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Sample records for adjuvant-induced arthritis aa

  1. Mechanism of Xinfeng Capsule on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Analysis of Urinary Metabolomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-juan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the potential effects of Xinfeng capsule (XFC) on urine metabolic profiling in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS). GC-TOF/MS technology was combined with multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). These methods were used to distinguish the healthy group, untreated group, and XFC treated group and elucidate potential biomarkers. Nine potential biomarkers such as hippuric acid, adenine, and L-dopa were identified as potential biomarkers, indicating that purine metabolism, fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and energy metabolism were disturbed in AA rats. This study demonstrated that XFC is efficacious for RA and explained its potential metabolomics mechanism. PMID:26989506

  2. Effective treatment of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis by celastrol

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, R.; Vidal, B.; Raquel, H.; Neves-Costa, A.; Figueiredo, N.; Gupta, V.; Fonseca, J.E.; Moita, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported an increase in interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-17 levels, and a continuous activation of caspase-1 in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These results suggest that drugs targeting IL-1β regulatory pathways, in addition to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), may constitute promising therapeutic agents in early RA. We have recently used a THP-1 macrophage-like cell line to screen 2320 compounds for those that down-regulate both IL-1β and TNF secretion. Celastrol was one of the most promising therapeutic candidates identified in that study. Our main goal in the present work was to investigate whether administration of celastrol is able to attenuate inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Moreover, since IL-1β is known to play a role in the polarization of Th17 cells, we also investigate whether administration of digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Th17 cells polarization, is able to attenuate inflammation in the same rat model. We found that celastrol administration significantly suppressed joint inflammation. The histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that celastrol-treated rats had a normal joint structure with complete abrogation of the inflammatory infiltrate and cellular proliferation. In contrast, we observed that digoxin administration significantly ameliorated inflammation but only if administrated in the early phase of disease course (after 4 days of disease induction), and it was not efficient at inhibiting the infiltration of immune cells within the joint and in preventing damage. Thus, our results suggest that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties and can constitute a potential anti-inflammatory drug with therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as RA. Furthermore, we find that early inhibition of Th17 cells polarization ameliorates arthritis but it is not as effective as celastrol. PMID:22415021

  3. Effects of relaxin in a model of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Santora, Karen; Rasa, Cordelia; Visco, Denise; Steinetz, Bernard; Bagnell, Carol

    2005-05-01

    A reduction in the incidence and severity of rheumatoid arthritis is seen in pregnant women. Relaxin, a hormone of pregnancy, has been implicated in decreased immune responsiveness. Consequently, the effects of relaxin and estradiol valerate, alone or in combination, were assessed in the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat. Combination hormone therapy reduced adjuvant-induced paw inflammation. Radiographic analysis of the tarsal joints showed that estradiol valerate plus relaxin treatment minimized soft tissue damage and bone changes when compared to vehicle-treated arthritic controls. These results indicate that relaxin may be a factor in reducing inflammation during pregnancy.

  4. Esculetin reduces leukotriene B4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gąsińska, Emilia; Gajewski, Michał; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Maśliński, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) is a natural coumarin with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity. It acts as a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenases (5-LOX and 12-LOX) and decreases the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9). Because both inhibition of lipoxygenases and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases are effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated whether esculetin may be effective in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Material and methods The study was performed on male Lewis rats, in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Rats were divided into two groups: control (treated with 1% methylcellulose) and experimental (treated with esculetin – 10 mg/kg ip.). The tested compound was administered for 5 consecutive days starting on the 21st day after induction of arthritis. Each group consisted of 7 animals. After 5 days of treatment, rats were anesthetized. The concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in plasma was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results The LTB4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis is increased in comparison to rats without inflammation (362 ±34 vs. 274 ±15 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively). Five-day treatment with esculetin in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats decreases the LTB4 level to a level comparable with rats without inflammation (284 ±23 pg/ml, p < 0.01). Conclusions LTB4 is the most potent chemotactic agent influencing neutrophil migration into the joint. It is known that its level in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis is increased and correlates with disease severity. Some other lipoxygenase inhibitors have already been tested as potential drug candidates in clinical and preclinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (Zileuton, PF-4191834). Because esculetin decreases the LTB4 level in plasma of rats in adjuvant-induced arthritis, it may also be considered as an attractive drug candidate for

  5. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  6. Inhibitory properties of triethylphosphine goldlupinylsulfide in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghia, M; Mattioli, F; Novelli, F; Minganti, V

    1995-09-01

    A new gold coordination compound (triethylphosphine goldlupinylsulfide: TP-Au-LS) was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat, by oral administration at doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day of gold for 17 consecutive days, in comparison with auranofin and betamethasone. TP-Au-LS produced a dose dependent reduction of both the injected and uninjected hind paw volume. Gold levels in serum (measured on day 18 by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry) were also found to be dose related. At the dose of 10 mg/kg, TP-Au-LS and auranofin induced superimposable reductions of the injected paw volume; however the first drug produced higher serum gold concentrations than those achieved with the latter.

  7. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  8. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Co-administration of water containing magnesium ion prevents loxoprofen-induced lesions in gastric mucosa of adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Takeda, Atsushi; Itanami, Yuri; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) comprise one of the most frequently used classes of medicines in the world; however, NSAIDs have significant side effects, such as gastroenteropathy, and rheumatoid arthritis patients taking NSAIDs are more susceptible to NSAID-induced gastric lesions as compared to patients with other diseases. In Asian countries, loxoprofen has been used clinically for many years as a standard NSAID. We demonstrate the preventive effect of the co-administration of water containing magnesium ion (magnesium water, 1-200 µg/kg) on the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats. Oral administration of loxoprofen (100 mg/kg) caused hemorrhagic lesions in the gastric mucosa of AA rats 14 d after adjuvant injection, and, following loxoprofen administration, the lesion score of AA rats was significantly higher than that of normal rats. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and nitric oxide (NO) production in the gastric mucosa of AA rats were also increased by the administration of loxoprofen, and the increase in lesions and NO were prevented by the administration of aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor. The co-administration of magnesium water decreased the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen in AA rats. In addition, the co-administration of magnesium water attenuated the increase in iNOS mRNA expression and NO production in AA rats receiving loxoprofen. These results suggest that the oral co-administration of magnesium water to AA rats has a potent preventive effect on the ulcerogenic response to loxoprofen, probably by inhibiting the rise in iNOS and NO levels in the gastric mucosa.

  10. Antioxidant and Angiostatic Effect of Spirulina platensis Suspension in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eman A. I.; Barakat, Bassant M.; Hassan, Ranya

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many degenerative diseases, mainly rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and curative properties and is also competent of acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and recently anti-angiogenic agent. In the present study, the antioxidant and the immunomodulatory effect of Spirulina platensis as well as its anti-angiogenic effect against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat model were tested. Results We found that the development of arthritis was concealed; moreover it successfully inhibited the development of macroscopic as well as microscopic and histopathological lesions in AIA rats when compared to control. Spirulina treated group showed a higher survival rate and moreover, it reduced the clinical score of RA in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Spirulina decreased serum levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, TBARS, VEGF and increased serum levels of GSH compared to the RA non-treated group. Conclusions The present study concluded that Spirulina is able to restrain the changes produced through adjuvant-induced arthritis. The suppressing effect of Spirulina could be attributed, at least in part, to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:25853428

  11. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  12. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  14. Ameliorative effect of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary phenol, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, Samuel Joshua; Murunikkara, Vachana; Sabina, Evan Prince; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2013-02-01

    p-Coumaric acid (3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoic acid), a common dietary polyphenol, is widely distributed in cereals, fruits and vegetables with antioxidant property. Numerous studies have enlightened the ability of dietary phenols to be considered as potential therapeutics against arthritis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the ameliorative effect of plant phenolic p-coumaric acid on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The reference drug indomethacin was used for comparison purposes. Arthritis was induced in rats by a single intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the foot pad of right hind paw. p-Coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b wt) and indomethacin (3 mg/kg b wt) were administered intraperitoneally for 8 days from day 11 to 18 after adjuvant injection. An increase in the activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes, tissue marker enzymes, glycoproteins and paw thickness was observed in the arthritic rats, on the contrary, the body weight was found to be reduced in arthritic rats when compared to normal control rats. Administration of p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b wt) to the arthritic rats reverted back the altered physical and biochemical parameters to near normal levels comparable to indomethacin treatment. Histopathological evaluation of ankle joints in arthritic rats also revealed the anti-inflammatory effect of p-coumaric acid by the reduction in leukocytes infiltration. Thus, the present study clearly demonstrates the anti-inflammatory potential of the p-coumaric acid against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

  15. Green tea extract improves the oxidative state of the liver and brain in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Gonçalves, Geferson; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the possible effects of the administration of a green tea extract on the oxidative state of the liver and brain of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, a model for human rheumatoid arthritis. Daily doses of 250 mg kg(-1) (59.8 mg catechins per kg) for 23 days were administered. This treatment produced significant diminutions in protein and lipid damage in liver, brain and plasma. It also diminished the tissue ROS contents and increased the antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The antioxidant defenses, which are diminished by arthritis, were improved by the green tea treatment, as revealed by the restoration of the GSH and protein thiol levels and by the strong tendency for normalizing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes. The activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is increased by arthritis in the liver, was also almost normalized by the treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that green tea consumption is possibly beneficial for the liver and brain of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis because it attenuates the pronounced oxidative stress that accompanies the disease and, thus, diminishes the injury to lipids and proteins in both liver and brain. There are also indications that, in the liver, the green tea can contribute to normalize the metabolic functions that are substantially modified by arthritis. For example, the green tea normalized the activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme of an important metabolic route (pentose monophosphate pathway). It is expected that the green tea treatment is equally able to normalize the activity of other enzymes (e.g., glucokinase and glucose 6-phosphatase), a hypothesis to be tested by future work.

  16. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  17. Effect of ethanol extract of Trigonella foenum graecum (Fenugreek) seeds on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P; Kavitha, Ch N; Babu, S Manohar; Reddy, V Prabhakar; Latha, A Kanaka

    2012-08-01

    Trigonella foenum graecum is an Iranian medicinal plant used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial outcome of the plant T. foenum graecum on adjuvant-induced arthritis in albino rats. Ethanol extract of T. foenum graecum was tested against Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. In the present study, paw volume was measured on the 4th, 8th, 14th and 21st day. On day 22, animals were anaesthetized, and blood samples were collected for the estimation of haemoglobin, white blood cells (WBC), differential white blood cells, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), red blood cells (RBC), interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The animals were sacrificed, and the cartilage tissue was isolated for estimation of lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH). Administration with both doses of T. foenum graecum (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the paw oedema and restored body weight. T. foenum graecum significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the differential WBC count, ESR and WBC (5.833 ± 0.703, 6.989 ± 58.5) content and also showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in RBC and Hb (4.783 ± 0.46, 15.46 ± 0.158) content. T. foenum graecum significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α levels. It also significantly decreased the levels of LPO and increased the SOD and GSH levels in cartilage tissue. In this study, T. foenum graecum 400-mg/kg dose showed more prominent results compared to the 200-mg/kg dose of T. foenum graecum. The results obtained in this study suggest that anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of T. foenum graecum may be the possible reason behind the observed anti-arthritic activity.

  18. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  19. Investigation of the effect of phlomisoside F on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuying; Dong, Yanfeng; Dong, Hanyu; Zhang, Wen; Li, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Phlomis younghusbandii Mukerjee (Labiatae) has been reported to be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of phlomisoside F (PF), isolated from P. younghusbandii Mukerjee (Labiatae), were investigated in male Wistar rats subjected to carrageen-induced paw edema and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Arthritis scores were evaluated by a 5-point ordinal scale (scores 0–4). Expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, COX-2 and 5-LOX were determined via ELISA and western blot assays. Subsequent to establishing the edema and arthritis models, oral administration of PF (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited mean edema rate, compared with the control group in carrageenan-induced paw edema assay. In addition, administration of PF (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day) for 28 days markedly exhibited an anti-arthritic activity by offsetting the body weight loss, inhibiting the paw edema, reducing the arthritis scores and the indices of thymus and spleen, inhibiting the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and 5-LOX, and increasing the expression of IL-10, when compared with the respective control group in CFA-induced arthritis assay. In conclusion, PF is a valuable anti-arthritic constituent of P. younghusbandii, and the present study results suggest that this herb may be used in the treatment of RA. PMID:28352356

  20. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer-dexamethasone conjugates in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ling-Dong; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Xin-Ming; Huang, Jian-Geng; Alnouti, Yazen; Wang, Dong

    2010-08-02

    N-(2-Hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer has been found to be arthrotropic (joint-targeting) in the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rat model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this manuscript, we report the quantitative pharmacokinetics and biodistribution (PK/BD) of (125)I-labeled HPMA copolymer-dexamethasone conjugate (P-Dex) in AA rats. Structural parameters of the prodrug such as the molecular weight (MW) and Dex content were found to have strong impact on the PK/BD profiles of P-Dex. The increase of MW (14,000, 24,000, and 42,000 g/mol) and Dex content (0, 151, and 313 micromol/g) enhances the arthrotropism of P-Dex. For the conjugate with highest MW and Dex content (P-H-M(W)/Dex), the percentage of injected doses per gram (ID/g) of ankle synovial tissue at day seventh postadministration is 1% g(-1), which confirms P-Dex as an arthrotropic macromolecular prodrug. For liver and spleen, the ID/g values are 0.51 and 3.64% g(-1), respectively. As an antigen-presenting organ, the sequestration of the prodrug by spleen may be explained by its abnormal enlargement associated with the systemic inflammatory disease model. Gradual reduction of spleen weight due to the inflammation resolution effect of P-Dex may also contribute to the high ID/g values. Increase of Dex content and reduction of MW would increase P-Dex distribution to kidney. The highest ID/g value for kidney at day seventh postadministration (0.91% g(-1)) was found with P-L-M(w) (MW = 14,000 g/mol, Dex content =288 micromol/g), which may suggest kidney tubuli reabsorption of the conjugates. The P-Dex's distribution to heart and lung is minimum.

  1. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  2. Chimeric cytotoxin IL2-PE40 delays and mitigates adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Case, J P; Lorberboum-Galski, H; Lafyatis, R; FitzGerald, D; Wilder, R L; Pastan, I

    1989-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in rats is a T-cell dependent "autoimmune" disease with close similarities to several forms of human arthritis. Injection of mycobacterial adjuvant leads to T-cell activation and proliferation, processes in which the de novo expression of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor plays a pivotal role. The subsequent massive mononuclear cell infiltration of the joints ultimately results in complete joint destruction. Because activation of the helper/inducer subset of T lymphocytes is critical to the establishment of disease, we reasoned that IL2-PE40, a cytotoxic IL-2-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein that targets the membrane-penetration and ADP-ribosylation domains of the toxin to cells bearing the IL-2 receptor, would be an effective and specific therapy. Adjuvant-injected rats were randomized to treatment with IL2-PE40, phosphate-buffered saline, or either of two control proteins related to IL2-PE40 but lacking either the receptor-binding moiety or an enzymatically active toxin domain and previously demonstrated to lack cytotoxicity in vitro. Intraperitoneal IL2-PE40 given before the establishment of overt clinical disease proved an effective and specific modifier of adjuvant arthritis by clinical, histological, and radiographic criteria. Our data suggest that IL2-PE40 may be effective in those diseases in which activated T-cells play an important role. Images PMID:2492102

  3. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  4. A(2A) adenosine receptors are differentially modulated by pharmacological treatments in rheumatoid arthritis patients and their stimulation ameliorates adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A(2A)ARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A(2A)AR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A(2A)AR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A(2A)ARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A(2A)AR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A(2A)AR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A(2A)AR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A(2A)AR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A(2A)AR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A(2A)ARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A(2A)AR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A(2A)AR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA.

  5. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P < 0.05), respectively. The present study proves the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  7. The absorption enhancement of norisoboldine in the duodenum of adjuvant-induced arthritis rats involves the impairment of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cong; Guo, Jiao-Mei; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Lindera aggregata (Sims) Kosterm root has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of rheumatism palsy, dyspepsia and frequent urination for a long time. Norisoboldine, the main active constituent of this herb drug, possesses outstanding anti-arthritis activity. However, the in vivo disposition of norisoboldine is known to a limited extent, especially under the pathological condition of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how the absorption of norisoboldine is altered in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Comparative studies of the intestinal absorption of norisoboldine in normal and AIA rats at different pathological stages of the arthritis were performed using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion, and the effects of an inhibitor of efflux proteins were also investigated. Norisoboldine was shown to be a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as P-gp inhibitor verapamil markedly increased the permeability coefficient (Peff ) of norisoboldine by 88% in the intestine of normal rats. Compared with normal rats, AIA rats displayed increased Peff values of norisoboldine by 84% and 86% on day 5 and day 10 after the appearance of the secondary response of arthritis, respectively. Verapamil could eliminate the difference of intestinal absorption of norisoboldine between normal and AIA rats. Further studies showed that impaired expression and activity of P-gp in AIA rats play a decisive role in the absorption enhancement of norisoboldine. Notably, the impairment of P-gp function positively correlated with the severity of arthritis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Sinomenine decreases MyD88 expression and improves inflammation-induced joint damage progression and symptoms in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hui; Yao, Ru-Bing; Zhao, Ling-Jie; Shen, Si-Yu; Zhao, Zhi-Ming; Cai, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is the active principle of the Chinese medical plant Sinomenium acutum which is widely used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. Recently, several groups indicated that myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) might be associated with disease progression of RA. Here, we observed the effect of SIN on MyD88 expression and showed its therapeutic role in RA. First, immunohistochemical staining in clinical specimens showed that MyD88 was mainly located in characteristic pathological structures of RA synovial tissues. Second, we found that MyD88 was overexpressed in the synovial tissues of the rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Treatment with SIN markedly decreased the expression of MyD88 in AIA rats. Finally, we provided evidences that SIN suppressed inflammation response and inflammation-induced joint destructive progression and arthritis symptoms in AIA rats. Therefore, SIN is an effective therapeutic agent for RA. Targeting MyD88 signaling may provide new methods for the treatment of RA.

  9. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  10. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSNs) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What's more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and in vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating the NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis.

  11. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Effect of genetic deletion of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 on the expression of Substance P in sensory neurons of mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Willcockson, Helen H.; Chen, Yong; Han, Ji Eun; Valtschanoff, Juli G.

    2010-01-01

    The neuropeptide Substance P (SP), expressed by nociceptive sensory afferents in joints, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Capsaicin causes neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to release SP from their central and peripheral axons, suggesting a functional link between SP and the capsaicin receptor, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The expression of both TRPV1 and SP have been reported to increase in several models of arthritis but the specific involvement of TRPV1-expressing articular afferents that can release SP is not completely understood. We here wanted to ascertain whether the increase in the number of SP-positive primary afferents in arthritis may be affected by genetic deletion of TRPV1. For this, we used immunohistochemistry to quantify the expression of SP in primary afferent neurons in wild type mice (WT) vs. TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). We found that the expression of SP in DRG 1) increased significantly over naïve level in both WT and KO mice 3 weeks after AIA, 2) was significantly higher in KO mice than in WT mice in naïve mice and 2-3 weeks after AIA, 3) was significantly higheron the side of AIA than on the contralateral, vehicle-injected side at all time points in WT mice, but not in KO mice, and 4) increased predominantly in small-size neurons in KO mice and in small- and medium-size neurons in WT mice. Since the size distribution of SP-positive DRG neurons in arthritic TRPV1-KO mice was not significantly different from that in naïve mice, we speculate that the increased expression of SP is unlikely to reflect recruitment of A-fiber primary afferents and that the higher expression of SP in KO mice may represent a plastic change to compensate for the missing receptor in a major sensory circuit. PMID:20303589

  13. Protective effect of Withania somnifera root powder in relation to lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, glycoproteins and bone collagen on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rasool, M; Varalakshmi, P

    2007-04-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of Withania somnifera Linn. Dunal (family-Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Results were compared with those for Indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the right hind paw of Wistar albino rats. Withania somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg/day) and Indomethacin (3 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for 8 days (from 11th to 18th day) after adjuvant injection. The anti-arthritic effect of W. somnifera root powder was assessed by measuring changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, and glycoprotein levels in plasma and spleen of arthritic animals. In addition, cartilage degradation was also assessed by estimating bone collagen, and urinary constituents in arthritic animals. Results of the present investigation showed significant increase in the level of lipid peroxides, glycoproteins, and urinary constituents with the depletion of antioxidant status and bone collagen in arthritic animals. These biochemical alterations observed were ameliorated significantly by oral administration of W. somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg body weight) in arthritic animals. The results of this study clearly indicate that W. somnifera root powder is capable of rectifying the above biochemical changes in adjuvant arthritis.

  14. Anti-arthritic Activity of Dashanga Ghana (An Ayurvedic Compound Formulation) Against Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Charles Foster Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddin, Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arthritis is the most common cause of disability, limiting the activities of adults throughout the world. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long-term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Besides this, currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a promising remedy in these cases. There is a need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. Considering this, a polyherbal Ayurvedic compound formulation (Dashanga Ghana) has been studied in experimental animals to evaluate anti-arthritic activity. Materials and Methods: Dashanga Ghana has been prepared in the laboratory by following standard guidelines. Charles Foster albino rats were used to evaluate the activity through Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model. Results and Conclusions: Dashanga Ghana is found to possess significant anti-arthritic activity. Further studies are required to identify and characterize exact active phyto-constituents and to elucidate the exact mechanism of action, which is responsible for the observed pharmacological profile. PMID:26862275

  15. Periarticular osteopenia in adjuvant induced arthritis: role of interleukin-1 in decreased osteogenic and increased resorptive potential of bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Tanihara, M; Ichikawa, Y; Osanai, A; Nakagawa, M; Ide, M; Mizushima, Y

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To clarify the local osteogenic and bone resorptive potential of periarticular bone in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA). METHODS--Formation of fibroblast colony forming units (FCFU; osteogenic precursor cells) and osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture was studied in AIA rats. Osteoclast-inducing activity in the AIA rat bone marrow was assayed by the addition of the marrow supernatant from rats with AIA to control cultures. Bone mineral density was determined by dual x ray absorptiometry. RESULTS--Marrow from AIA rats and that from animals receiving recombinant human interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta for seven days grew significantly fewer FCFU than control marrow. Formation of osteoclast-like cells was increased in bone marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially when bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of marrow supernatant. Formation of resorption lacunae on ivory slices was increased in the marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially from the right (adjuvant inoculated) tibia. AIA rat marrow supernatant promoted osteoclast-like cell formation in control culture, and this was significantly suppressed by an anti-IL-1 antibody. Rats with AIA showed a significant decrease in the bone mineral density of the periarticular regions of the tibia and femur. CONCLUSION--An uncoupled state in bone resorption-formation linkage, possibly mediated through an increase of IL-1 in the bone marrow, may contribute to the development of periarticular osteopenia in inflammatory arthritis. Images PMID:7632091

  16. Trichilia monadelpha bark extracts inhibit carrageenan-induced foot-oedema in the 7-day old chick and the oedema associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ainooson, G K; Owusu, G; Woode, E; Ansah, C; Annan, K

    2012-01-01

    Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Meliaceae) bark extract is used in African traditional medicine for the management of various disease conditions including inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous (TWE), alcoholic (TAE) and petroleum ether extract (TPEE) of T. monadelpha using the 7-day old chick-carrageenan footpad oedema (acute inflammation) and the adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats (chronic inflammation). TWE and TPEE significantly inhibited the chick-carrageenan footpad oedema with maximal inhibitions of 57.79±3.92 and 63.83±12 respectively, but TAE did not. The reference anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and dexamethasone) inhibited the chick-carrageenan-induced footpad oedema, with maximal inhibitions of 64.92±2.03 and 71.85±15.34 respectively. Furthermore, all the extracts and the reference anti-inflammatory agents (diclofenac, dexamethasone, methotrexate) inhibited the inflammatory oedema associated with adjuvant arthritis with maximal inhibitions of 64.41±5.56, 57.04±8.57, 62.18±2.56%, for TWE, TAE and TPEE respectively and 80.28±5.79, 85.75±2.96, 74.68±3.03% for diclofenac, dexamethasone and methotrexate respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant bark confirmed the presence of a large array of plant constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids, all of which may be potential sources of phyto-antiinflammatory agents. In conclusion, our work suggests that T. monadelpha is a potential source of antiinflammatory agents.

  17. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  18. Assessments of Immunomodulatory and Inflammatory effects against Induction of Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) crude extract Antigen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis Female Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Bagde, Swati; Singh, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Today it is well known about mechanisms of cell communication, how the cells that mediate immune response and tissue injury accumulate in tissues but the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is still unknown. This study was to evaluate immunomodulatory effects of crude Entamoeba histolytica (HM1 IMS strain) antigen in complete freund's adjuvant female wistar rats by studying the alterations in humoral and cell mediated immune responses and also the inflammatory effects by evaluating the changes in body weight, paw thickness, biochemical, serological, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and histopathology activities. Animals were randomly divided into six groups (n=6). CFA was induced in arthritic, drug and AA+CFA group whereas, 0.5ml amoebic antigen was induced subplantal in AA group while 0.5ml dose of amoebic antigen was given orally to AA+CFA group for 7-28th days. Indomethacin was used as a standard drug. Effects of amoebic antigen were associated with increased paw thickness and decreased body weight when compared to healthy control showed a significant difference. Oral administration of amoebic antigen has showed increased severe symptoms of arthritis in AA+CFA on comparison to healthy control rats. Significant increase in serum level of IL-6 and α TNF were found in AA group followed by AA+CFA group whereas, decrease in concentration of IL-10 was appear in AA+CFA group on comparison to arthritic and healthy control group (P<0.05). Histopathology of AA group showed severe signs of necrotic and degenerative changes on comparison to healthy control group. Thus the results demonstrated that E. histolytica alone or in combination with CFA increased bone damage, with alterations in antioxidant level in liver and kidney tissue homogenates as well as showed immunomodulatory arthritogenic properties which may contribute and raise joint inflammation.

  19. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  20. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  1. Long-Term Treatment by Vitamin B1 and Reduction of Serum Proinflammatory Cytokines, Hyperalgesia, and Paw Edema in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zaringhalam, Jalal; Akbari, Akhtar; Zali, Alireza; Manaheji, Homa; Nazemian, Vida; Shadnoush, Mahdi; Ezzatpanah, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune system is involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of inflammation and vitamins are important sources of substances inducing nonspecific immunomodulatory effects. Given the proinflammatory role of cytokines in the inflammation and pain induction, this study aimed to assess the effects of long-term administration of vitamin B1 on the proinflammatory cytokines, edema, and hyperalgesia during the acute and chronic phases of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Methods: On the first day of study, inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaws of rats. Vitamin B1 at doses of 100, 150, and 200 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally during 21 days of the study. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin B1 were also compared to indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Inflammatory symptoms such as thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema were measured by radiant heat and plethysmometer, respectively. Serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels were checked by rat standard enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) specific kits. Results: The results indicated that vitamin B1(150 and 200 mg/kg) attenuated the paw edema, thermal hyperalgesia, and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β during both phases of CFA-induced inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Effective dose of vitamin B1(150 mg/kg) reduced inflammatory symptoms and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β compare to indomethacin during the chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion: Anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic effects of vitamin B1 during CFA-induced arthritis, more specifically after chronic vitamin B1 administration, suggest its therapeutic property for inflammation. PMID:27872694

  2. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  3. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect of Kerabala: a value-added ayurvedic formulation from virgin coconut oil inhibits pathogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Sandya, S; Pramod, C; Asha, S; Svenia, Jose P; Premlal, S; GrishKumar, B

    2017-02-01

    Kerabala (CB) is a novel ayurvedic formulation used for treating various inflammatory diseases. This formulation was made from virgin coconut oil and it comprises extracts of Sida cordifolia, coconut milk and sesame oil. The current study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of CB on carrageenan-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic experimental models. 5 mg/kg bwt was found to be potent dose from carrageenan model and evaluated its effect in adjuvant-induced chronic arthritic model. The antioxidant assays like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation product, nitrate level and GSH were measured in paw tissue. Hematological parameters like hemoglobin (HB) count, ESR, WBC count, plasma CRP levels were analyzed. By RT-PCR, the inflammatory markers like cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expressions were evaluated. The extracellular matrix proteins like MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by zymography and its expression by western blotting. Histopathology and cytology of paw tissue and synovium were analyzed. The result indicated that there was a significant increment in the levels of antioxidant enzymes on CB administration. The hematological markers such as ESR, WBC and plasma CRP levels were reduced by CB treatment and it also increases the HB level. The upregulated gene level expressions of inflammatory markers like COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 were down regulated by administration of CB. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression significantly reduced by CB administration. Massive influx of inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferative collagen in histological analysis of paw tissue of arthritic rat was decreased by CB administration. Synovial cytology of CB administrated group shows reduced number of reactive mesothelial cells and synovial inflammatory cells. This current study shows that ayurvedic drug CB has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and

  4. Amelioration of adjuvant-induced arthritis by ursolic acid through altered Th1/Th2 cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Khan, Beenish; Bani, Sarang; Suri, K A; Satti, N K; Qazi, G N

    2006-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the activity of ursolic acid (UA) on proinflammatory (Th1) and anti-inflammatory (Th2) cytokines in the peripheral blood of arthritic balb/c mice. Ursolic acid is ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and is a constituent of numerous plants which are having diversified phylogenetic origin and taxonomic position. We applied Cytometric bead array (CBA) technology for simultaneously measurement of these cytokines in adjuvant inflammatory arthritis induced mice treated with ursolic acid in graded oral doses. Cytometric bead array uses the sensitivity of amplified fluorescence detection by flowcytometer to measure soluble analytes in a particle based immune assay. This assay can accurately quantitate five cytokines in a 50 microl sample volume. The T-helper (Th1) deviated cells produce detectable level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), while the Th2 deviated cells produce significant amount of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-5 (IL-5). Oral administration of UA at doses of 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 mg kg(-1) per oral dose inhibited the presence of IL-2, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in the peripheral blood.

  5. The protective effects of curculigoside A on adjuvant-induced arthritis by inhibiting NF-кB/NLRP3 activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huimin; Gao, Gongming; Zhang, Li; Shen, Guowei; Sun, Wenjian; Gu, Zhangping; Fan, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of curculigoside A (CA) on adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats and explore its possible mechanisms. AA was induced by intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were treated with CA(10 and 20mg/kg) from days 18 to 24 after immunization. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in serum were determined by ELISA. Moreover, the levels of super oxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined using commercial kits. In particular, NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-кB pathway were detected by Western blot. As expected, CA at 10 and 20mg/kg significantly relieved the hind paw swelling and arthritis index, reduced the levels of IL-6 IL-1β, PGE2, TNF-α, MDA and increased SOD activity in serum. In addition, CA effectively down-regulated the expression of NF-кB/NLRP3 pathway. These findings showed that CA exerted beneficial effects on rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

  6. Norisoboldine alleviates joint destruction in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis by reducing RANKL, IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhi-feng; Jiao, Xiao-lan; Wang, Ting; Lu, Qian; Xia, Yu-feng; Wang, Zheng-tao; Guo, Qing-long; Chou, Gui-xin; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effects of norisoboldine (NOR), a major isoquinoline alkaloid in Radix Linderae, on joint destruction in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) and its underlying mechanisms. Methods: AIA was induced in adult male SD rats by intradermal injection of Mycobacterium butyricum in Freund's complete adjuvant at the base of the right hind paw and tail. From d 14 after immunization, the rats were orally given NOR (7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) daily for 10 consecutive days. Joint destruction was evaluated with radiological scanning and H&E staining. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were prepared from fresh synovial tissues in the AIA rats. The expression of related proteins and mRNAs were detected by ELISA, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Results: In AIA rats, NOR (15 and 30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the swelling of paws and arthritis index scores, and elevated the mean body weight. NOR (30 mg/kg) prevented both the infiltration of inflammatory cells and destruction of bone and cartilage in joints. However, NOR (15 mg/kg) only suppressed the destruction of bone and cartilage, but did not obviously ameliorate synovial inflammation. NOR (15 and 30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the serum levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13, but not the osteoprotegerin and MMP-1 levels. The mRNA levels of RANKL, IL-6, COX-2, and MMP-13 in synovium were also suppressed. Dexamethasone produced similar effects in AIA rats as NOR did, but without elevating the mean body weight. In the cultured FLS, treatment with NOR (10 and 30 mmol/L) significantly decreased the secretion of RANKL, IL-6, PGE2, and MMP-13 proteins. Furthermore, the treatment selectively prevented the activation of MAPKs, AKT and transcription factor AP-1 component c-Jun, but not the recruitment of TRAF6 or the activation of JAK2/STAT3. Treatment of the cultured FLS with the specific inhibitors of p38, ERK, AKT, and AP-1

  7. Trikatu, an herbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by the suppression of inflammatory immune responses in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and on cultured fibroblast like synoviocytes via the inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Doss, Hari Madhuri; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-10-25

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of trikatu, an herbal compound and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Our results indicate that trikatu (1000 mg/kg/b.wt. oral) administration suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and downregulated the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) and transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B 65 (NFкB-p65) and activator protein-1 (AP-1)) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats. Consistently, the protein expression of NFкB-p65, IL-17, TNF-α, COX-2, and RANKL was also dramatically reduced in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats by trikatu treatment. In addition, trikatu suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 similar to the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes. Furthermore, trikatu alleviated the histopathology of joint of arthritic rats. Overall, these data highlights that trikatu could be a promising alternative modality for the possible treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

  8. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S.; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  9. AA amyloidosis associated with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Abhijeet; Chopra, Yogiraj; Theis, Jason D; Vrana, Julie A; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2013-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome due to renal AA amyloidosis. The AA amyloidosis was associated with a 3-year history of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The presence of serum amyloid A protein was confirmed by laser microdissection of Congo Red-positive glomeruli and vessels followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; this analysis excluded hereditary and familial amyloidosis. Aggressive management of the systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis resulted in improvement in clinical and laboratory parameters. The case represents an unusual cause of nephrotic syndrome in children. Early diagnosis of renal amyloidosis and management of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis is paramount to preventing progression of kidney disease.

  10. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar.

    PubMed

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats.

  11. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats. PMID:25276195

  12. β2-adrenoceptor signaling reduction in dendritic cells is involved in the inflammatory response in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huaxun; Chen, Jingyu; Song, Shasha; Yuan, Pingfan; Liu, Lihua; Zhang, Yunfang; Zhou, Aiwu; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammation of the synovium, which leads to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. Adrenoreceptor (AR) signaling may play an important role in modulating dendritic cell (DC), which may be involved in the pathogenesis of RA. We examined the effect of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline (ISO) on DC function, the impact of the β2-AR agonist salbutamol on adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) rats, and changes in β2-AR signaling in DCs during the course of AA. ISO inhibited the expression of the surface molecules CD86 and MHC-II, inhibited the stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation by DC and TNF-α secretion, and promoted DC antigen uptake and IL-10 secretion. The effects of ISO on MHC-II expression, DC stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation, and DC antigen uptake were mediated by β2-AR. Treatment with salbutamol ameliorated the severity of AA and histopathology of the joints and inhibited proliferation of thymus lymphocytes and FLS in vivo. β2-AR signaling was weaker in AA rats compared to the control. Elevated GRK2 and decreased β2-AR expression in DC cytomembranes were observed in AA and may have decreased the anti-inflammatory effect of β2-AR signaling. Decreased β2-AR signaling may be relevant to the exacerbation of arthritis inflammation. PMID:27079168

  13. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071).

  14. Stereoselective Pharmacokinetics and Chiral Inversion of Ibuprofen in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Hiroyuki; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    2-Arylpropionic acid (2-APA) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are commonly used in racemic mixtures (rac) for clinical use. 2-APA undergoes unidirectional chiral inversion of the in vivo inactive R-enantiomer to the active S-enantiomer. Inflammation causes the reduction of metabolic activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase. However, it is unclear whether inflammation affects the stereoselective pharmacokinetics and chiral inversion of 2-APA such as ibuprofen (IB). We examined the effects of inflammation on the pharmacokinetics of R-IB and S-IB after intravenous administration of rac-IB, R-IB, and S-IB to adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) rats, an animal model of inflammation. The plasma protein binding of rac-IB, glucuronidation activities for R-IB and S-IB, and P450 contents of liver microsomes in AA rats were determined. Total clearance (CLtot) of IB significantly increased in AA rats, although the glucuronidation activities for IB, and P450 contents of liver microsomes decreased in AA rats. We presumed that the increased CLtot of IB in AA rats was caused by the elevated plasma unbound fraction of IB due to decreased plasma albumin levels in AA rats. Notably, CLtot of R-IB but not S-IB significantly increased in AA rats after intravenous administration of rac-IB. These results suggested that AA could affect drug efficacies after stereoselective changes in the pharmacokinetics of R-IB and S-IB.

  15. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's ...

  16. Combination of carvacrol with methotrexate suppresses Complete Freund's Adjuvant induced synovial inflammation with reduced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Banji, Otilia J F; Banji, David; Soumya, N; Chilipi, Kiran Kumar; Kalpana, C H; Kranthi Kumar, C H; Annamalai, A R

    2014-01-15

    The present study evaluated the therapeutic benefit of the combination of carvacrol, an isoprenoid having potential anti-inflammatory action, with methotrexate in suppressing Complete Freund's Adjuvant induced arthritis and attenuating methotrexate induced hepatic damage. Arthritis was induced in rats with Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Animals received methotrexate (2mg/kg) intraperitonealy once a week for 5 weeks alone and along with carvacrol orally (50 and 100mg/kg) respectively from the 10th to the 42nd day. Control and carvacrol alone group were also studied. Paw volume, hypernociception, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were evaluated as arthritic markers. Hepatic marker enzymes in serum; myeloperoxidase, protein oxidation, and oxidative measures were determined in the liver homogenate. Liver histological assessments were also carried out. Methotrexate significantly controlled arthritis; however, liver damage was evident due to oxidative stress and rise in myeloperoxidase levels. Carvacrol suppressed the hyperalgesic response, significantly alleviated arthritis and reduced damage to the hepatocytes owing to a decline in the levels of myeloperoxidase and oxidative markers. High dose of the combination reduced the levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase by 24.74%, 30.2% and 28.14% compared with methotrexate treatment. Histological assessment also revealed that carvacrol minimizes methotrexate induced liver toxicity. In combination, carvacrol promoted the anti-arthritic action of methotrexate, reduced neutrophils infiltration and peroxidative damage to the liver. Therefore, carvacrol can serve as a useful adjuvant and promote the safe use of methotrexate in the management of arthritis.

  17. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene Y; Chi, Howard H; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2008-04-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1(l)) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-gamma in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1(l)) rats secreted high levels of IFN-gamma much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-beta was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-gamma, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis.

  18. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity.

  19. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-01-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  20. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  1. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Sida rhombifolia stems and roots in adjuvant induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Limmy, T P

    2012-04-01

    Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer anti-oxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Herbal medicine provides a foundation for various traditional medicine systems worldwide. The Sida species is one of the most important families of medicinal plants in India. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Sida rhombifolia extracts for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. The altered levels of hematological parameters were reverted to near normal levels, especially the elevated rate of erythrocyte sedimentation was significantly reduced by S. rhombifolia extracts in experimental rats. Oral administration of root and stem of S. rhombifolia extracts significantly increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological and transmission electron microscopy observations made on the hind limb tissue.

  3. UP1304, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba, Mitigates Pain and Inflammation in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though, the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share pain as the prime complaints. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side effects. Hence, the need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is an overdue. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP1304, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the botanical composition were demonstrated in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats with oral dose ranges of 50–200 mg/kg. Ibuprofen at a dose of 100 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. Ex vivo sulfated glycosaminoglycan inhibition assays were performed. Results: Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance, suppression of paw edema and ankle thickness were observed in animals treated with UP1304 compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats. These results were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment. Inhibitions of proteoglycan degradation were observed in a range of 37.5–61.7% for concentration of UP1304 at 50–200 μg/mL when compared to interleukin-1α-exposed untreated explants. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1304, for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, could potentially be considered agent of botanical origin for the improvement of arthritis associated symptoms. SUMMARY Pain is one of the cardinal signs of arthritis.Long term applications of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief are associated with cardiovascular

  4. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cao-Xin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Kou, Jian-Qun; Xu, Yin-Li; Wang, Shu-Zhi; Zhu, Qi; Yang, Lu; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis. PMID:25767552

  5. Suppression of Ongoing Experimental Arthritis by a Chinese Herbal Formula (Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan) Involves Changes in Antigen-Induced Immunological and Biochemical Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Lee, David Y.-W; Ma, Zhongze; Yu, Hua; Fong, Harry H. S.; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL), which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg) was fed to Lewis (RT.11) rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients. PMID:20981317

  6. Suppression of ongoing experimental arthritis by a chinese herbal formula (huo-luo-xiao-ling dan) involves changes in antigen-induced immunological and biochemical mediators of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Lee, David Y-W; Ma, Zhongze; Yu, Hua; Fong, Harry H S; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL), which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg) was fed to Lewis (RT.1(1)) rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients.

  7. Presence of glycosaminoglycans in purified AA type amyloid fibrils associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, J H; Husby, G; Kolset, S O

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have strongly suggested an association between glycosaminoglycans and tissue deposits of amyloid. The present study was aimed at studying this association in purified preparations of hepatic amyloid fibrils obtained from human AA type secondary amyloidosis. Glycosaminoglycans were isolated by gradient ion exchange chromatography of purified amyloid fibrils treated with pronase. Degradation with specific enzymes identified the glycosaminoglycans as chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate, and heparin/heparan sulphate. The total amount of glycosaminoglycans specifically coisolated with the amyloid fibrils was 15 micrograms/mg fibril weight. The presence of glycosaminoglycans in amyloid may play a part in the incorporation of structurally diverse protein precursors into amyloid fibrils of identical ultrastructure. PMID:2930277

  8. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-17

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA.

  9. Antibody responses to mycobacterial and self heat shock protein 65 in autoimmune arthritis: epitope specificity and implication in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ro; Kim, Eugene Y; Cerny, Jan; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2006-11-15

    Many autoimmune diseases are believed to involve primarily T cell-mediated effector mechanisms. There is increasing realization, however, that Abs may also play a vital role in the propagation of T cell-driven disorders. In this study, on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis, we examined the characteristics of serum Ab response to mycobacterial heat shock protein (hsp) 65 (Bhsp65), self (rat) hsp65 (Rhsp65), and linear peptides spanning these two molecules. The AA-resistant WKY (RT.1(l)) rat responded to the heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunization with a rapid burst of Abs to both Bhsp65 and Rhsp65. These Abs reacted with numerous peptide epitopes; however, this response was reduced to a few epitopes with time. On the contrary, the susceptible Lewis (RT.1(l)) rat developed a relatively lower Ab response to Bhsp65, and Abs to Rhsp65 did not appear until the recovery from the disease. The Ab response in Lewis rats diversified with progression of AA, and there was an intriguing overlap between the repertoire of Bhsp65-reactive B and T cells during the recovery phase of AA. Nonetheless, subsets of the repertoire of the late Abs in both rat strains became focused on the same epitope regions of Bhsp65 and Rhsp65. The functional relevance of these Abs was evident from the results showing that sera from recovery phase Lewis or WKY rats, but not that of naive rats, afforded protection against subsequent AA. These results are of significance in further understanding of the role of humoral immunity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis.

  10. Temporal cytokine expression and the target organ attributes unravel novel aspects of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Astry, Brian; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmunity is determined by multiple factors. Defining the contribution of the quantitative versus qualitative aspects of antigen-directed immune responses as well as the factors influencing target organ susceptibility is vital to advancing the understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In a series of studies, we have addressed these issues using the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lewis rats are susceptible to AA following immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra, whereas Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same MHC (major histocompatibility complex) haplotype are resistant. Comparative studies on these and other susceptible/resistant rodent strains have offered interesting insights into differential cytokine responses in the face of comparable T cell proliferative response to the disease relevant antigens. Study of the cytokine kinetics have also permitted validation of the disease-protective versus disease-aggravating effects of specific cytokines by treatment of rats/mice with those cytokines at different phases of the disease. In regard to the target organ attributes, the migration of arthritogenic leukocytes into the joints; the expression of mediators of inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue damage; the role of vascular permeability; and the characteristics of vascular endothelial cells have been examined. Further, various inhibitors of angiogenesis are effective in suppressing arthritis. Taken together, the differential cytokine responses and unique attributes of the target organ have revealed novel aspects of disease susceptibility and joint damage in AA. The translation of this basic research in animal models to RA patients would not only advance our understanding of the disease process, but also offer novel avenues for immunomodulation of this disease. PMID:24434324

  11. Spleen-specific suppression of TNF-alpha by cationic hydrogel-delivered antisense nucleotides for the prevention of arthritis in animal models.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Xia, Suhua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Jiangning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2009-09-01

    This study developed a transplantable platform based on cationic hydrogels to deliver antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASOs) targeting the mRNA of TNF-alpha. Cationic agarose (c-agarose) was obtained by conjugating ethylenediamine to agarose via an N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI)-activation method. ASO-c-agarose system was constructed by mixing ASO in cationic agarose gel of proper concentration and gelation temperature. In vivo assessment of ASO distribution suggested that the system specifically target to spleen, wherein the c-agarose-delivered ASO had a concentration remarkably 50-fold higher than that of the naked ASO. The distribution of c-agarose-delivered ASO was scarcely detectable in liver and kidney. Next, three types of animal models were setup to evaluate the therapeutic efficacies of ASO-Gel, including the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA), carrageen/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced arthritis (CLA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. The effects of ASO-c-agarose in alleviating inflammation and tissue destruction were evidenced in more than 90% of the testing animals, with decrease of main inflammatory cytokines, lightening of joint swelling and tissue damage, as well as increase in their body weights. All these findings suggest that this highly operable devise for the conveyance of antisense nucleotides together with its spleen-targeting property, could become a useful means of antisense-based therapeutics against rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.

  12. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  13. Recombinant human endostatin inhibits TNF-alpha-induced receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes in mice with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiu-Fang; Zhang, Xiu-Hong; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Li, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Bone loss is a critical pathology responsible for the functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well known that receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) plays a crucial role in bone loss in RA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) mediates bone erosion in RA by regulation of RANKL expression in an experimental model of RA, consisting of mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Cultured AA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) obtained from these mice were induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) combined with or without rh-endostatin. The levels of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA, soluble and membrane-bound proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. Western blotting and the luciferase reporter assay were used to study related signaling pathways. Rh-endostatin inhibited RANKL mRNA expression, soluble and membrane-bound protein expression in AA FLSs but not in CD4+ T cells. However, OPG expression and secretion was not affected by rh-endostatin in AA FLSs. Molecular analysis demonstrated that rh-endostatin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways. Moreover, rh-endostatin attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling by suppressing the phosphorylation level of inhibitor kappaBα (IκBα) and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in FLSs from mice with AA. These results provide the first evidence that rh-endostatin inhibits TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in AA FLSs.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of grape melanin. Inhibitory effects on paw edema and adjuvant induced disease.

    PubMed

    Avramidis, N; Kourounakis, A; Hadjipetrou, L; Senchuk, V

    1998-07-01

    Natural or synthetic melanin (CAS 8049-97-6) is a high molecular weight heteropolymer, product of the enzyme tyrosinase, found to possess radical scavenging and antioxidant functions. It was of interest, therefore, to study in detail the possible anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties of a melanin isolated from grapes. The inhibitory effect of melanin on carrageenin-induced edema, as well as on edemas produced by other phlogistics, was remarkable suggesting that melanin interferes with the prostaglandin as well as the leukotriene and/or complement system mediated inflammation. Grape melanin showed potent inhibitory effect on adjuvant induced disease (AID) in rat, suppressing significantly the primary inflammation and almost totally the secondary lesions of arthritis. Melanin under the present experimental conditions not only strongly inhibited the in vitro lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomal membranes, but furthermore protected the in vivo hepatic peroxidation occurring in AID rats, demonstrating its antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The serum proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-a and the serum globulin fraction were elevated in AID rats, parameters which were more or less normalised by melanin treatment in contrast to the reduced serum levels of IL-2 which were not affected. Similarly to other lipoxygenase inhibitors and hydroxyl radical scavenger NSAIDs, melanin treatment did not affect IL-1 neither increased the splenic mitogenic responses, unlike the classical cyclooxygenase inhibitory NSAIDs. The subpopulation Th1 (T4+ or T8+) of lymphocytes is mainly responsible for cellular immune responses and thus their possible inhibition by melanin could lead to suppression of the development of AID, a model for cell-mediated immunity. The effect of melanin on T-cells is exhibited by the reduced spleen mitogenic responses to a T-cell mitogen and the reduced serum levels of IL-2 of treated rats. In conclusion, grape melanin is an

  15. Anti-arthritic effects of Ephedra sinica STAPF herb-acupuncture: inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and adjuvant-induced polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mi-Jung; Lee, Han-Chang; Kim, Gun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Jung; Shim, Insop; Oh, Seung-Kyu; Kang, Sung-Keel; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of water distillates of Ephedra sinica STAPF (ES), in herb-acupuncture, on the inflammatory responses of arthritis was investigated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human macrophage and adjuvant-induced arthritic rat. The luciferase reporter vectors driven by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 promoters were transiently transfected into U937 cells, which were then differentiated and stimulated by PMA and LPS, respectively, to develop an in vitro anti-inflammation assay system. The luciferase activities, observed in the activated U937 cells, were significantly inhibited by ES herb-acupuncture, compared to those of PD98509 and berberine. To evaluate ES herb-acupuncture as a novel anti-arthritic therapy, a polyarthritic rat model was developed using heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 50 mul of ES distillate was subcutaneously injected into the ST36 acupoint on each knee joint. While the articular indexes of arthritic rats were evidently decreased by ES herb-acupuncture, their body weights did not regain their initial levels. This may be due to the accelerating effects of ES on weight-loss and fat consumption. The mRNA expressions of TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 genes, which were closely stimulated in the arthritic rat joints, were found to be restored to the normal levels through the ES treatment. In the case of IL-1beta, the recovery was not significant but substantial. The anti-arthritic effect of ES herb-acupuncture was not found in the ES-treated/non-acupoint group. In conclusion, the ES herb-acupuncture into the ST36 acupoint was found to be effective in alleviating the inflammatory response and thus arthritic symptoms in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

  16. Grape polyphenols and propolis mixture inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human leukocytes and reduces clinical scores in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mossalayi, M D; Rambert, J; Renouf, E; Micouleau, M; Mérillon, J M

    2014-02-15

    Polyphenols from red fruits and bee-derived propolis (PR) are bioactive natural products in various in vitro and in vivo models. The present study shows that hematotoxicity-free doses of grape polyphenols (GPE) and PR differentially decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated human peripheral blood leucocytes. While GPE inhibited the monocytes/macrophage response, propolis decreased both monokines and interferon γ (IFNγ) production. When used together, their distinct effects lead to the attenuation of all inflammatory mediators, as supported by a significant modulation of the transcriptomic profile of pro-inflammatory genes in human leukocytes. To enforce in vitro data, GPE+PR were tested for their ability to improve clinical scores and cachexia in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Extracts significantly reduced arthritis scores and cachexia, and this effect was more significant in animals receiving continuous low doses compared to those receiving five different high doses. Animals treated daily had significantly better clinical scores than corticoid-treated rats. Together, these findings indicate that the GPE+PR combination induces potent anti-inflammatory activity due to their complementary immune cell modulation.

  17. Endomorphins in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jessop, David S; Fassold, Alexander; Wolff, Christine; Hofbauer, Rafael; Chover-Gonzalez, Antonio; Richards, Louise J; Straub, Rainer H

    2010-04-01

    The opioid tetrapeptides endomorphins (EM)-1 and EM-2 are widely expressed in central nervous system and immune tissues of rats and humans. Their analgesic properties are well characterized but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. EM-1 significantly attenuated the onset of hindpaw inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of EMs in T cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts in synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In an ex vivo superfusion system, EM-1 potently inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or RA. These results demonstrate that EMs are endogenously synthesized within human immune cells and have the potential to act as potent therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. We discuss the clinical potential for EM analogues chemically modified to resist proteolytic degradation and identify modified protease-resistant analogues with enhanced bioactivity.

  18. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  19. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  20. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agent PEG-sTNFRI improves the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I system in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana Isabel; Vara, Elena; López-Calderón, Asunción; Angeles Villanúa, María

    2006-04-24

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is associated with body weight loss and decreased pituitary growth hormone (GH) and hepatic insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) synthesis. Cytokines as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediate wasting associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to analyse whether the inhibition of TNF is able to revert the decrease in the body weight and the GH/IGF-I axis in arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant, and 15 days later arthritic and control rats were daily injected with polyethylene glycol linked to soluble TNF receptor p55 (PEG-sTNFRI) (1 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline for 8 days. There was a significant decrease in pituitary GH mRNA (P<0.05), hepatic IGF-I mRNA (P<0.01) and serum concentrations of IGF-I (P<0.01) in arthritic rats. The 8-day administration of PEG-sTNFRI resulted in an increase in food intake (P<0.05) and body weight gain (P<0.01) in arthritic but not in control rats. There was an increase in pituitary GH mRNA after PEG-sTNFRI treatment both in control and in arthritic rats. There was a significant increase in IGF-I serum concentrations (P<0.05) and hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression (P<0.05) in control rats treated with PEG-sTNFRI, whereas the effect of this anti-TNF agent in arthritic rats was only statistically significant in hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression (P<0.05). These data suggest that TNF seems to be involved in the decrease in GH and IGF-I synthesis in arthritic rats.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  2. Anti-bone resorption activity of deer antler aqua-acupunture, the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong) in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Kap-Sung; Choi, Byeong-Joon; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Seung-Duk; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-01-15

    Effect of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, a traditional immunosuppressive acupuncture, was evaluated to assess the reductions in bone mass, strength, and turnover in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. For measuring the above parameters, a 20-day dosing experiment was performed using 6-week-old female Lewis rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting the adjuvant into the hind paw of the Lewis rats. The age-dependent increases in the body weight, lumbar bone mineral content and density (BMC and BMD) and compressive strength were disturbed in the arthritic rats. At 10 days, the histomorphometric parameters of bone formation (BFR/BS and BFR/BV) and the serum osteocalcin levels were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls of Lewis rats. However, the BMC values corrected for body weight did not differ significantly between the arthritic and normal rats, and the bone minerals were not reduced when they were compared with the baseline controls. At 20 days, the parameters of bone minerals and strength of the lumbar body in the arthritic rats, both with and without correction for body weight, were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls. The trabecular mineralizing surface remained significantly reduced and the osteoclast numbers were increased. DAA at the doses of 10, 20, 50 and 100 microg/kg, administered by Shinsu (B23) acupuncture daily from the start of the experiment, significantly prevented the development of the chronic paw edema at 20 days. The reductions in the parameters such as bone minerals, strength, and trabecular bone formation, and the increase in osteoclast number were alleviated by this DAA. Age-dependent increases in the lumbar height, disturbed by the adjuvant injection, were also maintained. These results indicated that a 20-day-period is necessary to obtain sufficient reductions in the bone mass and strength of the lumbar body

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  4. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound, suppresses pro-inflammatory mediators and RANKL expression via modulating NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are inhabitant mesenchymal cells of synovial joints and have been recognized to play an imperative role in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking these pathological roles of FLS provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment for RA. A recent study had confirmed that majoon ushba (MU), a polyherbal unani compound, possesses anti-arthritic effects in in vivo. Toward this direction, an effort has been made to understand the effect of MU on FLS derived from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Here, we observed that MU administration (100-300 µg/ml) significantly inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 protein similar to that of the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in NFкB signaling pathway and suppressed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in MAPKs signaling pathway in AIA-FLS. In addition, the protein expression of TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and iNOS was also found reduced. MU treatment significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-17, iNOS, and COX-2), transcription factors (NFкB-p65 and AP-1), and RANKL and attenuated the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 (ELISA) in AIA-FLS. Furthermore, MU treatment significantly inhibited the level of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes release, and glycoproteins and increased antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase and catalase) in AIA-FLS. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that MU possesses anti-inflammatory effect against AIA-FLS through the decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators expression by suppressing NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways.

  5. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  6. Enzyme and combination therapy with cyclosporin A in the rat developing adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovenská, E; Svík, K; Stancíková, M; Rovenský, J

    1999-01-01

    Recent knowledge of the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the mechanism of drug effects have enabled the use of new drugs and drug combinations in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. This study investigates the efficacy of both enzyme therapy and combined therapy with cyclosporin in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were administered either cyclosporin A (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg/day per os), a mixture of enzymes (Phlogenzym (PHL); 45 mg/kg twice daily intrarectally), or a combination of 2.5 mg cyclosporin A and 90 mg PHL for a period of 40 days from the adjuvant application. Levels of serum albumin, changes in hind paw swelling and bone erosions were measured in rats as variables of inflammation and arthritis-associated destructive changes. Treatment with 5 mg of cyclosporin A, as well as with the combination therapy with cyclosporin A plus PHL, significantly inhibited both the inflammation and destructive arthritis-associated changes. However, 2.5 mg of cyclosporin A and PHL alone inhibited these disease markers, although to a lesser extent and at a later stage of arthritis development. The results show the inhibitory effect of enzyme therapy on rat adjuvant arthritis, as well as the efficacy of a low dose of cyclosporin A given in combination with enzyme therapy, which may be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... psoriasis are also at risk for psoriatic arthritis. Identification of genes that increase the risk of psoriatic arthritis will help scientists unlock the secrets of this troubling disease, and identify targets for more specific and effective therapy. Biologic therapies. ...

  8. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is inflammation of a joint due to a gonorrhea infection. Causes Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  10. Ferulic acid ethyl ester diminished Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced incapacitation through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Valmor Macedo; Gomes, Bruno de Sousa; Neto, Benedito de Sousa; Ferreira, Alana Rodrigues; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Carvalho e Martins, Maria do Carmo; Oliveira, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid ethyl ester (FAEE) is a derivate from ferulic acid which reportedly has antioxidant effect; however, its role on inflammation was unknown. In this study, we investigated the orally administered FAEE anti-inflammatory activity on experimental inflammation models and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. CFA-induced arthritis has been evaluated by incapacitation model and radiographic knee joint records at different observation time. FAEE (po) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.001) within the 1st to 5th hours at 50 and 100 mg/kg doses. FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg, po inhibited leukocyte migration into air pouch model (p < 0.001), and myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities (p < 0.001) increased total thiol concentration and decreased the TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations, NO, and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. In the CFA-induced arthritis, FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the edema and the elevation paw time, a joint disability parameter, since second hour after arthritis induction (p < 0.001). FAEE presented rat joint protective activity in radiographic records (p < 0.001). The data suggest that the FAEE exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte migration, oxidative stress reduction, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  11. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  12. Utility of animal models for identification of potential therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hegen, M; Keith, J C; Collins, M; Nickerson-Nutter, C L

    2008-11-01

    Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are widely used for testing potential new therapies for RA. However, the question of which animal model is most predictive of therapeutic efficacy in human RA commonly arises in data evaluation. A retrospective review of the animal models used to evaluate approved, pending RA therapies, and compounds that were discontinued during phase II or III clinical trials found that the three most commonly used models were adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rats and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and mice. Limited data were found for more recently developed genetically modified animal models. Examination of the efficacy of various compounds in these animal models revealed that a compound's therapeutic efficacy, rather than prophylactic efficacy, in AIA and CIA models was more predictive of clinical efficacy in human RA than data from either model alone.

  13. Vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated serum homocysteine levels in rat adjuvant arthritis: effect of vitamin E administration.

    PubMed

    Can, Cenk; Cinar, Mehtap G; Koşay, Sezen; Evinç, Akgün

    2002-06-14

    We aimed to study the alterations in serum homocysteine levels and endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxant responses in adjuvant-induced arthritis of the rat and to determine the effects of vitamin E administration on these changes. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant into the paw. 26 days after the induction of arthritis, serum homocysteine levels and relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodiumnitroprusside in thoracic aortas were evaluated. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine were decreased in aortas from arthritic rats, whereas the responses to sodiumnitroprusside were not significantly different when compared to the aortas from control rats. A significant increase was observed in serum homocysteine levels of the arthritic rats in comparison to those of controls. Vitamin E administration (100 mg/kg/day, i.m. for 26 days) to arthritic rats resulted in a significant increase in endothelium-dependent aortic responses to acetylcholine and a significant decrease in serum homocysteine levels with respect to the non-treated arthritic rats. However, in healthy rats, vitamin E treatment significantly decreased the acetylcholine-induced relaxant responses. We conclude that adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat is associated with increased serum homocysteine levels and this is accompanied by a reduction in endothelium-dependent vascular responses in the thoracic aortas. Vitamin E treatment leads to normalization of the increased serum homocysteine levels and improves the endothelium-dependent relaxant responses in this experimental model.

  14. Septic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... septic arthritis. Knees are most commonly affected, but septic arthritis also can affect hips, shoulders and other joints. The infection can quickly and severely damage the cartilage and bone within the joint, so prompt treatment is crucial. Treatment involves draining the joint with ...

  15. Peptide vaccination in Montanide adjuvant induces and GM-CSF increases CXCR3 and cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression by tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; King, Laura K; Nunnley, Lenora D; Mullins, Irene M; Slingluff, Craig L; Mullins, David W

    2013-11-01

    T cell infiltration of melanoma is associated with enhanced clinical efficacy and is a desirable endpoint of immunotherapeutic vaccination. Infiltration is regulated, in part, by chemokine receptors and selectin ligands on the surface of tumor-specific lymphocytes. Therefore, we investigated the expression of two homing molecules--CXCR3 and CLA - on vaccine-induced CD8 T cells, in the context of a clinical trial of a melanoma-specific peptide vaccine. Both CXCR3 and CLA have been associated with T cell infiltration of melanoma. We demonstrate that a single subcutaneous/intradermal administration of peptide vaccine in Montanide adjuvant induces tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are predominantly positive for CXCR3, with a subpopulation of CXCR3(+)CLA(+) cells. Addition of GM-CSF significantly enhances CXCR3 expression and increases the proportion of CLA-expressing cells. Concurrent with CXCR3 and CLA expression, vaccine-induced CD8 cells express high levels of Tbet, IFN-γ, and IL-12Rβ1. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that peptide vaccination in adjuvant induces CD8 T cells with a phenotype that may support infiltration of melanoma.

  16. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Psoriatic arthritis is when a person has psoriasis and arthritis together. Enthesitis-related arthritis usually affects ... person's symptoms, find out if others in the family have had arthritis, and do a complete physical ...

  18. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  19. Anti-IL-17A therapy protects against bone erosion in experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Shi-Juan; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Davis, Nicole; Hong, Kyu; Vu, Anna; Kwan, Sylvia; Fayadat-Dilman, Laurence; Asio, Agelio; Bowman, Edward P

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by a subset of memory T cells and other innate immune cells. It is associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to IL-17A expression in RA synovial fluid. The severe bone erosive rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (rAIA) and mouse collagen-induced arthritis (mCIA) models were used to address the therapeutic efficacy of anti-IL-17A treatment with a focused investigation on bone protection. In the rAIA model, treatment with anti-IL-17A completely alleviated arthritis, lowered the level of receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), and inhibited structural damage to the bones. In the mCIA model, IL-17A neutralization coincident with arthritis development or in mice with established arthritis diminished joint swelling by inhibiting disease initiation and progression. Intriguingly, even the few joints that became outwardly severely inflamed in the presence of an anti-IL-17A antagonist had diminished joint histopathology scores compared to severely inflamed, control-treated mice. The bone-preserving property correlated with decreased RANKL message in severely inflamed paws of arthritic mice. These data identify IL-17A as a key factor in inflammation-mediated bone destruction and support anti-IL-17A therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bone diseases such as RA.

  20. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of providers usually treats JA. Medicines and physical therapy can help maintain movement and reduce swelling and pain. They may also help prevent and treat complications. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... also cause side effects, such as easy bruising, bone thinning, cataracts and diabetes. Antirheumatic (say: "anti-roo-mat-ick") medicines can help fight RA. If these medicines are started early ... arthritis, osteoarthritis, RA, rheumatic disease, rheumatoid nodules, ...

  2. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  3. Thumb Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis can cause severe pain, swelling, and decreased strength and range of motion, making it difficult to ... tenderness at the base of your thumb Decreased strength when pinching or grasping objects Decreased range of ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  5. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  6. Evaluation of bone targeting salmon calcitonin analogues in rats developing osteoporosis and adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Krishna H; Asghar, Waheed; Newa, Madhuri; Jamali, Fakhreddin; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of the peptide hormone calcitonin have been used in medicine as biologic drug therapies for decades, to treat pathological conditions of excessive bone turnover, such as osteoporosis, where more bones are removed than replaced during bone remodeling. Osteoporosis and other chronic skeletal diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, exact a substantial and growing toll on aging populations worldwide however they respond poor to synthetic biologic drug therapy, due in part to the rapid half-life of elimination, which for calcitonin is 43 minutes. To address those shortcomings, we have developed and synthesized bone-targeting variants of calcitonin as a targeted drug delivery strategy, by conjugation to bisphosphonate drug bone-seeking functional groups in highly specific reaction conditions. To evaluate their in vivo efficacy, bisphosphonate-mediated bone targeting with PEGylated (polyethylene glycol conjugated) and non-PEGylated salmon calcitonin analogues were synthesized and dose escalation was performed in female rats developing Osteoporosis. The bone-targeting calcitonin analogues were also tested in a separate cohort of male rats developing adjuvant-induced arthritis. Ovariectomized female rats developing Osteoporosis were administered daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 5, 10 and 20 IU/kg of calcitonin for 3 months. Adjuvant arthritis was developed in male rats by administering Mycobacterium butyricum through tail base injection. Daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 20 IU/kg of calcitonin was administered and the rats were measured for visible signs of inflammation to a 21 day endpoint. In both studies, the effect of drug intervention upon bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by measuring the trabecular bone volume percentage and BMD at the proximal tibial metaphysis using in vivo micro-computed tomography. With dose escalation studies, only bone targeting analogue dosed groups

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  8. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Fungal Infections Infectious Arthritis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  9. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  10. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  11. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  12. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  13. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  14. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  15. ER stress, p66shc, and p-Akt/Akt mediate adjuvant-induced inflammation, which is blunted by argirein, a supermolecule and rhein in rats.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao-Dong; Ding, Ming-Jian; Dai, De-Zai; Wu, You; Zhang, Yun; Dai, Yin

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activities of argirein and rhein on inflammatory edema in rat paw which was caused by complete adjuvant, compared with ibuprofen. We hypothesized that the adjuvant-induced inflammation is attributed to upregulation of activating transcript factor 6 (ATF6; a chaperone for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress), p66Shc (an adaptive protein modulating oxidative stress), and NADPH oxidase subunits p22phox and gp91phox in the inflamed tissues. Biomarkers were measured in the rat paw in association with monitoring swellings. The primary inflammatory edema of the injected paw occurred rapidly and sustained over a couple of days, and the secondary inflammation developed 2 weeks later. The inflammatory edema was accompanied by upregulation of cytokines including ATF6, p66Shc, p22phox, gp91phox, and MMP-2 and an increase in ratio of p-Akt/Akt in the afflicted paw. These were suppressed by either argirein and rhein or ibuprofen. These findings indicate that ER stress, upregulated p66Shc, and phosphorylated Akt are actively implicated in the inflammatory zone caused by adjuvant injection. These biomarkers were causal factors responsible for inflammation of the afflicted paw and were suppressed by a supermolecule argirein and rhein, and the anti-inflammatory activities of the two compounds were comparable to that of ibuprofen.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Snehal S.; Shah, Praboth V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG) is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. PMID:23930040

  18. Inhibition of cartilage and bone destruction in adjuvant arthritis in the rat by a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Considerable evidence has associated the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with the degradation of cartilage and bone in chronic conditions such as arthritis. Direct evaluation of MMPs' role in vivo has awaited the development of MMP inhibitors with appropriate pharmacological properties. We have identified butanediamide, N4- hydroxy-2-(2-methylpropyl)-N1-[2-[[2-(morpholinyl)ethyl]-,[S- (R*,S*)] (GI168) as a potent MMP inhibitor with sufficient solubility and stability to permit evaluation in an experimental model of chronic destructive arthritis (adjuvant-induced arthritis) in rats. In this model, pronounced acute and chronic synovial inflammation, distal tibia and metatarsal marrow hyperplasia associated with osteoclasia, severe bone and cartilage destruction, and ectopic new bone growth are well developed by 3 wk after adjuvant injection. Rats were injected with Freund's adjuvant on day 0. GI168 was was administered systemically from days 8 to 21 by osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously. GI168 at 6, 12, and 25 mg/kg per d reduced ankle swelling in a dose-related fashion. Radiological and histological ankle joint evaluation on day 22 revealed a profound dose related inhibition of bone and cartilage destruction in treated rats relative to rats receiving vehicle alone. A significant reduction in edema, pannus formation, periosteal new bone growth and the numbers of adherent marrow osteoclasts was also noted. However, no significant decrease in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte infiltration of synovium and marrow hematopoietic cellularity was seen. This unique profile of antiarthritic activity indicates that GI168 is osteo- and chondro-protective, and it supports a direct role for MMP in cartilage and bone damage and pannus formation in adjuvant- induced arthritis. PMID:7629505

  19. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  20. A pure polysaccharide from Ephedra sinica treating on arthritis and inhibiting cytokines expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuhong; Shu, Zunpeng; Xing, Na; Xu, Bingqing; Wang, Changfu; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, we found that the acidic polysaccharides of Ephedra sinica had immunosuppressive effect to treat rheumatoid arthritis and the pure polysaccharide ESP-B4 was the main composition of the acidic polysaccharides. At present, the exact molecular mechanism of ESP-B4 on treating arthritis is unclear. We are thus evaluating the properties of ESP-B4 on LPS-induced THP-1 pro-monocytic cells and adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats via TLR4. In vitro, ESP-B4 decreased the production of cytokines induced by LPS. In addition, ESP-B4 reduced the LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB. Pretreatment with ESP-B4 significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of MAPKs induced by LPS. Furthermore, in vivo, after 12 days of disease induced by adjuvant, rats were treated with ESP-B4 for 16 days. ESP-B4 significantly improved all parameters of inflammation. ESP-B4 reduced the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines by inhibiting the TLR4 signaling pathway to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Aberrant MHC class II expression in mouse joints leads to arthritis with extraarticular manifestations similar to rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Satoshi; Ota, Shusuke; Sekine, Chiyoko; Tada, Toyohiro; Otsuka, Takanobu; Okamoto, Takashi; Sønderstrup, Grete; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2006-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with certain MHC class II molecules. To clarify the role of these determinants in RA, we generated the D1CC transgenic mouse that expressed genes involved in antigen processing and presentation by the MHC class II pathway in joints. The class II transactivator, which was transcribed from the rat collagen type II promoter and enhancer, directed the expression of these genes. In D1CC mice congenic for the H-2q (DBA/1) background, small amounts of bovine collagen type II in adjuvant induced reproducibly an inflammatory arthritis resembling RA. Importantly, these stimuli had no effect in DBA/1 mice. Eighty-nine percent of D1CC mice developed chronic disease with joint swelling, redness, and heat in association with synovial proliferation as well as pannus formation and mononuclear infiltration of synovial membranes. Granulomatous lesions resembling rheumatoid nodules and interstitial pneumonitis also were observed. As in patients with RA, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected during the inflammatory stage. Finally, joints in D1CC mice displayed juxtaarticular demineralization, severe joint space narrowing, and erosions, which led to ankylosis, but without the appearance of osteophytes. Thus, aberrant expression of MHC class II in joints facilitates the development of severe erosive inflammatory polyarthritis, which is very similar to RA. PMID:16980409

  2. Rating AAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Why alternative investments? In a word: performance. Many higher education endowment and foundation managers are making increasing commitments to alternative investments, or AAs, in order to obtain higher returns and broader diversification for their investment portfolios than public securities instruments can usually provide. Learn how to handle…

  3. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  4. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis: pathophysiology and treatments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies targeting specific inflammatory mediators revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Targeting key components of the immune system allows efficient suppression of the pathological inflammatory cascade that leads to RA symptoms and subsequent joint destruction. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, one of the most severe complications of RA, is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder caused by deposition of AA amyloid fibrils in multiple organs. These AA amyloid fibrils derive from the circulatory acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and may be controlled by treatment. New biologics may permit AA amyloidosis secondary to RA to become a treatable, manageable disease. Rheumatologists, when diagnosing and treating patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to RA, must understand the pathophysiology and clinical factors related to development and progression of the disease, including genetic predisposition and biological versatility of SAA.

  5. The role of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis in rheumatoid arthritis: an integrative overview.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Carmen; Adán, Norma; Ledesma-Colunga, María G; Solís-Gutiérrez, Mariana; Triebel, Jakob; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease destroying articular cartilage and bone. The female preponderance and the influence of reproductive states in RA have long linked this disease to sexually dimorphic, reproductive hormones such as prolactin (PRL). PRL has immune-enhancing properties and increases in the circulation of some patients with RA. However, PRL also suppresses the immune system, stimulates the formation and survival of joint tissues, acquires antiangiogenic properties upon its cleavage to vasoinhibins, and protects against joint destruction and inflammation in the adjuvant-induced model of RA. This review addresses risk factors for RA linked to PRL, the effects of PRL and vasoinhibins on joint tissues, blood vessels, and immune cells, and the clinical and experimental data associating PRL with RA. This information provides important insights into the pathophysiology of RA and highlights protective actions of the PRL/vasoinhibin axis that could lead to therapeutic benefits.

  6. APL-1, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein, alone or combined with methotrexate attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2016-05-09

    Induction of tolerance to autoantigens in vivo is a complex process that involves several mechanisms such as the induction of regulatory T cells and changes in the cytokine and chemokine profiles. This approach represents an attractive alternative for treatment of autoimmune diseases. APL-1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a novel CD4 + T cell epitope of human heat-shock protein of 60 kDa (HSP60), an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have shown previously that this peptide efficiently inhibited the course of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Lewis rats and induced regulatory T cell (Treg) in ex vivo assay with PBMC isolated from RA patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of APL-1 and its combination with methotrexate (MTX) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in male DBA/1 mice at 8 weeks of age by immunization with chicken collagen. APL, MTX or both were administrated beginning from arthritis onset. Therapeutic effect was evaluated by arthritis and joint pathologic scores. In addition, TNFα and IL-10 in sera were measured by ELISA. Treg induction was assessed by FACS analysis. APL-1 inhibits efficiently the course of arthritis in CIA, similar to MTX. In addition, therapy with APL-1 plus MTX reduced CIA in mice, associated with an increase in Treg. These facts reinforce the therapeutic possibilities of APL-1 as a candidate drug for treatment of RA.

  7. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  9. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  10. Arthritis in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity. About half of adults with heart disease (49%) ... adults with arthritis who also have heart disease, diabetes or obesity, have some limitation of their normal activities because ...

  11. Effect of nabumetone treatment on vascular responses of the thoracic aorta in rat experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ulker, S; Onal, A; Hatip, F B; Sürücü, A; Alkanat, M; Koşay, S; Evinç, A

    2000-04-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drug which is known to cause less gastrointestinal damage than other NSAI drugs. This study was performed to evaluate whether nabumetone treatment might alter the vascular aberrations related to inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Nabumetone treatment (120 or 240 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), orally) was initiated on the 15th day of adjuvant inoculation and continued for 14 days. Arthritic lesions, vascular contractile and relaxant responses and gastroduodenal histopathological preparations were evaluated 29 days after adjuvant inoculation. The contractile responses of aortic rings to phenylephrine and KCl were increased in grade 2 arthritic rats. In grade 3 arthritis only the phenylephrine contractility was decreased. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were decreased in grades 2 and 3. In healthy rats, nabumetone did not change the vascular responses. After treatment of arthritic rats with nabumetone, both the contractile and relaxant response of the aortic rings returned to normal, and arthritic score and paw swelling were reduced. Gastroduodenal histopathology did not show erosions or ulcers in any of the groups. In conclusion, nabumetone improved the systemic signs and vascular alterations in experimental arthritis without showing any gastrointestinal side effects.

  12. Effects of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate in a dietary bar formulation on inflammation, interleukin-1beta, matrix metalloprotease-9, and cartilage damage in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chou, May M; Vergnolle, Nathalie; McDougall, Jason J; Wallace, John L; Marty, Stephanie; Teskey, Val; Buret, Andre G

    2005-04-01

    This study examined the effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) alone and CS plus glucosamine sulfate (GS) in a dietary bar formulation on inflammatory parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis and on the synthesis of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Following 25 days pretreatment with dietary bars containing either CS alone, CS plus GS, or neither CS nor GS, rats were either sham injected or injected with Freund's complete adjuvant into the tail vein. Rats were fed their respective bars for another 17 days after inoculation. Parameters of disease examined included clinical score (combination of joint temperature, edema, hyperalgesia, and standing and walking limb function), incidence of disease, levels of IL-1beta in the serum and paw joints, levels of MMP-9 in the paw joints, paw joint histology, and joint cartilage thickness. Treatment with CS plus GS, but not CS alone, significantly reduced clinical scores, incidences of disease, joint temperatures, and joint and serum IL-1beta levels. Treatment with CS alone and CS plus GS inhibited the production of edema and prevented raised levels of joint MMP-9 associated with arthritis. Similarly, CS alone and CS plus GS treatment also prevented the development of cartilage damage associated with arthritis. Combination CS plus GS treatment in a dietary bar formulation ameliorates clinical, inflammatory, and histologic parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The benefits of CS and GS in combination are more pronounced than those of CS alone. The reduction of arthritic disease by CS plus GS is associated with a reduction of IL-1beta and MMP-9 synthesis.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Polyphenolic-Enriched Red Raspberry Extract in an Antigen Induced Arthritis Rat Model†

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    The red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. Here we sought to investigate the cartilage protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using: 1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and, 2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents) and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/Kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  14. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    van Bruggen, M.C.; van den Broek, M.F.; van den Berg, W.B. )

    1991-09-01

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation.

  15. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  16. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  18. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... tendons causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  19. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  20. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  1. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis via regulating inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of majoon ushba (MU) and its underlying mechanism in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. MU (1000mg/kg/b.wt) and methotrexate (3mg/kg/b.wt) were administered from day 11 to day 18th for 8days after adjuvant induction. We have found that MU treatment significantly increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) and inhibited the over production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (ELISA) in the serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17), inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)), MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and transcription factors (NF-кB and AP-1) (Real-Time PCR) was found significantly downregulated in the synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. In addition, the protein expression of NF-кB, IL-17, COX-2, and RANKL (western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis) was found reduced. On the other hand, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a bone remodeling marker was found to be elevated in synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. Furthermore, MU treatment prevented body weight loss and reduced the joint paw edema, cell infiltration, cartilage and bone degradation as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis. In conclusion, our current findings provide scientific evidence for the traditional claim of MU as an anti-arthritic drug.

  2. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  3. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  4. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kou-Zhu; Liu, Yan-Li; Gu, Jin-Hua; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV) in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg), the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg), and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg) were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg) significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23634171

  5. Maximal adjuvant activity of nasally delivered IL-1α requires adjuvant responsive CD11c+ cells and does not correlate with adjuvant-induced in vivo cytokine production1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Afton L.; Johnson, Brandi T.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Gunn, Michael D.; Hou, Baidong; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Staats, Herman F.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1 has been shown to have strong mucosal adjuvant activities, but little is known about its mechanism of action. We vaccinated IL-1R1 bone marrow chimeric mice to determine if IL-1R1 expression on stromal cells or hematopoietic cells was sufficient for the maximal adjuvant activity of nasally delivered IL-1α as determined by the acute induction of cytokine responses and induction of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor (LF)-specific adaptive immunity. Cytokine and chemokine responses induced by vaccination with IL-1α were predominantly derived from the stromal cell compartment and included G-CSF, IL-6, IL-13, MCP-1, and KC. Nasal vaccination of Il1r1−/− mice given wild-type bone marrow (WT→KO) and WT→WT mice with LF + IL-1α induced maximal adaptive immune responses, while vaccination of wild-type mice given Il1r1−/− bone marrow (KO→WT) resulted in significantly decreased production of LF-specific serum IgG, IgG subclasses, lethal toxin-neutralizing antibodies, and mucosal IgA compared to WT→KO and WT→WT mice (p < 0.05). IL-1α adjuvant activity was not dependent upon mast cells. However, the ability of IL-1α to induce serum LF-specific IgG2c and lethal toxin-neutralizing antibodies was significantly impaired in CD11c-Myd88−/− mice when compared to WT mice (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that CD11c+ cells must be directly activated by nasally administered IL-1α for maximal adjuvant activity and that, while stromal cells are required for maximal adjuvant-induced cytokine production, the adjuvant-induced stromal cell cytokine responses are not required for effective induction of adaptive immunity. PMID:22345651

  6. Periploca forrestii Saponin Ameliorates Murine CFA-Induced Arthritis by Suppressing Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingqin; Li, Minghui; He, Qiuhong; Yang, Xinping; Ruan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Periploca forrestii Schltr. has been used as a Chinese folk medicine due to its versatile pharmacological effects such as promoting wounds and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the antiarthritic activity of Periploca forrestii saponin (PFS) and its active compound Periplocin has still not been demonstrated. Here, we evaluated the antiarthritic effects of PFS in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by intragastric administration at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory activities of Periplocin were also examined in LPS-induced AIA splenocytes and synoviocytes. PFS significantly ameliorated joint swelling; inhibited bone erosion in joints; lowered levels of IL-6 and TGF-β1 in AIA rat splenocyte; and reduced joint protein expression levels of phospho-STAT3 and IKKα. Using LPS-induced AIA splenocytes, we demonstrate that Periplocin suppressed the key proinflammatory cytokines levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TGF-β1, and IL-13 and IL-22 and transcription factor levels of T-bet, GATA3, and C-Jun genes. Periplocin also suppressed LPS-induced cytokine secretion from synoviocytes. Our study highlights the antiarthritic activity of PFS and its derived Periplocin and the underlying mechanisms. These results provide a strong rationale for further testing and validation of the use of Periploca forrestii Schltr. as an alternative modality for the treatment of RA. PMID:28057980

  7. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone might fall or be injured in a car accident. Then, years after the individual’s knee has apparently healed, he might get arthritis in his knee joint. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints and bones (often of ...

  8. Comparative antigen-induced gene expression profiles unveil novel aspects of susceptibility/resistance to adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming T; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-12-01

    Lewis (LEW) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype (RT.1(l)) display differential susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). LEW are susceptible while WKY are resistant to AIA. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis of these disparate outcomes, we compared the gene expression profiles of the draining lymph node cells (LNC) of these two rat strains early (day 7) following a potentially arthritogenic challenge. LNC were tested both ex vivo and after restimulation with the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65. Biotin-labeled fragment cRNA was generated from RNA of LNC and then hybridized with an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray chip. The differentially expressed genes (DEG) were compared by limiting the false discovery rate to <5% and fold change ≥2.0, and their association with quantitative trait loci (QTL) was analyzed. This analysis revealed overall a more active immune response in WKY than LEW rats. Important differences were observed in the association of DEG with QTL in LEW vs. WKY rats. Both the number of upregulated DEG associated with rat arthritis-QTL and their level of expression were relatively higher in LEW when compared to WKY rat; however, the number of downregulated DEG-associated with rat arthritis-QTL as well as AIA-QTL were found to be higher in WKY than in LEW rats. In conclusion, distinct gene expression profiles define arthritis-susceptible versus resistant phenotype of MHC-compatible inbred rats. These results would advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and might also offer potential novel targets for therapeutic purposes.

  9. [Effect of electro-acupuncture on cortical and hippocampal EEG in adjuvant arthritis rats].

    PubMed

    Lou, Z; Sun, W; Liu, Y; Tong, Z

    1992-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats were used as the chronic pain model. The cortical and hippocampal (HPC) EEG were recorded. The behaviour and local inflammatory reaction were observed. The results showed an arousal response of desynchronization of the ECoG and HPC EEG in the AA rats, the delta waves were decreased and beta waves increased significantly. However, the inhibited effect to the desynchronization were showed could be inhibited by the electro-acupuncture (EA) on bilateral Zusanli points and morphine in the AA rats. The results suggested that the cortex and hippocampus participate in the modulating action of chronic pain, and the EA has an analgesic action.

  10. Adjuvant-induced joint inflammation causes very rapid transcription of beta-preprotachykinin and alpha-CGRP genes in innervating sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bulling, D G; Kelly, D; Bond, S; McQueen, D S; Seckl, J R

    2001-04-01

    Neuropeptides synthesized in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been implicated in neurogenic inflammation and nociception in experimental and clinical inflammatory arthritis. We examined the very early changes in response to adjuvant injection in a rat model of unilateral tibio-tarsal joint inflammation and subsequent monoarthritis. Within 30 min of adjuvant injection ipsilateral swelling and hyperalgesia were apparent, and marked increases in beta-preprotachykinin-A (beta-PPT-A) and alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-encoding mRNAs were observed in small-diameter L5 DRG neurones innervating the affected joint. This response was augmented by recruitment of additional small-diameter DRG neurones expressing beta-PPT-A and CGRP transcripts. The increased mRNA was paralleled by initial increases in L5 DRG content of the protein products, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Within 15 min of adjuvant injection there were increases in electrical activity in sensory nerves innervating a joint. Blockade of this activity prevented the rapid induction in beta-PPT-A and CGRP mRNA expression in DRG neurones. Increased expression of heteronuclear (intron E) beta-PPT-A RNA suggests that increases in beta-PPT-A mRNA levels were, at least in part, due to transcription. Pre-treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide had no effect upon the early rise in neuropeptide mRNAS: This and the rapid time course of these changes suggest that increased sensory neural discharge and activation of a latent modulator of transcription are involved.

  11. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  12. Psoriasis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, A

    1990-10-01

    The exact association between psoriasis and arthritis remains an enigma. Some investigators consider that the two disorders constitute a disease entity, psoriatic arthritis, while others support the thesis that psoriasis and arthritis are common diseases and occur simultaneously by chance. The author upholds the latter view as viable. To underscore his viewpoint he presents a comprehensive overview of the controversial opinions through an historical perspective as well as reporting on his epidemiologic and clinical findings from large population studies in the Netherlands. Therapeutic regimens for the management of both skin and joint problems are presented.

  13. Candidate multi-epitope vaccines in aluminium adjuvant induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Lu, Y; Chen, Y

    2000-10-01

    Some neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 envelope proteins were identified to induce antibodies which could effectively inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro. But only very low levels of these antibodies were determined in the HIV-1 infected individuals. To increase the levels of protective antibodies in vivo, we suggested multi-epitope vaccine as a new strategy to induce high level of neutralization antibodies with predefined multi-epitope specificity. A synthesized epitope peptide MP (CG-GPGRAFY-G-ELDKWA-G-RILAVERYLKD) containing three neutralizing epitopes (GPGRAFY, ELDKWA, RILAVERYLKD) was conjugated to carrier protein KLH, and then used for immunization in mouse together with aluminium adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant (FA). The candidate MP-KLH multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium adjuvant could induce antibody response very strongly to the epitope peptide C-(RILAVERYLKD-G)2 and the immunosuppressive peptide (P1) (LQARILAVERYLKDQQL) (antibody titer: 1:51200), strongly to the epitope peptide C-(ELDKWA-G)4 and the C-domain peptide (P2) (1:12800), and moderately to the epitope peptide C-(GPGRAFY)4 and the V3 loop peptide (1:1600). The immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies in sera could recognize P1, P2, V3 loop peptides and rsgp41 (aa 539-684). These results are similar with that in the case of PI-BSA in FA, and suggest that the multi-epitope vaccine in aluminium could induce high levels of antibodies of predefined multi-epitope specificity, which provides experimental evidence for the new strategy to develop an effective neutralizing antibody-based multi-epitope vaccine against HIV-1.

  14. MP Joint Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis. The x-ray shows narrowing of the space between the bones, which is a sign that cartilage has been lost. Your doctor may also order blood tests or imaging studies to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There are many ...

  15. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  16. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  17. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  18. SKLB023 Blocks Joint Inflammation and Cartilage Destruction in Arthritis Models via Suppression of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation in Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Li, Xiuxia; Pei, Heying; Xiang, Mingli; Chen, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common arthritis and is mainly characterized by symmetric polyarticular joint disorders. Our previous study demonstrated a novel small molecule compound (Z)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(4-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene) methyl) phenoxy) acet-amide (SKLB023) showed potently anti-arthritic effects in a rat arthritis model, however, the underlying mechanisms for this are largely unknown. Both NF-κB and macrophages were reported to play important roles in the pathologic processes of RA. The purposes of this study were to indicate whether NF-κB and macrophages contributed to anti-arthritic effects of SKLB023 in two experimental arthritis models. Our results showed that SKLB023 could significantly improve joint inflammation and cartilage destruction both in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. We further found that the binding activation of NF-κB to DNA in joint tissues and RAW264.7 macrophages were suppressed by SKLB023. SKLB023 also inhibited the NF-κB activity in peritoneal macrophages by luciferase assay. Furthermore, the number of macrophages in synovial tissues was decreased after the treatment of different doses of SKLB023. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in plasma, and the levels of TNF-α, NO, and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages were down-regulated by SKLB023. Finally, SKLB023 attenuated the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in vivo and suppressed the phosphorylations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These observations identify a novel function for SKLB023 as an inhibitor of NF-κB in macrophages of RA, highlighting that SKLB023 was a potential therapeutic strategy for RA. PMID:23431370

  19. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  20. Successful immunotherapy with matrix metalloproteinase-derived peptides in adjuvant arthritis depends on the timing of peptide administration

    PubMed Central

    van Bilsen, Jolanda HM; Wagenaar-Hilbers, Josée PA; van der Cammen, Maarten JF; van Dijk, Mariska EA; van Eden, Willem; Wauben, Marca HM

    2002-01-01

    We have recently found that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are targets for T-cell and B-cell reactivity in experimental arthritis. In the present article, we investigate whether modulation of MMP-specific T-cell responses could influence the course of adjuvant arthritis (AA). Lewis rats were treated nasally with MMP peptides prior to or after AA induction. Administration of the MMP-10 or the MMP-16 peptide prior to AA induction reduced the arthritic symptoms. In contrast, administration of the MMP-10 peptide after AA induction aggravated the arthritic symptoms. The present study shows the possible usefulness of MMP peptides for immunotherapy. However, a clear understanding of proper timing of peptide administration is crucial for the development of such therapies. PMID:12106501

  1. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  2. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  3. Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, D.C.; Zhang, L.P.; Ma, F.; Abshire, S.M.; McIlwrath, S.L.; Stinchcomb, A.L.; Westlund, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current arthritis treatments often have side-effects attributable to active compounds as well as route of administration. Cannabidiol (CBD) attenuates inflammation and pain without side-effects, but CBD is hydrophobic and has poor oral bioavailability. Topical drug application avoids gastrointestinal administration, first pass metabolism, providing more constant plasma levels. Methods This study examined efficacy of transdermal CBD for reduction in inflammation and pain, assessing any adverse effects in a rat complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced monoarthritic knee joint model. CBD gels (0.6, 3.1, 6.2 or 62.3 mg/day) were applied for 4 consecutive days after arthritis induction. Joint circumference and immune cell invasion in histological sections were measured to indicate level of inflammation. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in response to noxious heat stimulation determined nociceptive sensitization, and exploratory behaviour ascertained animal’s activity level. Results Measurement of plasma CBD concentration provided by transdermal absorption revealed linearity with 0.6–6.2 mg/day doses. Transdermal CBD gel significantly reduced joint swelling, limb posture scores as a rating of spontaneous pain, immune cell infiltration and thickening of the synovial membrane in a dose-dependent manner. PWL recovered to near baseline level. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord (CGRP, OX42) and dorsal root ganglia (TNFα) revealed dose-dependent reductions of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Results showed 6.2 and 62 mg/day were effective doses. Exploratory behaviour was not altered by CBD indicating limited effect on higher brain function. Conclusions These data indicate that topical CBD application has therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects. PMID:26517407

  4. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  5. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  6. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  7. AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Rebecca; Josephson, Michelle A.; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M.

    2012-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a disorder characterized by the abnormal formation, accumulation and systemic deposition of fibrillary material that frequently involves the kidney. Recurrent AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft has been documented in patients with tuberculosis, familial Mediterranean fever, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic pyelonephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. De novo AA amyloidosis is rarely described. We report two cases of AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft. Our first case is a 47-year-old male with a history of ankylosing spondylitis who developed end-stage renal disease reportedly from tubulointerstitial nephritis from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent use. A biopsy was never performed. One year after transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the femoral head and 8 years post-transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the renal allograft. He was treated with colchicine and adalimumab and has stable renal function at 1 year-follow-up. Our second case is a 57-year-old male with a long history of intravenous drug use and hepatitis C infection who developed end-stage kidney disease due to AA amyloidosis. Our second patient's course was complicated by renal adenovirus, pulmonary aspergillosis and hepatitis C with AA amyloidosis subsequently being identified in the allograft 2.5 years post-transplantation. Renal allograft function remains stable 4-years post-transplantation. These reports describe clinical and pathologic features of two cases of AA amyloidosis presenting with proteinuria and focal involvement of the renal allograft. PMID:22833808

  8. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition. PMID:27321428

  9. Treatment with anti-NAP monoclonal antibody reduces disease severity in murine model of novel angiogenic protein-induced or ovalbumin-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, N B; Krishnamurthy, J; Salimath, B P

    2013-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Synovial angiogenesis contributes to inflammation in RA. In this study we have developed an arthritic model in rats using a novel angiogenic protein (NAP), isolated from human synovial fluid of RA patients. We produced anti-NAP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the same in adjuvant-induced or NAP-induced arthritis as a model of human RA. The treatment of arthritic rats with anti-NAP mAbs resulted in effective amelioration of paw oedema, radiological arthritic characteristics, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and NAP, compared to that of untreated arthritic animals. Further, profiling of angiogenic markers such as synovial microvessel density, angiogenesis, CD31, VEGF and fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) by immunohistochemistry both in arthritic and anti-NAP mAb-treated animals revealed the efficacy of mAb as an anti-angiogenic functional antibody. Therefore, NAP may be an attractive target to design anti-angiogenic and anti-arthritic therapies to control the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  10. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  11. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  12. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  13. Arthritis in Roman Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K; Thould, B T

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of arthritis in Roman Britain was investigated by examining the skeletons of 416 adults from the Roman cemetery at Poundbury Camp near Dorchester, Dorset. The mean height of the people was not much less than that of the current British population, and the prevalence of right handedness was similar to our own. There was a high prevalence of osteoarthritis for such a relatively young community, with particularly severe changes in the vertebral column. The pattern of joints affected by osteoarthritis was different from that seen now, but the prevalence of vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis was much the same. Rheumatoid arthritis was seen as often as the expected rat would indicate, given that the population died young, but it was rare. Other forms of arthritis, including gout and ankylosing spondylitis, were not seen. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6418269

  14. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  15. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  17. Enhanced Topical Delivery of Tetrandrine by Ethosomes for Treatment of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pKa = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin. PMID:24062995

  18. Enhanced topical delivery of tetrandrine by ethosomes for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pK(a) = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin.

  19. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  20. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  1. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  2. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  4. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... If arthritis is due to damaged ligaments, the support structures of the joint may be unstable or “loose.” ... dominant hand is affected • Your personal goals, home support structure, and ability to understand the treatment and comply ...

  5. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  8. Ramipril and haloperidol as promising approaches in managing rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Fahmy Wahba, Mariam Gamal; Shehata Messiha, Basim Anwar; Abo-Saif, Ali Ahmed

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a challenging autoimmune disorder, whose treatments usually cause severe gastrointestinal, renal and other complications. We aimed to evaluate the beneficial anti-arthritic effects of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril and a dopamine receptor blocker, haloperidol, on Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced RA in adult female albino rats. Rats were allocated into a normal control group, an arthritis control group, two reference treatment groups receiving dexamethasone (1.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/day), and two treatment groups receiving ramipril (0.9 mg/kg/day) and haloperidol (1 mg/kg/day). Serum rheumatoid factor, matrix metalloprotinease-3 (MMP-3) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein as specific rheumatoid biomarkers, serum immunoglobulin G and antinuclear antibody as immunological biomarkers, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) as immunomodulatory cytokines, serum myeloperoxidase and C-reactive protein as inflammatory biomarkers, as well as malondialdehyde and glutathione reduced (GSH) as oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed. A histopathological study on joints and spleens was performed to support the results of biochemical estimations. Ramipril administration significantly corrected all the measured biomarkers, being restored back to normal levels except for MMP-3, TNF-α and IL-10. Haloperidol administration restored all the measured biomarkers back to normal levels except for TNF-α, IL-10 and GSH. In conclusion, ACE inhibitors represented by ramipril and dopamine receptor blockers represented by haloperidol may represent new promising protective strategies against RA, at least owing to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potentials.

  9. Novel self-assembled tacrolimus nanoparticles cross-linking thermosensitive hydrogels for local rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Wang, Kaiyuan; Wang, Hanning; Chen, Fang; Huang, Wencong; Chen, Yuqi; Chen, Jiali; Tao, Jin; Wen, Xiaoguang; Xiong, Subin

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to explore the potential application of novel self-assembled nanoparticles cross-linking thermosensitive hydrogels composed of polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (Soluplus) and tacrolimus (FK-506) for local therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The sol-gel transition temperature (Tsol-gel), gelation time, rheological behaviors, in vitro release, in vivo gelation and retention, and therapeutic efficacy against adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were compared between the Soluplus hydrogels and widely studied poloxamer 407 (P407) delivery systems. In sol, the spherical and uniform FK506 loaded Soluplus nanoparticles (Soluplus-SNPs) were self-assembled with encapsulation efficiency of 99.5±1.5% and particle size of 73.9±2.9nm. The decreased Tsol-gel of Soluplus-SNPs hydrogels was associated with the addition of salts, elevation of pH and ionic strength. The optimal Tsol-gel of Soluplus-SNPs with concentrations of 10%-30% in phosphate buffer (50mM, pH 7.4) was from 37.4±0.1°C to 32.8±0.3°C and the gelation time was not greater than 2min. Soluplus-SNPs gelling systems showed lower viscosity and wider range concentrations in sol state at 25°C and stronger gel strength at 37°C than P407, which resulting in longer sustained release of FK506 but without burst-release in vitro, and longer retention time in the local injection site in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy to treat AIA rats was significantly enhanced from d10 to d17 after a single dose of FK506 loaded in 10% and 20% Soluplus-SNPs hydrogels. In conclusion, Soluplus-SNPs hydrogel is a potential sustainable delivery system for FK506 to treat RA locally.

  10. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  11. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis.

  12. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839

  13. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

  14. [Sarcopenia in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis covers the condition of chronic inflammation connected to the increased concentration of inflammatory mediators, reduced physical activity, immobilization caused by pain, stiffness and joint destruction as well as accompanying hormonal and metabolic disorders. It all may lead to extra-articular complications, also to the loss of muscle mass with the weakness of muscle strength, adding to the disability and significantly lowering the patients' quality of life. Sarcopenia is an advanced form of muscle mass loss which constitutes an independent and vital threat for dexterity. Attempts are made to define and classify sarcopenia basing on the measurements of muscle mass where the examinations are conducted by the method of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, absorptiometry of two X-ray beams of various energies, electric bioimpedance and anthropometric methods. The data gained in few studies conducted in order to estimate the reduction of muscle mass in patients with rheumatoid arthritis confirm the significant increase of sarcopenia occurence in this group. Procedure with rheumatoid arthritis covers primarily treatment of the inflammatory process with traditional and biological medicaments that modify the course of illness. Such treatment seems to diminish the risk of equal sarcopenia occurrence. The effectiveness of using anabolic medicaments and high protein diet has not been proved. Currently, regular physical activity including aerobic exercise and exercises with load is considered a good method of muscle mass loss prevention and a procedure in case of confirmed muscle mass loss.

  15. AAS Career Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2012-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society provides substantial programs in the area of Career Services.Motivated by the Society's mission to enhance and share humanity's understanding of the Universe, the AAS provides a central resource for advertising positions, interviewing opportunities at its annual winter meeting and information, workshops and networks to enable astronomers to find employment.The programs of the Society in this area are overseen by an active committee on employment and the AAS Council itself.Additional resources that help characterize the field, its growth and facts about employment such as salaries and type of jobs available are regularly summarized and reported on by the American Institute of Physics.

  16. Topical dermal application of essential oils attenuates the severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Komeh-Nkrumah, Steva A.; Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at examining the effect of an ointment containing essential oils (EO) on the severity of adjuvant arthritis (AA), an experimental model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in Lewis rats and to define the underlying mechanisms. At the onset of AA, rats received topical application twice daily of ointment containing 20% EO or placebo ointment. The synovial fluid (SF) and synovium-infiltrating cells (SIC) of rats were tested for pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. The hind paws and skin were examined histologically. The activity/level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and anti-mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65) antibodies was tested. Arthritic rats treated with ointment containing EO developed less severe clinical arthritis compared to the controls, and this activity was attributable to EO and not the carrier oil. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, and the activity of MMPs in SF and SIC-lysate were significantly (p<0.05) reduced in EO-treated arthritic rats compared to the controls. However, the levels of anti-Bhsp65 antibodies were unaffected by treatment. Thus, topical dermal delivery of EO-containing ointment downmodulates the severity of AA in Lewis rats by inhibiting defined mediators of inflammation. Such ointments should be tested in patients with RA and other arthritic conditions. PMID:21544881

  17. Green tea protects rats against autoimmune arthritis by modulating disease-related immune events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ro; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Wu, Qing-Li; Satpute, Shailesh R; Tan, Ming T; Simon, James E; Berman, Brian M; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2008-11-01

    Green tea, a product of the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. The polyphenolic compounds from green tea (PGT) possess antiinflammatory properties. We investigated whether PGT can afford protection against autoimmune arthritis and also examined the immunological basis of this effect using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AA can be induced in Lewis rats (RT.1(l)) by immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb), and arthritic rats raise a T cell response to the mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). Rats consumed green tea (2-12 g/L) in drinking water for 1-3 wk and then were injected with Mtb to induce disease. Thereafter, they were observed regularly and graded for signs of arthritis. Subgroups of these rats were killed at defined time points and their draining lymph node cells were harvested and tested for T cell proliferative and cytokine responses. Furthermore, the sera collected from these rats were tested for anti-Bhsp65 antibodies. Feeding 8 g/L PGT to Lewis rats for 9 d significantly reduced the severity of arthritis compared with the water-fed controls. Interestingly, PGT-fed rats had a lower concentration of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 but a greater concentration of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 than controls. PGT feeding also suppressed the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response. Thus, green tea induced changes in arthritis-related immune responses. We suggest further systematic exploration of dietary supplementation with PGT as an adjunct nutritional strategy for the management of RA.

  18. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  19. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  20. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding.

  1. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    with other inflam- matory rheumatic diseases, including gout (n 4), pseudogout (n 2), psoriatic arthritis (n 1), spondyloarthritis (n 3...Expression and function of CXCL16 in a novel model of gout . Arthritis Rheum 2010;62:2536–44. 23. Koch AE, Burrows JC, Marder R, Domer PH, Leibovich SJ

  3. The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis.

  4. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  5. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  6. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  7. Classification of degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N. S.; Cruess, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the former division of degenerative arthritis into idiopathic types and those secondary to some disease process is no longer valid. Recent studies have indicated that abnormal concentrations of force on cartilage lead to the development of this disease. A classification is presented that is based on the assumption that the process is initiated by abnormal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix, normal concentrations of force on abnormal cartilage matrix or normal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix that is supported by bone of abnormal consistency. PMID:907947

  8. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo evaluation of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Samira; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Rameshrad, Maryam; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-04-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite (TA-loaded HAp) nanocomposites in the arthritic rat model. The HAp nanocomposites were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method and the drug was subsequently incorporated into the nanocomposites using an impregnation method. The physicochemical properties as well as cytotoxicity of the prepared nanoformulation were examined as well. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the prepared nanoformulation, the various parameters such as paw volume, haematological parameters and histological studies were assessed in the arthritic rats. The nanocomposites with the particle size of 70.45 nm, pore size of 2.71 nm and drug loading of 41.94% were obtained in this study. The specific surface area (aBET) as well as the volume of nitrogen adsorbed on one gram of HAp to complete the monolayer adsorption (Vm) were decreased after the drug loading process. The prepared nanoformulation revealed the slower drug release profile compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, the obtained data from MTT assay showed that the TA-loaded nanocomposites had a lower cytotoxic effect on NIH-3T3 and CAOV-4 cell lines as compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites demonstrated favorable effects on the paw volume as well as the haematological and histopathological abnormalities in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Therefore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites are potentially suggested for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis after further required evaluations.

  9. Protective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. Against Inflammation Associated with Development of Arthritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mali, Ravindra G; Mehta, Anita A

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-arthritic activity of ethanolic extract of seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. (MOEE) in adjuvant-induced arthritis in adult female Wistar rats. During the experimental period, body weight, paw edema volume (primary lesion) and arthritic index (secondary lesion) was observed. On the 21st day, serum from each animal was used for estimation of Rheumatoid Factor (RF) value and levels of selected cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1, and IL-6). Whole blood was used for measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Liver homogenate was utilized for assessment of oxidative stress and histopathology was performed to measure degree of inflammation in synovial joint. Our results suggest that, percentage reduction in body weight was less, paw edema volume and arthritic index score was decreased significantly as compared to diseased control animals. Serum levels of RF, TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6 also showed decreased levels as compared to those in the diseased control group. Treatment with MOEE also altered oxidative stress in relation to its anti-inflammatory activity. Histopathological observations showed mild or less infiltration of lymphocytes, angiogenesis and synovial lining thickening. From all above results and observations, it can be concluded that Moringa oleifera possesses promising antiarthritic property.

  10. Fermented wheat germ extract (avemar) inhibits adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Telekes, Andras; Resetar, Akos; Balint, Geza; Blazso, Gabor; Falkay, Gyorgy; Lapis, Karoly; Raso, Erzsebet; Szende, Bela; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Hidvegi, Mate

    2007-09-01

    Anti-inflammatory efficacy of the fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE, Avemar) in the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model was examined. To Wistar rats with AA, different doses of FWGE and anti-inflammatory drugs (indomethacin, dexamethasone) as monotherapies were administered and FWGE and either diclofenac or dexamethasone were also given in combination. Besides plethysmographies of the paws, histological investigations of synovial tissues were also performed along with detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Gene expressions of COX-1 and 2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). FWGE monotherapy significantly inhibited the development of the secondary (immune-mediated) response in AA, and dexamethasone and indomethacin exerted inhibitory effects in a degree comparable to that of FWGE. Histological analysis of the affected joints confirmed the results. FWGE inhibited COX-1 and -2, while indomethacin enhanced COX-2 gene expressions. FWGE had an additive interaction with diclofenac. It is concluded that FWGE has significant anti-inflammatory efficacy confirmed by plethysmography, histology, and real-time PCR.

  11. Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumor without Atlantoaxial Subluxation or Rheumatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Cho, Won Ho; Cha, Seung Heon

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of retro-odontoid pseudotumor (ROP) without rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). A 76-year-old woman presented with paresthesia and weakness of both lower and upper extremities. She had no laboratory or physical findings of RA. Dynamic X-ray showed no AAS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a retro-odontoid mass compressing the spinal cord. Transdural mass debulking and biopsy were performed via minimal left suboccipital craniectomy and C1 hemilaminectomy. Two months after surgery, her symptoms were aggravated. Follow-up MRI visualized mass re-growth and spinal cord compression due to the mass and AAS. Posterior C1-2 fixation was performed without further decompression. Twelve months after posterior fixation, no symptoms were apparent and follow-up MRI showed complete resolution of the ROP with C1-2 bony fusion. The ROP with C1-2 instability might be completely resolved only C1-2 fusion without decompression. Furthermore, we speculated that osteoarthritis of C1-2 itself causes a partial tear or degradation of the transverse ligament, that induced formation of ROP. PMID:27857933

  12. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2017-03-30

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis.

  13. Ameliorative Effects of a Polyphenolic Fraction of Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. Bark in Animal Models of Inflammation and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Badal; Bodhankar, Subhash; Mohan, V; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Syn C. verum, family: Lauraceae) is one of the oldest traditional medicines for inflammatory- and pain-related disorders. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the polyphenol fraction from Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark (CPP) in animal models of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Dose-response studies of CPP (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) used in a separate set of in vivo experiments were conducted in acute (carrageenan-induced rat paw edema), subacute (cotton pellet-induced granuloma), and sub-chronic (AIA, adjuvant-induced established polyarthrtis) models of inflammation in rats and the acetic acid-induced writhing model of pain in mice. Effects of CPP on cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from Concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated lymphocytes were also evaluated in vitro. CPP showed a strong and dose-dependent reduction in paw volume, weight loss reversal effects against carrageenan-induced paw edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models in rats. CPP (200 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days) showed a significant reduction in elevated serum TNF-α concentration without causing gastric ulcerogenicity in the AIA model in rats. CPP also demonstrated mild analgesic effects during acute treatment as evidenced by the reduction in the writhing and paw withdrawal threshold of the inflamed rat paw during the acetic acid-induced writhing model and Randall-Selitto test. CPP was found to inhibit cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from ConA-stimulated lymphocytes in vitro. In conclusion, CPP demonstrated prominent action in animal models of inflammation and arthritis and therefore can be considered as a potential anti-rheumatic agent with disease-modifying action.

  14. Efficacy of ultrasound mediated microbubbles in diclofenac gel to enhance transdermal permeation in rheumatoid arthritis induced rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, A H; Chuang, H C; Chung, H Y

    2015-08-01

    In previous study in the literature, the effect of ultrasound on the transdermal permeation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac has been investigated. Therapeutic ultrasound can increase circulation in the inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Recently, transdermal drug delivery has been demonstrated by ultrasound (US) combining with microbubbles (MBs) contrast agent. In this study, the efficiency of US-MBs mediated diclofenac delivery for adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats was evaluated. RA was induced by injection of 100 μl Freund's complete adjuvant into the ankle joint in SD male rats (250-300g) and were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group (C); (2) penetrating diclofenac alone (D); (3) US alone (U); (4) US combined with penetrating diclofenac (DU); (5) US combined with MBs and penetrating diclofenac (DUB). The evaluations of ankle width were performed for 10 days by high frequency (40MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler mode imaging before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of arthritis induced show synovitis and neovascularity. After treatment, only a little neovascularity has been observed. The recovery rate at 10th day in the group DUB (97.7±2.7 %) was significantly higher than in the group C (1.0±2.7 %), group D (37.5±4.6 %), group U (75.5±4.2 %) and group DU (87.3±5.2 %) (p <; 0.05). Our results investigated that the treatments of US and MBs can increase skin permeability to enhance diclofenac sodium delivery and inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounded the arthritic ankle. In color Doppler imaging, after the combination treatment, the synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area was reduced quickly.

  15. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or changes in certain hormones, may promote the development of rheumatoid arthritis in a genetically susceptible person who has been exposed to a triggering agent from the environment. Even though all the answers are not known, ...

  16. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  17. Glucocorticoid use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harris, E D

    1983-09-01

    Although the early hopes and enthusiasm held for glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis therapy have been greatly modified, there is still a secondary therapeutic role for these drugs, one which has been refined by clinical experience.

  18. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Atlantoaxial Subluxation in Surgically Treated Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients, Considering the Time Interval between Rheumatoid Arthritis Diagnosis and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Na, Min-Kyun; Bak, Koang-Hum; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Ryu, Je Il; Han, Myung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease that can affect the cervical spine, especially the atlantoaxial region. The present study evaluated the risk factors for atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) development and progression in patients who have undergone surgical treatment. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the data of 62 patients with RA and surgically treated AAS between 2002 and 2015. Additionally, we identified 62 patients as controls using propensity score matching of sex and age among 12667 RA patients from a rheumatology registry between 2007 and 2015. We extracted patient data, including sex, age at diagnosis, age at surgery, disease duration, radiographic hand joint changes, and history of methotrexate use, and laboratory data, including presence of rheumatoid factor and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Results The mean patient age at diagnosis was 38.0 years. The mean time interval between RA diagnosis and AAS surgery was 13.6±7.0 years. The risk factors for surgically treated AAS development were the serum CRP level (p=0.005) and radiographic hand joint erosion (p=0.009). The risk factors for AAS progression were a short time interval between RA diagnosis and radiographic hand joint erosion (p<0.001) and young age at RA diagnosis (p=0.04). Conclusion The CRP level at RA diagnosis and a short time interval between RA diagnosis and radiographic hand joint erosion might be risk factors for surgically treated AAS development in RA patients. Additionally, a short time interval between RA diagnosis and radiographic hand joint erosion and young age at RA diagnosis might be risk factors for AAS progression. PMID:27847572

  19. Canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heuser, W

    1980-11-01

    A miniature poodle was presented with a history of a chronic, insidious hind limb lameness. As part of the clinical approach to the case, a serum electrophoresis was done which revealed a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Analysis of stife and carpal joint fluid revealed an elevated white cell count, that consisted of about 75% neutrophils and 25% monocytes. The joint fluid was sterile on bacteriological culture. Radiographs of the carpal joints indicated some narrowing of joint spaces and subchondral lucencies. Rheumatoid factor was identified on serological testing. Histopathology of carpal joint biopsies indicated a nonsuppurative synovitis. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The dog was treated with prednisone on a long term basis. Response to treatment has been good.

  20. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  1. Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melodie; Bergman, Martin Jan

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a dynamic systemic disease that can have a profound affect on a patient’s self-esteem. Fortunately, numerous therapeutic advances have been made over the last 10 years. In order to help patients manage their disease, healthcare providers should be aware of the modifiable risk factors that may exacerbate psoriasis. Additionally, exploring the impact the disease has on a patient and how it may change over their lifespan will help ensure appropriate therapies are used. Patients are unique so one medication will not fit all of our patients’ needs. In this paper, the authors look at available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Educating psoriasis patients, in addition to collaborating with patients and other healthcare providers, may help initiate therapies that will result in patients living their lives to the fullest. PMID:28360971

  2. Psoriatic Arthritis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Peter; Ryan, Caitriona; Menter, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating condition, which affects approximately one-quarter of psoriasis patients. Recent findings have furthered our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of PsA. There have been major advances in the identification of genes associated with joint involvement but not with cutaneous disease alone. The elucidation of key immunologic pathways has allowed the development of novel targeted therapies that are in the research pipeline. Currently, good screening tests and biomarkers to diagnose early PsA and to guide therapy are limited. In this paper, we present recent findings with regard to the immunopathogenesis and genetics of PsA, biomarkers, and screening tools and review the targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. PMID:23209897

  3. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  4. Celastrus aculeatus Merr. suppresses the induction and progression of autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune response to heat-shock protein 65

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Li; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2007-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine products are increasingly being used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms of action of these agents are not fully defined. Using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis, we determined whether the ethanol extract of Celastrus aculeatus Merr. (Celastrus), a Chinese herb, can down-modulate the severity of AA, and also examined the Celastrus-induced changes in immune responses to the disease-related antigen mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). AA was induced in the Lewis (LEW; RT.1l) rat by immunization subcutaneously with heat-killed M. tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb). Celastrus was fed to LEW rats by gavage daily, beginning either before Mtb challenge (preventive regimen) or after the onset of AA (therapeutic regimen). An additional group of rats was given methotrexate for comparison. All rats were graded regularly for the signs of arthritis. In parallel, the draining lymph node cells of Celastrus-treated rats were tested for proliferative and cytokine responses, whereas their sera were tested for the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide. Celastrus feeding suppressed both the induction as well as the progression of AA, and the latter effect was comparable to that of methotrexate. Celastrus treatment induced relative deviation of the cytokine response to anti-inflammatory type and enhanced the production of anti-Bhsp65 antibodies, which are known to be protective against AA. Celastrus feeding also reduced the levels of nitric oxide. On the basis of our results, we suggest further systematic exploration of Celastrus as an adjunct therapeutic modality for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17645785

  5. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  6. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters November 25, 2013 Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis The presence of a specific type of gut bacteria correlates with rheumatoid arthritis in newly diagnosed, untreated people. The finding suggests ...

  7. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  8. Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J T

    1986-10-01

    Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children are reviewed as distinct entities in the differential diagnosis of the many types of juvenile arthritis reviewed here and in other articles.

  9. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

    2000-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

 PMID:11053062

  10. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is now well established that there is a preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is

  11. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  12. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  13. Differential Diagnosis of Polyarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pujalte, George G A; Albano-Aluquin, Sheila A

    2015-07-01

    Polyarticular arthritis is commonly encountered in clinical settings and has multiple etiologies. The first step is to distinguish between true articular pain and nonarticular or periarticular conditions by recognizing clinical patterns through the history and physical examination. Once pain within a joint or joints is confirmed, the next step is to classify the pain as noninflammatory or inflammatory in origin. Noninflammatory arthritis, which is mostly related to osteoarthritis, has a variable onset and severity and does not have inflammatory features, such as warm or swollen joints. Osteoarthritis usually presents with less than one hour of morning stiffness and pain that is aggravated by activity and improves with rest. A review of systems is usually negative for rashes, oral ulcers, or other internal organ involvement. In contrast, inflammatory arthritis generally causes warm, swollen joints; prolonged morning stiffness; and positive findings on a review of systems. Once inflammatory arthritis is suspected, possible diagnoses are sorted by the pattern of joint involvement, which includes number and type of joints involved, symmetry, and onset. The suspicion for inflammatory arthritis should be confirmed by the appropriate serologic/tissue and/or imaging studies in the clinical setting or in consultation with a subspecialist.

  14. Cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J B M; Tak, Paul P

    2002-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by synovial inflammation that leads to the destruction of cartilage and bone. In the last decade, there was a lot of successful research in the field of cytokine expression and regulation. It has become clear that pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, derived predominantely from cells of macrophage lineage, play a major role in the initiation and perpetuation of the chronic inflammatory process in the RA synovial membrane. Monokines are abundant in rheumatoid synovial tissue, whereas low amounts of lymphokines are found. The involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, in the pathogenesis of RA is well accepted. Recent data provide evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18 plays a crucial role in the development and sustenance of inflammatory joint diseases. There also appears to be a compensatory anti-inflammatory response in RA synovial membrane. It has become clear in the last few years that T cell-derived cytokines expressed preferentially by Th1 cells contribute to joint destruction and inflammation in RA. However, products from Th2 cells may be protective.

  15. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  16. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  17. Amyloid Goiter Associated with Amyloidosis Secondary to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uzum, Gungor; Kaya, Fatih Oner; Uzum, Ayse Kubat; Kucukyilmaz, Meltem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Leblebici, Cem; Koc, Oguz

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis refers to a variety of conditions in which amyloid proteins are abnormally deposited in organs and/or tissues. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are primary amyloidosis (PA) of light chains and secondary amyloidosis (SA) caused by chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although involvement of the thyroid gland by amyloid is a relatively common phenomenon, clinically significant enlargement of the thyroid owing to amyloid deposition is a rare occurrence. In SA, the deposition of amyloid associated (AA) protein is associated with atrophy of thyroid follicles. The clinical picture of these patients is characterized by rapid, painless thyroid gland enlargement which may be associated with dysphagia, dyspnea, or hoarseness. Thyroid function is not impaired in most cases. Although amyloid goitre secondary to systemic amyloidosis due to chronic inflammatory diseases is relatively common, specifically related to RA is much more uncommon one and it is reported less in the literature. In this report, A 52-old-year female patient with amyloid goiter associated with amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis is presented. PMID:24368922

  18. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  19. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  20. Improving recognition of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, Philip G; Coates, Laura C

    2009-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis but is underdiagnosed. Psoriasis affects over 1.5% of the UK population. Around 15% of these patients will be diagnosed with PsA, but up to 40% may have evidence of arthritis if reviewed thoroughly. PsA can be difficult to diagnose as patients present with a variety of different patterns of arthritis. Most patients with PsA have relatively mild skin psoriasis, but some have more significant disease. Only 10-20% develop arthritis before their skin disease. Many patients have mild skin psoriasis that they are unaware of, or have not had diagnosed. Joint involvement is far more variable in PsA, compared with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients may present with: monoarthritis; oligoarthritis; involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints; a rheumatoid arthritis-like picture with multiple joints involved including the small joints in the hand or axial disease producing symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Features such as dactylitis (uniform sausage-like swelling of the whole digit either finger or toe) and enthesitis (inflammation at the sites of muscle or tendon attachment to bone) may also help diagnose PsA. Skin disease is present in the majority of patients although not all. Hidden areas for psoriasis include: behind the ears; at the top of the natal cleft and around the umbilicus. Larger joints, particularly the knees, can develop very big effusions causing obvious swelling. Areas to test for enthesitis should include the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, costochondral joints and the elbow. Patients with suspected PsA should be referred promptly to a rheumatologist for further assessment and treatment. Diagnosis of PsA can be made on clinical grounds but blood tests and radiographs are performed routinely to aid diagnosis. Initial therapy for PsA should include NSAIDs to ease pain and stiffness. Local injections of corticosteroids are recommended for peripheral arthritis (given IA) and

  1. Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

    1969-01-01

    The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

  2. Management of Arthritis and Rheumatism

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Duncan

    1970-01-01

    The principles of successful management of the patient with arthritis depend on adequate patient education and various medical and physical therapy measures to control pain and maintain function. In many instances psychiatric and orthopaedic consultations are invaluable. The treatment of arthritis at any age, however, must depend on a precise diagnosis. This may require examination of synovial fluid including polarizing microscopy, serological studies, arthrographic procedures and an awareness of factors which may influence the level of serum uric acid. The establishment of a diagnosis alone may be insufficient for proper evaluation and the physician may be assisted by physio, occupational therapy and medical social work assessments. Imagesp37-a PMID:20468462

  3. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  4. [Understanding rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Sordet, Christelle; Mrabet, Dalila; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2005-12-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and severe inflammatory rheumatic disease, for which the immune mechanisms are being decoded little by little. The pathogenic ncludes significant cellular actors of innate immunity (fibroblastic synoviocytes, macrophages, mastocytes...) and adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocytes). These actors interact through the production of and response to specific (cytokines, chemokines and auto-antibodies) and non-specific (prostaglandins, nitrous oxide [NO], complement, proteases) mediators. The chronology of this rheumatoid synovitis is becoming progressively clearer. Its initiation could be the consequence of a precocious activation of the innate immunity, induced by bacterial agents or debris (PAMP). The activation of the synoviocytes and the macrophages via specific receptors (PPR) unleashes an intense inflammatory reaction that triggers a cascade of events. The ongoing nature of this synovitis leads to the intra-articular recruitment of different cells of immunity. This cellular afflux amplifies the macrophagic and synoviocytic activation and proliferation. All of these interactive phenomena end in the production of large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFa, IL1, IL6, IL15, IL17, IL18) but also other pathogenic mediators (auto-antibodies, complement, prostaglandins, nitrous oxide...). This synovitis persists, as it is no longer regulated by a sufficient production of physiological regulators (soluble receptors and inhibitors of cytokines). The consequence of this intense inflammation and synovial proliferation leads to osteo-articular destruction by the production of proteases and the activation of osteoclasts by the RANK/RANK-ligand pathway under the effect of cytokines (TNFa, IL5, IL1, IL6, IL17) and other mediators (prostaglandins) liberated by synoviocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes. The decryption of this puzzle has already created new therapeutic orientations. The identification of new targets is one of the major

  5. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  6. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  7. IFNγ production in peripheral blood of early Lyme disease patients to hLFAαL (aa326-345)

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Solecki, Maria JC; Wormser, Gary P; Dattwyler, Raymond J

    2002-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto contains a T helper 1 (Th1) cell epitope that could play a role in an autoimmune response to hLFA1. Methods We used two peptides, hLFAαL (aa326-345) and Borrelia burgdorferi OspAB31 (aa164-183), as stimulating antigens to measure Th1 proinflammatory IFNγ cytokine production in peripheral blood of Lyme disease patients presenting with EM without history of arthritis, as well as in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. Results IFNγ responses to hLFA1 peptide were observed in 11 of 19 Lyme disease patients and in 3 of 15 healthy controls. In contrast, only 2 of 19 of the Lyme disease patients and none of the controls responded to the homologous OspAB31 peptide. Conclusions IFNγ was produced in response to stimulation with peptide hLFAαL (aa326-345) in peripheral blood of 58% of patients with early Lyme disease without signs of arthritis, as well as in peripheral blood of 20% of healthy individuals, but not in response to stimulation with the homologous OspAB31 (aa164-183) peptide (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that reactivity to the hLFA1 peptide in peripheral blood may be the result of T cell degeneracy. PMID:12385648

  8. Breast cancer-associated metastasis is significantly increased in a model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Das Roy, Lopamudra; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Schettini, Jorge L; Gruber, Helen E; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies including breast cancer. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA) that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints. Other systemic effects associated with arthritis include increased cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge, available for a decade, it has never been questioned if the site of chronic inflammation linked to AA creates a milieu that attracts tumor cells to home and grow in the inflamed bones and lungs which are frequent sites of breast cancer metastasis. Methods To determine if chronic inflammation induced by autoimmune arthritis contributes to increased breast cancer-associated metastasis, we generated mammary gland tumors in SKG mice that were genetically prone to develop AA. Two breast cancer cell lines, one highly metastatic (4T1) and the other non-metastatic (TUBO) were used to generate the tumors in the mammary fat pad. Lung and bone metastasis and the associated inflammatory milieu were evaluated in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic mice. Results We report a three-fold increase in lung metastasis and a significant increase in the incidence of bone metastasis in the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic control mice. We also report that the metastatic breast cancer cells augment the severity of arthritis resulting in a vicious cycle that increases both bone destruction and metastasis. Enhanced neutrophilic and granulocytic infiltration in lungs and bone of the pro-arthritic and arthritic mice and subsequent increase in circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor

  9. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send...inflammatory properties in RA pathogenesis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Citrullination, chemokines, chemotaxis, rheumatoid arthritis, immunology 16. SECURITY

  10. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  11. Altered Th17/Treg balance and dysregulated IL-1β response influence susceptibility/resistance to experimental autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesha, S H; Dudics, S; Weingartner, E; So, E C; Pedra, Jhf; Moudgil, K D

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed at gaining an insight into immune mechanisms of differential susceptibility to autoimmunity of individuals sharing the same major histocompatibility complex by studying arthritis-susceptible Lewis (LEW) and arthritis-resistant Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats (both RT.1(l)) using the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lymph node cells (LNC) and synovium-infiltrating cells (SIC) of LEW and WKY rat subjected to an arthritogenic challenge were tested. The frequency of T helper 17 (Th17) and T regulatory (Treg) cells was determined by flow cytometry, whereas serum and spleen adherent cell (SAC)-derived supernatant were analyzed for specific cytokines and chemokines. We observed that WKY rats are not deficient in generating a Th17 response to the arthritogenic challenge in LNC (periphery); however, the Th17/Treg ratio is markedly reduced in the joint (target organ) of WKY versus LEW rats because of reduced Th17 levels therein in WKY rats. These results suggest differential and selective decrease in Th17 cell migration into the joints of WKY rats. Interestingly, serum levels of chemokines RANTES and MCP-1 were reduced in WKY rats. Furthermore, WKY rats showed reduced serum IL-1β level in vivo but no defect in IL-1β production by SAC in vitro, suggesting an effective in vivo regulation of IL-1β response. We also unraveled the role of interferon-γ (IFNγ), which we have previously reported to be increased in WKY versus LEW rats, in regulation of IL-1β. Thus, reduced Th17/Treg ratio in the target organ (joints) and decreased systemic IL-1β might contribute to the AA-resistance of WKY rats; whereas the converse factors render LEW more vulnerable to AA.

  12. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder ...

  13. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. How Do People With Osteoporosis and Arthritis Cope? If you have osteoporosis or arthritis, exercise can ... People with arthritis need to learn ways to cope with joints that don't move well and ...

  14. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract has potent anti-arthritic effects on collagen-induced arthritis by modifying the T cell balance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Abdel-Hamied, Hala E; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Bakheet, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterised by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints, joint malformations, and disability. The continuous use of conventional anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with severe adverse effects. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) is considered to have protective effects against several diseases. In this study based on the mouse adjuvant-induced-arthritis (AIA) model, we examined the effects of GSPE on the key mediators of arthritic inflammation, namely T cell subsets, glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR) expressing cells, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, Th17 cells, Th1/Th2 cytokines, and inflammatory mediator gene expression. We treated BALB/c mice with 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg GSPE or saline daily (14 days) per orally (p.o.) at the onset of AIA. At the peak phase of AIA (day 14), the heparinised whole blood and ankle joints of all groups were collected and tested. GSPE-treated mice showed a substantial reduction in the levels of T cell subsets, GITR-expressing cells, and Th1 cytokines as well as the inflammatory mediators (MCP-1, MIP-2, and ICAM-1) that induce them compared with the vehicle-treated (saline) and arthritic mice. However, GSPE significantly upregulated the number of Tregs and Th2 cytokine producing cell number or it also induced Th17/Treg rebalance and orchestrated various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the gene expression of their mediators that mediate cellular infiltration into the joints. This might, contribute to its anti-arthritic activity. Our results suggest that p.o. treatment with GSPE attenuated AIA in mice might offer a promising alternative/adjunct treatment for RA.

  15. Upper cervical instability associated with rheumatoid arthritis: what to 'know' and what to 'do'.

    PubMed

    Slater, Helen; Briggs, Andrew M; Fary, Robyn E; Chan, Madelynn

    2013-12-01

    This case report describes a patient who presented with cervical spinal pain and headaches associated with atlanto-axial subluxation (AAS) secondary to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For physiotherapists, especially less experienced clinicians, the significant risks associated with using manual assessment and treatment techniques in such a patient require careful consideration right at the start of a consultation. The focus of the case is therefore on the recognition of AAS in this patient with RA, highlighting the clinical findings that alert clinicians to this possibility and explaining the requisite knowledge and skills required to safely and effectively manage this patient. The use of screening tools to help clinicians identify possible RA in its pre-diagnosis stage and the clinical signs and symptoms that raise the index of suspicion for AAS, are discussed. The relevant contraindications and precautions associated with manual treatments directed at the upper cervical spine, and which may have potentially serious negative consequences, including quadriplegia and mortality, are addressed. Finally, the implications for the use of manual assessment and treatment of patients with RA and co-morbid AAS are addressed.

  16. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  17. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  18. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  19. TNF inhibition as therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2002-07-01

    The introduction of TNF- alpha -inhibiting biologicals has been a major therapeutic breakthrough in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Against a background of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug experience, this review focuses on present experiences and possible future developments. TNF inhibition results in profound improvement in the majority of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but non-response and adverse effects need attention. Adalimumab is being filed for approval. Other monoclonal antibodies or receptor constructs are in late development. Small molecule inhibitors of TNF production or signalling are a hot topic. One emerging target is nuclear factor kappa B and selective inhibition has proved effective in animal models of arthritis. Synovial proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by diminished apoptosis of fibroblasts, whereas bone marrow precursor cells undergo accelerated apoptosis in active rheumatoid arthritis. Both abnormalities are seemingly ameliorated by TNF inhibition. Anti-apoptotic strategies will soon go into development for control of unresponsive rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  1. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  2. Role of IL-8 rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms in the development of primary gouty arthritis in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y X; Zhao, H; Guo, H Q

    2016-10-17

    In this study, we investigated the role of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of the interleukin-8 gene (IL-8; rs4073 and rs2227306) in the susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis in a Chinese population. Three hundred and twelve patients with primary gouty arthritis and 340 healthy controls were recruited from the Yan'an University Affiliated Hospital between January 2014 and March 2015. The IL-8 rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Unconditional multiple-logistic regression analysis revealed that the TT genotype of rs4073 was correlated with primary gouty arthritis risk, compared to the AA genotype [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-2.54; P = 0.02]. In addition, the IL-8 rs4073 T allele was associated with a significant elevated risk of primary gouty arthritis, in comparison to the A allele (OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.67; P = 0.01). However, we observed no significant relationship between the IL-8 rs2227306 polymorphism and primary gouty arthritis risk. The results of this study suggest that the IL-8 rs4073 polymorphism could be a marker for primary gouty arthritis development.

  3. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  4. Galectin-3: A key player in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Ea, Hang-Korng; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Reboul, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis is more and more considered as the leading reason for the disability in the world, particularly regarding its main entities, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The common feature of arthritis is inflammation, which is mainly supported by synovitis (synovial inflammation), although the immune system plays a primary role in rheumatoid arthritis and a secondary one in osteoarthritis. During the inflammatory phase of arthritis, many pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators are secreted by infiltrating immune and resident joint cells, which are responsible for cartilage degradation and excessive bone remodeling. Amongst them, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, galectin-3, has been reported to be highly expressed and secreted by inflamed synovium of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Furthermore, galectin-3 has been demonstrated to induce joint swelling and osteoarthritis-like lesions after intra-articular injection in laboratory animals. However, the mechanisms underlying its pathophysiological role in arthritis have not been fully elucidated. This review deals with the characterization of arthritis features and galectin-3 and summarizes our current knowledge of the contribution of galectin-3 to joint tissue lesions in arthritis.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis.

  6. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally affects people between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients with RA have a significantly higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) compared to the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) associated with RA places this disease among the most widely studied. The duration of RA was associated with MS, implicating the role of inflammation in MS development. The presence of MS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis. A positive correlation between prevalence of MS and worsening of functional status was found in patients with RA. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk and a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the rheumatologist should be aware of those MS risk factors and attempt to modify them. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of MS in RA.

  7. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  8. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  9. Update in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana R; Staudt, Leslie; James, Judith A

    2005-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by polyarticular symmetrical arthritis. Inflammatory mediators targeting joint structures produce joint inflammation with pain, functional loss, joint destruction and permanent deformity. Currently, no cure for RA exists but the increasing use of combination therapy and immunomodulatory agents has led to improved quality of life and long-term outlook for many of these patients. While traditionally employed therapies have provided limited disease suppression, advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RA have resulted in new therapies targeting very specific components of the inflammatory process. These new treatments have shown very promising results with improved efficacy and an overall decreased toxicity profile. This review provides an overview for practicing clinicians of the current immunosuppressive therapies in RA with an emphasis on newer biological agents regarding their mechanisms of action, efficacy, side effects and monitoring recommendations. Developing therapeutics will be briefly discussed.

  10. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  11. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  12. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  14. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  15. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  16. Cytokine expression and synovial pathology in the initiation and spontaneous resolution phases of adjuvant arthritis: Interleukin-17 expression is upregulated in early disease

    PubMed Central

    Bush, K A; Walker, J S; Lee, C S; Kirkham, B W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the immune processes controlling the initiation and spontaneous resolution of adjuvant arthritis (AA). We investigated synovial T-cell recruitment and mRNA expression of IL-17 and other important disease related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, TNF and TGF-β in inguinal lymph node (ILN) and synovial membrane (SM). Arthritis severity was assessed by a numerical rating score and rats were sacrificed every 3–4 days postadjuvant induction. Further assessment involved quantitative radiology and histology of the ankle joints on each day, and the ILN and SM were removed for RNA extraction. Cytokine mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR and densitometry. Paraffin sections of rat ankle joints were stained for T-cells (CD3) by immunohistochemistry. In the ILN, there was an increase in IL-17, TNF and IFN-γ expression in the early stages of disease, with a secondary sustained increase in IFN-γ expression. In the SM, there was expression of T-cell cytokines in early arthritis (day 13), and prolonged TNF and TGF-β expression, which reflected disease progression. IL-4 mRNA expression increased in the later stages of AA. Synovial T-cell numbers transiently increased at day 6, and remained high from days 13–28. Increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, including IL-17, in the ILN reflects the initiating events in the early stage of disease. IL-17 may therefore play an important role in the pathogenesis of AA. The increase in IL-4 (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the SM in the later stages of AA suggests that IL-4 is involved in the spontaneous resolution of AA. The initial increase in IFN-γ in the ILN may reflect a pro-inflammatory response, while the prolonged secondary increase may indicate activation of regulatory T-cells. PMID:11298138

  17. Septic Arthritis Caused by Noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with β-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

  18. Opioid analgesics for rheumatoid arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Samuel L; Richards, Bethan L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-02-06

    CLINICAL QUESTION Do the benefits of opioid analgesics outweigh the risks in patients with persistent pain due to rheumatoid arthritis? BOTTOM LINE Weak opioids (such as codeine, dextropropoxyphene, and tramadol) may be effective in the short-term management of rheumatoid arthritis pain, but adverse effects are common and may outweigh the benefits; alternative analgesics should be considered first.

  19. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  20. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  1. Current concepts in the treatment of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen-hua; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2013-02-01

    Gouty arthritis is an extremely painful condition that causes functional impairment. Gouty arthritis has become increasingly complex because of multiple comorbidities, iatrogenic factors and hyperuricemia that is refractory to treatment. In this review, we present a general overview of gouty arthritis including its pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, predisposing factors and prophylactic therapy for preventing gouty arthritis flares.

  2. A.A., constructivism, and reflecting teams.

    PubMed

    Nevels, B

    1997-12-01

    Numerous studies and clinical anecdotes reveal a relationship between attendance at A.A. meetings and/or degree of involvement in A.A. and maintenance of sobriety. Hypotheses as to how A.A. and/or the A.A. meeting is helpful to its members have ranged from a focus on factors common to all therapy groups, to aspects of A.A. "treatment" which are behavioral in nature. Presented here is another way of understanding A.A.'s effectiveness within the frame of more recent, constructivistic approaches to family therapy. In particular, the A.A. topic meeting is compared to the reflecting team concept of Tom Anderson.

  3. A Case Report Describing a Rare Presentation of Simultaneous Occurrence of MPO-ANCA-Associated Vasculitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papireddy, Muralidhar; Gao, John

    2016-01-01

    Background. Renal-limited myeloperoxidase vasculitis with simultaneous rheumatoid arthritis is reported as a rare occurrence. Review of literature suggests that most patients had a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis for several years prior to presenting with renal failure from myeloperoxidase vasculitis. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old Caucasian male presented to the hospital experiencing malaise, fevers, decreased oral intake, nausea, and vomiting for one week duration. His past medical history consisted of newly diagnosed but untreated rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. He was found to have acute renal failure, proteinuria, and hypoglycemia. Standard therapy, including intravenous fluids, did not improve his acute renal failure. A vasculitis workup resulted in a positive myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) pauci-immune type, suggestive of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV). Treatment consisted of prednisone, cyclophosphamide, and seven cycles of plasmapheresis, in addition to hemodialysis for uremia. Upon discharge, he received hemodialysis for another week and continued treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisone. Conclusion. Patients with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis may develop renal failure due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication use and AA type amyloidosis; however, necrotizing glomerulonephritis with crescent formation has been rarely reported. This stresses the importance of early recognition and swift initiation of treatment. PMID:27891268

  4. Surgical Management of Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mulon, Pierre-Yves; Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2016-11-01

    Lameness related to synovial infection needs to be addressed promptly because rapid degradation of the synovial homeostasis results in permanent cartilage alterations detrimental to complete recovery. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, synovial fluid analysis, and imaging. Commonly affected joints are the fetlock, carpus, tarsus, and stifle; shoulder, elbow, and hip may also be infected. Knowing the source of infection is essential in cases of remote septic arthritis. Antimicrobials should be administered; local delivery systems may be used. Therapy relies on the removal of inflammatory mediators. Pain management is critical throughout the surgical procedures and the recovery period.

  5. Flurbiprofen in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Pipitone, V; Numo, R; Loizzi, P

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary findings are reported from an open study of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily in 24 patients and from 6 out of 30 patients treated so far in a double-blind crossover comparison of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily and 150 mg indomethacin daily in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The results indicate that flurbiprofen is effective in relieving symptoms and is better tolerated than indomethacin. Using an experimental model in rats to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of flurbiprofen, data suggest that flurbiprofen is unable to prevent an immunological type of inflammation but is capable of modifying the type and extent of cellular infiltration.

  6. Experimental immunization with anti-rheumatic bacterial extract OM-89 induces T cell responses to heat shock protein (hsp)60 and hsp70; modulation of peripheral immunological tolerance as its possible mode of action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BLOEMENDAL, A; VAN DER ZEE, R; RUTTEN, V P M G; VAN KOOTEN, P J S; FARINE, J C; VAN EDEN, W

    1997-01-01

    OM-89 is a bacterial (Escherichia coli) extract used for oral administration in the treatment of RA. Given the evidence that immunity to bacterial heat shock antigens plays a critical role in the immunomodulation of arthritis and possibly inflammation in general, the purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the presence and immunogenicity of hsp in OM-89. Furthermore, we studied the effects of OM-89 in an experimental arthritis, where hsp are known to have a critical significance in disease development. In rats immunization with OM-89 was found to lead to proliferative T cell responses to hsp60 and hsp70 of both E. coli and mycobacterial origin. Conversely, immunization with hsp antigens was also found to induce T cell reactivity specific for OM-89. Based on this and the antigen specificity analysis of specific T cell lines, hsp70 (DnaK) turned out to be one of the major immunogenic constituents of OM-89. Parenteral immunization with OM-89 was found to reduce resistance to adjuvant arthritis (AA), whereas oral administration was found to protect against AA. Given the arthritis-inhibitory effect of oral OM-89 in AA, it is possible that peripheral tolerance is induced at the level of regulatory T cells with specificity for hsp. This may also constitute a mode of action for OM-89 as an arthritis-suppressive oral drug. PMID:9353151

  7. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  9. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S; Liao, Katherine P; Davis, John M; Solomon, Daniel H; Matteson, Eric L; Knutson, Keith L; Hlatky, Mark A; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatic disease and heart disease share common underpinnings involving inflammation. The high levels of inflammation that characterize rheumatic diseases provide a “natural experiment” to help elucidate the mechanisms by which inflammation accelerates heart disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common of the rheumatic diseases and has the best studied relationships with heart disease. Methods Review of current literature on heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis Results Patients with RA have an increased risk of developing heart disease that is not fully explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therapies used to treat RA may also affect the development of heart disease; by suppressing inflammation, they may also reduce the risk of heart disease. However, their other effects, as in the case of steroids, may increase heart disease risk. Conclusions Investigations of the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in RA may delineate novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of heart disease, and help identify novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. PMID:24093840

  11. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  12. Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Promotes Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, Pierre; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Cuda, Carla M.; Dominguez, Salina; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Monach, Paul; Lafyatis, Robert; Rice, Lisa M.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Baum, Rebecca; Richez, Christophe; Perlman, Harris; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Polymorphisms in the transcription factor IRF5 are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. This study was done to determine the role of IRF5 in arthritis development. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in mice deficient in IRF5, or lacking IRF5 only in myeloid cells, and arthritis severity was evaluated. K/BxN arthritis was also induced in mice deficient in TRIF, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 to determine pathways through which IRF5 might promote arthritis. In-vitro studies were performed to determine the role of IRF5 in IL-1 receptor and TLR signaling. Results Arthritis severity was reduced in IRF5-deficient, TRIF-deficient, TLR3-deficient and TLR7-deficient mice. The expression of multiple genes regulating neutrophil recruitment or function and bioactive IL-1β formation was reduced in the joints during active arthritis in IRF5-deficient mice. In vitro studies showed that TLR7 and the TRIF-dependent TLR3 pathway induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production in disease relevant cell types in an IRF5-dependent manner. Conclusion IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory arthritis. This is likely due at least in part to the role of IRF5 in mediating pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream of TLR7 and TLR3. As TLR7 and TLR3 are both RNA-sensing TLRs, this suggests that endogenous RNA ligands present in the inflamed joint promote arthritis development. These findings may be relevant to human RA as RNA capable of activating TLR7 and TLR3 is present in synovial fluid and TLR7 and TLR3 are upregulated in the joints of RA patients. PMID:26315890

  13. Gout: epitome of painful arthritis.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B

    2010-10-01

    Arthritic pain and disability are at or near the top of the list of reasons adult patients seek medical attention. At least 47.8 million US residents have arthritis. In Europe, the magnitude of the problem is similar, affecting 8 million in the United Kingdom and 108 million across the continent. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form of arthritis. In a regional UK study, nearly half of adults 50 years or older reported some form of osteoarthritic knee pain over a 1-year period. Among the arthritides, gout is notable for the agonizing nature and unique pathogenesis of the pain it generates. Gout is the most common cause of inflammatory arthritis among men and postmenopausal women. Because of the atypical nature of some of its clinical manifestations, gout can present serious diagnostic challenges for practicing physicians. In recent years, knowledge about gout's pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis has advanced on a broad front. Genetic variants within a newly identified transport gene, SLC2A9, have been associated with a low fractional excretion of uric acid and the presence of gout in several population samples. The SLC2A9 gene encodes glucose transporter 9-a unique hexose and high-capacity urate transporter. In addition, human ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G2 (ABCG2), encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found to mediate renal urate secretion. Introduction of a mutation encoded in a model system by a common single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2231142, resulted in a 53% reduction in urate transport rates compared with wild-type ABCG2. Based on a large population study, it has been estimated that at least 10% of all gout cases in white persons may be attributable to this single nucleotide polymorphism causal genetic variant. Of the various categories of arthritis, the crystal-induced arthropathies, gout and pseudogout, are manifested by acute inflammation and tissue damage arising from deposition in joints and periarticular tissues of

  14. Mycotic Septic Arthritis of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Adam; Matthews, Scott; Wilson, Alister

    Septic arthritis is a debilitating acute orthopedic emergency. Unfortunately, the diagnosis can be delayed or missed in immunocompromised patients with diabetes mellitus, and the result can be catastrophic. These patients are also at risk for atypical infections, including mycotic subtypes, which are more insidious than their more aggressive, more common Staphylococcus counterparts. The result is increased morbidity. In this article, we report a case of Candida albicans septic arthritis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. Her case highlights the complexities of this specific disease entity. With early diagnosis, treatment is multimodal, involving surgical débridement and prolonged antifungal therapy.

  15. My treatment approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Davis, John M; Matteson, Eric L

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival.

  16. Orbit of 1976 AA. [asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.; Williams, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    The orbit of Asteroid 1976 AA is described, with attention given to calculations of its period and its distance from earth, both of which could be accurately and quickly determined by measuring the minor planet's position over wide ranges of hour angle on one to three nights. The geometry of the asteroid's orbit is compared to that of earth's orbit, and the periodicity of the minor planet's approaches to earth is projected. The motion of 1976 AA over an interval of seven centuries into both past and future is also studied; the possibility of its libration with respect to earth or to Venus is examined. Some data on closest approaches of the asteroid to Mars and Venus, as well as to earth, are given.

  17. Fungal arthritis of the wrist caused by Candida parapsilosis during infliximab therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Miura, Toshiki; Morita, Euan; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Ohe, Takashi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2012-11-01

    A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with infliximab, presented with uncontrollable wrist arthritis. Fungal arthritis caused by Candida parapsilosis was confirmed by examining her aspirated joint fluid. Her infliximab therapy was interrupted, and antifungal therapy with fluconazole was started. After the fungal infection had been ameliorated, surgical debridement and arthrodesis of the wrist joint were conducted, and her symptoms completely resolved. Although fungal arthritis is rare, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of exacerbated monoarthritis in patients treated with biological agents.

  18. Knee Arthritis Without Other Joint Symptoms in the Elderly With Seronegative Elderly Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Ryutaro; Date, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Elderly onset Rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) has important clinical distinctions when compared with younger onset RA (YORA). In knee arthritis of elderly patients, infection, crystal-induced arthritis or EORA should be suspected if elevation of CRP in the preoperative examination and turbid joint effusion in their knee joint are found. Furthermore, if joint swelling and effusion remain after performing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the infection after TKA, implant debris-related arthritis and EORA should be considered. However, it is difficult to diagnose patients as EORA if Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) are negative. The differential diagnosis is very important. PMID:28217205

  19. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis.

  20. Epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis: rheumatoid arthritis and mortality.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, Elena; Davis, John M; Crowson, Cynthia S; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2010-10-01

    Increased mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely recognized but not fully explained. Despite substantial improvements in management and growing knowledge of the determinants of increased mortality, evidence for reduction in mortality in RA has lagged behind. Indeed, most studies report no apparent reduction in mortality in RA. However, emerging evidence from some recent RA inception cohorts suggests no increased mortality, including cardiovascular mortality, but this awaits further confirmation. Although it is possible that recent advances in RA treatment may manifest in improvement of survival in the near future, other factors, including undertreated or unrecognized low-grade inflammation, comorbidities, and immunogenetic factors, may contribute to the excess mortality in RA and impede its improvement. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the rates and determinants of mortality in RA, identify and discuss potential explanations for excess mortality, and outline promising research avenues for targeting mortality in RA.

  1. Developments in the rat adjuvant arthritis model and its use in therapeutic evaluation of novel non-invasive treatment by SOD in Transfersomes.

    PubMed

    Simões, S I; Delgado, T C; Lopes, R M; Jesus, S; Ferreira, A A; Morais, J A; Cruz, M E M; Corvo, M L; Martins, M B F

    2005-03-21

    The aim of this study was firstly to refine a rat model of arthritis, the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model, by studying the time course of the disease, introducing new evaluation methods such as haematological and biochemical parameters in order to identify the main stages of the disease. An optimisation of treatment schedule and evaluation criteria was developed. This refinement provided novel non-invasive anti-inflammatory treatment of the AA with SOD by using mixed lipid vesicles specially developed for transdermal delivery, Transfersomes (Tfs), this being the second major aim. The time course of AA includes a first stage: 1 day after the disease induction, the induced paw volume more than doubled and the paw circumference increased by approx. 50%. Two weeks later, another stage occurred where the disease shifted from the local arthritis form towards polyarthritis: an additional increase of volume and circumference of the induced and non-induced paws, occurred. The animals also started to loose weight around day 14 after the disease induction. Radiographic observable lesions increased correspondingly. Treatment of animals, started at day 1 after induction, by epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs showed that 1 mg SOD/kg body weight is more efficient than 0.66 mg SOD /kg body weight. As a positive control, SOD liposomes intravenously injected were used for comparison and confirmed the biological efficiency of epicutaneously applied SOD in Tfs. SOD solution and empty Tfs epicutaneously applied exerted no effect. In addition, epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs used prophylactically was able to suppress the induced rat paw oedema. Radiographic images showed less joint lesions in SOD-Tfs treated animals in comparison with control and placebo treated rats. It was shown for the first time that SOD incorporated into Tfs and applied onto a skin area not necessarily close to the inflamed tissue is able to promote non-invasive treatment of induced arthritis.

  2. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  3. Etoricoxib for arthritis and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Peter; Kubler, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, have come to play an important role in the pharmacologic management of arthritis and pain. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of etoricoxib in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, acute gouty arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, low back pain, acute postoperative pain, and primary dysmenorrhea. Comparative studies indicate at least similar efficacy with etoricoxib versus traditional NSAIDs. Etoricoxib was generally well tolerated in these studies with no new safety findings during long-term administration. The gastrointestinal, renovascular, and cardiovascular tolerability profiles of etoricoxib have been evaluated in large patient datasets, and further insight into the cardiovascular tolerability of etoricoxib and diclofenac will be gained from a large ongoing cardiovascular outcomes program (MEDAL). The available data suggest that etoricoxib is an efficacious alternative in the management of arthritis and pain, with the potential advantages of convenient once-daily administration and superior gastrointestinal tolerability compared with traditional NSAIDs. PMID:18360581

  4. Sporotrichosis arthritis: clinical features in seven patients.

    PubMed

    Crout, J E; Brewer, N S; Tompkins, R B

    1977-03-01

    A review of the clinical features of seven patients with sporotrichosis arthritis showed that six had joint infection without previous skin or lung involvement and that one with myelofibrosis had joint and skin infection. The average time from onset of joint symptoms to diagnosis was 25 months, resulting in joint damage that required arthrodesis in four patients. Tissue from open synovial biopsy was superior to synovial fluid for obtaining a positive culture; concomitant synovial fluid and synovial tissue cultures were superior to either one alone. Granulomatous inflammation was seen in synovial tissue in six patients biopsied. Amphotericin B with surgical debridement of the affected joint was successful treatment in four patients. Although an uncommon cause of joint disease, sporotrichosis arthritis may go unrecognized and mimic other forms of arthritis, resulting in irreparable damage in an otherwise curable form of arthritis.

  5. An update on drug-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Marwan H

    2016-08-01

    A large and heterogeneous group of drugs can cause drug-induced arthritis. No single pathogenetic mechanism or drug class unifies these diverse culprits. Recognizing that joint symptoms may, in fact, be drug-related not only saves time and unnecessary investigations but can also prevent needless suffering and morbidity due to late recognition of a drug-induced arthritic condition. The extent of drug-induced arthritis is variable and ranges from minor short-lived and reversible arthralgia to a prolonged and occasionally destructive arthritis. The onset of arthritis due to various medications in relation to the timing of drug initiation is also variable and may range from a few days to several months.

  6. ASTROMEDICINE IN THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Janai, Sudhakar; Biviji, A. T.; Naik, D. G.; Lakhe, R. T.; Rao, V. Bhaskar

    1991-01-01

    One patient of rheumatoid arthritis was treated according to astromedicine. Wearing of Coral beads had remarkable effect on the disease. The interesting finding are reported in this paper. PMID:22556538

  7. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre.

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an Expert For You Patient Handouts Summary Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  9. Exercise Helps Ease Arthritis Pain and Stiffness

    MedlinePlus

    ... is crucial for people with arthritis. It increases strength and flexibility, reduces joint pain, and helps combat ... muscles around your joints Help you maintain bone strength Give you more energy to get through the ...

  10. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  11. A multicenter report of biologic agents for the treatment of secondary amyloidosis in Turkish rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Kalyoncu, Umut; Aksu, Kenan; Omma, Ahmet; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Çağatay, Yonca; Küçükşahin, Orhan; Dönmez, Salim; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Mercan, Rıdvan; Bayındır, Özün; Çefle, Ayşe; Yıldız, Fatih; Balkarlı, Ayşe; Kılıç, Levent; Çakır, Necati; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Öksüz, Mustafa Ferhat; Çobankara, Veli; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Sayarlıoğlu, Mehmet; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Akkoç, Nurullah

    2016-07-01

    In this multicenter, retrospective study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of biologic therapies, including anti-TNFs, in secondary (AA) amyloidosis patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, the frequency of secondary amyloidosis in RA and AS patients in a single center was estimated. Fifty-one AS (39M, 12F, mean age: 46.7) and 30 RA patients (11M, 19F, mean age: 51.7) with AA amyloidosis from 16 different centers in Turkey were included. Clinical and demographical features of patients were obtained from medical charts. A composite response index (CRI) to biologic therapy-based on creatinine level, proteinuria and disease activity-was used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. The mean annual incidence of AA amyloidosis in RA and AS patients was 0.23 and 0.42/1000 patients/year, respectively. The point prevalence in RA and AS groups was 4.59 and 7.58/1000, respectively. In RA group with AA amyloidosis, effective response was obtained in 52.2 % of patients according to CRI. RA patients with RF positivity and more initial disease activity tended to have higher response rates to therapy (p values, 0.069 and 0.056). After biologic therapy (median 17 months), two RA patients died and two developed tuberculosis. In AS group, 45.7 % of patients fulfilled the criteria of good response according to CRI. AS patients with higher CRP levels at the time of AA diagnosis and at the beginning of anti-TNF therapy had higher response rates (p values, 0.011 and 0.017). During follow-up after anti-TNF therapy (median 38 months), one patient died and tuberculosis developed in two patients. Biologic therapy seems to be effective in at least half of RA and AS patients with AA amyloidosis. Tuberculosis was the most important safety concern.

  12. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression.

  13. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy.

  14. ▼ Apremilast for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    ▼ Apremilast (Otezla - Celgene Europe Ltd.) is a novel orally administered immunomodulatory medicine licensed for the treatment of plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The company suggests that it has demonstrated proven and durable efficacy in both conditions and has a favourable safety profile with no requirement for drug-specific pre-screening or ongoing laboratory monitoring. Here we review the evidence on the safety and efficacy of apremilast in the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

  15. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  16. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients.

  17. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Banik, Snehashish

    2013-01-01

    Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs). Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort. PMID:23997576

  18. Psychosocial Concepts in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews and tabulates some of the current concepts of the role of psychosocial factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concepts prevalent during the 1950's are listed followed by discussion of some of the variable factors that complicate studies in this field. Studies are then cited which lead to the following conclusions: 1. Patients with RA tend to have certain personality characteristics, such as depression, rigidity, dependency, neurotic response patterns, emotional instability, feelings of guilt and low ego strength. 2. These are not specific to RA. 3. They may well be sequelae of the disease rather than pre-morbid features. 4. There is no clear evidence as to the role of psychological stress in causing or activating RA. 5. Personality factors have an influence on the course of the disease. PMID:20468900

  19. [Imaging modalities of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tamai, K

    1992-03-01

    Modern diagnostic techniques for rheumatoid arthritis include x-ray examination, arthro- or myelography, CT scan, scintigraphy, thermography, ultrasonography, and MRI. X-ray is the simplest and most common method for assessing the degree of joint destruction. Arthrography provides information on intra-articular pathology. CT is particularly of value in visualizing changes in the axial skeleton. Joint scintigraphy, using 99m-technetium pertechnetate, is available in evaluating the degree of synovial inflammation. Thermography has been performed for a similar purpose. Ultrasound allows a real-time, dynamic study of soft tissues in and around the joint, including tendons, synovium and articular cartilage. MRI most clearly shows various pathological conditions such as pannus, degenerated cartilage or spinal cord compression, although the examination time should be shortened.

  20. Emerging biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paek, So Yeon; Han, Ling; Weiland, Matthew; Lu, Chuan-Jian; McKinnon, Kathleen; Zhou, Li; Lim, Henry W; Elder, James T; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disease which affects 2-4% of the worldwide population. Approximately 20-30% of patients with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a frequently destructive and disabling condition. As skin manifestations precede joint symptoms in nearly all patients with PsA, identification of biomarkers for early prediction of joint damage is an important clinical need. Because not all patients with PsA respond to treatment in the same fashion, identification of biomarkers capable of predicting therapeutic response is also imperative. Here, we review existing literature and discuss current investigations to identify potential biomarkers for PsA disease activity, with particular emphasis on microRNAs as novel markers of interest. Serum (soluble) biomarkers, peripheral osteoclast precursor as cellular biomarkers, and genetic loci associated with skin and joint disease are also reviewed.

  1. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  2. Synovial fluid lactic acid levels in septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V

    1981-01-01

    Synovial fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 50 samples by gas liquid chromatography. Specimens from 4 patients with bacteria arthritis, other than gonococcal, had a mean lactic acid concentration of 215 mg/dl. One patient with gonococcal arthritis had a synovial fluid lactic acid of 30 mg/dl. Forty-one patients with inflammatory arthritis and 4 patients with degenerative arthritis had mean synovial fluid lactic acid levels of 27 and 23 mg/dl respectively. The estimation of synovial fluid lactic acid is reliable in differentiating septic arthritis from inflammatory and degenerative arthritis except when the infecting organism is NEisseria gonorrhoeae.

  3. Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Ayten; Kayan, Gökçen; Yaylacı, Selçuk; Demir, Mustafa Volkan; Karakeçe, Engin; Tamer, Ali; Karabay, Oğuz

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint is rare. A 57-year-old male patient presented with swelling, pain, and redness of the elbow. The symptoms first appeared one month ago; he was given antibiotic treatment after the diagnosis of septic arthritis at another center. The patient who did not improve with treatment was diagnosed with tuberculous arthritis according to the culture and was started on antituberculosis treatment. Tuberculous arthritis usually presents with chronic arthritis. However, it can also present in patients with septic arthritis.

  4. MR imaging of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, José A; Narváez, Javier; De Lama, Eugenia; De Albert, Matías

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment have been recognized as essential for improving clinical outcomes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. However, diagnosis is somewhat difficult in the early stages of the disease because the diagnostic criteria were developed from data obtained in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis and therefore are not readily applicable. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly being used in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis due to its capacity to help identify the key pathologic features of this disease entity at presentation. MR imaging has demonstrated greater sensitivity for the detection of synovitis and erosions than either clinical examination or conventional radiography and can help establish an early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. It also allows the detection of bone marrow edema, which is thought to be a precursor for the development of erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis as well as a marker of active inflammation. In addition, MR imaging can help differentiate rheumatoid arthritis from some clinical subsets of peripheral spondyloarthropathies by allowing identification of inflammation at the insertions of ligaments and tendons (enthesitis).

  5. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs. PMID:20615240

  6. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2016-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  7. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2017-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  8. Inhibition of arthritis by systemic administration of endostatin in passive murine collagen induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, D; Yoshida, K; Yasuda, J; Yokoyama, T; Kingetsu, I; Yamaguchi, N; Joh, K; Matsushima, M; Saito, S; Yamada, A

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Four kinds of monoclonal anti-type II collagen antibody followed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) three days later were given to 6 week old, female Balb/c mice to induce arthritis. Three groups of mice received 0.2 mg/kg/day, 2 mg/kg/day, and 10 mg/kg/day of endostatin, respectively, whereas a control group received phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Endostatin or PBS was given for 13 days, starting before the development of arthritis. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis scores and hind paw thicknesses. Mice were killed for histological examination on the 22nd day after the administration of monoclonal anti-type II collagen antibody. Results: Arthritis developed within three days after LPS administration in both the control and endostatin treatment groups. No difference in the development rate of arthritis was noted between the control and endostatin treatment groups. Arthritis scores remained significantly lower in the endostatin 10 mg/kg/day group than in the control group. Hind paw thicknesses also remained significantly smaller in the endostatin 10 mg/kg/day group than in the control group. Histopathological examination showed that synovial thickening and subchondral bone erosion improved more in the endostatin treatment groups than in the control group. Conclusion: The systemic administration of endostatin had an arthritis inhibiting effect in RA animal models. Endostatin inhibited, in particular, pannus formation and bone destruction. PMID:12810435

  9. Cerebral biochemical pathways in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis: a comparative metabolomic study.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Norbert W; Fernandez, Carla; Pellissier, Jean-François; Cozzone, Patrick J; Béraud, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases, including brain disorders, are associated with perturbations of tissue metabolism. However, an often overlooked issue is the impact that inflammations outside the brain may have on brain metabolism. Our main goal was to study similarities and differences between brain metabolite profiles of animals suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and adjuvant arthritis (AA) in Lewis rat models. Our principal objective was the determination of molecular protagonists involved in the metabolism underlying these diseases. EAE was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and spinal-cord homogenate (SC-H), whereas AA was induced by CFA only. Naive rats served as controls (n = 9 for each group). Two weeks after inoculation, animals were sacrificed, and brains were removed and processed for metabolomic analysis by NMR spectroscopy or for immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, both inflammatory diseases caused similar, though not identical, changes in metabolites involved in regulation of brain cell size and membrane production: among the osmolytes, taurine and the neuronal marker, N-acetylaspartate, were decreased, and the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, slightly increased in both inoculated groups compared with controls. Also ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, sources of inflammatory agents, and several glycolytic metabolites were increased in both inoculated groups. By contrast, the amino acids, aspartate and isoleucine, were less concentrated in CFA/SC-H and control vs. CFA rats. Our results suggest that inflammatory brain metabolite profiles may indicate the existence of either cerebral (EAE) or extra-cerebral (AA) inflammation. These inflammatory processes may act through distinct pathways that converge toward similar brain metabolic profiles. Our findings open new avenues for future studies aimed at demonstrating whether brain metabolic effects provoked by AA are pain/stress-mediated and/or due to the

  10. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  11. Obesity May Make Rheumatoid Arthritis Tough to Spot, Track

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164558.html Obesity May Make Rheumatoid Arthritis Tough to Spot, Track Inflammation from excess weight ... HealthDay News) -- Blood tests to diagnose and monitor rheumatoid arthritis may be thrown off by obesity in women, ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can diet affect symptoms? Can certain diets affect rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ... saturated fats might help reduce symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. But the research studies supporting this benefit have ...

  13. Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... your browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions Publication ... between these conditions. Osteoporosis Arthritis For Your Information Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  14. Even a Little Exercise Can Help with Arthritis, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163340.html Even a Little Exercise Can Help With Arthritis, Study Says Just 45 ... and Human Services. More Health News on: Arthritis Exercise and Physical Fitness Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  15. Arthritis Education: Opportunities and State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltroy, Lawren H.; Liang, Matthew H.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of programs have produced changes in knowledge, behavior, and health for arthritis patients. National dissemination of patient education programs is in progress. Research needs center on new populations, delivery methods, and arthritis-specific applications of theory. (SK)

  16. Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162571.html Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis? Study may offer new insight into the cause ... the long-noticed connection between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests. The discovery might also ...

  17. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  18. Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced hyperalgesia: a human perception.

    PubMed

    Gould, H J

    2000-03-01

    Much of our current understanding about chronic pain and the mechanisms of nociception has been derived from animal models (Bennett GJ. Animal models of neuropathic pain. In: Gebhart, GF, Hammond DL, Jensen TS, editors. Progress in pain research and management, vol. 2, Proceedings of the 7th World Congress of Pain. Seattle, WA: IASP Press, 1994. pp. 495-510; Dubner R, Methods of assessing pain in animals. In: Wall PD, Melzack R, editors. Textbook of pain, vol. 3. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 1994. pp. 293-302). It has been argued in some cases that animals do not perceive 'pain' as humans do, and thus extrapolation of the results of studies in animals is invalid. Clearly, the animal models used in the laboratory do not approach the complexity of chronic pain encountered in the clinical setting. Human pain perception is more complex since it encompasses lesion variability, as well as psychosocial, cultural, developmental, and environmental variables. Where parallels exist, it is possible to gain insight into certain aspects of human pain syndromes that are likely to lead to improved therapeutic opportunities for individual patients. One such model that is frequently used in animals to study pain associated with inflammation is the subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). For ethical reasons, however, little information is available from humans concerning pain associated with this form of inflammation. Due to an inadvertent subcutaneous injection of CFA into the terminal phalanx of this investigator, a study with an N of 1, was conducted to compare the subjective effects of CFA-induced inflammation with objective measurements.

  19. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more disease... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  20. Kingella kingae causing septic arthritis in Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A; Settas, L

    1983-08-01

    A case of septic arthritis of the elbow caused by Kingella kingae, a Gram-negative bacillus, is described. The patient had long-standing, severe rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome. This appears to be the first report from the United Kingdom of Kingella kingae as the aetiological agent of septic arthritis.

  1. [Candida arthritis of the TM joint complicating chronic otitis media].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Nassar, I; Fikri, M; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-11-01

    Infectious arthritis of the temporomandibular joint is very uncommon, and arthritis of the TM joint as a result of candida albicans infection has not previously been reported. The authors describe a patient treated for chronic otitis media complicated by arthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The diagnosis was made using CT scan and bacteriologic sampling.

  2. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  3. [Erroneous prescription of rumalon to rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    PubMed

    Erov, N K

    1984-01-01

    The author describes 2 cases of erroneous prescription of rumalon to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as a result of which in one of the patients oligoarthritis arthritis while in the other one the typical seropositive slow-progressing rheumatoid arthritis transformed to RA with systemic manifestations.

  4. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy.

  5. Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic inflammatory and destructive arthropathy that consumes considerable personal, social and economic costs. It consists of a syndrome of pain, stiffness and symmetrical inflammation of the synovial membrane (synovitis) of freely moveable joints such as the knee (diarthrodial joints). Although the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis is unclear, the disease is characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining of diarthrodial joints, high synovial proliferation and an influx of inflammatory cells, macrophages and lymphocytes through angiogenic blood vessels. Diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs slow disease progression and can induce disease remission in some patients. Methotrexate is the first line therapy, but if patients become intolerant to this drug, biologic agents should be used. The development of biological substances for the treatment of rheumatic conditions has been accompanied by ongoing health economic discussions regarding the implementation of these highly effective, but accordingly, highly priced drugs are the standard treatment guidelines of rheumatic diseases. In this way, more efficient strategies have to be identified. Despite numerous reviews in rheumatoid arthritis in the last years, this area is in constant development and updates are an urgent need to incorporate new advances in rheumatoid arthritis research. This review highlights the immunopathogenesis rationale for the current therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Remission-inducing drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The administration of certain drugs to patients with established rheumatoid arthritis frequently results in improvement that is slow to appear but persists for long periods, even after the drug is discontinued. The three main drugs with this effect, whose efficacy and toxicity are reviewed in this paper, are gold salts, D-penicillamine and chloroquine. The cytotoxic agents used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, which likely have nonspecific anti-inflammatory actions and have serious long-term side effects, are also briefly reviewed. A new drug, levamisole, is currently being tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is suggested that the time for considering the introduction of a remission-inducing drug in patients with progressive rheumatoid arthritis is after an adequate trial of therapy with salicylates or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or both, and before the oral administration of steroids. It is difficult, however, on the basis of rigorous clinical comparisons, to recommend which of the three main remission-inducing drugs should be tried first, although gold salts have been used the most. Patients who have improved with 6 months of chrysotherapy may continue treatment for at least 3 years, during which time the frequency of mucocutaneous and renal toxic effects will steadily decrease. Some aspects of the medical economics of therapy with remission-inducing drugs for rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. PMID:6768438

  7. Clinical approaches to early inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Dijkmans, Ben A C

    2009-11-01

    Several advances have been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis, as well as in the clinical evaluation and treatment, of early inflammatory arthritis. The presence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) has emerged as a major new biomarker for use in clinical practice. The presence of ACPAs can be used to divide patients with early arthritis into subsets that are phenotypically similar but have varying pathogenetic and prognostic features. Although the detection of ACPAs is a major development in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), prediction of the outcome of arthritis at the individual level can still be much improved. For patients diagnosed with RA, and who have active polyarthritis, treatment is not dependent on the assessment of prognostic factors, as these patients are best treated with combination therapy; over 40% of these patients achieve remission with such treatment. In patients who present with oligoarthritis, however, management should be based on the assessment of prognostic factors. The success of early treatment of inflammatory arthritis and the recognition of a measurable preclinical phase of RA offer hope that treating the disease before it becomes clinically active might be possible.

  8. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  9. Epigenetic modifications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strietholt, Simon; Maurer, Britta; Peters, Marvin A; Pap, Thomas; Gay, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decades, genetic factors for rheumatoid diseases like the HLA haplotypes have been studied extensively. However, during the past years of research, it has become more and more evident that the influence of epigenetic processes on the development of rheumatic diseases is probably as strong as the genetic background of a patient. Epigenetic processes are heritable changes in gene expression without alteration of the nucleotide sequence. Such modifications include chromatin methylation and post-translational modification of histones or other chromatin-associated proteins. The latter comprise the addition of methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl groups or even larger moieties such as binding of ubiquitin or small ubiquitin-like modifier. The combinatory nature of these processes forms a complex network of epigenetic modifications that regulate gene expression through activation or silencing of genes. This review provides insight into the role of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and points out how a better understanding of such mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Martin; Barber Chamoux, Nicolas; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNFα antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque.

  11. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S. J.; Clegg, D. O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the susceptibility allele frequency as 2.16%, and estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-half of familial RA, although it accounts for only approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. PMID:7942852

  12. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  13. Clinical Symptoms of Skin, Nails, and Joints Manifest Independently in Patients with Concomitant Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wittkowski, Knut M.; Leonardi, Craig; Gottlieb, Alice; Menter, Alan; Krueger, Gerald G.; Tebbey, Paul W.; Belasco, Jennifer; Soltani-Arabshahi, Razieh; Gray, John; Horn, Liz; Krueger, James G.

    2011-01-01

    This study correlated assessment tools for evaluating the severity of skin, nail, and joint symptoms in patients with psoriasis (Pso) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Adults with plaque Pso (with or without PsA) were enrolled from four U.S. institutions. Patients were evaluated using a novel 10-area Linear Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (XL-PASI), Psoriatic Arthritis Assessment (PsAA), Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation Questionnaire (PASE), Nail Assessment (NA) and Joint Assessment (JA) tools, Psoriasis Weighted Extent and Severity Index (PWESI), and Lattice Physician Global Assessment (LS-PGA). Correlations between assessment tools and individual items in the assessment tools were performed. Data from 180 patients (55 with PsA) were analyzed. Highest correlations between tools (r = 0.77–0.88) were between the XL-PASI, PWESI and LS-PGA. Individual items in the XL-PASI correlated with items in the PWESI for extent skin symptoms, but not for all body areas. Overall, correlations were seen between hands and feet, between face and scalp, and between buttocks, chest, and back. Only low correlation was seen between items assessing joint symptoms with items assessing skin symptoms. These data support the notion that the complex phenotype of psoriatic disease requires instruments that assess the severity of skin, nails, and joints separately. PMID:21673809

  14. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of a Chinese herbal drug Yi Shen Juan Bi in adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman; Peng, Cheng; Fang, Weirong; Han, Caifeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immunomodulating mechanisms of a Chinese herbal medicine Yi Shen Juan Bi (YJB) in treatment of adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats. Materials and Methods: Levels of serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Expression of TNF-α mRNA and IL-1β mRNA in synovial cells was measured with the semi-quantitative technique of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while caspase-3 was examined by western blot analysis. Results: The administration of YJB significantly decreased the production of serum TNF-α and IL-1β. It also decreased significantly the TNF-α mRNA, IL-1β mRNA, and caspase-3 expression in synoviocytes. Conclusions: YJB produces the immunomodulatory effects by downregulating the over-activated cytokines, while it activates caspase-3, which is the key executioner of apoptosis in the immune system. This may be the one of the underlying mechanisms that explains how YJB treats the rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20711367

  16. Pro musculoskeletal ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohrndorf, Sarah; Backhaus, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound has become a widely used imaging diagnostic tool both in the use of daily clinical practice and for clinical studies in monitoring treatment efficiency and predicting disease outcome. By US, detection of inflammatory soft tissue and erosive bone lesions is possible. Grey-scale and power Doppler ultrasound examination is more sensitive and more reliable than clinical examination. Furthermore, patients with unclear arthritic symptoms can be better diagnosed for arthritis by US than by clinical examination. This article gives an overview about the use of US in the diagnosis of early arthritis, especially early rheumatoid arthritis, its role as a prognostic assessor (structural damage), as a monitor for treatment response, as an detector of "real" remission, and a guide to injection procedure.

  17. The association between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leech, Michelle T; Bartold, P M

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and poor oral health has been recognised for many decades. The association between periodontal infection and the risk of developing RA has been the subject of epidemiological, clinical and basic science research in recent times. Converging and reproducible evidence now makes a clear case for the role of specific periodontal infective pathogens in initiating, amplifying and perpetuating rheumatoid arthritis. The unique enzymatic properties of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and its contribution to the burden of citrullinated peptides is now well established. The impact of localized infection such as periodontitis in shaping specific anti-citrullinated peptide immune responses highlights a key area for treatment, prevention and risk assessment in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Immunopathology of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D; Ritchlin, C; FitzGerald, O

    2005-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is characterised by several unique clinical features that differentiate it from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Attempts to identify immunopathological mechanisms, some shared with psoriasis, that underlie these differences from RA have been most challenging. Recent research studies, however, highlight novel findings in PsA at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels that form the basis for a new understanding of this relatively common form of inflammatory arthritis. In particular, the availability of new, biological antitumour necrosis factor α therapies have allowed further insight into the immunopathology of psoriasis and PsA. This brief review focuses on immunohistological studies in psoriatic skin, PsA synovium, and bone to demonstrate how these data advance our knowledge of disease pathogenesis. PMID:15708930

  19. Relationship of Psoriatic Arthritis to Other Spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Palazzi, Carlo; Lubrano, Ennio; Padula, Angela

    2015-11-01

    In the early 1970s, Moll and co-workers formulated the unified concept of spondyloarthritides, a group of conditions sharing similar clinical features. Subsequently, criteria for their classification have been proposed by Amor and coworkers, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group, and the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society. Opinion, however, is divided between those who believe that the different entities of the complex represent the variable expression of the same disease ("lumpers") and those who think that these should be considered separately but under the same umbrella ("splitters"). Several sets of criteria have been proposed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the most recent being the ClASsification for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. According to some authors, there are persuasive arguments to support the view of PsA as a distinct entity.

  20. Radiosynovectomy in the therapeutic management of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Knut, Liepe

    2015-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a well-established therapy in arthritis and involves an intra-articular injection of small radioactive particles to treat a synovitis. In Europe, frequent indications are rheumatoid and poly-arthritis. Especially in Germany radiosynovectomy is the second common therapy in Nuclear Medicine with about 40,000-60,000 treated joints per year. In Spain, USA, Turkey, Argentines and Philippines the therapy is more use in hemophilic arthritis with excellent results. Especially in developing countries with low availability of clotting factors, the radiosynovectomy represent a cost effective therapeutic option for repeated bleedings in hemophilic arthropathy. The special focus in these countries is maintaining of mobility and work ability. Often only the knee and medium joints (ankle, elbow and shoulder) are treated using yttrium-90, rhenium-186 or phosphorus-32. However, in rheumatoid arthritis most common affected joints are the fingers. For the treatment in these small joints, erbium-169 is necessary. Unfortunately, erbium-169 is only available in Europe. Further indications for radiosynovectomy are osteoarthritis and the articular effusion after joint replacement. The reported response rates in rheumatoid and poly-arthritis range from 60% to 80% depends from the stage of previous arthrosis. The best effectiveness of therapy was observed in hemophilic arthritis with response rate of 90% and significant reducing of bleeding frequency. The therapy is well-tolerated with low rate of side effects. In respect of the specific uptake of particles in the synovia and short range of beta radiation, the radiation exposure outside the joint is very low. The radiosynovectomy has efforts in comparison to surgical synovectomy: it's a minor intervention with low costs; and simultaneous treatments of multiple joints or treatment in short intervals are possible. The presented paper summarized the published papers and reports our own experiences in >15,000 treated joints.

  1. [Post-traumatic psoriatic arthritis. 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Thomachot, B; Lafforgue, P; Acquaviva, P C

    Physical trauma is generally accepted as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. In the last ten years, there have been a few rare case reports of physical trauma precipitating psoriasic arthritis. We observed two such cases following an occupational accident discovered one and a half year and two and a half year after onset of the first clinical manifestations. In the first case, a 43-year-old man had a fracture of the right calcaneus in March 1991. He was treated with nailing and also required emergency surgery of the posterior tibial artery. The tibiotarsal joint was normal radiologically. Pain persisted after treatment and in 1993 he presented with psoriasis of the scalp and several other localizations together with Hallopeau's acrodermatitis continua of the ankle, pathognomonic for psoriasic arthritis. Salazosufapyridin was given. The second case was a 50-year-old man who had major pain in both wrists immediately after falling on the palm of his hands in 1992. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome developed which did not respond well to surgery. In 1993, he developed inflammatory synovitis and also had psoriasis mainly located at the elbows. Immunological tests were negative. Cortisone and salazosulfapyridin were not particularly effective and the patient later developed arthritis of the hip and ankle joints. Physicians should be aware of physical trauma as a causative factor in psoriasic arthritis due to the potential legal implications. Criteria for imputability are: single major physical trauma, absence of clinical signs prior to the trauma, continuous clinical course, first signs occurring then predominating at the joint exposed to trauma. The pathophysiology of this type of arthritis is not well understood. Deep Koebner's phenomena could be involved. Activation of substance P has also been hypothesized.

  2. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  3. Yoga for arthritis: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J

    2011-02-01

    This article reviews the existing literature on using yoga for arthritis. It includes peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980 to 2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 4 non-RCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported, and attrition was comparable or better than that typical for exercise interventions. Evidence was strongest for reduced disease symptoms (tender/swollen joints, pain) and disability and for improved self-efficacy and mental health. Interventions, research methods, and disease diagnoses were heterogeneous.

  4. Septic arthritis of the hand and wrist.

    PubMed

    Murray, P M

    1998-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the hand and wrist is relatively uncommon. The most common cause is penetrating trauma such as a human or animal bite. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcal species. Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pasteurella multocida, Eikenella corrodens, and Mycobacterium marinum also may occur in specific clinical settings. The best clinical results occur following an accurate diagnosis, prompt surgical drainage, and debridement in concert with appropriate antibiotics and early postoperative range of motion. A delay in diagnosis or treatment is associated with an unsatisfactory outcome.

  5. Psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Megna, Matteo; Patrì, Angela; Balato, Nicola; Costa, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis frequency ranges from 1 to 3 % in white population, and arthritis occurs in 10-40 % of psoriasis patients, representing a relevant health issue. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy, associated with psoriasis, in which ocular-, intestinal-, metabolic-, and cardiovascular-related manifestations can variably coexist. In order to favor early PsA and psoriasis diagnosis, it is crucial to rule out other conditions that can resemble the disease and delay appropriate therapeutic approach. Therefore, the aim of this review is to focus on PsA and psoriasis differential diagnosis.

  6. Rheumatoid vasculitis: early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abdulqader, Yasir; Al-Ani, Muhsen; Parperis, Konstantinos

    2016-11-08

    Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and late complication of rheumatoid arthritis and may affect small-to-medium-sized vessels. Here, we report a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with amaurosis fugax in the left eye, symmetric polyarthritis, Raynaud's symptoms and paraesthesia in both lower extremities. The patient subsequently experienced right foot drop, nail fold infracts and gangrene of his right second toe. He was found to have a high titre of rheumatoid factor and treatment with rituximab and high dose of corticosteroids led to significant improvement of his symptoms. This is rare case describing the early onset of rheumatoid vasculitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Psychological effects of living with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah

    2014-12-02

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term inflammatory condition that can affect physical, psychological and social function. The condition is not curable - although drug therapy can be used to reduce inflammation - and patients often experience daily symptoms of joint pain and stiffness, fatigue and functional limitations. Patients may also experience psychological challenges. This article focuses on the psychological implications of living with rheumatoid arthritis, including reaction to diagnosis, anxiety and depression, body image, sexuality, self-esteem and social role. It aims to explore the role of the nurse in addressing these psychological challenges to optimise the physical and psychological status of each patient.

  8. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential contribution to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Melo de Andrade, Marcus Vinicius

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis - structural damage - functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potencial contribution to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Andrade, Marcus Vinicius Melo de

    2016-03-22

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis-structural damage-functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. [Therapeutic update in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, T; Avenel, G; Vittecoq, O

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was revolutionized by the introduction of the biologics. Their power and their good safety profile have allowed to define new objectives and procedures to reach them; it is the "treat to target" concept. New recommendations were published by EULAR or ACR to obtain the remission as soon as possible. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, in particular the methotrexate (MTX), remain the cornerstone of RA treatment in association with symptomatic treatments. The use of corticosteroids can be necessary to control the disease activity in the waiting time of the DMARDs efficiency or to control a flare. The absence of remission after 3months after initiation of MTX should prompt the rheumatologist to intensify the treatment with biologics. The increasing number of biologics targeting different mechanisms (5 anti-tumor necrosis factor-α, antagonist of interleukine-1 [IL-1] receptor, antagonist of IL-6 receptor, anti-CD20, anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) asks the question of the strategy in their prescription. Besides, all the registers or meta-analysis plead in favor of a good safety subject to a moderate prescription and to a greater vigilance. Except the opportunist infections, it is more the comorbidities or the associated treatments such as corticoids or MTX, which would favor the infections than anti-TNFα. There is no indication that biologics may increase the risk of solid cancer compared with a population of RA patients not exposed to anti-TNFα. However, biologics could increase the risk of cutaneous cancers, including melanoma.

  11. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact.

  12. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of “personalized prevention” for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  13. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of "personalized prevention" for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools.

  14. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  15. SKG arthritis as a model for evaluating therapies in rheumatoid arthritis with special focus on bone changes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kresten Krarup; Lindgaard, Lisa Mejlvang; Wogensen, Lise; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to further characterize the SKG model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its potential for studying intervention treatments, with special focus on bone targeting therapies. Three individual studies were conducted, using a total of 71 SKG mice, comparing arthritis induction with mannan versus zymosan A, female versus male mice, and the effect of dexamethasone intervention treatment initiated at different time points after arthritis induction. Hind paws were embedded undecalcified in methyl methacrylate, and sections were stained with Masson-Goldner trichrome. Areal Bone Mineral Density (aBMD) of the femora was determined with pDXA. RNA was extracted from the hind paws followed by the quantification by reverse transcriptase PCR. SKG mice stimulated with mannan presented a higher arthritis score than mice stimulated with zymosan A. Female SKG mice developed a more severe arthritis than male SKG mice. Dexamethasone inhibited arthritis clinically as well as histologically when the treatment was initiated prophylactically or within the first week of arthritis. Femoral aBMD was lower in animals with arthritis than in control animals. The RANKL RNA expression was elevated in arthritic mice, whereas OPG RNA expression was unchanged. The results suggest mannan as arthritis inductor and female instead of male mice in experiments as well as an optimal time window for the initiation of treatment. Systemic bone loss as well as local up regulation of RANKL was present early in SKG arthritis. These results demonstrate that SKG arthritis is a suitable new model for evaluating therapies in RA.

  16. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  17. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  18. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  19. [The golden age of rheumatoid arthritis treatment].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Today, we enjoy the golden age of rheumatology. In the 1970s, the paradigm for treating rheumatoid arthritis consisted in a pyramid. In the decade of the 1980s, and shortly after began a revolution in the understanding and treatment of rheumatic diseases. Methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-blockers came on the scene.

  20. Pain management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Durham, Catherine O; Fowler, Terri; Donato, AnneMarie; Smith, Whitney; Jensen, Elizabeth

    2015-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common inflammatory conditions in the United States affecting approximately 1 million adults. This article briefly reviews the evidence-based diagnosis of RA, mainstays of treatment to prevent joint destruction, and pain management.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Korean (한국어) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Chinese - Simplified ( ...

  2. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  3. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human food after removal and condemnation of all affected parts. Affected joints with corresponding lymph... joint capsule shall not be opened until after the affected joint is removed. (b) Carcasses affected...

  4. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human food after removal and condemnation of all affected parts. Affected joints with corresponding lymph... joint capsule shall not be opened until after the affected joint is removed. (b) Carcasses affected...

  5. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND... affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human... nodes shall be removed and condemned. In order to avoid contamination of the meat which is passed,...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison J

    2005-12-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) is a common orthopedic condition encountered in horses that are presented to equine veterinarians. Successful out-come is dependent on prompt and thorough evaluation and treatment. This article briefly reviews the pathophysiology, outlines diagnostics, describes treatment options and prognostics, and discusses current research in diagnosis and treatment of SA.

  7. Effects of Biologic Agents in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Amyloidosis Treated with Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Yoko; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to examine the safety and effects of therapy with biologics on the prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of reactive AA amyloidosis participated in the study. The survival was calculated from the date of HD initiation until the time of death, or up to end of June 2015 for the patients who were still alive. HD initiation was according to the program of HD initiation for systemic amyloidosis patients associated with RA. Results Ten patients had been treated with biologics before HD initiation for a mean of 28.2 months (biologic group), while 18 had not (non-biologic group). HD was initiated in patients with similar characteristics except for the tender joint count, swollen joint count, and disease activity score (DAS)28-C-reactive protein (CRP). History of biologics showed that etanercept was frequently used for 8 patients as the first biologic. There was no significant difference in the mortality rate according to a Kaplan-Meier analysis (p=0.939) and or associated risk of death in an age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (p=0.758) between both groups. Infections were significantly more frequent causes of death in the biologic group than in the non-biologic group (p=0.021). However, treatment with biologics improved the DAS28-CRP score (p=0.004). Conclusion Under the limited conditions of AA amyloidosis treated with HD, the use of biologics might affect infection and thus may not improve the prognosis. Strict infection control is necessary for the use of biologics with HD to improve the prognosis. PMID:27725536

  8. Quality in rheumatoid arthritis care.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Sehrash; Lesuis, Nienke; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; van Riel, Piet; Landewé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    While most rheumatology practices are characterized by strong commitment to quality of care and continuous improvement to limit disability and optimize quality of life for patients and their families, the actual step toward improvement is often difficult. This is because there are still barriers to be addressed and facilitators to be captured before a satisfying and cost-effective practice management is installed. Therefore, this review aims to assist practicing rheumatologists with quality improvement of their daily practice, focusing on care for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. First we define quality of care as "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge". Often quality is determined by the interplay between structure, processes, and outcomes of care, which is also reflected in the corresponding indicators to measure quality of care. Next, a brief overview is given of the current treatment strategies used in RA, focusing on the tight control strategy, since this strategy forms the basis of international treatment guidelines. Adherence to tight control strategies leads, also in daily practice, to better outcomes in patients with regard to disease control, functional status, and work productivity. Despite evidence in favor of tight control strategies, adherence in daily practice is often challenging. Therefore, the next part of the review focuses on possible barriers and facilitators of adherence, and potential interventions to improve quality of care. Many different barriers and facilitators are known and targeting these can be effective in changing care, but these effects are rather small to moderate. With regard to RA, few studies have tried to improve care, such as a study aiming to increase the number of disease activity measures done by a combination of education and feedback. Two out of the three studies showed markedly

  9. Vitamin D and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Athanassiou, Panagiotis; Lyraki, Aikaterini; Raftakis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 1 and multiple sclerosis. Reduced vitamin D intake has been linked to increased susceptibility to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with disease activity in patients with RA. The objective was to evaluate vitamin D status in patients with RA and to assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and disease activity. Methods: In a cohort of 44 patients with RA, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] levels, parathyroid hormone levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. Disease activity was evaluated by calculating the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). A control group (n = 44), matched for age and sex, was evaluated as well. Results: In the cohort of 44 patients with RA 25(OH)D3 levels were found to be low compared with the control group, 25(OH)D3 being 15.26 ± 1.07 ng/ml [mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM)] and 25.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml in the patient and control group respectively (Student’s t test, p < 0.001). Parathyroid hormone levels were 71.08 ± 7.02 pg/ml (mean ± SEM) (normal values 10.0–65.0 pg/ml), CRP 7.6 ± 1.57 mg/litre (mean ± SEM) (normal values < 3 mg/litre) and ESR was 38.0 ± 4.6 mm/h (mean ± SEM) in the group of patients with RA. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were found to be negatively correlated to the DAS28, the correlation coefficient being −0.084. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were also found to be negatively correlated to CRP and ESR, the correlation coefficient being –0.115 and −0.18, respectively. Conclusion: It appears that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with RA, and that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to disease severity in RA. As vitamin D deficiency has been linked to diffuse musculoskeletal pain, these results have therapeutic implications. Vitamin D supplementation may be needed

  10. Classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, A J

    1995-05-01

    The development of classification schemes for RA in the last 40 years has followed the increasingly precise understanding of the nature of the clinical disease and the recognition of the different requirements of classification methods in clinic and population settings. In published studies of RA in clinic patients the most widely used criteria sets have been the 1958 ARA (ACR) criteria and its 1961 adaptation (the Rome (active) criteria). These sets classified disease as 'classical', 'definite', 'probable' and 'possible' RA based on criteria comprising clinical, serological, radiological and histological features (the latter were dropped from the Rome criteria set because of their impracticality). More recently, a new criteria set (the 1987 ARA criteria) has been developed using statistical techniques. This set was derived using RA cases and controls attending hospital clinics. It is based on the earlier criteria sets but accommodates the characteristic pattern of joint involvement in RA more precisely. The criteria recognize only the single disease category of 'rheumatoid arthritis'. In validation studies, the 1987 criteria set has been found to have enhanced specificity over earlier schemes in clinic-based studies of RA. The sensitivity may, however, be reduced, in particular in studies of early disease. The application of classification criteria for case recognition in the population and family studies of RA has proved more problematic. In these settings, there is the additional requirement to recognize individuals with remitted and inactive disease as RA cases. The 1966 New York criteria were developed for this specific purpose, however their format proved cumbersome and they have not been widely adopted. The 1987 criteria set is insufficiently sensitive to recognize inactive disease if the criteria are applied exactly as they have been defined. The sensitivity of the 1987 criteria set is, however, substantially enhanced if the criteria are adapted to

  11. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  12. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis... guidance for industry entitled ``Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment.'' This... of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It also addresses additional considerations for...

  13. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  15. Tetrandrine inhibits migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes through down-regulating the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA GTPases and activation of the PI3K/Akt and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Zhu, Xian-Yang; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhi-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), the main active constituent of Stephania tetrandra root, has been demonstrated to alleviate adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Tet on the migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) and explore the underlying mechanisms. By using cultures of primary FLS isolated from synoviums of RA patients and cell line MH7A, Tet (0.3, 1 μmol·L(-1)) was proven to significantly impede migration and invasion of RA-FLS, but not cell proliferation. Tet also greatly reduced the activation and expressions of matrix degrading enzymes MMP-2/9, the expression of F-actin and the activation of FAK, which controlled the morphologic changes in migration process of FLS. To identify the key signaling pathways by which Tet exerts anti-migration effect, the specific inhibitors of multiple signaling pathways LY294002, Triciribine, SP600125, U0126, SB203580, and PDTC (against PI3K, Akt, JNK, ERK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB-p65, respectively) were used. Among them, LY294002, Triciribine, and SP600125 were shown to obviously inhibit the migration of MH7A cells. Consistently, Tet was able to down-regulate the activation of Akt and JNK as demonstrated by Western blotting assay. Moreover, Tet could reduce the expressions of migration-related proteins Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA in MH7A cells. In conclusion, Tet can impede the migration and invasion of RA-FLS, which provides a plausible explanation for its protective effect on RA. The underlying mechanisms involve the reduction of the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, inhibition of the activation of Akt and JNK, and subsequent down-regulation of activation and/or expressions of MMP-2/9, F-actin, and FAK.

  16. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  17. A case of fungal arthritis caused by Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Wook; Lee, Tong-Joo; Kim, Myung-Ku; Lee, Moon; Jung, Jae-Ho

    2010-03-01

    Hansenula anomala (H. anomaly) is part of the normal flora in the alimentary tract and throat. It has been reported to be an organism causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. However, cases of fungal arthritis caused by H. anomala are rare. We encountered a case of H. anomala arthritis in a 70-year-old man who was treated with an empirical antibiotic treatment and surgery under the impression of septic arthritis. However, the patient did not improve after antibiotic therapy and surgery. Consequently, knee joint aspiration was performed again, which identified fungal arthritis caused by H. anomala. It was treated successfully with amphotericin B and fluconazole. When treating arthritis patients with diabetes, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis by H. anomala and provide the appropriate treatment.

  18. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  19. [The pulmonological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, György; Karabélyos, Csaba; Tarján, Zsolt

    2008-07-20

    In their review article the authors overview the primary and secondary pulmonary complications of rheumatoid arthritis with the help of bibliographic data. They emphasize the pulmonological complications of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs used for the pharmaceutical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, of which they discuss the methotrexate induced pulmonary diseases. Methotrexate participates nearly in all of additive double and triple--O'Dell-scheme--combined disease modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. Because of that, the early detection of drug-induced pulmonological complications is important. For rheumatologists the treatment of methotrexate resistant rheumatoid arthritis is always getting a higher and higher challenge. Biological therapeutical drugs act as cytokine antagonists, by blocking TNF-alpha and, compared to disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, they can more effectively inhibit the progression of the disease. These are the biological response modifiers. Their main representatives are infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. At the end, the authors discuss secondary pulmonary complications caused by biological response modifiers, e.g. the biological response modifiers associated pulmonary tuberculosis, bacterial tracheobronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, bronchiectasia, pulmonary oedema, rapid fibrosing alveolitis, and coccidioidomycosis. At 3% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treated with biological response modifiers, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, pulmonary and systemic mycosis--coccidioidomycosis can appear with a 15% of mortality. As a consequence of frequent earthquakes, the spores getting into the air from the ground infect immunosuppressed patients treated with biological response modifiers. The authors draw attention to the fact that patients who receive biological therapy and travel to the above-mentioned endemic or earthquake-active regions, have a potential high risk, so it is indispensable that they are informed by the

  20. Endogenous IL-22 Plays a Dual Role in Arthritis: Regulation of Established Arthritis via IFN-γ Responses

    PubMed Central

    Justa, Shivali; Zhou, Xiaoqun; Sarkar, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objective IL-22 is elevated in patients with inflammatory arthritis and correlates with disease activity. IL-22 deficient mice have reduced incidence of arthritis. Recombinant IL-22 restrains progression of arthritis via increase in IL-10 responses when administered prior to onset of arthritis. These findings imply a possible dual role of IL-22 in inflammatory arthritis depending on the phase of arthritis. Experiments outlined here were designed to elucidate the contribution of endogenous IL-22 before and after the onset of arthritis. Methods Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in DBA1 or IFN-γ deficient mice following immunization with collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. Anti-IL-22 antibody or isotype control were administered prior to or after onset of arthritis and disease progression assessed by clinical scoring and histopathology. IL-22, IL-17 and IFN-γ responses were measured by ELISA and flowcytometry. Anti-collagen antibody responses were analyzed by ELISA. Expression of IL-22R1 in CD4+ cells was elucidated by flowcytometry and real time PCR. Results Collagen specific IL-22 responses were expanded during arthritis and IL-22 producing cells were discrete from IL-17 or IFN-γ producing cells. Neutralization of IL-22 after onset of arthritis resulted in significant increase in Th1 responses and significantly reduced severity of arthritis. CD4+ cells from arthritic mice showed increased surface expression of IL-22R1. In vitro, CD4+T cells cultured with antigen presenting cells in the presence or absence of IL-22 suppressed or induced IFN-γ, respectively. The protective effect of anti-IL-22 was reversed in IFN-γ deficient mice. Moreover, administration of anti-IL-22 prior to onset of arthritis augmented arthritis severity. Conclusion We show for the first time that IL-22 plays a dual role: protective prior to the onset of arthritis and pathogenic after onset of arthritis. The pathogenic effect of IL-22 is dependent on suppression of IFN

  1. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis.

  2. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Deborah; Lee, Joyce S; King, Talmadge E

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  4. Effect and Treatment of Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  5. An unusual case of gonococcal arthritis of the finger.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susanne B; Unglaub, Frank; Dragu, Adrian; Gessner, André; Horch, Raymund E

    2009-10-01

    Gonococcal arthritis is the most common acute septic arthritis in sexually active young adults. It is caused by the gram-negative diplococcus Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In 0.5-3% an untreated mucosal infection disseminates throughout the system and affects mostly big joints like the knee, elbows, and ankles. N. gonorrhoeae is a fragile microorganism which is difficult to culture. Penicillin resistance has developed worldwide in recent years, therefore, patients should be treated by a third generation Cephalosporin. In this article, we describe the unexpected finding of septic arthritis in the proximal interphalangeal joint of a 50-year-old patient. The septic arthritis was caused by N. gonorrhoeae.

  6. Nanomedicine for Intra-Articular Drug Delivery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Mary, Hannah; Del Rincόn, Inmaculada; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation within the joint. Recent developments in the understanding of inflammation have led to an increased interest in the use of nanomedicine in the treatment and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The ability of nanomedicine, such as nanoparticles, to permeate into and/or retain within the inflamed joint after intravenous and/or intra-articular administration has proven to be beneficial in improving rheumatoid arthritis therapy while reducing systemic exposure of patients to potentially toxic anti-arthritic drugs. This review aims at explaining the major applications of nanomedicine in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and diagnosis.

  7. Managing cardiovascular risk in patients with inflammatory arthritis: practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tournadre, Anne; Mathieu, Sylvain; Soubrier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, have higher rates of cardiovascular mortality. While the increased cardiovascular risk is only explained to some extent, a lot of research is currently conducted to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, risk stratification, and optimal cardiovascular risk management. This review sought to report epidemiological data pertaining to the cardiovascular disease burden in patients with inflammatory arthritis, underlying mechanisms accounting for excessive cardiovascular risk, along with recommendations regarding risk assessment and management in this patient population. PMID:27721904

  8. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  9. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  10. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  11. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  12. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  13. Abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Maya H; Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul

    2008-01-01

    T-cell biology has regained importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Despite the significant improvements associated with the introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α blockade, reasonable proportions of failures and suboptimal responses have been reported, necessitating a search for alternative targeted therapies. This has included drug therapy designed to interrupt T-cell activation via the co-stimulation pathway. Abatacept is a recombinant fusion protein that blocks the co-stimulatory signal mediated by the CD28-CD80/86 pathway, which is required for T-cell activation. Several clinical trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of this drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes the clinical data supporting this line of treatment and considers the safety and efficacy data from phase II and III trials. PMID:19007425

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swart, J F; Wulffraat, N M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with refractory inflammatory arthritis can still respond favourable to autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, this treatment has a high morbidity and even 5% mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), a subset of the non-haematopoietic stromal cells obtained from bone marrow, were found to have a strong immunosuppressive effect. MSC treatment is explored in many diseases like diabetes, SLE, MS and RA. This review covers all relevant literature regarding MSC treatment of inflammatory arthritis (RA and JIA). This review contains data of in vitro studies, animal studies and clinical studies. The following subjects will be discussed in detail: properties of MSC, presence of MSC in the joint, intra-articular versus intravenous route, autologous versus allogeneic, ideal source of MSC, distribution, transdifferentiation, engraftment, rejection, efficacy and toxicology. After reading this review the reader will be totally updated in this quickly evolving field of MSC therapy.

  15. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  16. Ibuprofen or aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Blechman, W J; Schmid, F R; April, P A; Wilson, C H; Brooks, C D

    1975-07-28

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal drug with analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties that was recently introduced for use in antiarthritis therapy in the United States. In a year-long double-blind multiclinic trial in 885 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ibuprofen was at least as satisfactory as aspirin, considering both efficacy and tolerance. In the majority of patients, daily doses ranged from 800 to 1,600 mg of ibuprofen and 3 to 6 gm of aspirin. The drugs did not differ greatly in providing relief from arthritis symptoms, but ibuprofen was definitely better tolerated, especially in regard to gastrointestinal complaints. Seven percent of the ibuprofen group dropped out of the study because of adverse reactions, as compared with 16% of the aspirin group; 17% of the ibuprofen group and 31% of the aspirin group had gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. [Follicular bronchiolitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Morita, S; Sato, A; Hayakawa, H; Chida, K; Sato, J; Todate, A; Tsukamoto, K; Toyoshima, M; Imokawa, S; Iwata, M

    1996-08-01

    A 52-year-old man with an 8-year history of rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to the hospital because of coughing and purulent sputum. A chest X-ray film obtained on admission showed small nodular shadows without overinflation in both lower lung fields, and a high-resolution CT scan showed many micronodular shadows in the centrilobular regions. Follicular bronchiolitis was diagnosed from the results of an open-lung biopsy, and prednisolone therapy was started at a dosage of 40 mg/day. Sinusitis developed 4 years later. Five years after the start of steroid therapy, dilation of bronchi and thickening of bronchial walls appeared on a CT scan, which also showed areas of low attenuation that were presumed to be bronchiolitis obliterans. These findings suggest that the pattern of airway disease can vary during the course of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. [Synovial membrane diagnostic assessment in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, B; Dann, P; Friemann, J; Pauly, T; Schneider, M

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most frequent inflammatory rheumatic disease. At the beginning of the disease, where, based on today's knowledge the therapeutic possibilities are largest, the diagnostic methods do not permit a differentiated estimation of the prognosis. Conventional x-rays are mostly normal and serum markers unspecific. So far--in contrast to other diseases--only little information had been drawn from the pathomorphologic substrate "synovialis" itself to assess the prognosis. Reasons therefor were found in difficulties in obtaining synovial tissue besides surgical interventions, particularly in patients with early arthritis. By minimalizing the diagnostic instruments and improvement of the technique, synovial tissue sampling in RA has become minimally invasive and it is even possible to perform on the smallest joints, such as finger joints. Hereby, synovial analysis is open for detecting pathways of inflammation and joint destruction, which might support the advancement of new therapeutic strategies, followed by a better prognosis and outcome of RA.

  19. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  20. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  1. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  2. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  3. One year in an Alaskan arthritis clinic.

    PubMed

    Templin, D

    1999-10-01

    During 1997 visits were made by 852 individuals to an arthritis clinic in Alaska serving predominantly Alaska Natives. Three hundred twenty- seven of these were seen for the first time. The ratio of women to men was 3:1. Rheumatoid Arthritis was the most common arthritic condition seen, followed by Degenerative Joint Disease and Spondyloarthropathies. Three hundred five Tlingit and 246 Eskimo made up 65% of the patients seen that year. Methotrexate was the most frequently used Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug but the other such drugs were prescribed as well. Recording demographic and clinical information on a portable computer at the time of visit provided record linkage and the data for this report and was used in Health Care Planning.

  4. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  5. Yoga for Arthritis: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The aim of this article was to systematically review the existing literature on the use of yoga for persons with arthritis. We included peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980-2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis patients and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including four RCTs and four NRCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported and attrition was comparable or better than typical for exercise interventions. Evidence was strongest for reduction in disease symptoms (tender/swollen joints, pain) and disability, as well as improved self-efficacy and mental health. Interventions, research methods and disease diagnoses were heterogeneous. Larger, rigorous RCTs are necessary to more effectively quantify the effects of yoga for arthritic populations PMID:21220084

  6. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  7. Cytochrome aa3 in Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mikiei; Ogawa, Naohide; Ihara, Kunio; Sugiyama, Yasuo; Mukohata, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    A cytochrome in an extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, was purified to homogeneity. This protein displayed a redox difference spectrum that is characteristic of a-type cytochromes and a CN− complex spectrum that indicates the presence of heme a and heme a3. This cytochrome aa3 consisted of 44- and 35-kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of the 44-kDa subunit was similar to that of the heme-copper oxidase subunit I, and critical amino acid residues for metal binding, such as histidines, were highly conserved. The reduced cytochrome c partially purified from the bacterial membrane fraction was oxidized by the cytochrome aa3, providing physiological evidence for electron transfer from cytochrome c to cytochrome aa3 in archaea. PMID:11790755

  8. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis.

  9. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed

    Gay, R M; Lane, T W; Keller, D C

    1983-01-01

    A normal part of the oral flora, Kingella kingae has seldom been recognized as the cause of serious clinical infections. We report a case of documented septic arthritis caused by K. kingae in an otherwise healthy infant. We suggest that it may be more common than thought based on the general unfamiliarity with this organism and the fact that several dozen clinical isolates have been identified by reference laboratories.

  10. Kienbock's disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Desy, Nicholas M; Bernstein, Mitchell; Harvey, Edward J; Hazel, Hazel

    2011-06-01

    Kienbock's disease or osteonecrosis of the lunate is an uncommon cause of wrist pain. . Though there have been several reports of cases in patients with various rheumatologic diseases, the precise etiology has currently not been established. We report a case of Kienbock's disease that occurred in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report with an association between these two conditions.

  11. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed Central

    Gay, R M; Lane, T W; Keller, D C

    1983-01-01

    A normal part of the oral flora, Kingella kingae has seldom been recognized as the cause of serious clinical infections. We report a case of documented septic arthritis caused by K. kingae in an otherwise healthy infant. We suggest that it may be more common than thought based on the general unfamiliarity with this organism and the fact that several dozen clinical isolates have been identified by reference laboratories. PMID:6826703

  12. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Amir; Zisman, Devy

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome. PMID:28178440

  13. [Genomic approach to pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryo

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies identified multiple genes and polymorphisms that increase risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Genomic approach is characterized with its integrative style using mathematical and statistical models. Its main targets include (1)combinatorial effect of multiple genetic and environmental factors, (2)heterogeneity of pathological states and its individuality, and (3)their chronological heterogeneity. Genomic approach will clarify pathophysiology of various diseases along with the progresses in molecular biology and other researches on individual molecules.

  14. Decreased fibrinolytic activity in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mussoni, L; Pintucci, G; Romano, G; De Benedetti, F; Massa, M; Martini, A

    1990-12-01

    The basal fibrinolytic activity in 17 children with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) was investigated. It was found that patients with JCA, and particularly those with the systemic form, show decreased plasma fibrinolytic activity and a marked increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor. Additionally, it was found that patients with systemic JCA, but not those with the polyarticular or pauciarticular form, have increased circulating levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and endothelial cell protein, suggesting possible endothelial cell participation in systemic JCA.

  15. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  16. AAS Nova and Astrobites: Making current astronomy research accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Astrobites Team

    2016-10-01

    AAS Nova and Astrobites are two resources available for astronomers, astronomy students, and astronomy enthusiasts to keep up with some of the most recent research published across the field of astronomy. Both supported by the AAS, these two daily astrophysical literature blogs provide accessible summaries of recent publications on the arXiv and in AAS journals. We present the goals, content, and readership of AAS Nova and Astrobites, and discuss how they might be used as tools in the undergraduate classroom.

  17. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities. PMID:21234398

  18. Lipid abnormalities in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erum, Uzma; Ahsan, Tasnim; Khowaja, Danish

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of dyslipidemia in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study, conducted at the ‘Rheumatology Clinic’ of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC), Karachi, from November 2013 to May 2014. A total of 200 patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), diagnosed according to the ACR/EULAR criteria 2010, were included in the study. Laboratory investigations including creatinine, ALT, CBC, TSH and fasting lipid profile (LDL, HDL, and Total cholesterol) were done for all patients. Results: Out of 200 patients, 23 (11.5%) were male and 177 (88.5%) were female. The mean age was 36.31±10.46 years and the mean duration of disease was 3.82±3.03 years. A total of 107 (53.5%) patients had dyslipidemia, and the commonest abnormality was a low HDL, seen in 83 (41.5 %) patients. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia was frequently observed in Rheumatoid Arthritis. This may be considered as a secondary impact of chronic inflammatory state, seen in RA. Lipid abnormalities should be sought at regular intervals, and corrective actions taken to mitigate increased cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28367205

  19. Etanercept in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Puig, L; López-Ferrer, A; Laiz, A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the most important recent studies on the use of etanercept in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Using various assessment tools, such as the Disease Activity Score 28-joint count (DAS28), the PsA Response Criteria (PsARC), and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) score, several authors have shown that etanercept can reduce the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis and inhibit radiographic progression in studies with follow-up periods of up to 2 years. There is evidence that etanercept is effective in the treatment of psoriatic enthesitis, dactylitis, and axial joint disease as well as in disease affecting the skin and nails. In clinical trials, etanercept had a safety profile similar to that of placebo and this profile did not change over time. Cost-effectiveness models have found etanercept to be the most cost-effective tumor necrosis factor inhibitor in patients with psoriatic arthritis and mild to moderate psoriasis. Etanercept has a favorable risk-benefit profile in the short term. The concomitant use of methotrexate does not alter etanercept survival.

  20. Hemochromatosis simulating rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fabíola Brasil; Callegari, Amanda; Sarinho, José Célso; Lucena, Juliana; Casagrande, Renielly; de Souza, Branca Dias Batista

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of a patient who had a previous diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, nonerosive, rheumatoid factor negative, that despite the therapeutic approach presented progressive worsening of the articular and general condition. After extensive research, she had a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Joint symptoms are common manifestations in hemochromatosis. The arthropathy of hemochromatosis may resemble inflammatory arthropathy mimicking RA, particularly in the most common sites as 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal. Radiologically are observed decreased joint space, subchondral sclerosis, cyst formation and chondrocalcinosis. Treatment with disease modifying drugs for rheumatoid arthritis tend to worsen the clinical picture, since the liver is the major site of deposition of iron in hemochromatosis and these medications are known to be hepatotoxic. Phlebotomy treatment for hemochromatosis is apparently ineffective in reversing the articular manifestations, which requires the association with iron chelating drugs. Due to the apparent difficulty in differentiating between the two diseases, a screening profile of iron in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with atypical progression is necessary.

  1. Gemcitabine-induced gouty arthritis attacks.

    PubMed

    Bottiglieri, Sal; Tierson, Neil; Patel, Raina; Mo, Jae-Hyun; Mehdi, Syed

    2013-09-01

    In this case report, we review the experience of a patient who presented with early stage pancreatic cancer (Stage IIb) who underwent a Whipple procedure and adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient's past medical history included early stage colon cancer in remission, post-traumatic-stress-disorder, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, osteoarthritis, gout, and pre-diabetes. Chemotherapy initially consisted of weekly gemcitabine. The patient developed acute gouty attacks after his second dose of gemcitabine, which brought him to the emergency room for emergent treatment on several occasions. Gemcitabine was held and treatment began with fluorouracil and concurrent radiation. After completion of his chemoradiation with fluorouracil, he was again treated with weekly gemcitabine alone. As soon as the patient started gemcitabine chemotherapy the patient developed gouty arthritis again, requiring discontinuation of chemotherapy. The patient received no additional treatment until his recent recurrence 8 months later where gemcitabine chemotherapy was again introduced with prophylactic medications consisting of allopurinol 100 mg by mouth daily and colchicine 0.6 mg by mouth daily throughout gemcitabine chemotherapy, and no signs of gouty arthritis occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing gout attacks associated with gemcitabine therapy. There is limited data available describing the mechanism that gouty arthritis may be precipitated from gemcitabine chemotherapy. Further monitoring and management may be required in patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy with underlying gout.

  2. Tolerizing DNA vaccines for autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Higgins, John P; Kidd, Brian A; Tomooka, Beren; Digennaro, Carla; Lee, Lowen Y; de Vegvar, Henry E Neuman; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2006-12-01

    Current therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases non-specifically suppress immune function, and there is great need for fundamental approaches such as antigen-specific tolerizing therapy. In this paper we describe development of antigen-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and use of protein microarrays to monitor response to therapy and to identify potential additional autoimmune targets for next generation vaccines. We demonstrate that tolerizing DNA vaccines encoding type II collagen (CII) reduced the incidence and severity of CIA. Atorvastatin, a statin drug found to reduce the severity of autoimmunity, potentiated the effect of DNA vaccines encoding CII. Analysis of cytokines produced by collagen-reactive T cells derived from mice receiving tolerizing DNA encoding CII, as compared to control vaccines, revealed reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Arthritis microarray analysis demonstrated reduced spreading of autoantibody responses in mice treated with DNA encoding CII. The development of tolerizing DNA vaccines, and the use of antibody profiling to guide design of and to monitor therapeutic responses to such vaccines, represents a promising approach for the treatment of RA and other autoimmune diseases.

  3. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  4. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  5. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne D.; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  8. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  9. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  10. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests.

  11. The pro-apoptotic effects of TIPE2 on AA rat fibroblast-like synoviocytes via regulation of the DR5–caspase–NF-κB pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chunyan; Zhang, Shifeng; Hong, Shifu; Pang, Jinglong; Yesibulati, Yeletai; Yin, Ping; Zhuang, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    TIPE2, also known as TNFAIP8L2, a member of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 (TNFAIP8) family, is known as an inhibitor in inflammation and cancer, and its overexpression induces cell death. We examined the role of TIPE2 with respect to adjuvant arthritis (AA)-associated pathogenesis by analyzing the TIPE2 regulation of death receptor (DR5)-mediated apoptosis in vitro. The results showed that TIPE2 was detected in normal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), but scarcely observed in AA-FLSs. Therefore, recombinant MIGR1/TIPE2+/+ and control MIGR1 lentivirus vectors were transfected to AA-FLSs, which were denoted as TIPE2+/+-FLSs and MIGR1-FLSs, respectively. Our results showed that TIPE2+/+-FLSs were highly susceptible to ZF1-mediated apoptosis, and ZF1 was our own purification of an anti-DR5 single chain variable fragment antibody. Under the presence of TIPE2, the expression of DR5 was significantly increased compared with that of the MIGR1-FLS group. In contrast, the level of phosphorylated nuclear factor-kappa B (pNF-κB) was lower in the TIPE2+/+-FLS group treated with ZF1, whereas the activity of caspase was higher. Moreover, the rate of apoptosis in the TIPE2+/+-FLS group, which was pretreated with caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, was significantly decreased. In contrast, the apoptosis occurrence in the MIGR1-FLS group increased significantly with the pretreatment of the NF-κB inhibitor Bay. These results indicated that TIPE2 increased the apoptosis of AA-FLSs by enhancing DR5 expression levels, thereby promoting the activation of caspase and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB in AA-FLSs. TIPE2 might potentially act as a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27013892

  12. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  13. Sporotrichosis arthritis. A case presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Goss, G; Gotsman, A; Asvat, M S

    1983-12-31

    Mimicry by fungal infection of other chronic bone and joint diseases may easily result in a tardy diagnosis with subsequent needless surgery or permanent damage to the joint and its function. A case of sporotrichosis arthritis involving both wrists and knee joints is described. Diagnostic pitfalls and therapeutic dilemmas are outlined. The literature on this apparently 'rare' form of arthritis is reviewed.

  14. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  15. Lysosomal β-glucuronidase regulates Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis severity.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H; Chen, Xinjian; Zachary, James F; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most prevalent arthropod-borne illness in the United States and remains a clinical and social challenge. The spectrum of disease severity among infected patients suggests that host genetics contribute to pathogenic outcomes, particularly in patients who develop arthritis. Using a forward genetics approach, we identified the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUSB), a member of a large family of coregulated lysosomal enzymes, as a key regulator of Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Severely arthritic C3H mice possessed a naturally occurring hypomorphic allele, Gusbh. C57BL/6 mice congenic for the C3H Gusb allele were prone to increased Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Radiation chimera experiments revealed that resident joint cells drive arthritis susceptibility. C3H mice expressing WT Gusb as a transgene were protected from severe Lyme arthritis. Importantly, the Gusbh allele also exacerbated disease in a serum transfer model of rheumatoid arthritis. A known GUSB function is the prevention of lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Development of Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis in Gusbh-expressing mice was associated with heightened accumulation of GAGs in joint tissue. We propose that GUSB modulates arthritis pathogenesis by preventing accumulation of proinflammatory GAGs within inflamed joint tissue, a trait that may be shared by other lysosomal exoglycosidases.

  16. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001). These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Virus antibody levels and delayed hypersensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P E; Waxman, J; Hirshaut, Y; Kaplan, M H

    1976-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus antibody levels were not higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to matched controls. Delayed hypersensitivity, measured by skin test reactivity, was depressed in rheumatoid arthritis. There was no correlation between virus antibody titres and delayed hypersensitivity. PMID:182092

  18. Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis: Opportunities for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Due to its chronic nature and its associated impact on physical function and life quality, arthritis in its various forms imposes a significant burden on society. Objective: To critically review and evaluate: (1) what has been documented about the burden of arthritis, (2) what is being done in treatment, and (3) what might be done at…

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis in 2014: Exciting times for RA research.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul

    2015-02-01

    2014 saw the emergence of a novel rheumatoid arthritis therapy to rival methotrexate, as well as advances in our understanding of mouse T.cell biology and of the cross-talk between the nervous system and the immune system. How will these advances affect the future of rheumatoid arthritis research and therapy?

  20. 7th meeting of the global arthritis research network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Last October, the 7th meeting of the Global Arthritis Research Network was held in Zurich, Switzerland. European and American experts who have made major recent contributions to molecular biology got together to provide insights into novel technologies and approaches useful for biomedical research, especially for research on arthritis and related conditions. PMID:21892971

  1. Role of viscosupplementation in osteo-arthritis of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rajesh; Mahajan, Sumit

    2013-05-01

    Osteo-arthritis is the chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It is caused by 'wear and tear' on a joint. Knee is the most commonly Involved joint. Disease is so crippling that patient is unable to walk independently from bed to bathroom. The major causes of osteo-arthritis are age, gender, obesity, medical condition and hereditary. The signs and symptoms of osteo-arthritis are pain, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and loss of function. No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing osteo-arthritis. Management of osteo-arthritis includes non-pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical. A relatively new procedure is viscosupplementation, in which a preparation of hyaluronic acid is injected into the knee joint. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance found in the synovial fluid. It acts as a lubricant to enable bones to move smoothly over each other and a shock absorber for joint loads. The decrease in the elastic and viscous properties of synovial fluid in osteo-arthritis results from both a reduced molecular size and a reduced concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid. Viscosupplementation may be a therapeutic option for individuals with osteo-arthritis of the knee. Viscosupplementation has been shown to relieve pain in many patients who cannot get relief from non-medicinal measures or analgesic drugs. This article is to know the mechanism of action, patients' selection criteria, rationale and efficacy of viscosupplimentation in the management of osteo-arthritis of knee.

  2. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... meeting. Agenda: On July 22, 2013, the committee will discuss the Assessment of...

  3. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

  4. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  5. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  6. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. Evaluating and mitigating fracture risk in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Matthew B; Saag, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are predisposed to systemic bone loss, and they are at an increased risk of fractures. Although there are similarities in the patient demographics between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the general population of osteoporosis patients, there are factors, particularly the use of glucocorticoids, which are specific to rheumatoid arthritis. These factors can lead to an increased risk of bone loss and fracture. Given that fractures are often very debilitating, especially in elderly patients, it is of paramount importance for the practicing rheumatologist to be aware of ways to reduce the risk of fracture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This review discusses currently available modalities for fracture risk assessment as well as pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions available to treat and prevent bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  8. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  9. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  10. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint: an uncommon location.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Mateo Soria, Lourdes; Riveros Frutos, Anne; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Holgado Pérez, Susana; Olivé Marqués, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Septic pyogenic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a rare entity that occurs in immunosuppressed patients or those with discontinuity of defense barriers. There are only 15 cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and the isolation of a microorganism in synovial fluid or blood cultures. The evidence of arthritis by imaging (MRI, ultrasound or scintigraphy) may be useful. Antibiotic treatment is the same as in septic arthritis in other locations. Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most frequently isolated. Our objective was to describe the clinical features, treatment and outcome of patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint at a Rheumatology Department. We developed a study with a retrospective design (1989-2012). The medical records of patients with septic arthritis were reviewed (101 patients). Those involving the acromioclavicular joint were selected (6 patients; 6%).

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of enthesitis-related arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) JIA category describes a clinically heterogeneous group of children including some who have predominately enthesitis, enthesitis and arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, or inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthropathy. ERA accounts for 10%–20% of JIA. Common clinical manifestations of ERA include arthritis, enthesitis, and acute anterior uveitis. Axial disease is also common in children with established ERA. Treatment regimens for ERA, many of them based on adults with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologic agents either individually or in combination. PMID:23236258

  12. Systemic AA amyloidosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Real de Asúa, Diego; Costa, Ramón; Galván, Jose María; Filigheddu, María Teresa; Trujillo, Davinia; Cadiñanos, Julen

    2014-01-01

    The term “amyloidosis” encompasses the heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of autologous fibrillar proteins. The global incidence of amyloidosis is estimated at five to nine cases per million patient-years. While amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is more frequent in developed countries, amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is more common in some European regions and in developing countries. The spectrum of AA amyloidosis has changed in recent decades owing to: an increase in the median age at diagnosis; a percent increase in the frequency of primary AL amyloidosis with respect to the AA type; and a substantial change in the epidemiology of the underlying diseases. Diagnosis of amyloidosis is based on clinical organ involvement and histological evidence of amyloid deposits. Among the many tinctorial characteristics of amyloid deposits, avidity for Congo red and metachromatic birefringence under unidirectional polarized light remain the gold standard. Once the initial diagnosis has been made, the amyloid subtype must be identified and systemic organ involvement evaluated. In this sense, the 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component scintigraphy is a safe and noninvasive technique that has revolutionized the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment in systemic amyloidosis. It can successfully identify anatomical patterns of amyloid deposition throughout the body and enables not only an initial estimation of prognosis, but also the monitoring of the course of the disease and the response to treatment. Given the etiologic diversity of AA amyloidosis, common therapeutic strategies are scarce. All treatment options should be based upon a greater control of the underlying disease, adequate organ support, and treatment of symptoms. Nevertheless, novel therapeutic strategies targeting the formation of amyloid fibrils and amyloid deposition may generate new expectations for patients with AA amyloidosis. PMID:25378951

  13. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  14. Evaluation and management of adult shoulder pain: a focus on rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2014-07-01

    Shoulder pain is a common reason for a patient to see their primary care physician. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of 3 common shoulder disorders; rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral joint arthritis. The typical history and physical examination findings for each of these entities are highlighted, in addition to treatment options.

  15. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides.

  17. Prevalence and occupational impact of arthritis in Saskatchewan farmers.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Gjevre, Regina M; Trask, Catherine; King, Nathan; Koehncke, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural workers have physically demanding occupations. In this study of Saskatchewan farmers, the authors examined (1) self-reported prevalence of physician-diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; and (2) the impact of these chronic arthridities on engagement in physical tasks related to farming. This study was conducted through a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort Study in which 2,473 adult residents upon 1,216 farms participated. Collected survey data included demographic and health information; regional musculoskeletal symptoms for each participant assessed via the Standard Nordic Questionnaire; and engagement in various specific physical tasks or activities associated with mixed farming practices. Of the 2,473 respondents, 13% reported chronic arthritic diagnoses (10% osteoarthritis, 4% rheumatoid arthritis, with 1% from each category overlapping with both forms of arthritis). Participants reporting arthritis were more likely to also report disabling musculoskeletal symptoms involving their shoulders, elbows, hands, lower back, hips, knees, and ankles. Farmers with arthritis reported less participation in all physical farming activities studied, including various machinery operations, herd maintenance and veterinary activities, overhead work, shoveling/pitchfork work, and lifting/carrying. When adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, operation of combines and shoveling/pitchfork work continued to be significantly less engaged in by farmers with arthritis. The overall prevalence of arthritis was consistent with general population prevalence, although the category of rheumatoid arthritis was overrepresented. Farmers with arthritis were significantly less likely to participate in combine operation and shoveling/pitchfork chores compared with their counterparts without arthritis.

  18. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  19. Distinguishing inflammatory from noninflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, and dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    The most widely applied criteria for classifying psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are the CASPAR (ClASsification of Psoriatic ARthritis) criteria. A patient who fulfills the CASPAR criteria must have evidence of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, or spondylitis, and may have an inflammatory musculoskeletal component, dactylitis. Although the criteria were developed by rheumatologists, not all patients with PsA are seen by rheumatologists. Thus, it is important for clinicians such as dermatologists, primary care providers, physiatrists, and orthopedists, and patients themselves, to be able to recognize the presence of inflammatory musculoskeletal disease and distinguish it from degenerative or traumatic musculoskeletal disease. At their 2010 annual meeting, members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) discussed the steps they are taking to define the key variables that must be present to distinguish inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, and dactylitis from degenerative, traumatic, mechanical, or infectious forms of these conditions.

  20. Immunoregulation in arthritis. A review on synovial immune reactions in RA and in some experimental animal models for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klareskog, L; Holmdahl, R; Goldschmidt, T; Björk, J

    1987-01-01

    Local synovial immune reactions have during recent years been characterized both in human arthritides, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and in animal models for arthritis. Common characteristics of human RA on one hand and experimental adjuvant arthritis and collagen arthritis on the other hand, are induced expression of class II transplantation antigens on synovial cells close to the cartilage and presence of activated T lymphocytes in close proximity to these class II expressing cells. The present review aims to describe some implications of these and subsequent findings both concerning the analysis of the pathogenesis of RA and concerning some therapeutic implications derived from parallel studies on relevant features of the human RA and the respective animal models for arthritis.

  1. MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Redelinghuys, Pierre; Whitehead, Lauren; Augello, Andrea; Drummond, Rebecca A; Levesque, Jean-Michel; Vautier, Simon; Reid, Delyth M; Kerscher, Bernhard; Taylor, Julie A; Nigrovic, Peter A; Wright, John; Murray, Graeme I; Willment, Janet A; Hocking, Lynne J; Fernandes, Maria J G; De Bari, Cosimo; Mcinnes, Iain B; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A−/− mice. Methods Clec12A−/− mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A−/− phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors. PMID:26275430

  2. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics.

  3. Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

  4. Abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig) is a new agent which targets T-cell activation, an event which is thought to be critical to the onset and maintenance of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Abatacept now has substantial evidence from phase III trials for efficacy in patients with RA who have failed to respond to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and antitumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents. Safety profile is favorable in combination with DMARDs. The mechanism of action and available evidence of its efficacy and safety are reviewed in this article. PMID:18360649

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3).

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited - Advanced Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA.

  7. Gonococcal arthritis: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Fam, A; McGillivray, D; Stein, J; Little, H

    1973-02-03

    Six cases of gonococcal arthritis are described. Three presented during the initial "bacteremic stage" with polyarthralgia, fever, skin lesions and sterile synovial fluid. Two presented during the "septic joint stage" with positive synovial culture, and one presented during the "stage of residual deformity". Transient electrocardiographic changes were noted in two of the six cases. All responded to antibiotic therapy. One required additional surgical intervention.The condition is common, coinciding with the rising incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic gonorrhea. Gonococcal infection must be considered in the differential diagnosis of migratory polyarthralgia, tenosynovitis, oligoarthritis, fever or unusual skin lesions. Criteria for diagnosis, lines of treatment and relevant literature are reviewed.

  8. A case study on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tom

    2003-09-01

    At a time when many managed care organizations increasingly shift costs to patients through tiered formularies and widening copay differentials, biologic agents represent a significant clinical and financial challenge unlikely to be managed optimally with tiered formularies and greater patient cost sharing. The information discussed in this article is intended for healthcare professionals involved with rheumatoid arthritis therapy, including but not limited to physicians in both the inpatient and outpatient setting, and for other managed care professionals, including medical directors, pharmacy directors, long-term care decision makers, nurses, pharmacists, and case managers.

  9. What next for rheumatoid arthritis therapy?

    PubMed

    Blake, Simon M; Swift, Barbara A

    2004-06-01

    Introduction of biological agents for the treatment of the chronic inflammatory joint disease rheumatoid arthritis has reinvigorated research into this debilitating disease. These agents have been shown to both act on the signs and symptoms of disease, as well as retard the progression of joint destruction. However, these agents are not efficacious in all cases and their expense and route of administration can severely limit their use. Therefore the search continues not only for additional targets to help those individuals refractive to current therapy but also for more affordable orally active small molecule alternatives to biological agents.

  10. Current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Colmegna, Inés; Ohata, Brent R; Menard, Henri A

    2012-04-01

    Progress in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), together with the availability of new therapies, has changed the way we think about RA. The paradigm shift in RA therapy has been from controlling symptoms to controlling the disease process with the abrogation of inflammation. Challenges that are still unresolved include the issues in disease prevention, treatment specificity to restore tolerance, approaches to facilitate tissue repair, and treatment optimization to fit the individual patient's disease phenotype and comorbidity context. This review summarizes the pathogenesis-related rationales for the current therapeutic strategies in RA and for emerging therapies and potential approaches to restoring immune tolerance in RA.

  11. Complete heart block in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, M; Lever, J V; Cosh, J

    1983-01-01

    We report 8 cases of complete heart block (CHB) occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and review 20 similar patients previously reported. Complete heart block occurs generally in patients with established erosive nodular rheumatoid disease. It usually appears to be sudden and permanent, but progression from minor conduction delays is not uncommon. The characteristic histopathological finding is a rheumatoid granuloma in or near the AV node or bundle of His. If syncope or Stokes-Adams attacks occur, the treatment of choice is the insertion of a permanent pacemaker. The prognosis is good provided no other cardiac lesions occur, whether pericardial, valvular, or myocardial. Images PMID:6882034

  12. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited – Advanced Imaging Review

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA. PMID:28105245

  14. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  15. Therapeutic effect of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Miranda-Hernandez, Socorro; Alim, Md Abdul; Hayes, Linda; Bird, Guy; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2017-03-22

    Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and protective properties, is a potential agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is the most commonly used animal model for studying the pathogenesis of RA. This study analysed the therapeutic role of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. The animals were allocated into five groups that were subjected to the following treatments: negative (untreated) control, positive control (arthritis-induced), arthritis+methotrexate, arthritis+quercetin, and arthritis+methotrexate+quercetin. Assessments of weight, oedema, joint damage, and cytokine production were used to determine the therapeutic effect of quercetin. This study demonstrated for the first time the anti-inflammatory and protective effects of quercetin in vivo in CIA. The results also showed that the concurrent administration of quercetin and methotrexate did not offer greater protection than the administration of a single agent. The use of quercetin as a monotherapeutic agent resulted in the lowest degree of joint inflammation and the highest protection. The reduced severity of the disease in animals treated with quercetin was associated with decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and MCP-1. In conclusion, this study determined that quercetin, which was non-toxic, produced better results than methotrexate for the protection of joints from arthritic inflammation in mice. Quercetin may be an alternative treatment for RA because it modulates the main pathogenic pathways of RA.

  16. Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Ventricular Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients. PMID:24368945

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in foals with infectious arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie; LeRoux, Alexandre; Trichel, Jessica; Riggs, Laura; Bragulla, Herman H; Rademacher, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of foals with infectious and noninfectious arthritis are described. Six foals with infectious arthritis and three foals with noninfectious arthritis were grouped based on synovial fluid analysis results and examined with radiography and MR imaging. Four out of six foals with infectious arthritis had osseous lesions in MR images indicative of osteomyelitis and only 4/19 lesions were detected on digital radiographs. The three foals with noninfectious arthritis had no osseous lesions in MR images or radiographically. Of the six joints that had osseous lesions detected with MR imaging, three had at least one lytic lesion detected radiographically. Osseous lesions in the epiphysis, metaphysis, and physis appeared in MR images as T2W, short tau inversion recovery, and proton density hyperintense foci with a hypointense halo. The same lesions appeared hyperintense in the 3D RSSG water excitation pulse sequence but lacked a surrounding hypointense halo. Most joints of foals with infectious arthritis had heterogenous signals within the synovial fluid whereas all of the nonseptic joints had homogenous synovial fluid signals. MR imaging appears to be better than radiography in the detection of osseous lesions in foals diagnosed with infectious arthritis and may be a valuable screening test for the presence of osteomyelitis.

  18. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  19. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  20. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836