sprague-Dawley can hold rat size essentially constant for significant periods of time. The undesirable aspects are the need to cage the animals individually, with resultant psychological as well as metabolic effects. Restraint studies of slow-growing strains such as the Fischer 344 indicate that denying access to food and water for periods of several hours at a time interrupts normal gain only temporarily.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 (a polyherbal unani formulation) in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Kumar, Rohit; Jain, Hitesh; Gupta, Y. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: UNIM-301 is a polyherbal formulation used in the Unani system of medicine for the treatment of joint pain and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 in carrageenan-induced paw edema and complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema and CFA induced animal arthritis models, respectively, in doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg body weight. Anti-inflammatory activity of UNIM-301 was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model using a digital plethysmometer. Anti-arthritic activity was evaluated using CFA induced arthritis, and joint sizes were measured at regular intervals using a micrometer screw gauge. Serum was collected and subjected to estimation of pro-inflammatory cytokine. Indomethacin 3 mg/kg body weight) was used as a standard drug in both the models. The acute and chronic toxicity study was carried out to evaluate the safety of the test drug. Results: UNIM-301 treatment produced a dose-dependent reduction in paw edema and paw thickness in carrageenan-induced paw edema and CFA-induced arthritis, respectively, as compared to control. UNIM 301 also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediator in a dose-dependent manner as compared to control. Conclusion: The result of the present study suggests that anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of UNIM-301, which might be accredited to inhibitory activity on pro-inflammatory cytokines to its various individual constituents. PMID:25829793

  14. Acclimation to decompression sickness in rats.

    PubMed

    Montcalm-Smith, E A; McCarron, R M; Porter, W R; Lillo, R S; Thomas, J T; Auker, C R

    2010-03-01

    Protection against decompression sickness (DCS) by acclimation to hyperbaric decompression has been hypothesized but never proven. We exposed rats to acclimation dives followed by a stressful "test" dive to determine whether acclimation occurred. Experiments were divided into two phases. Phase 1 rats were exposed to daily acclimation dives of hyperbaric air for 30 min followed by rapid decompression on one of the following regimens: 70 ft of seawater (fsw) for 9 days (L70), 70 fsw for 4 days (S70), 40 fsw for 9 days (L40), 40 fsw for 4 days (S40), or unpressurized sham exposure for 9 days (Control). On the day following the last exposure, all were subjected to a "test" dive (175 fsw, 60 min, rapid decompression). Both L70 and S70 rats had significantly lower incidences of DCS than Control rats (36% and 41% vs. 62%, respectively). DCS incidences for the other regimens were lower than in Control rats but without statistical significance. Phase 2 used the most protective regimen from phase 1 (L70); rats were exposed to L70 or a similar regimen with a less stressful staged decompression. Another group was exposed to a single acclimation dive (70 fsw/30 min) on the day before the test dive. We observed a nonsignificant trend for the rapidly decompressed L70 dives to be more protective than staged decompression dives (44% vs. 51% DCS incidence). The single acclimation dive regimen did not provide protection. We conclude that protection against DCS can be attained with acclimating exposures that do not themselves cause DCS. The deeper acclimation dive regimens (70 fsw) provided the most protection.

  15. Pinealectomy aggravates acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Szklarczyk, Joanna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Jaworek, Andrzej K; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, a pineal indoleamine, protects the pancreas against acute damage; however, the involvement of the pineal gland in the pancreatoprotective action of melatonin is unknown. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of pinealectomy on the course of acute caerulein-induced pancreatitis (AP) in rats. AP was induced by a subcutaneous infusion of caerulein (25 μg/kg) into pinealectomized or sham-operated animals. Melatonin (5 or 25 mg/kg) was given via intraperitoneal (ip) injection 30 min prior to the induction of AP. The pancreatic content of the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal (MDA + 4HNE) and the activity of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), were measured in each group of rats. Melatonin blood levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). In the sham-operated rats, AP was confirmed with histological examination and manifested as pancreatic edema and an increase in the blood lipase level (by 1,500%). In addition, the pancreatic content of MDA+ 4HNE was increased by 200%, and pancreatic glutathione peroxydase (GSH-Px) activity was reduced by 40%. Pinealectomy significantly aggravated the histological manifestations of AP, reduced the GSH-Px activity and markedly augmented the levels of MDA+ 4HNE in the pancreas of rats with or without AP as compared to sham-operated animals. Melatonin was undetectable in the blood of the pinealectomized rats with or without AP. Treatment with melatonin (25 mg/kg, ip) prevented the development of AP in the sham-operated rats and significantly reduced pancreatic inflammation in the animals previously subjected to pinealectomy. In conclusion, pineal melatonin contributes to the pancreatic protection through the activation of the antioxidative defense mechanism in pancreatic tissue as well as its direct antioxidant effects.

  16. [Berberine inhibits cardiac fibrosis of diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Shen, Yongjie; He, Jinfeng; Liu, Guoling; Song, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Objective To explore the effect of berberine on cardiac fibrosis of diabetic rats by observing the expressions of serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) , collagen type 1 (Col1) and collagen type 3 (Col3) in myocardial tissues of diabetic rats after berberine treatment. Methods The diabetic model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptococci (STZ). Forty-three diabetic rats were randomly divided into diabetic model group (n=9), berberine treated groups of different doses [50, 100, 150 mg/(kg.d), gavage administration for 12 weeks; n=9, 9, 8 respectively], and metformin group as positive control (n=8); other 8 normal rats served as a negative control group. After the last administration, fasting blood glucose, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were measured; rats' heart were taken to calculate the heart mass index (HMI); ELISA was used to detect the serum levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF; collagenous fibers in cardiac tissues were tested by Masson staining; collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by image analysis; Col1 and Col3 in cardiac tissues were determined by Western blotting. Results Compared with the normal control group, the fasting blood glucose, LVSP, LVEDP absolute value, HMI, the degree of cardiac fibrosis, the expressions of TGF-β1, CTGF, Col1 and Col3 significantly increased in the model group. All indexes mentioned above were reduced obviously in berberine treated groups of 100 and 150 mg/(kg.d). Conclusion Berberine improves cardiac fibrosis in diabetic rats through down-regulating the expressions of TGF-β1 and CTGF and reducing the synthesis and deposition of Col1 and Col3.

  17. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Disturbed patterns of behaviour in morphine tolerant and abstinent rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R.; Mitchell, E.; Stolerman, I. P.

    1971-01-01

    1. Eating, drinking and spontaneous motor activity were studied in rats receiving large daily doses of morphine. These forms of behaviour were largely suppressed when the rats were made abstinent and were restored when morphine was given again. 2. Compensation for depressions of behaviour during abstinence did not seem sufficient to account for all the stimulant effects of morphine in tolerant rats. Morphine also had slight stimulant actions in non-tolerant rats. 3. In tolerant rats, the repeated pairing of the effects of morphine with the re-emergence of behaviour such as eating and drinking may intensify the rewarding value of the drug. PMID:5105387

  19. Fenbendazole treatment and litter size in rats.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Nancy A; Bieszczak, Jeremiah R; Verhulst, Steven; Disney, Kimberly E; Montgomery, Kyle E; Toth, Linda A

    2006-11-01

    Fenbendazole is commonly used in laboratory animal medicine as an anthelmintic for elimination of pinworms. It is generally regarded as a safe drug with minimal side effects. In our facility, 2 breeding colonies of rats were treated with fenbendazole to eliminate pinworms. Analysis of the breeding records revealed that feeding Sprague-Dawley rats a diet containing fenbendazole on a continuous basis for 7 consecutive weeks was associated with a significant reduction in litter size. Although the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown, the finding prompts caution when using fenbendazole to treat valuable breeding colonies or strains that are poor breeders.

  20. Glycoconjugate in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kano, K; Ube, M; Taniguchi, K

    2001-05-01

    The taste buds of the fungiform papillae, circumvallate papilla, foliate papillae, soft palate and epiglottis of the rat oral cavity were examined by lectin histochemistry to elucidate the relationships between expression of glycoconjugates and innervation. Seven out of 21 lectins showed moderate to intense staining in at least more than one taste bud. They were succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA). Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). UEA-I and BSL-I showed moderate to intense staining in all of the taste buds examined. They strongly stained the taste buds of the epiglottis, which are innervated by the cranial nerve X. UEA-I intensely stained the taste buds of the fungiform papillae and soft palate, both of which are innervated by the cranial nerve VII. The taste buds of circumvallate papilla and foliate papillae were innervated by the cranial nerve IX and strongly stained by BSL-I. Thus, UEA-I and BSL-I binding glycoconjugates, probably alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose, respectively, might be specific for taste buds. Although the expression of these glycoconjugates would be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve X, the differential expression of alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose might be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve VII and IX, respectively.

  1. Rat hepatitis E virus: geographical clustering within Germany and serological detection in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Johne, Reimar; Dremsek, Paul; Kindler, Eveline; Schielke, Anika; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Gregersen, Henrike; Wessels, Ute; Schmidt, Katja; Rietschel, Wolfram; Groschup, Martin H; Guenther, Sebastian; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2012-07-01

    Zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialised countries is thought to be caused by transmission from wild boar, domestic pig and deer as reservoir hosts. The detection of HEV-specific antibodies in rats and other rodents has suggested that these animals may represent an additional source for HEV transmission to human. Recently, a novel HEV (ratHEV) was detected in Norway rats from Hamburg, Germany, showing the typical genome organisation but a high nucleotide and amino acid sequence divergence to other mammalian and to avian HEV strains. Here we describe the multiple detection of ratHEV RNA and HEV-specific antibodies in Norway rats from additional cities in north-east and south-west Germany. The complete genome analysis of two novel strains from Berlin and Stuttgart confirmed the association of ratHEV to Norway rats. The present data indicated a continuing existence of this virus in the rat populations from Berlin and Hamburg. The phylogenetic analysis of a short segment of the open reading frame 1 confirmed a geographical clustering of the corresponding sequences. Serological investigations using recombinant ratHEV and genotype 3 capsid protein derivatives demonstrated antigenic differences which might be caused by the high amino acid sequence divergence in the immunodominant region. The high amount of animals showing exclusively ratHEV RNA or anti-ratHEV antibodies suggested a non-persistent infection in the Norway rat. Future studies have to prove the transmission routes of the virus in rat populations and its zoonotic potential. The recombinant ratHEV antigen generated here will allow future seroepidemiological studies to differentiate ratHEV and genotype 3 infections in humans and animals.

  2. Cecal infusion of nutrients improves nutritional status of rats.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, E; Raina, N; Allard, J P

    1995-11-01

    The role of colonic fermentation in providing energy was investigated in rats with small bowel transection (T) or 80% resection (SBR). Rats were randomized to receive for 12 d either saline (S) or the enteral solution (E) through a cecostomy to meet 30% of energy requirement; the rest (70%) was provided by parenteral nutrition. Although SBR-S rats lost weight significantly compared with d 1 of the study, SBR-E rats gained. Significantly greater carcass wet weight and fat were found in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. SBR-E and T-E rats had significantly greater colonic mucosal dry weight and protein compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. Cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) contents were also significantly higher in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. There was no significant effect of surgery (T vs. SBR) on any of the variables studied. These results suggest that the products of fermentation of an enteral solution infused through a cecostomy contribute substantially to energy requirement, maintenance of body composition and nutritional status of rats.

  3. Renal Function and Hemodynamic Study in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kwang; Kang, Sung Kyew

    1995-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the renal function and hemodynamic changes in obesity and hyperinsulinemia which are characteristics of type II diabetes. Methods Studies were carried out in two groups of female Zucker rats. Group 1 rats were obese Zucker rats with hereditary insulin resistance. Group 2 rats were lean Zucker rats and served as controls. In comparison with lean Zucker rats, obese Zucker rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia but normoglycemia. Micropuncture studies and morphologic studies were performed in these rats. Results Functional studies showed that obese Zucker rats exhibited increases in kidney weight and GFR(obese Zucker, 1.23±.07)ml/min; lean Zucker, 0.93±.03ml/min). Micropuncture studies revealed that the increase in GFR in obese Zucker rats was attributable to the increases in the single nephron plasma flow rate and glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure. The glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient was the same in both groups. Morphologic studies revealed that the increase in GFR in obese Zucker rats was associated with an increase in glomerular volume. Conclusions These results suggest that obesity and hyperinsulinemia, which are the characteristics of type II diabetes, can be associated with glomerular hyperfiltration and glomerular capillary hypertension. PMID:7626557

  4. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Tian, Tian; Xiao, Bo; Li, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The current work examines the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology to provide an experimental basis for radiation protection. Electromagnetic radiation was generated by a Helmholtz coil constructed from copper wire. There were six rats altogether: three rats in the experimental group, and three rats in the control group. The rats in the experimental group were continuously exposed to radiation for 10 hours every day, and rats in the control group remained in a normal environment. After 30 days, the characteristics of hemorheology of the two groups were compared. The average plasma viscosity, whole blood high shear velocity, and whole blood low shear viscosity were lower in rats in the experimental group than in rats in the control group, while the whole blood shear viscosity was higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Results suggest that long term exposure to electromagnetic radiation does have certain impacts on the cardiovascular system, deeming it necessary to take preventative measures.

  5. Core temperature of tailless rats exposed to centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1984-01-01

    The role of the tail in the altered thermoregulation of rats during acute exposure to hypergravity was investigated, using groups of rats of two ages: 55 days (young) and 138 days (old). Rectal and foot temperature changes were measured in intact and tailless rats subjected to 1 h centrifugation of 2.8 G, with preceding (1 h) and following (1-3 h) 1 G periods. At 22 C, the loss of body heat from the tail per se does not measurably contribute to the hypothermia induced by hypergravity. However, the heat loss from the feet was greater in the tailless rats than in the intact rats from the young group of animals, although there was no significant difference between the tailless and intact rats in the old animal group.