Science.gov

Sample records for adl facilities include

  1. Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  2. 13. Historic drawing of rocket engine test facility layout, including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic drawing of rocket engine test facility layout, including Buildings 202, 205, 206, and 206A, February 3, 1984. NASA GRC drawing number CF-101539. On file at NASA Glenn Research Center. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Canadian ADL Partnership Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Canadian Defense Academy,PO Box 17000 Station Forces ,Kingston ON CANADA K7K 7B4...CMP Canadian ADL Partnership Lab Presentation by CDA Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the... Canadian ADL Partnership Lab 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  4. HomeADL for adaptive ADL monitoring within smart homes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Nugent, Chris D; Finlay, Dewar D; Mulvenna, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present homeADL: a representation standard for an inference hierarchy of activities of daily living which may be monitored in a sensor equipped smart home. The approach allows a free exchange of ADL monitoring structures between different communities who share the same concern of providing high quality healthcare to the elderly. Its ability of matching different ADL protocols enables a mapping between an ADL protocol to a suitable smart home which makes an effective management of smart homes within a community hence, not only being able to satisfy an individual's healthcare requirements but also efficiently using monitoring resources at hand.

  5. DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE FACILITIES INCLUDING NON-METALLIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Mr. Herb Duvoisin

    2003-05-26

    CyTerra has leveraged our unique, shallow buried plastic target detection technology developed under US Army contracts into deeper buried subsurface facilities and including nonmetallic pipe detection. This Final Report describes a portable, low-cost, real-time, and user-friendly subsurface plastic pipe detector (LULU- Low Cost Utility Location Unit) that relates to the goal of maintaining the integrity and reliability of the nation's natural gas transmission and distribution network by preventing third party damage, by detecting potential infringements. Except for frequency band and antenna size, the LULU unit is almost identical to those developed for the US Army. CyTerra designed, fabricated, and tested two frequency stepped GPR systems, spanning the frequencies of importance (200 to 1600 MHz), one low and one high frequency system. Data collection and testing was done at a variety of locations (selected for soil type variations) on both targets of opportunity and selected buried targets. We developed algorithms and signal processing techniques that provide for the automatic detection of the buried utility lines. The real time output produces a sound as the radar passes over the utility line alerting the operator to the presence of a buried object. Our unique, low noise/high performance RF hardware, combined with our field tested detection algorithms, represents an important advancement toward achieving the DOE potential infringement goal.

  6. The New ADL Registry. ADL Registry Web Portal Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    Approaches 18 19 Primary ADL Registry Contributors Contributor Records Entry Date Navy eLearning (US Navy) 2,086 08/05/2008 Joint Knowledge Development...ADL Registry  http://adlregistry.adlnet.gov/  Navy eLearning Content Team  https://www.netc.navy.mil/ile  Joint Knowledge Online  http

  7. 30 CFR 585.701 - What must I include in my Facility Design Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my Facility Design Report? 585.701 Section 585.701 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Facility Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 585.701 What must I include in my Facility...

  8. 30 CFR 585.701 - What must I include in my Facility Design Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I include in my Facility Design Report? 585.701 Section 585.701 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Facility Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 585.701 What must I include in my Facility...

  9. 30 CFR 585.701 - What must I include in my Facility Design Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my Facility Design Report? 585.701 Section 585.701 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Facility Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 585.701 What must I include in my Facility...

  10. 50 CFR 15.41 - Criteria for including facilities as qualifying for imports. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Qualifying Facilities Breeding Exotic Birds in Captivity § 15.41 Criteria for including facilities as qualifying for imports. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for including facilities...

  11. 21 CFR 200.10 - Contract facilities (including consulting laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. 200.10 Section 200.10 Food and... extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. (a) Section 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...) The Food and Drug Administration is aware that many manufacturers of pharmaceutical products...

  12. 21 CFR 200.10 - Contract facilities (including consulting laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. 200.10 Section 200.10 Food and... extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. (a) Section 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...) The Food and Drug Administration is aware that many manufacturers of pharmaceutical products...

  13. 21 CFR 200.10 - Contract facilities (including consulting laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. 200.10 Section 200.10 Food and... extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. (a) Section 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...) The Food and Drug Administration is aware that many manufacturers of pharmaceutical products...

  14. 21 CFR 200.10 - Contract facilities (including consulting laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. 200.10 Section 200.10 Food and... extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. (a) Section 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...) The Food and Drug Administration is aware that many manufacturers of pharmaceutical products...

  15. 21 CFR 200.10 - Contract facilities (including consulting laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... laboratories) utilized as extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. 200.10 Section 200.10 Food and... extramural facilities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. (a) Section 704(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and...) The Food and Drug Administration is aware that many manufacturers of pharmaceutical products...

  16. 30 CFR 285.701 - What must I include in my Facility Design Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my Facility Design Report? 285.701 Section 285.701 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 285.701 What must I include in my Facility Design...

  17. 30 CFR 285.701 - What must I include in my Facility Design Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my Facility Design Report? 285.701 Section 285.701 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Facility Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 285.701 What must...

  18. Trainee Occupational Therapists Scoring the Barthel ADL.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth; Nugent, Chris; Bond, Raymond; Martin, Suzanne

    2015-09-01

    Within medical applications there are two main types of information design; paper-based and digital information [1]. As technology is constantly changing, information within healthcare management and delivery is continually being transitioned from traditional paper documents to digital and online resources. Activity of Daily Living (ADL) charts are still predominantly paper based and are therefore prone to "human error" [2]. In light of this, an investigation has taken place into the design for reducing the amount of human error, between a paper based ADL, specifically the Barthel Index, and the same ADL created digitally. The digital ADL was developed as an online platform as this offers the best method of data capture for a large group of participants all together [3]. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of the Barthel Index ADL in paper format and then reproduce the same ADL digitally. This paper presents the findings of a study involving 26 participants who were familiar with ADL charts, and used three scenarios requiring them to complete both a paper ADL and a digital ADL. An evaluation was undertaken to ascertain if there were any 'human errors' in completing the paper ADL and also to find similarities/differences through using the digital ADL. The results from the study indicated that 22/26 participants agreed that the digital ADL was better, if not the same as a paper based ADL. Further results indicated that participants rate highly the added benefit of the digital ADL being easy to use and also that calculation of assessment scores were performed automatically. Statistically the digital BI offered a 100 % correction rate in the total calculation, in comparison to the paper based BI where it is more common for users to make mathematical calculation errors. Therefore in order to minimise handwriting and calculation errors, the digital BI proved superior than the traditional paper based method.

  19. [ADL and actual life styles of all Japanese centenarians as determined by a visitation interview survey].

    PubMed

    Ogihara, R; Maeda, K; Tsujibayashi, K; Tomabechi, K; Ohta, T; Iwabuchi, K; Mano, Y

    2000-03-01

    A visiting interview survey was performed on all centenarians living in Japan to investigate their Activities of Daily Life (ADL). 2,851 centenarians, 92.9% of all subjects completed the interview. They were divided into three groups, good ADL (almost independent in daily life), moderate ADL (almost independent in indoor life), and inferior ADL (bed fast) by the condition of ADL. Some factors of health conditions, family size, frequency of use of public welfare services, and life styles were compared among these three groups. Both the good and the moderate ADL groups accounted for about 20% each, and the inferior ADL group was about 60% of the subjects. The condition of ADL of men was better than that of women. The inferior ADL group showed a significantly higher percentage of chronic diseases. High ratios of cerebral vascular disease and dementia were seen in this group, and many had no teeth. While two thirds of all the centenarians lived at home, over 90% of the good ADL group lived at home. The mode of family size was three including the person oneself. An average of 21% of men and 27% of women used public health welfare services. However 40% of the centenarians in the inferior ADL group used those services. Men had better dietary habits for health than women. The good ADL group showed the most desirable dietary habits among the three groups and had the highest percentage of drinkers and smokers. Men practiced a greater number of ideal habits for longevity than women. Of the ADL groups, centenarians in the good ADL group had the highest percentage of ideal habits for longevity. The centenarians who maintained good ADL had the following characteristics: There were fewer people under medical treatment. They had maintained their own teeth. Almost all of them were living at their home with their family. They had continued good dietary habits and daily life for health and longevity. For the maintenance and improvement of ADL of centenarians, adequate social welfare

  20. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  1. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  2. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  3. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... impoundments; (c) Water treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be...

  4. MDS-Based State Medicaid Reimbursement and the ADL-Decline Quality Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellows, Nicole M.; Halpin, Helen A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the relationship between the quality indicator for decline in activities of daily living (ADL) and the use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for determining Medicaid skilled nursing facility reimbursement. Design and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using the 2004 National MDS Facility Quality Indicator reports as…

  5. The Classic Measure of Disability in Activities of Daily Living Is Biased by Age but an Expanded IADL/ADL Measure Is Not

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate, by age, the performance of 2 disability measures based on needing help: one using 5 classic activities of daily living (ADL) and another using an expanded set of 14 activities including instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), walking, getting outside, and ADL (IADL/ADL). Methods. Guttman and item response theory (IRT) scaling methods are used with a large (N = 25,470) nationally representative household survey of individuals aged 18 years and older. Results. Guttman scalability of the ADL items increases steadily with age, reaching a high level at ages 75 years and older. That is reflected in an IRT model by age-related differential item functioning (DIF) resulting in age-biased measurement of ADL. Guttman scalability of the IADL/ADL items also increases with age but is lower than the ADL. Although age-related DIF also occurs with IADL/ADL items, DIF is lower in magnitude and balances out without causing age bias. Discussion. An IADL/ADL scale measuring need for help is hierarchical, unidimensional, and unbiased by age. It has greater content validity for measuring need for help in the community and shows greater sensitivity by age than the classic ADL measure. As demand for community services is increasing among adults of all ages, an expanded IADL/ADL measure is more useful than ADL. PMID:20100786

  6. Performance-based assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) ability among women with chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Waehrens, Eva Ejlersen; Amris, Kirstine; Fisher, Anne G

    2010-09-01

    Functional ability, including the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), is considered a core outcome domain in chronic pain clinical trials and is usually assessed through generic or disease-specific self-report questionnaires. Research, however, indicates that self-report and performance-based assessment of ADL offer distinct but complementary information about ability. The present study, therefore, investigated the applicability of a performance-based measure of ADL ability, the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), among 50 women with chronic widespread pain. The investigated psychometric properties of the AMPS included discrimination between a sample of healthy women and those with chronic widespread pain, as well as stability when no intervention was provided and sensitivity to change following intervention. Data were obtained based on a repeated measures design performing AMPS evaluations twice pre- and twice post-rehabilitation. Results indicated that the ADL motor ability measures of the participants were significantly lower than those of healthy women of same age, the ADL motor and ADL process ability measures remained stable when no intervention was provided and the ADL motor ability measures were sensitive to change following a 2-week interdisciplinary rehabilitation program. A weak correlation (r(s)=-0.35) was found between self-reported ADL ability as measured by the physical function subscale of the Functional Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and performance-based ADL motor measures, and no correlation (r(s)=-0.02) was found between FIQ ADL measures and ADL process ability, supporting the need for both performance-based and self-reported assessment of ADL.

  7. Do subclinical vascular abnormalities precede impaired physical ability and ADL disability?

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Marjolein E M; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Mueller-Schotte, Sigrid; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, YvonneT

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of disability in activities of daily living (ADL) through its effect on physical functioning. However, it is unclear whether subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change in subclinical vascular abnormalities is also associated with an impaired physical ability and with ADL disability. In a longitudinal study, 490 middle-aged and older persons were included. Physical ability was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery and ADL disability using a questionnaire on self-reported basic and instrumental ADL. Subclinical vascular abnormalities were measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, in men only). Longitudinal associations between baseline markers of subclinical vascular abnormalities, their rate of change, and change in physical ability or ADL disability were assessed using generalized estimation equation models. After adjustment for confounders, higher baseline PWV, change in PWV, baseline CIMT (in men) and change in CIMT (in men) were associated with a higher rate of change in physical ability (regression coefficients 0.035, 95% CI [0.018; 0.052]; 0.047, 95% CI [0.024; 0.069]; 0.214, 95% CI [0.070; 0.358] and 0.148, 95% CI [0.019; 0.277], respectively). No relations were found for change in ADL disability. In subjects with incident cardiovascular disease, higher change in PWV was associated with a higher rate of change in ADL disability (regression coefficient 0.054, 95% CI [0.001; 0.106]). The present study showed that subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change were associated with higher rate of change in physical ability. The association between (change in) subclinical vascular abnormalities and ADL disability tended to be stronger in persons with incident and prevalent cardiovascular disease. These data may suggest that ADL decline is more a direct effect of experienced clinically manifest vascular events rather than the effect of progression of

  8. Factors favoring a degradation or an improvement in activities of daily living (ADL) performance among nursing home (NH) residents: a survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Bürge, Elisabeth; von Gunten, Armin; Berchtold, André

    2013-01-01

    Different factors influence ADL performance among nursing home (NH) residents in long term care. The aim was to investigate which factors were associated with a significant change of ADL performance in NH residents, and whether or not these factors were gender-specific. The design was a survival analysis. The 10,199 participants resided in ninety Swiss NHs. Their ADL performance had been assessed by the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) in the period from 1997 to 2007. Relevant change in ADL performance was defined as 2 levels of change on the ADL scale between two successive assessments. The occurrence of either an improvement or a degradation of the ADL status) was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The analysis included a total of 10,199 NH residents. Each resident received between 2 and 23 assessments. Poor balance, incontinence, impaired cognition, a low BMI, impaired vision, no daily contact with proxies, impaired hearing and the presence of depression were, by hierarchical order, significant risk factors for NH residents to experience a degradation of ADL performance. Residents, who were incontinent, cognitively impaired or had a high BMI were significantly less likely to improve their ADL abilities. Male residents with cancer were prone to see their ADL improve. The year of NH entry was significantly associated with either degradation or improvement of ADL performance. Measures aiming at improving balance and continence, promoting physical activity, providing appropriate nourishment and cognitive enhancement are important for ADL performance in NH residents.

  9. Physical performance as long-term predictor of onset of activities of daily living (ADL) disability: a 9-year longitudinal study among community-dwelling older women.

    PubMed

    Idland, Gro; Pettersen, Renate; Avlund, Kirsten; Bergland, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Disability in ADL of aging women is an important public health concern. It is thus of interest to identify modifiable factors underlying onset of ADL disability. We assessed whether three physical performance-based measurements could predict ADL disability 9 years later. The participants were 113 non-disabled community-dwelling women with a mean age of 79.5 years at baseline. The baseline examinations of physical performance were: functional reach, climbing steps and comfortable walking speed. ADL disability was defined as need of personal assistance in at least one of five basic ADL items. The participants were followed for 9 years. Logistic regression models were fitted for each of the physical performance measurements together with the covariates in relation to ADL disability. At follow-up 25.7% were disabled in ADL. All three performance measurements were significantly associated with the onset of ADL disability at 9 years of follow-up, however, only walking speed remained significantly related to onset of ADL disability, when all three performance measurements were included in the same model. In conclusion all the three performance measurements were related to onset of ADL disability, with walking speed having the strongest predictive value. Systematic screening based on walking speed measurements of non-disabled older women might help health professionals to identify those at risk of ADL disability and introduce preventive measures in time.

  10. [Reduced ADL, QOL and musculoskeletal dysfunction associated with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Homma, Toshiaki

    Chronic respiratory disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)continues to cause a heavy health and economic burden in the world. Lower-limb muscle dysfunction is a prominent and major extrapulmonary features in individuals with moderate-to-very severe COPD and has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, activity of daily living(ADL), health related quality of life(HRQOL)and even survival. Osteoporosis is also an important systemic feature of COPD. Osteoprotic fracture cause many symptoms and complications, including the impairment of ventilation, and create a heavy economic burden. Comprehensive treatments(drug medication and non-drug treatment)for these impairments, such as pulmonary rehabilitation, are recommended. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves dyspnea, exercise capacity, ADL, and HRQOL, each of which is recognized predictors of mortality.

  11. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... treatment facilities for potable water supplies, including desalination facilities; (d) Buildings necessary... may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL...

  12. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  13. 25 CFR 170.228 - Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used to calculate CTC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used to... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr Inventory and Long-Range Transportation Planning (lrtp) § 170.228 Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used...

  14. 25 CFR 170.228 - Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used to calculate CTC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used to... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr Inventory and Long-Range Transportation Planning (lrtp) § 170.228 Are all facilities included in the IRR Inventory used...

  15. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  16. Assessing and Forecasting Facilities in Higher Education Including the Top Facilities Issues. APPA Thought Leaders Series, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunday, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The APPA (Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers) Thought Leaders Series turned five years old this year--a significant event in a momentous time for higher education. Participants in the 2010 symposium looked back at both the achievements and the missteps of higher education over the last half-decade, a period that posed many…

  17. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  18. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  19. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  20. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  1. States and compacts: Issues and events affecting facility development efforts, including the Barnwell opening

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Ten years have passed since the first regional low-level radioactive waste compacts received Congressional consent and initiated their efforts to develop new disposal capacity. During these 10 years, both significant achievements and serious setbacks have marked our efforts and affect our current outlook. Recent events in the waste marketplace, particularly in the operating status of the Barnwell disposal facility, have now raised legitimate questions about the continued rationale for the regional framework that grew out of the original legislation enacted by Congress in 1980. At the same time, licensing activities for new regional disposal facilities are under way in three states, and a fourth awaits the final go-ahead to begin construction. Uncertainty over the meaning and reliability of the marketplace events makes it difficult to gauge long-term implications. In addition, differences in the status of individual state and compact facility development efforts lead to varying assessments of the influence these events will, or should, have on such efforts.

  2. The Langley thermal protection system test facility: A description including design operating boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Langley thermal protection system test facility is presented. This facility was designed to provide realistic environments and times for testing thermal protection systems proposed for use on high speed vehicles such as the space shuttle. Products from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures, having a maximum total enthalpy of 10.3 MJ/kg, are used as a test medium. Test panels with maximum dimensions of 61 cm x 91.4 cm are mounted in the side wall of the test region. Static pressures in the test region can range from .005 to .1 atm and calculated equilibrium temperatures of test panels range from 700 K to 1700 K. Test times can be as long as 1800 sec. Some experimental data obtained while using combustion products of methane-air mixtures are compared with theory, and calibration of the facility is being continued to verify calculated values of parameters which are within the design operating boundaries.

  3. Overview of United States coal export terminals. [Includes description of present coal port terminal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Existing coal export ports in the United States are in general not designed to the standards compatible with the current state of the art. The United States has a current coal export capacity in the order of 83 million tons per year. This could be increased to 138 million tons per year through a process of modernization and expansion which would take about six to eight years for full realization. Even if this expansion program took place it would not result in an overall coal export system that was economically competitive due to the fact that our export terminals are generally outmoded and cannot accommodate the large vessels engaged in the world coal trade and which can be accommodated at the major coal destination ports in Europe and Japan. In order for the United States to achieve an economically competitive posture in the world coal trade, new ports that will handle 150,000 to 250,000 DWT ships are needed. The new terminals must be designed to receive coal efficiently and minimize the demurrage costs for both railcars on the delivery side and ships on the load out side. There are port sites available in the US which could be developed to effectively handle the increased requirements. Each major new port could easily be designed to handle 20 to 50 million tons per year at ultimate capacity subject to the availability of coal from the source at a reasonable cost. New port construction is needed to satisfy the projected demand at a reasonable cost and to provide for the obsolescence of existing facilities. Decisions are needed now so that the ports will be operating 20 years from now and serve as replacements for present facilities which are becoming obsolete. The government of the United States can and must play a major role if success is to be achieved.

  4. Alternate Communications Spectrum Study (ACSS) for Aviation Data Links (ADL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work was to identify the key factors involved in the use of alternate spectrum in various bands for a future integrated CNS data link. The study focused on systems and spectral bands that can deliver VDL-or-higher data rates in a two-way communication setting (including air-ground, ground-air, and air-air modes of operation), with multiple platforms (aircraft) operating in the same local environment. We begin with a review of the initial task list, and the final task list. The final task list contained a focus upon spectral availability and related systems that could be affected by the deployment of a new aviation data link (ADL) system. Most of this addresses the lower few layers of the communications protocol stack. A brief review of current related efforts in the aeronautical community is then provided, in which we describe several systems and programs of interest. Participation in some of these efforts is recommended. We also delineate several of the advantages and disadvantages of these system/efforts, in view of anticipated requirements of a new ADL. Desired attributes of a new ADL system are then discussed, and a connection with existing systems is made. The need to consider a wider set of alternative systems and technologies is described, and the beneficial aspects of a particular transmission technique- spread spectrum-are discussed. We then discuss in more detail several potential spectral regions, in terms of propagation conditions, available technology, spectrum availability, and waveform selection. Some comments on the need for standardization are also provided. We note that none of the existing systems described will likely meet the full range of desired features of a new ADL, but that several systems and spectral regions offer promise in terms of one or more characteristics. A system design and analysis approach is then provided. In this, we again focus on the lower few layers of the protocol stack, and aim to capture the main features

  5. A Methodology for Post Operational Clean Out of a Highly Active Facility Including Solids Behaviour - 12386

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Michael J.; Ward, Tracy R.; Maxwell, Lisa J.

    2012-07-01

    organic acids. A strategy-experimental feedback approach has been used to establish a wash regime for the POCO of the HALES facility at Sellafield. The close working of the strategy and experimental teams has permitted a wash sequence to be developed which is considered to be robust by both sides. The technical underpinning of the strategy is expected to make stakeholder buy-in more readily achievable. (authors)

  6. An Extensible ADL for Service-Oriented Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashroush, R.; Spence, I.

    While architecture description languages (ADLs) have gained wide acceptance in the research community as a means of describing system designs, the uptake within the service-oriented architecture (SOA) domain has been slower than might have been expected. A contributory cause may be the perceived lack of flexibility and, as yet, the limited tool support. This chapter describes ALI, a new ADL that aims to address these deficiencies by providing a rich, extensible and flexible syntax for describing component and service interface types and the use of patterns and meta-information. These enhanced capabilities are intended to encourage more widespread ADL usage.

  7. Autonomous Decentralized Loop network - ADL aiming at fault-tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanbe, Seiichiro; Ashida, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Mori, Kinji; Ihara, Hirokazu

    An Autonomous Decentralized System (ADS) network is proposed which provides fault detection, fault recovery, transmission, and maintenance for a space system in a distributed manner. An Autonomous Decentralized Loop (ADL) network system is presented as an application of ADS. The ADL system construction, communication protocol, transmission control, and fault detection and recovery are examined. The ADS features autonomous nodes which allow no subsystem to be down without advance notice. The functional availability of ADL is compared with that of a two-redundant loop.

  8. Correlates of ADL difficulty in a large hemodialysis cohort.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca; Allman, Richard M; Bowling, C Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Needing assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) is an early indicator of functional decline and has important implications for individuals' quality of life. However, correlates of need for ADL assistance have received limited attention among patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD). A multicenter cohort of 742 prevalent HD patients was assessed in 2009-2011 and classified as frail, prefrail and nonfrail by the Fried frailty index (recent unintentional weight loss, reported exhaustion, low grip strength, slow walk speed, low physical activity). Patients reported need for assistance with 4 ADL tasks and identified contributing symptoms/conditions (pain, balance, endurance, weakness, others). Nearly 1 in 5 patients needed assistance with 1 or more ADL. Multivariable analysis showed increased odds for needing ADL assistance among frail (odds ratio [OR] 11.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.50-23.41; P < 0.001) and prefrail (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.01-3.68; P = 0.046) compared with non-frail patients. In addition, the odds for needing ADL assistance were lower among blacks compared with whites and were higher among patients with diabetes, lung disease, and stroke. Balance, weakness, and "other" (frequently dialysis-related) symptoms/conditions were the most frequently named reasons for ADL difficulty. In addition to interventions such as increasing physical activity that might delay or reverse the process of frailty, the immediate symptoms/conditions to which individuals attribute their ADL difficulty may have clinical relevance for developing targeted management and/or treatment approaches.

  9. Algorithm integration using ADL (Algorithm Development Library) for improving CrIMSS EDR science product quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B.; Wilson, M.; Divakarla, M. G.; Chen, W.; Barnet, C.; Wolf, W.

    2013-05-01

    Algorithm Development Library (ADL) is a framework that mimics the operational system IDPS (Interface Data Processing Segment) that is currently being used to process data from instruments aboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. The satellite was launched successfully in October 2011. The Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounder Suite (CrIMSS) consists of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instruments that are on-board of S-NPP. These instruments will also be on-board of JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System) that will be launched in early 2017. The primary products of the CrIMSS Environmental Data Record (EDR) include global atmospheric vertical temperature, moisture, and pressure profiles (AVTP, AVMP and AVPP) and Ozone IP (Intermediate Product from CrIS radiances). Several algorithm updates have recently been proposed by CrIMSS scientists that include fixes to the handling of forward modeling errors, a more conservative identification of clear scenes, indexing corrections for daytime products, and relaxed constraints between surface temperature and air temperature for daytime land scenes. We have integrated these improvements into the ADL framework. This work compares the results from ADL emulation of future IDPS system incorporating all the suggested algorithm updates with the current official processing results by qualitative and quantitative evaluations. The results prove these algorithm updates improve science product quality.

  10. To What Degree Does Provider Performance Affect a Quality Indicator? The Case of Nursing Homes and ADL Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Charles D.; Chen, Min; Sherman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigates what factors affect the degree to which nursing home performance explains variance in residents' change in status of activities of daily living (ADL) after admission. Design and Methods: The database included all residents admitted in 2002 to a 10% random sample of nursing homes in the United States.…

  11. The Economy's Influence on Environmental Sustainability and Energy: Including the Top Ten Facilities Issues. APPA Thought Leaders Series, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunday, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Since 2006, the APPA (Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers) Thought Leaders Series has brought together experts in higher education for two days of discussion about the challenges facing colleges and universities in North America. Energy and the environment were the focal points for the 2009 Thought Leaders Symposium, and the result…

  12. The Prediction of ADL and IADL Disability Using Six Physical Indicators of Frailty: A Longitudinal Study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2014-01-01

    Frailty is a predictor of disability. A proper understanding of the contribution of individual indicators of frailty in the prediction of disability is a requisite for preventive interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive power of the individual physical frailty indicators: gait speed, physical activity, hand grip strength, Body Mass Index (BMI), fatigue, and balance, for ADL and IADL disability. The sample consisted of 505 community-dwelling persons (≥75 years, response rate 35.1%). Respondents first participated between November 2007 and June 2008, and a subset of all respondents participated again one year later (N = 264, 52.3% response rate). ADL and IADL disability were assessed by the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale. BMI was assessed by self-report, and the other physical frailty indicators were assessed with the TUG test (gait speed), the LAPAQ (physical activity), a hand grip strength test, the SFQ (fatigue), and the Four-test balance scale. All six physical frailty indicators were associated with ADL and IADL disability. After controlling for previous disability, sociodemographic characteristics, self-perceived lifestyle, and chronic diseases, only gait speed was predictive of both ADL and IADL disability, whereas there was a small effect of fatigue on IADL disability. Hence, these physical frailty indicators should be included in frailty assessment when predicting future disability.

  13. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  14. The ADL Registry and CORDRA. Volume 1: General Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    and problems encountered by others in related fields, such as library science , computer and network systems design, and publishing. As ADL...in and exist in isolated islands, limiting their visibility, access, and reuse. 4 Compared to publishing and library science , the learning

  15. 21 CFR 803.33 - If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reporting Requirements § 803.33 If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report... during the annual reporting period including: (i) Report number; (ii) Name and address of the device... I submit an annual report? 803.33 Section 803.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  16. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural water supply project? 404.10 Section 404.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY...

  17. 43 CFR 404.10 - Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Are there certain types of infrastructure and facilities that may not be included in a rural water supply project? 404.10 Section 404.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY...

  18. 77 FR 12081 - Comscope, Inc., Catawba Facility, A Subsidiary of the Carlyle Group Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... products for the cable television industry. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October 26... adversely affected by increased company imports of coaxial cable and coax products for the cable television... Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staffmasters, Including On- Site Workers from Cable Transport,...

  19. The relation of hypertension to changes in ADL/IADL limitations of Mexican american older adults.

    PubMed

    Caskie, Grace I L; Sutton, Maryann C; Margrett, Jennifer A

    2010-05-01

    Hypertension, highly prevalent and often undiagnosed among older Mexican Americans, is associated with greater limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) that can lead to greater dependency for older adults. Using data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly study, the rate of increase in ADL/IADL limitations for a 7-year period was examined for 3,046 older Mexican Americans classified either as reporting hypertension at baseline, first reporting hypertension at subsequent waves, or never reporting hypertension. Latent growth models indicated increased ADL/IADL limitations over time; individuals with hypertension evidenced greater increases than those without hypertension. Age, comorbidities, and depression were positively related to greater ADL/IADL limitations at baseline for all groups; only age was consistently related to ADL/IADL change over time. Development of hypertension may increase the risk of ADL/IADL decline, but early diagnosis and treatment may attenuate this effect.

  20. Perceptions of participating in high-intensity functional exercise among older people dependent in activities of daily living (ADL).

    PubMed

    Lindelöf, N; Rosendahl, E; Gustafsson, S; Nygaard, J; Gustafson, Y; Nyberg, L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how older people, dependent in ADL perceive their participation in a high-intensity, functional exercise program compared to the perceptions of those participating in a control activity. Forty-eight older people living in residential care facilities answered a questionnaire about their perceptions of participating in an activity for three months. They were aged 65-98, had a mean score of 24 on Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and 14 on Barthel ADL Index. The participants had been randomized to exercise (n=20) or control activity (n=28). Differences in responses between exercise and control activity were evaluated using logistic and ordinal regression analyses. The results show that a majority of the exercise group perceived positive changes in lower limb strength, balance, and in the ability to move more safely and securely compared to a minority of the control group (p<0.001). Significantly more respondents in the exercise activity answered that they felt less tired due to the activity (p=0.027) and that they prioritized this activity above other activities (p=0.010). More exercise participants reported that meeting for three months was too short, and fewer that it was too long compared to the control group (p=0.038). This study shows that older people living in residential care facilities, dependent in ADL, and with mild or no cognitive impairment had positive perceptions about participating in high-intensity functional exercise. The findings support the use of a high-intensity exercise program in this population of older people.

  1. Prevalence and predictors of healthcare utilization among older people (60+): focusing on ADL dependency and risk of depression.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Magnus; Kristensson, Jimmie; Midlöv, Patrik; Fagerström, Cecilia; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare utilization patterns over a six-year period among older people (60+), classified as dependent/independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and/or at/not at risk of depression and to identify healthcare utilization predictors. A sample (n=1402) comprising ten age cohorts aged between 60 and 96 years was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Baseline data were collected between 2001 and 2003. Number and length of hospital stays were collected for six years after baseline year. Group differences and mean changes over time were investigated. Healthcare utilization predictors were explored using multiple linear regression analysis. The results revealed that 21-24% had at least one hospital stay in the six years after baseline, 29-37% among ADL dependent subjects and 24-33% among those at risk of depression. There was a significant increase of hospital stays in all groups over time. ADL-dependent subjects and those at risk of depression had significant more hospital stays, except for those at/not at risk of depression in years 2, 4 and 5. The healthcare utilization predictors 5-6 years after baseline were mainly age, previous healthcare utilization and various symptoms and, in 1-2 and 3-4 years after baseline, age, various diagnostic groups and various physical variables. Thus healthcare utilization patterns seem to be similar for the different groups, but it is difficult to find universal predictors. This suggests that different variables should be considered, including both ADL and psychosocial variables, when trying to identify future healthcare users.

  2. RET promoter variations in familial African degenerative leiomyopathy (ADL): first report of a possible genetic-environmental interaction.

    PubMed

    Van Rensburg, C; Moore, S W; Zaahl, M

    2012-12-01

    African degenerative leiomyopathy (ADL, DL, Bantu pseudo-Hirschsprung's disease) is a distinctive visceral myopathy, of unknown etiology, occurring in Africa. It has a classical clinical and histologic picture in young indigenous African children. It presents as intestinal pseudo-obstruction with a massive megacolon due to degeneration of smooth muscle without aganglionosis. Because of its late presentation and geographical and ethnic distribution, it is thought to be an acquired degenerative hollow visceral myopathy. Only one previous report of familial recurrence exists. The main Hirschsprung susceptibility gene RET is a potential candidate gene in this condition, because of its role in the development of the intrinsic innervation and ganglia of the smooth muscle layers of the gastro-intestinal tract. We report a second case of familial ADL recurrence and explore possible etiologic causes including variations of the RET gene. Multiple variations in the RET promoter were identified in this case which leads to the possibility of a genetic-environmental predisposition for this condition. We therefore hypothesize that RET may play a modulating role in ADL susceptibility (and possibly other visceral myopathies). It is possible that subtle malformations in the ENS may result from RET dysfunction which then predisposes the individual to environmental influences which initiate the later onset of muscle degeneration.

  3. The Development of a Hierarchical Polychotomous ADL-IADL Scale for Noninstitutionalized Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempen, G. I. J. M.; Suurmeijer, T. P. B. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tested hierarchical scale comprising 18 activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) items on 101 noninstitutionalized older adults in Netherlands. Results confirmed possibility of constructing unidimensional, hierarchical. polychotomous scale measuring "functional problems on ADL-IADL." Considered…

  4. Adl migration estimation model (for microcomputers) (release number 1). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    ADL Migration Estimation Model (AMEM) is a user friendly software package programmed for an IBM personal computer that provides the user with the ability to estimate the weight fraction of a chemical migrating from a polymeric material. The chemical may be an additive (e.g., a plasticizer) or unreacted monomer (e.g., styrene). The program estimates the migration of chemicals based on mathematical equations derived using diffusion and mass transfer theories. The user is prompted for chemical specific data such as molecular weight and vapor pressure of the migrant. The user may enter the diffusion coefficient for the polymer of interest or may use one of the default values provided by the software for six generic types of polymers with a wide range of diffusion coefficients. Background information, model development, mathematical calculations, example scenarios, and a user's guide are provided in the documentation.

  5. Rasch analysis of the ADL scale of the A-ONE.

    PubMed

    Arnadóttir, Gudrún; Fisher, Anne G

    2008-01-01

    The ADL-focused Occupation-based Neurobehavioral Evaluation (A-ONE; Arnadóttir, 1990) can be used to evaluate both performance of activities of daily living (ADL) tasks and neurobehavioral problems that interfere with ADL task performance among clients with neurological disorders. This study examined the rating scale structure and aspects of validity and reliability of the A-ONE's ordinal ADL scale by applying Rasch analysis methods (Bond & Fox, 2001). Rasch analysis of 209 clients' A-ONE assessments indicated that misfit of items to the ADL scale could be reduced by removing the two communication items. Threshold disordering could be corrected by combining two adjacent scoring categories (supervision and verbal assistance), thus supporting four response categories. Separation reliability for item calibrations (.98) was high and acceptable for people (.90). Finally, principal components analysis of the residuals supported unidimensionality. The study provided support for converting the ordinal ADL scale to an interval scale that has potential to be used to measure changes in ADL task performance over time.

  6. Alvimopan* (ADL 8-2698) is a novel peripheral opioid antagonist.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W K

    2001-11-01

    Alvimopan (ADL 8-2698; Adolor Corporation, Exton, PA, USA) is a novel, peripherally restricted opioid antagonist. After oral administration, it has activity specific to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. ADL 8-2698 has low systemic absorption and a high affinity for mu-opioid receptors. In healthy subjects, ADL 8-2698 antagonized loperamide-induced changes in GI transit and prevented morphine-induced delays in oral-cecal transit time without antagonizing centrally mediated opioid effects, such as analgesia or pupillary constriction. In the treatment of opioid naive patients who underwent surgery and received opioids for acute pain, oral ADL 8-2698 (6.0 mg) improved the management of postoperative ileus (POI) by shortening the time to achieve normal bowel function and, ultimately, hospital stay. Postoperative nausea and vomiting and the overall incidence of all GI side effects were reduced in patients treated with ADL 8-2698 for POI. Analgesia was not compromised, because there were no changes in median opioid consumption or Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores in patients treated with ADL 8-2698 versus patients treated with placebo. No drug-related side effects were observed in acute pain postsurgical patients in the initial POI study. In patients treated with opioids for chronic pain or opioid addiction, lower doses of oral ADL 8-2698 (0.5 to 3.0 mg) reversed opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) and normalized GI activity. These effects were evident without compromising opioid analgesia or inducing central nervous system symptoms of withdrawal. Some chronic opioid patients receiving apparently supramaximal doses of ADL 8-2698 (> or = 3.0 mg) reported localized GI side effects, possibly indicative of a localized GI withdrawal response. The most common side effects of ADL 8-2698 in chronic pain patients with OBD were abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea. These effects were not observed in most OBD patients receiving lower doses of ADL 8-2698. Overall, ADL 8-2698 was

  7. A Process for the Representation of openEHR ADL Archetypes in OWL Ontologies.

    PubMed

    Porn, Alex Mateus; Peres, Leticia Mara; Didonet Del Fabro, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    ADL is a formal language to express archetypes, independent of standards or domain. However, its specification is not precise enough in relation to the specialization and semantic of archetypes, presenting difficulties in implementation and a few available tools. Archetypes may be implemented using other languages such as XML or OWL, increasing integration with Semantic Web tools. Exchanging and transforming data can be better implemented with semantics oriented models, for example using OWL which is a language to define and instantiate Web ontologies defined by W3C. OWL permits defining significant, detailed, precise and consistent distinctions among classes, properties and relations by the user, ensuring the consistency of knowledge than using ADL techniques. This paper presents a process of an openEHR ADL archetypes representation in OWL ontologies. This process consists of ADL archetypes conversion in OWL ontologies and validation of OWL resultant ontologies using the mutation test.

  8. Comparisons of social interaction and activities of daily living between long-term care facility and community-dwelling stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Ae; Park, Se-Gwan; Roh, Hyo-Lyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to compare the correlation between social interaction and activities of daily living (ADL) between community-dwelling and long-term care facility stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Subjects were 65 chronic stroke patients (32 facility-residing, 33 community-dwelling). The Evaluation Social Interaction (ESI) tool was used to evaluate social interaction and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measure was used to evaluate ADL. [Results] Both social interaction and ADL were higher in community-dwelling than facility-residing stroke patients. There was a correlation between ESI and ADL for both motor and process skills among facility-residing patients, while only ADL process skills and ESI correlated among community-dwelling patients. In a partial correlation analysis using ADL motor and process skills as control variables, only process skills correlated with ESI. [Conclusion] For rehabilitation of stroke patients, an extended treatment process that combines ADL and social activities is likely to be required. Furthermore, treatment programs and institutional systems that can improve social interaction and promote health maintenance for community-dwelling and facility-residing chronic stroke patients are needed throughout the rehabilitation process. PMID:26644659

  9. Comparisons of social interaction and activities of daily living between long-term care facility and community-dwelling stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Ae; Park, Se-Gwan; Roh, Hyo-Lyun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to compare the correlation between social interaction and activities of daily living (ADL) between community-dwelling and long-term care facility stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Subjects were 65 chronic stroke patients (32 facility-residing, 33 community-dwelling). The Evaluation Social Interaction (ESI) tool was used to evaluate social interaction and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measure was used to evaluate ADL. [Results] Both social interaction and ADL were higher in community-dwelling than facility-residing stroke patients. There was a correlation between ESI and ADL for both motor and process skills among facility-residing patients, while only ADL process skills and ESI correlated among community-dwelling patients. In a partial correlation analysis using ADL motor and process skills as control variables, only process skills correlated with ESI. [Conclusion] For rehabilitation of stroke patients, an extended treatment process that combines ADL and social activities is likely to be required. Furthermore, treatment programs and institutional systems that can improve social interaction and promote health maintenance for community-dwelling and facility-residing chronic stroke patients are needed throughout the rehabilitation process.

  10. Asymmetric Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Unexpectedly Stable Spiroepoxy-β-Lactones Including Facile Conversion to Tetronic Acids: Application to (+)-Maculalactone A

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Richard J.; Morris, Kay A.; Vallakati, Ravikrishna; Zhang, Wei; Romo, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    A novel class of small spirocyclic heterocycles, spiroepoxy-β-lactones (1,4-dioxaspiro[2.3]-hexan-5-ones), is described that exhibit a number of interesting reactivity patterns. These spiroheterocycles, including an optically active series, are readily synthesized by epoxidation of ketene dimers (4-alkylidene-2-oxetanones) available from homo- or heteroketene dimerization. An analysis of bond lengths in these systems by X-ray crystallography and comparison to data for known spirocycles and those determined computationally, suggest that anomeric effects in these systems may be more pronounced due to their rigidity and may contribute to their surprising stability. The synthetic utility of spiroepoxy-β-lactones was explored and one facile rearrangement identified under several conditions provides a 3-step route from acid chlorides to optically active tetronic acids, ubiquitous heterocycles in bioactive natural products. The addition of various nucleophiles to these spirocycles leads primarily to addition at C5 and C2. The utility of an optically active spiroepoxy-β-lactone was demonstrated in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of the anti-fouling agent, (+)-maculalactone A, which proceeds in 5 steps from hydrocinnamoyl chloride by way of a tetronic acid intermediate. PMID:19453152

  11. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  12. 21 CFR 803.33 - If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING User Facility... medical device reports, or the number assigned by us for reporting purposes in accordance with § 803.3; (2...) Date of the annual report and report numbers identifying the range of medical device reports that...

  13. Framework for preventing accidental falls in hospitals - management plan for ADL, medication and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of medical accidents is essential. Among medical accidents, accidental falls remain a serious problem. While "assessment score sheets" have already been used in hospitals to prevent accidental falls, satisfactory results have not actually been achieved. In this study, we aim to establish a methodology for preventing accidental falls. We consider that the 'management plan' for each patient includes three factors. A plan of instructions for patients on actions they can take for safety in their ADL (Activities of Daily Living) is essential as a base. Second, a plan to keep up with any short term change in a patient's state is needed, because the state of a hospitalized patient will usually be temporarily affected by medication and changing medical conditions. We develop a model for preventing accidental falls, which enable us to design appropriate management plan for each patient. Then, we develop a prototype system based on the designed model. Finally, we address the result of verification of the model, by applying the prototype system into actual cases in hospitals.

  14. [Genetic analysis of multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae including meropenem resistance that was isolated from elderly residents with pneumonia in nursing-care facilities].

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuko; Chiba, Naoko; Sato, Kentaro; Nara, Syoetu; Kato, Satoko; Kanazawa, Hisao; Ikejima, Shin; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Satoshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2014-07-01

    From February to December 20XX, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) showing MICs of 16-32 microg/mL to cefotaxime (CTX) and 4-8 microg/mL to meropenem (MEPM) were isolated from 6 patients hospitalized at the general hospital S (2 cases) and hospital A (4 cases), close to the hospital S. Five elderly patients among these six cases came from nursing care facilities or nursing care-related medical facilities. All elderly persons (mean age: 81.7 years) were diagnosed as having pneumonia at the time of admission and the problematic PRSP was isolated from sputum samples collected on admission. Notably, all of these PRSP isolates simultaneously showed high resistance to macrolide agents mediated by an erm (B) gene and to fluoroquinolone agents via mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. Eventually, they were identified as multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae (MDRSP) with high resistance to many agents. The capsule type of all strains was serotype 19F and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that they belonged to clonal complex (CC) 7993, which has not been reported before. It was thus concluded that the MDRSP that had spread within the nursing facilities was transmitted to the general hospitals via the elderly inpatients with pneumonia caused by these agents. Although one case finally had a poor outcome, the pneumococcal infection was not the direct trigger of the event. The current ratio of MDRSP is concluded to be very low. However, general hospitals that accept patients for therapeutic purposes from nursing-care facilities have to share epidemiological information in a timely manner with the nursing homes to prevent nosocomial infections.

  15. Firearms in Frail Hands: An ADL or A Public Health Crisis!

    PubMed

    Patel, Dupal; Syed, Quratulain; Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Rader, Erin

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of neurocognitive disorders, which may impair the ability of older adults to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), rises with age. Depressive symptoms are also common in older adults and may affect ADLs. Safe storage and utilization of firearms are complex ADLs, which require intact judgment, executive function, and visuospatial ability, and may be affected by cognitive impairment. Depression or cognitive impairment may cause paranoia, delusions, disinhibition, apathy, or aggression and thereby limit the ability to safely utilize firearms. These problems may be superimposed upon impaired mobility, arthritis, visual impairment, or poor balance. Inadequate attention to personal protection may also cause hearing impairment and accidents. In this article, we review the data on prevalence of firearms access among older adults; safety concerns due to age-related conditions; barriers to addressing this problem; indications prompting screening for firearms access; and resources available to patients, caregivers, and health care providers.

  16. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  17. A Long-Term Perspective on Person-Environment Fit and Adl Dependence among Older Swedish Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwarsson, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study described person--environment (P-E) fit and activities of daily living (ADLs) among older adults, and it explored the relationship between P-E fit and ADL dependence, testing Lawton's docility hypothesis at two points in time. Design and Methods: From a random sample of individuals aged 75-84 living in a Swedish municipality,…

  18. Investigation of three-dimensional flow field in a turbine including rotor/stator interaction. I - Design development and performance of the research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Camci, C.; Halliwell, I.; Zaccaria, M.

    1992-01-01

    A description of the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) installed at the Turbomachinery Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University is presented in this paper. The facility diameter is 91.66 cm (3 feet) and the hub-to-tip ratio of the blading is 0.73. The flow path consists of turbulence generating grid, 23 nozzle vane and 29 rotor blades followed by outlet guide vanes. The blading design, carried out by General Electric Company personnel, embody modern HP turbine design philosophy, loading and flow coefficient, reaction, aspect ratio, and blade turning angles; all within the current aircraft engine design turbine practice. State-of-the-art quasi-3D blade design techniques were used to design the vane and the blade shapes. The vanes and blades are heavily instrumented with fast response pressure, shear stress, and velocity probes and have provision for flow visualization and laser Doppler anemometer measurement. Furthermore, provision has been made for detailed nozzle wake, rotor wake and boundary layer surveys. A 150 channel slip ring unit is used for transmitting the rotor data to a stationary instrumentation system. All the design objectives have been met.

  19. Measuring Disability: Application of the Rasch Model to Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, T. Joseph; DeChello, Laurie M.; Garcia, Ramon; Fifield, Judith; Rothfield, Naomi; Reisine, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Performed a comparative analysis of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) items administered to 4,430 older adults and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living administered to 605 people with rheumatoid arthritis scoring both with Likert and Rasch measurement models. Findings show the superiority of the Rasch approach over the Likert method. (SLD)

  20. The Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Vision and Getting From Here To There

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    The SCORM Run-Time Environment describes the Learning Management System (LMS) (or Server) requirements needed to manage the ADL run-time...Electronics Engineers ITS Intelligent Tutoring System LMS Learning Management System LSAL Learning Systems Architecture Lab OSTP Office of Science and

  1. ADL State of the Union. Where We Are and Where We Are Going

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-18

    Contributing Factors  Community specific needs  Legacy content and systems  Advances in technologies ( Web 2.0 , mobile, etc…)  ADL will  Engage...Technologies ILT Focus Areas  Game-based Training (Serious Games)  Virtual Worlds  Mobile Devices  Web 2.0 30 Potential of Immersive Training

  2. Hospital Readmission among Older Adults Who Return Home with Unmet Need for ADL Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Glen; Xu, Huiping; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Craig, Bruce A.; Stallard, Eric; Thomas, Joseph, III.; Sands, Laura P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined whether returning to the community from a recent hospitalization with unmet activities of daily living (ADL) need was associated with probability of readmission. Methods: A total of 584 respondents to the 1994, 1999, and/or 2004 National Long-Term Care Surveys (NLTCS) who were hospitalized within 90 days prior to the…

  3. JPSS Cryosphere Algorithms: Integration and Testing in Algorithm Development Library (ADL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsidulko, M.; Mahoney, R. L.; Meade, P.; Baldwin, D.; Tschudi, M. A.; Das, B.; Mikles, V. J.; Chen, W.; Tang, Y.; Sprietzer, K.; Zhao, Y.; Wolf, W.; Key, J.

    2014-12-01

    JPSS is a next generation satellite system that is planned to be launched in 2017. The satellites will carry a suite of sensors that are already on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. The NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Algorithm Integration Team (AIT) works within the Algorithm Development Library (ADL) framework which mimics the operational JPSS Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). The AIT contributes in development, integration and testing of scientific algorithms employed in the IDPS. This presentation discusses cryosphere related activities performed in ADL. The addition of a new ancillary data set - NOAA Global Multisensor Automated Snow/Ice data (GMASI) - with ADL code modifications is described. Preliminary GMASI impact on the gridded Snow/Ice product is estimated. Several modifications to the Ice Age algorithm that demonstrates mis-classification of ice type for certain areas/time periods are tested in the ADL. Sensitivity runs for day time, night time and terminator zone are performed and presented. Comparisons between the original and modified versions of the Ice Age algorithm are also presented.

  4. Using ADLs to Establish Eligibility for Long-Term Care among the Cognitively Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Used database from Oregon Medicaid program to examine differences in the potential insurance coverage of demented persons by using different formulations of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) dependencies. For those with clear dementia, 81-88 percent of the persons with significant behavioral problems were correctly identified when a cut score of…

  5. Comparing Differences in ADL Outcomes for the STOMP Intervention for Dementia in the Natural Home Environment Versus a Clinic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ciro, CA; Poole, JL; Skipper, B; Hershey, LA

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined structured rehabilitation techniques for improving activities of daily living in people with mild-moderate dementia. We sought to examine the advantages to delivering the Skill-building through Task-Oriented Motor Practice (STOMP) intervention in the home environment (versus the clinic), hypothesizing that ADL improvement would be significantly better, time to meeting goals would be faster and fewer displays of behavior would be noted. Methods Compared results of two quasi-experimental studies of STOMP, one completed in the home, one completed previously in a clinic. Participants were English-speaking; community dwelling adults aged 50–90 diagnosed with mild-moderate dementia who could participate in an intensive rehabilitation program (5 days/week, 3 hours/day, for 2 weeks). Outcome measurements include examiner-observation of performance and proxy-report of performance and satisfaction with performance in patient-selected goals. Results No differences existed in the sociodemographic characteristics between the home and clinic groups where the groups were primarily white, married, had > high school education and had mild-moderate dementia. Results from the home group indicate that participants made significant improvement in ADL which was generally retained at the 90 day follow-up. These results were not significantly different than the clinic group. No significant advantages were noted for the home group in terms of time to meeting goals or exhibition of fewer behaviors. Discussion The STOMP intervention appeared to work equally as well in the home and in the clinic. Future studies should continue to examine the benefits of massed practice using high-dose regimens.

  6. How many and which items of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are necessary for screening.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Bernd; Hoeffken, Klaus; Pientka, Ludger; Wedding, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Geriatric assessment (GA) in elderly cancer patients serves as screening instrument to identify patients who are vulnerable or frail. To reduce the diagnostic burden for patients and caregivers, we asked how many and which items of ADL and IADL questionnaires are necessary to identify those patients with limitations in the sum score of ADL or IADL. Data of 327 elderly patients (age>or=60 years), of whom 27.9% had limitations in ADL and 36.0% in IADL score, were entered in a forward selection model. Four out of ten items of ADL identified 95.3% of patients with limitations in ADL. Two out of eight items of IADL identified 97.4% of patients with limitations in IADL. The combined use of these items recognised 98.5% of patients with limitations in ADL or IADL score. If ADL and IADL scores are used for screening, we recommend an abbreviated version with 6 instead of 18 items.

  7. Towards an ADL taxonomy for occupational therapists. Previously published in Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 1994; 1:69-76.

    PubMed

    Tornquist, K; Sonn, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    One of the main concepts in occupational therapy is human occupation. In occupational therapy there is a need for a common conceptual framework to assess and describe the ability of patients to perform occupational activities of daily living. The aim of this report was to develop a taxonomy concerning the activities of daily living (ADL). In the taxonomy, occupation has been defined and related to common concepts of disability. Ordinary ADL terms have been categorized into three levels: occupational forms, activities and actions. Different actions are components of and subordinated to superior activities. Experience shows that the ADL taxonomy contributes to a valid (content and construct) assessment of ADL, a common language for OTs and to a clearer picture of the patient's performance in daily life activities.

  8. The in vitro pharmacology of the peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists, alvimopan, ADL 08-0011 and methylnaltrexone.

    PubMed

    Beattie, D T; Cheruvu, M; Mai, N; O'Keefe, M; Johnson-Rabidoux, S; Peterson, C; Kaufman, E; Vickery, R

    2007-05-01

    This study characterized the pharmacology of the peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists, alvimopan, its metabolite, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone. The activities of the compounds were investigated with respect to human or guinea pig opioid receptor binding and function in recombinant cell lines and mechanical responsiveness of the guinea pig ileum. Alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 had higher binding affinity than methylnaltrexone at human mu opioid receptors (pK (i) values of 9.6, 9.6, and 8.0, respectively). The compounds had different selectivities for the mu receptor over human delta and guinea pig kappa opioid receptors. ADL 08-0011 had the highest mu receptor selectivity. With respect to their mu opioid receptor functional activity ([(35)S]GTPgammaS incorporation), methylnaltrexone had a positive intrinsic activity, consistent with partial agonism, unlike alvimopan and ADL 08-0011, which had negative intrinsic activities. Alvimopan, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone antagonized inhibitory responses mediated by the mu opioid agonist, endomorphin-1 (pA (2) values of 9.6, 9.4, and 7.6, respectively) and by U69593, a kappa opioid agonist (pA (2) values of 8.4, 7.2, and 6.7, respectively). In morphine-naive guinea pig ileum, methylnaltrexone reduced, while alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 increased, the amplitude of electrically evoked contractions and spontaneous mechanical activity. In tissue from morphine-dependent animals, alvimopan and ADL 08-0011 increased spontaneous activity to a greater degree than methylnaltrexone. The data suggested that alvimopan-induced contractions resulted predominantly from an interaction with kappa opioid receptors. It is concluded that alvimopan, ADL 08-0011, and methylnaltrexone differ in their in vitro pharmacological properties, particularly with respect to opioid receptor subtype selectivity and intrinsic activity. The clinical significance of the data from this study remains to be determined.

  9. ADL abilities and vocational competencies: Blue-collar workers aged 45 years and over.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, E

    1995-01-01

    A questionnaire composed of 55 items that addressed activities of daily living (ADL) abilities and 13 basic vocational competencies, such as memory and muscular power, was completed by 48 nondisabled male workers aged ≥45 years. The workers were all engaged in the manufacturing industry. All respondents found the following five tasks easy to do: wring a towel, put arms through sleeves, open and shut a door, turn a tap on and off, and open and shut a sliding door. Among basic vocational competencies, the highest performance, with but a small standard deviation, occurred with the muscular power competency; a low performance with a large standard deviation (P=0.05) occurred with concentration. No age difference was discerned in planning ability, cooperativeness, muscular power, staying power, manual adeptness, and sense of equilibrium, whereas in learning ability, agility, and concentration, people aged ≥65 years showed significantly lower performance (P=0.05). The characteristics of vocational competencies in manufacturing industry workers aged ≥45 years were fond to be linked to ADL abilities, and the effectiveness of the ADL abilities survey, prepared on an experimental basis, was confirmed for the evaluation of vocational competencies.

  10. Loneliness in elderly individuals, level of dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) and influential factors.

    PubMed

    Hacihasanoğlu, Rabia; Yildirim, Arzu; Karakurt, Papatya

    2012-01-01

    This study has been carried out to investigate the level of loneliness, determine the level of dependence in the ADL and influential factors in the elderly people. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 5 Family Healthcare Centers (FHC) located in central Erzincan, Turkey between March and June 2010. The data of the research was collected using a questionnaire that determined the descriptive and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). Mean score of the UCLA-LS was determined as 51.59 ± 4.44. It was determined that 2% of the elderly ADL were completely dependent, 14.5% were semi-dependent. Factors such as being old, a widow/divorced, having a lower level of education and/or income, living alone, having a chronic disease, poor self-perceived health, lack of visits by relatives or acquaintances, dissatisfaction with the place of living, and being fully dependent while performing daily activities were determined as factors which increased the level of loneliness. Furthermore, factors such as being old, a female, a widow/divorced, living together with a daughter/son, having a chronic disease and poor self-perceived health were found to be influential in dependency. Elderly people who are alone and dependent in fulfilling their ADL should be monitored more closely.

  11. Relationship between Barthel Index scores during the acute phase of rehabilitation and subsequent ADL in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Shigetaka; Takata, Shinjiro; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kashihara, Michiharu; Osawa, Toshifumi; Komatsu, Koji; Masuda, Yuki; Okahisa, Tetsuya; Nishikawa, Koji; Kondo, Shin; Yamada, Megumi; Takahara, Risa; Ogata, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Yuka; Nagahiro, Shinji; Kaji, Ryuji; Yasui, Natsuo

    2010-02-01

    The Barthel Index (BI) cannot be used to measure initial stroke severity or by extension, to stratify patients by severity in acute stroke trials because most patients are bedbound in the first few hours after stroke, either by their deficit or by medical directive. Our objectives were to clarify the threshold of acute BI for use in the prediction of subsequent independence in activities of daily living (ADL) and to assist in the definition of acute stroke rehabilitation goals. Subjects comprised 78 patients out of 191 inpatients admitted with acute stroke at our hospital during 2006-2007. The BI ADL score was divided into 2 ranges (BI> or =60 and < or =40), in a process similar to previous studies. During the acute period (from onset to approximately 3 weeks), all patients with a BI> or =40 could improve their ADL in 6 months. Patients with a BI< or =40 exhibited two ADL recovery outcomes (improved and no change) at 6 months. We also found that the skill level of basic activities related to standing was significant indicator of BI improvement (P<0.001). BI scores determined at approximately 3 weeks were reliable predictors of ADL disabilities at 6 months.

  12. Six-month walking program changes cognitive and ADL performance in patients with Alzheimer.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Massimo; Scarsini, Renato; Schena, Federico

    2011-08-01

    Motor inactivity is typical in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease although there is evidence that physical exercise can reduce depression and enhance performance of daily activities. The aim of this study was to determine whether a walking program could reduce the functional and cognitive decline of elderly nursing home residents in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease. A total of 21 patients (84 ± 5 years) were randomly assigned to a walking program (WG) or to a control group (CG). A 6-minute walking test (6WT), the Barthel index of activities of daily living (ADLs), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) tests were performed before and after 24 weeks of the program. The WG showed significant improvement in the 6WT (20%) and ADLs (23%), while the CG decreased in MMSE (-47%), the WG had a slower decline (-13%). This study indicates that it is possible to stabilize the progressive cognitive dysfunctions in nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease through a specific walking program.

  13. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  14. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  15. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  16. The Effect of Licensure Type on the Policies, Practices, and Resident Composition of Florida Assisted Living Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Debra; Burge, Stephanie; Quadagno, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Most assisted living facility (ALF) residents are White widows in their mid- to late 80s who need assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) because of frailty or cognitive decline. Yet, ALFs also serve younger individuals with physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury, or serious mental illness. We compare Florida ALFs with…

  17. Using Rasch Analysis to Evaluate Accuracy of Individual Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) for Disability Measurement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Li, Yanen

    2015-01-01

    Our study objectives were to examine the accuracy of individual activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) for disability measurement, and determine whether dependence or difficulty is more useful for disability measurement. We analyzed data from 499 patients with 2+ ADLs or 3+ IADLs who participated in a home visiting nurse intervention study, and whose function had been assessed at study baseline and 22 months. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate accuracy of 24 individual ADL and IADL items. The individual items differed in the amount of information provided in measuring functional disability along the range of disability, providing much more information in (usually) one part of the range. While nearly all of the Item Information Curves (IICs) for the ADL dependence, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence items were unimodal with one information peak each, the IICs for ADL difficulty exhibited a bimodal pattern with two peaks. Which of the individual items performed better in disability measurement varied by the extent of functional disability (i.e., by how disabled the patients were). The information peaks of most ADLs and many IADLs rise or drop steeply in a relatively short distance. Thus, whether dependence or difficulty is superior often changes very quickly along the disability continuum. There was considerable heterogeneity in which individual items provided the most and the least information at the three points of interest examined across the disability range (-2 SD units, mean, +2 SD units). While the disability region (low, medium, and high disability) for which each individual item provided the most information remained quite stable between baseline and 22 months for ADL difficulty, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence, relatively large shifts occurred for ADL dependence items. At the disability mean dependence items offered more information for assessment than difficulty. While ADLs also provided more information at -2 and +2 SD

  18. Examination of Children's Recess Physical Activity Patterns Using the Activities for Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP) Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellino, Megan Babkes; Sinclair, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Thorough assessment of children's physical activity is essential to efficacious interventions to reduce childhood obesity prevalence. The purpose of this study was to examine children's recess physical activity (RPA) patterns of behavior using the Activities of Daily Living-Playground Participation (ADL-PP: Watkinson et al., 2001) instrument.…

  19. A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie; Ranner, Maria; von Koch, Lena; Eriksson, Gunilla; Johansson, Ulla; Ytterberg, Charlotte; Tham, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit ≤3 months after stroke, dependent in ≥two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain “participation”, 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain “emotion” in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required. PMID:24506231

  20. Health Status and ADL Functioning of Older Persons with Intellectual Disability: Community Residence versus Residential Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz, Hefziba; Merrick, Joav; Morad, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to study differences in aging phenomena among adults with intellectual disability (ID), who live in community residence versus their peers in residential care centers and to determine the contribution of health status, age, gender, etiology and level of ID to the decline in ADL function with age. Our study was based…

  1. Older Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations: immigration and other factors associated with institutionalization.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Chi, Monica

    2012-09-07

    This study determined the national prevalence and profile of Asian Americans with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) limitations and identified factors associated with institutionalization. Data were obtained from 2006 American Community Survey, which replaced the long-form of the US Census. The data are nationally representative of both institutionalized and community-dwelling older adults. Respondents were Vietnamese (n = 203), Korean (n = 131), Japanese (n = 193), Filipino (n = 309), Asian Indian (n = 169), Chinese (n = 404), Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (n = 54), and non-Hispanic whites (n = 55,040) aged 55 and over who all had ADL limitations. The prevalence of institutionalized among those with ADL limitations varies substantially from 4.7% of Asian Indians to 18.8% of Korean Americans with ADL limitations. Every AAPI group had a lower prevalence of institutionalization than disabled Non-Hispanic whites older adults (23.8%) (p < 0.001). After adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, Asian Indians, Vietnamese, Japanese, Filipino, and Chinese had significantly lower odds of institutionalization than non-Hispanic whites (OR = 0.29, 0.31, 0.58, 0.51, 0.70, respectively). When the sample was restricted to AAPIs, the odds of institutionalization were higher among those who were older, unmarried, cognitively impaired and those who spoke English at home. This variation suggests that aggregating data across the AAPI groups obscures meaningful differences among these subpopulations and substantial inter-group differences may have important implications in the long-term care setting.

  2. Ambient and smartphone sensor assisted ADL recognition in multi-inhabitant smart environments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nirmalya; Misra, Archan; Cook, Diane

    2016-02-01

    Activity recognition in smart environments is an evolving research problem due to the advancement and proliferation of sensing, monitoring and actuation technologies to make it possible for large scale and real deployment. While activities in smart home are interleaved, complex and volatile; the number of inhabitants in the environment is also dynamic. A key challenge in designing robust smart home activity recognition approaches is to exploit the users' spatiotemporal behavior and location, focus on the availability of multitude of devices capable of providing different dimensions of information and fulfill the underpinning needs for scaling the system beyond a single user or a home environment. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach for recognizing complex activities of daily living (ADL), that lie in between the two extremes of intensive use of body-worn sensors and the use of ambient sensors. Our approach harnesses the power of simple ambient sensors (e.g., motion sensors) to provide additional 'hidden' context (e.g., room-level location) of an individual, and then combines this context with smartphone-based sensing of micro-level postural/locomotive states. The major novelty is our focus on multi-inhabitant environments, where we show how the use of spatiotemporal constraints along with multitude of data sources can be used to significantly improve the accuracy and computational overhead of traditional activity recognition based approaches such as coupled-hidden Markov models. Experimental results on two separate smart home datasets demonstrate that this approach improves the accuracy of complex ADL classification by over 30 %, compared to pure smartphone-based solutions.

  3. Ambient and smartphone sensor assisted ADL recognition in multi-inhabitant smart environments

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Archan; Cook, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Activity recognition in smart environments is an evolving research problem due to the advancement and proliferation of sensing, monitoring and actuation technologies to make it possible for large scale and real deployment. While activities in smart home are interleaved, complex and volatile; the number of inhabitants in the environment is also dynamic. A key challenge in designing robust smart home activity recognition approaches is to exploit the users' spatiotemporal behavior and location, focus on the availability of multitude of devices capable of providing different dimensions of information and fulfill the underpinning needs for scaling the system beyond a single user or a home environment. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach for recognizing complex activities of daily living (ADL), that lie in between the two extremes of intensive use of body-worn sensors and the use of ambient sensors. Our approach harnesses the power of simple ambient sensors (e.g., motion sensors) to provide additional ‘hidden’ context (e.g., room-level location) of an individual, and then combines this context with smartphone-based sensing of micro-level postural/locomotive states. The major novelty is our focus on multi-inhabitant environments, where we show how the use of spatiotemporal constraints along with multitude of data sources can be used to significantly improve the accuracy and computational overhead of traditional activity recognition based approaches such as coupled-hidden Markov models. Experimental results on two separate smart home datasets demonstrate that this approach improves the accuracy of complex ADL classification by over 30 %, compared to pure smartphone-based solutions. PMID:27042240

  4. Ventilatory demand and dynamic hyperinflation induced during ADL-based tests in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karoliny; Gulart, Aline A.; Munari, Anelise B.; Karloh, Manuela; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Airflow limitation frequently leads to the interruption of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). These patients commonly show absence of ventilatory reserve, reduced inspiratory reserve volume, and dynamic hyperinflation (DH). Objective To investigate ventilatory response and DH induced by three ADL-based protocols in COPD patients and compare them to healthy subjects. Method Cross-sectional study. COPD group: 23 patients (65±6 years, FEV1 37.2±15.4%pred); control group: 14 healthy subjects (64±4 years) matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Both groups performed all three tests: Glittre-ADL test; an activity test that involved moving objects on a shelf (TSHELF); and a modified shelf protocol isolating activity with upper limbs (TSHELF-M). Ventilatory response and inspiratory capacity were evaluated. Results Baseline ventilatory variables were similar between groups (p>0.05). The ventilatory demand increased and the inspiratory capacity decreased significantly at the end of the tests in the COPD group. Ventilatory demand and DH were higher (p<0.05) in the TSHELF than in the TSHELF–M in the COPD group (p<0.05). There were no differences in DH between the three tests in the control group (p>0.05) and ventilatory demand increased at the end of the tests (p<0.05) but to a lower extent than the COPD group. Conclusion The TSHELF induces similar ventilatory responses to the Glittre-ADL test in COPD patients with higher ventilatory demand and DH. In contrast, the ventilatory response was attenuated in the TSHELF-M, suggesting that squatting and bending down during the Glittre-ADL test could trigger significant ventilatory overload. PMID:27333482

  5. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  6. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  7. Time trends in prevalence of activities of daily living (ADL) disability and survival: comparing two populations (aged 78+ years) living in a rural area in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, Britt-Marie; Wimo, Anders; Qiu, Chengxuan; Engström, Maria; von Strauss, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study time trends in prevalence of disability in ADL and survival among men and women 78 years and older comparing two cohorts. The study was a time trend study based on two population-based community cohorts, the Nordanstig Project (NP), collected 1995-1998 and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Nordanstig (SNAC-N), collected 2001-2003. The participants were people aged 78 years and older from the NP cohort (N=303) and from the SNAC-N cohort (N=406). All were clinically examined by physicians and nurses using standardized protocols. Disability was defined as a need for assistance in one or more ADL activities. The prevalence of disability and survival were compared using logistic and Cox models. The prevalence of ADL disability was stable for men, while women became more disabled in ADL during the time period, OR 2.36 (1.12-4.94). There was no significant difference in survival time between the cohorts in either ADL disabled persons or non-disabled persons. There was a tendency for increased survival for non-disabled persons in SNAC-N compared with NP, although not significant; this was particularly true for women. In general, women survived longer than men did regardless of whether they were ADL disabled or not. The time trends for ADL disability found in the study show that ADL disability had increased in women but not in men. More studies are needed to identify risk factors for ADL disability with a view to preventing it in time.

  8. Facilities Engineering in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagluiso, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    An overview of NASA facilities is given outlining some of the more interesting and unique aspects of engineering and facilities associated with the space program. Outlined are some of the policies under which the Office of Facilities conducts its business. Included are environmental quality control measures.

  9. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  10. Evaluation of a radio based ADL interaction recognition system in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands.

    PubMed

    Neuhaeuser, J; Diehl-Schmid, J; Lueth, T C

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution the evaluation of a system called "Eventlogger" is presented, which is installed in a day hospital for old age psychiatry. The Eventlogger is a radio based module with an adjustable communication range, able to recognize interaction of the user with objects or with other people. It is intended to function as a monitoring tool for the users' activities. Due to the demographic change monitoring systems for elderly people become more important. In this paper the "simple activities of daily living" (sADL) is introduced as well as the evaluation for the recognition of sADL in a day hospital for old age psychiatry with healthy probands is presented. Together with the first approaches of post processing for better results it is shown that the system is now ready to be used with patients of the day hospital for old age psychiatry.

  11. The tool in the brain: apraxia in ADL. Behavioral and neurological correlates of apraxia in daily living.

    PubMed

    Bieńkiewicz, Marta M N; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Goldenberg, Georg; Hughes, Charmayne M L; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ from other animals in the way they can skilfully and precisely operate or invent tools to facilitate their everyday life. Tools have dominated our home, travel and work environment, becoming an integral step for our motor skills development. What happens when the part of the brain responsible for tool use is damaged in our adult life due to a cerebrovascular accident? How does daily life change when we lose the previously mastered ability to make use of the objects around us? How do patients suffering from compromised tool use cope with food preparation, personal hygiene, grooming, housework, or use of home appliances? In this literature review we present a state of the art for single and multiple tool use research, with a focus on the impact that apraxia (impaired ability to perform tool-based actions) and action disorganization syndrome (ADS; impaired ability to carry out multi-step actions) have on activities of daily living (ADL). Firstly, we summarize the behavioral studies investigating the impact of apraxia and other comorbidity syndromes, such as neglect or visual extinction, on ADL. We discuss the hallmarks of the compromised tool use in terms of the sequencing of action steps, conceptual errors committed, spatial motor control, and temporal organization of the movement. In addition, we present an up-to-date overview of the neuroimaging and lesion analyses studies that provide an insight into neural correlates of tool use in the human brain and functional changes in the neural organization following a stroke, in the context of ADL. Finally we discuss the current practice in neurorehabilitation of ADL in apraxia and ADS aiming at increasing patients' independence.

  12. Prevalence of functional disability in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and associated factors, as predictors of morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Millán-Calenti, José C; Tubío, Javier; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; González-Abraldes, Isabel; Lorenzo, Trinidad; Fernández-Arruty, Teresa; Maseda, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the existing relationship among variables referred to the person, specifically age and gender, and the functional dependence in basic ADL and in IADL, as well as the possible relationship it has with the increase of morbidity and mortality in a random sample of 598 individuals older than 65 years. Of these individuals, 34.6% were categorized as dependent for at least one ADL, and 53.5% if we refer to IADL. Regarding the ADL, the risk of dependence increases (odds ratio=OR=1.089) per year of age, (OR=2.48) in women's case; while there is an IADL correlation between age and the score (r=-0.527; p<0.001). A relationship exists between dependence and the days of hospitalization (for ADL: r=-0.12, p=0.018 and IADL: r=-0.97, p=0.003), the number of visits to the doctor (ADL: r=-0.27, p<0.001; IADL: r=-0.25, p<0.001) or the presence of concomitant pathologies such as dementia (ADL: p<0.001; IADL: p<0.001). There is a significant association between age, gender and dependence, as well as between dependence and morbidity and mortality, so that dependence could be used as a predictor of both.

  13. Association of early-onset dementia with activities of daily living (ADL) in middle-aged adults with intellectual disabilities: the caregiver's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Hsia, Yi-Chen; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated in detail which factors influence activities of daily living (ADL) in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) comorbid with/without dementia conditions. The objective of the present study was to describe the relation between early onset dementia conditions and progressive loss of ADL capabilities and to examine the influence of dementia conditions and other possible factors toward ADL scores in adults with ID. This study was part of the "Healthy Aging Initiatives for Persons with an Intellectual Disability in Taiwan: A Social Ecological Approach" project. We analyzed data from 459 adults aged 45 years or older with an ID regarding their early onset symptoms of dementia and their ADL profile based on the perspective of the primary caregivers. Results show that a significant negative correlation was found between dementia score and ADL score in a Pearson's correlation test (r=-0.28, p<0.001). The multiple linear regression model reported that factors of male gender (β=4.187, p<0.05), marital status (β=4.79, p<0.05), education level (primary: β=5.544, p<0.05; junior high or more: β=8.147, p<0.01), Down's syndrome (β=-9.290, p<0.05), severe or profound disability level (β=-6.725, p<0.05; β=-15.773, p<0.001), comorbid condition (β=-4.853, p<0.05) and dementia conditions (β=-9.245, p<0.001) were variables that were able to significantly predict the ADL score (R(2)=0.241) after controlling for age. Disability level and comorbidity can explain 10% of the ADL score variation, whereas dementia conditions can only explain 3% of the ADL score variation in the study. The present study highlights that future studies should scrutinize in detail the reasons for the low explanatory power of dementia for ADL, particularly in examining the appropriateness of the measurement scales for dementia and ADL in aging adults with ID.

  14. Characteristics of Mexican American Elders Admitted to Skilled Nursing Facilities in the United States: Data from the Hispanic EPESE Study

    PubMed Central

    Espino, David V.; Angel, Jaqueline L.; Wood, Robert C.; Finely, M. Rosina; Ye, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the current study is to describe the factors associated with Mexican American elders who have spent time in a SNF compared to those who have not in the Southwestern United States. Design Data were collected on the Mexican American elders who reported a SNF stay within 10 years of baseline. Participants A probability sample of 3050 Mexican American elders from five Southwestern states followed from 1993 to 2005 were examined. Measures Variables examined included socio-demographics, language of interview, disabilities with Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), selfreported health, cognitive status and depression. Results A total of 78 (3.9%) out of 2020 subjects resided in SNF’s. Using univariate analyses older age, English-language interview, poorer cognitive status, and functional disabilities were independently associated with Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) admissions. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age reveal that SNF patients were older (OR =1.08, p=0.001), have an ADL disability (OR=4.94, p<0.001), scored in the Geriatric Depression Scale depressed range (OR=2.72, p=0.001) and were more likely to interview in English (OR=1.95, p=0.042), when compared to community counterparts. Conclusions Mexican American elders resided in a SNF at some point in the previous ten years were older and more likely to be functionally impaired. They also were more likely to prefer English as their primary language indicating they were more likely to agree to a SNF stay than their Spanish speaking counterparts. PMID:23352979

  15. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  16. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  17. Testing for neglect in right-hemispheric stroke patients using a new assessment battery based upon standardized activities of daily living (ADL).

    PubMed

    Eschenbeck, Philipp; Vossel, Simone; Weiss, Peter H; Saliger, Jochen; Karbe, Hans; Fink, Gereon R

    2010-10-01

    Spatial neglect is most frequently observed after right-hemispheric stroke and is characterized by a failure to report, to respond, or to orient to stimuli presented to the contralesional side. Although many neglect patients show difficulties in accomplishing activities of daily living (ADL), to date the clinical assessment of neglect is based upon neuropsychological paper-and-pencil tests. Thus, essential information about the patient's functional status may be missed out. Accordingly, we aimed at developing a new neglect test battery that incorporates standardized ADL. Six conventional paper-and-pencil neglect tests and eight standardized ADL with newly developed neglect-specific scoring criteria and cut-off scores were administered to 68 right-hemispheric stroke patients. According to the neuropsychological tests 22 patients showed symptoms suggesting neglect, whereas 17 patients showed symptoms suggesting neglect according to the newly developed neglect test based upon ADL. Neglect-specific impairments in the neuropsychological tests were significantly associated with those in the ADL-based tests, although dissociations were observed in seven patients. Neglect severity (as reflected in the percentage of positive subtests) was comparable for both test batteries and both test instruments showed high interrater reliability. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping revealed that the severity of neglect according to the neuropsychological and ADL-based tests was significantly associated with lesions within right fronto-parietal networks. We conclude that the newly developed ADL-based neglect battery provides an economic and ecologically valid tool for the assessment of neglect. The test can be used to assess and quantify neglect in everyday activities, and thus to monitor realistically rehabilitative needs of neglect patients.

  18. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  19. Patients', doctors', and caregivers' assessment of disability using the UPDRS-ADL section: are these ratings interchangeable?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Benito-León, Julian; Alonso, Fernando; Catalán, M José; Pondal, Margarita; Tobías, Aurelio; Zamarbide, Ivana

    2003-09-01

    This multicenter study sought to analyze the validity and reliability of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-section 2 (Activities of Daily Living, ADL) as applied by patients and caregivers. Sixty pairs of PD patients-caregivers were enrolled for study purposes. Neurologists used a set of scales to determine disease severity and patients' functional state. Patients and caregivers used adapted versions of the UPDRS-section 2 in tandem with other measures. Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests, weighted kappa, intraclass and Spearman's correlation coefficients, as well as multivariate linear regression models were applied. On the whole, PD patient self-assessment and caregiver evaluation of patients' disability showed close concordance with neurologists' ratings. Correlation between caregiver ratings and clinical evaluation tended to be slightly lower than that for patient-based self-assessment. Depression showed a positive correlation with disability and had a nonsystematic influence on UPDRS-section 2 (ADL) scores. As expected, there was a significant correlation between perceived disability and health-related quality of life measures. Caregiver burden did not reduce the level of agreement with neurologists as to the overall rating of any given patient's disability. In PD, UPDRS-section 2-based assessment of disability by patients themselves and caregivers is a valid and reliable outcome.

  20. Structure design for a Two-DoF myoelectric prosthetic hand to realize basic hand functions in ADLs.

    PubMed

    Hoshigawa, Suguru; Jiang, Yinlai; Kato, Ryu; Morishita, Soichiro; Nakamura, Tatsuhiro; Yabuki, Yoshiko; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic hands are desired by those who have lost a hand or both hands not only for decoration but also for the functions to help them with their activities of daily living (ADL). Prosthetic robotic hands that are developed to fully realize the function of a human hand are usually too expensive to be economically available, difficult to operate and maintain, or over heavy for longtime wearing. The aim of this study is therefore to develop a simplified prosthetic hand (sim-PH), which is to be controlled by myoelectric signals from the user, to realize the most important grasp motions in ADL by trading off the cost and performance. This paper reports the structure design of a two-DoF sim-PH with two motors to drive the CM joint of the thumb and the interlocked MP joints of the other four fingers. In order to optimize the structure, the model of the sim-PH was proposed based on which 7 sim-PHs with different structural parameters were manufactured and tested in a pick-and-place experiment. Correspondence analysis of the experimental results clarified the relationship between the hand functions and the shapes of fingers.

  1. Reduction in patient burdens with graphical computerized adaptive testing on the ADL scale: tool development and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wu, Hing-Man; Wang, Weng-Chung; Castillo, Roberto Vasquez; Chou, Willy

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness and efficacy of saving time and reducing burden for patients, nurses, and even occupational therapists through computer adaptive testing (CAT). Methods Based on an item bank of the Barthel Index (BI) and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) for assessing comprehensive activities of daily living (ADL) function in stroke patients, we developed a visual basic application (VBA)-Excel CAT module, and (1) investigated whether the averaged test length via CAT is shorter than that of the traditional all-item-answered non-adaptive testing (NAT) approach through simulation, (2) illustrated the CAT multimedia on a tablet PC showing data collection and response errors of ADL clinical functional measures in stroke patients, and (3) demonstrated the quality control of endorsing scale with fit statistics to detect responding errors, which will be further immediately reconfirmed by technicians once patient ends the CAT assessment. Results The results show that endorsed items could be shorter on CAT (M = 13.42) than on NAT (M = 23) at 41.64% efficiency in test length. However, averaged ability estimations reveal insignificant differences between CAT and NAT. Conclusion This study found that mobile nursing services, placed at the bedsides of patients could, through the programmed VBA-Excel CAT module, reduce the burden to patients and save time, more so than the traditional NAT paper-and-pencil testing appraisals. PMID:19416521

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Seed Acid Detergent Lignin (ADL) and Hull Content in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Jian, Hongju; Wei, Lijuan; Qu, Cunmin; Xu, Xinfu; Lu, Kun; Qian, Wei; Li, Jiana; Li, Maoteng; Liu, Liezhao

    2015-01-01

    A stable yellow-seeded variety is the breeding goal for obtaining the ideal rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) plant, and the amount of acid detergent lignin (ADL) in the seeds and the hull content (HC) are often used as yellow-seeded rapeseed screening indices. In this study, a genome-wide association analysis of 520 accessions was performed using the Q + K model with a total of 31,839 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. As a result, three significant associations on the B. napus chromosomes A05, A09, and C05 were detected for seed ADL content. The peak SNPs were within 9.27, 14.22, and 20.86 kb of the key genes BnaA.PAL4, BnaA.CAD2/BnaA.CAD3, and BnaC.CCR1, respectively. Further analyses were performed on the major locus of A05, which was also detected in the seed HC examination. A comparison of our genome-wide association study (GWAS) results and previous linkage mappings revealed a common chromosomal region on A09, which indicates that GWAS can be used as a powerful complementary strategy for dissecting complex traits in B. napus. Genomic selection (GS) utilizing the significant SNP markers based on the GWAS results exhibited increased predictive ability, indicating that the predictive ability of a given model can be substantially improved by using GWAS and GS.

  3. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  4. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  5. NEP facilities (LeRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetrone, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the Electric Propulsion Research Building (no. 16) the Electric Power Laboratory (BLDG. 301); the Tank 6 Vacuum Facility; and test facilities for electric propulsion and LeRC.

  6. Oil Pollution Act (OPA) and Federal Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Oil Pollution Prevention regulation sets forth requirements for prevention of, preparedness for, and response to oil discharges at specific non-transportation-related facilities, including federal facilities.

  7. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  8. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  9. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  10. Special Feature: Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, George; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Planning Laboratory Design" (Storm); "Perkins Money for Automotive Programs" (Cash); "Stretching a Budget" (Warren); "Video Teleconferencing--Powerful Communication for Occupational Educators" (Major); "Danger: Hazardous Materials" (Brown); and "Keeping Facilities Safe--Electrical…

  11. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials.

  12. Risk Factors for Nursing Home Placement in Alzheimer's Disease: A Longitudinal Study of Cognition, ADL, Service Utilization, and Cholinesterase Inhibitor Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Asa K.; Londos, Elisabet; Minthon, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify risk factors for early nursing home placement (NHP) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on the impact of longitudinal change in cognition, activities of daily living (ADL), service utilization, and cholinesterase inhibitor treatment (ChEI). Design and Methods: In an open, 3-year, prospective, multicenter study…

  13. Quick lateral movements of the trunk in a seated position reflect mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) function in frail elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Kimura, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kensuke; Arai, Shin; Iwata, Hiroshi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel and safe performance test for measuring mobility is described. The test, which we have named the Seated Side Tapping test (Side Tapping test), requires the subjects to move their bodies laterally to the left and right in turn as quickly as possible whilst remaining in a seated position. We examined the associations between the results of the new test and those of other mobility tests, ADL, and the use of walking aids. The participants were 75 frail elderly people who were receiving rehabilitation services. Gait speed and the timed up and go (TUG) test were employed as mobility tests, and the participants' use of walking aids was recorded. The ADL score was assessed using the Barthel Index. Significant correlations were found between the side tapping test and gait speed (r=-0.59, p<0.01), and TUG (r=0.63, p<0.01). This test also revealed significant relationships with the ADL scores and the use of walking aids. These results indicate that an ability to perform quick lateral trunk movements in a seated position reflects their mobility during standing. Thus, we concluded that since the side tapping test is simple and safe, it is useful for detecting mobility impairments, ADL levels, and the need for walking aids, especially in frail elderly individuals.

  14. Cognitive Impairment as a Strong Predictor of Incident Disability in Specific Adl-Iadl Tasks among Community-Dwelling Elders: The Azuchi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Hiroko H.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Yamakawa, Masanobu; Sekikawa, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotugu

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We examined differential effects of cognitive impairment on each of the activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks. Design and Methods: In a 3-year follow-up of community-dwelling elderly persons in Azuchi, Japan, we assessed cognition by using the Hasegawa Dementia Scale. We examined (a) the…

  15. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  16. GRC Ground Support Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintOnge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The ISS Program is conducting an "ISS Research Academy' at JSC the first week of August 2010. This Academy will be a tutorial for new Users of the International Space Station, focused primarily on the new ISS National Laboratory and its members including Non-Profit Organizations, other government agencies and commercial users. Presentations on the on-orbit research facilities accommodations and capabilities will be made, as well as ground based hardware development, integration and test facilities and capabilities. This presentation describes the GRC Hardware development, test and laboratory facilities.

  17. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  18. Facility Focus: Science Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of five custom designs used in university science buildings. Descriptions include renovation to a mechanical engineering lab, construction of a new building for molecular biology, the reconstruction of chemistry labs, the renovation of a vision lab, and a new research and education facility. Includes photos. (RJM)

  19. Fabrication of Rare-earth Aluminate (ReAlO3) Glass and Crystalline phases by Aerodynamic Levitation (ADL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavalingu, B.; Yoda, Shinichi; Kumar, M. S. Vijaya

    2012-07-01

    Containerless processing by levitation technique has been extensively used for material science and engineering because it suppresses inhomogeneous nucleation from the container wall and helps to produce stable, metastable and glass phases. The containerless levitation technique is widely explored for material processing because of its technological and scientific advantages. Recently, research on bulk glass and glass-ceramics have attracted the attention of material scientists as they are considered as low cost optical materials of the future. In the present study, the formation of bulk spherical glass and crystalline ReAlO _{3}(Re=La-Lu,Y) phases has been investigated due to their unique features in terms of the solidification process from an undercooled melt, glass structure and optical properties. An Aerodynamic levitation (ADL) was used to undercool the melt well below the melting temperature. Sintered bits of ReAlO _{3} sample with a diameter of ~2.5 mm and mass of ~20-25 mg was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO _{2} laser and then the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO _{2} laser and solidified. The surface temperature and solidification process of the levitated droplet was monitored using pyrometer and high speed video camera, respectively. Among the rare earth aluminum perovskites Lanthanum, Neodymium and samarium aluminum perovskites solidified as glass and others YAlO _{3} and Europium to Lutetium aluminum perovskites solidified as crystalline phases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of cross-sectioned samples, TG/DTA, Transmittance and Refractive Index studies were performed for both glass and crystalline phases. The results of the above studies revealed the formation of glass and crystalline phases directly from the undercooled melt. The glass transition temperature (Tg) gradually increased with increasing ionic radius of the rare-earth elements. The NdAlO _{3} glass phase showed a high refractive index of ~1

  20. 44 CFR 331.5 - Production facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production facilities. 331.5... AND FACILITIES IN LABOR SURPLUS AREAS § 331.5 Production facilities. All Federal departments and... production facilities, including expansion, to the extent that such selection is consistent with existing...

  1. 7 CFR 1735.17 - Facilities financed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....12; (3) Facilities to provide service other than 1-party; and (4) System designs or facilities to... improvement, expansion, construction, acquisition, and operation of systems or facilities (including station..., construction, and acquisition of systems or facilities (excluding station apparatus owned by the...

  2. AeroADL: applying the integration of the Suomi-NPP science algorithms with the Algorithm Development Library to the calibration and validation task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchin, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    A common problem for the off-line validation of the calibration algorithms and algorithm coefficients is being able to run science data through the exact same software used for on-line calibration of that data. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program solved part of this problem by making the Algorithm Development Library (ADL) available, which allows the operational algorithm code to be compiled and run on a desktop Linux workstation using flat file input and output. However, this solved only part of the problem, as the toolkit and methods to initiate the processing of data through the algorithms were geared specifically toward the algorithm developer, not the calibration analyst. In algorithm development mode, a limited number of sets of test data are staged for the algorithm once, and then run through the algorithm over and over as the software is developed and debugged. In calibration analyst mode, we are continually running new data sets through the algorithm, which requires significant effort to stage each of those data sets for the algorithm without additional tools. AeroADL solves this second problem by providing a set of scripts that wrap the ADL tools, providing both efficient means to stage and process an input data set, to override static calibration coefficient look-up-tables (LUT) with experimental versions of those tables, and to manage a library containing multiple versions of each of the static LUT files in such a way that the correct set of LUTs required for each algorithm are automatically provided to the algorithm without analyst effort. Using AeroADL, The Aerospace Corporation's analyst team has demonstrated the ability to quickly and efficiently perform analysis tasks for both the VIIRS and OMPS sensors with minimal training on the software tools.

  3. Energy Dissipator Facilities and Riprap Repair, Coy Glen and Cayuga Inlet, Ithaca, New York. Design Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    procedure for uhesigning a free overfall I-0.0044 awl II. 1 . from figur 219, slill,,’,ay is best shown liv nas of an example. 11, 5 " ’onsid er that such a...ADA01 711 HOWARD NEEDLES TAM04EN ANO RERGENDOFF NEW YORK F/ 13iADl ENERGY DISSIPATOR FAC ILIT IES AND RIPRAP REPAIR- Coy GLEN AND A TCA ’ AUG 75...S. TYP FQ REPORT & PERIOD COVEJ!ED Energy Dissipator Facilities and Riprap Repat Final Coy Glen and Cayuga Inlet ; ] I /I Ithaca, New York - . 6

  4. The assess facility descriptor module

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  6. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  7. Is patient-grouping on basis of condition on admission indicative for discharge destination in geriatric stroke patients after rehabilitation in skilled nursing facilities? The results of a cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geriatric stroke patients are generally frail, have an advanced age and co-morbidity. It is yet unclear whether specific groups of patients might benefit differently from structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Therefore, the aims of our study are 1) to determine relevant patient characteristics to distinguish groups of patients based on their admission scores in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and (2) to study the course of these particular patient-groups in relation to their discharge destination. Methods This is a longitudinal, multicenter, observational study. We collected data on patient characteristics, balance, walking ability, arm function, co-morbidity, activities of daily living (ADL), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and depressive complaints of 127 geriatric stroke patients admitted to skilled nursing facilities with specific units for geriatric rehabilitation after stroke. Results Cluster analyses revealed two groups: cluster 1 included patients in poor condition upon admission (n = 52), and cluster 2 included patients in fair/good condition upon admission (n = 75). Patients in both groups improved in balance, walking abilities, and arm function. Patients in cluster 1 also improved in ADL. Depressive complaints decreased significantly in patients in cluster 1 who were discharged to an independent- or assisted-living situation. Compared to 80% of the patients in cluster 2, a lower proportion (46%) of the patients in cluster 1 were discharged to an independent- or assisted-living situation. Conclusion Stroke patients referred for rehabilitation to SNFs could be clustered on the basis of their condition upon admission. Although patients in poor condition on admission were more likely to be referred to a facility for long-term care, this was certainly not the case in all patients. Almost half of them could be discharged to an independent or assisted living situation, which implied that also in patients in poor condition on

  8. Synergistic antidepressant-like effects between a kappa opioid antagonist (LY2444296) and a delta opioid agonist (ADL5859) in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Tallarida, Ronald; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Kappa opioid (KOP) receptor antagonists and delta opioid (DOP) receptor agonists have antidepressant-like effects in animal tests and may be useful for treatment-resistant depression in humans. In this study, we examined whether the combination of a KOP receptor antagonist and a DOP receptor agonist would produce a better than additive effect (i.e. synergy). LY2444296 is a short-acting selective nonpeptide KOP receptor antagonist. ADL5859 is a selective nonpeptide DOP receptor agonist which does not produce seizures and EEG disturbances. Each compound and combinations of the two were examined in the forced swim test (FST) one h post injection, a screening test for antidepressant-like effect, in male adult C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Lab). LY2444296 [subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] at 10 and 30mg/kg, but not 3mg/kg, significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ADL5859 also reduced immobility time dose-dependently at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, but not at 1mg/kg. An analysis was conducted using the method of Tallarida and Raffa (2010), which employed dose equivalence. The relative potency of the drugs was determined to be LY2444296: ADL5859=1:0.28, which was the dose ratio for combination studies. Six combinations of the two compounds were tested in mice at a fixed dose ratio. We found that LY2444296 and ADL5859 yielded significant synergistic effects for the antidepressant-like effect at the combined dose ranging from 3.84mg/kg to 9.0mg/kg. ADL5859 (10mg/kg), LY2444296 (30mg/kg) and their combined dose (3.84mg/kg) had no effects on locomotor activities. Since the two drugs have distinct pharmacological profiles, such a synergism will allow use of lower doses of both drugs to achieve desired antidepressant effects with fewer side effects.

  9. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  10. Food Service Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifenbark, Ray

    This annotated bibliography included summaries of 14 articles and one report dealing with the topic of school and college food service programs. A brief introduction discusses the current trend toward more diversified use of food service facilities and describes recent innovations in the preparation and distribution of students' meals. Many of the…

  11. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  12. QF monitoring. [Qualifying Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, S. ); Hoffman, B. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines the effects on project financing of independent power projects of the California Public Utilities Commission decision to grant authority to California utilities to monitor and enforce compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Qualifying Facility standards. The topics of the article include monitoring proposals, monitoring guidelines, the effects of monitoring, minimizing status loss and monitoring requirements.

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  14. Modular space station facilities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The modular space station will operate as a general purpose laboratory (GPL). In addition, the space station will be able to support many attached or free-flying research and application modules that would be dedicated to specific projects like astronomy or earth observations. The GPL primary functions have been organized into functional laboratories including an electrical/electronics laboratory, a mechanical sciences laboratory, an experiment and test isolation laboratory, a hard data process facility, a data evaluation facility, an optical sciences laboratory, a biomedical and biosciences laboratory, and an experiment/secondary command and control center.

  15. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  16. Designing a Distance Learning Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    Details the design of a distance-learning facility through analysis of its functions, paper-handling requirements, and current and future communications-technology needs. It also lists special features the facility should have, including up-to-date wiring capacities for telecommunications, uplink and downlink capabilities to satellites, and…

  17. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  18. Physical Education Facilities for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Larry; Frederick, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    Physical education facilities at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio have been adapted for the recreational needs of handicapped students. Changes include a special exercise room, accessible locker and shower facilities, a pool area, and a wheelchair repair shop. (CJ)

  19. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  20. Looking Northwest at Office Building Boiler Room, Including Cinderblock Walls, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northwest at Office Building Boiler Room, Including Cinderblock Walls, Fuel Tank and Scale Weights - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Office, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  1. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  2. ADL ORVIS: An air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s-1 fringe-1, differences of 1-2 m s-1 across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  4. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  5. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  6. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  7. Disaster Management and Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Grace

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes discussions from a seminar focusing on earthquakes and educational facilities, including findings related to educational buildings; partnerships; training; standards, regulations, and procedures; finance and legislation; and research and support. (EV)

  8. Experimenting with Science Facility Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the modern school science facility and how computers and teaching methods are changing their design. Issues include power, lighting, and space requirements; funding for planning; architect assessment; materials requirements for work surfaces; and classroom flexibility. (GR)

  9. Facility Planning for Technology Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Tweed W.; Stewart, G. Kent

    1993-01-01

    When planning new school buildings or modifications to existing structures, checking facility planning in relation to technology planning is critical. Areas requiring serious attention include space, electricity, lighting, security, furnishings, shielding, and acoustics. (MLF)

  10. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  11. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  12. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  13. Interactive Astronomical Data Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinglesmith, D. A., III

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the Interactive Astronomical Data Analysis Facility (IADAF) which performs interactive analysis of astronomical data for resident and visiting scientists. The facilities include a Grant measuring engine, a PDS 1010A microdensitometer, a COMTAL image display system and a PDP 11/40 computer system. Both hardware and software systems are examined, including a description of thirteen overlay programs. Some uses of the IADAF are indicated.

  14. Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, E.A.; Whitehead, J.K.; Encke, D.B.; Dorsey, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    This material was developed to assist engineers in incorporating pollution prevention into the design of new or modified facilities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The material demonstrates how the design of a facility can affect the generation of waste throughout a facility`s entire life and it offers guidance on how to prevent the generation of waste during design. Contents include: Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design training course booklet; Pollution prevention design guideline; Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design lesson plan; Training participant survey and pretest; and Training facilitator`s guide and schedule.

  15. 7 CFR 51.57 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for Plants Operating Under Continuous Inspection on A Contract Basis § 51.57 Facilities. Each packing plant shall be equipped with adequate sanitary facilities and accommodations, including but not... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities. 51.57 Section 51.57...

  16. 24 CFR 891.220 - Prohibited facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited facilities. 891.220 Section 891.220 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Housing for the Elderly § 891.220 Prohibited facilities. Projects may not include facilities...

  17. Facility Consideration for Handicapped Intramural Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvaddy, Jim

    The author discusses the specifics of planning new facilities and restructuring existing ones for intramural and recreational use by handicapped and normal individuals. Detailed are suggestions for general accessibility (including parking, ramps and door hardware aspects), toilet facilities, swimming pools, and such miscellaneous facilities as…

  18. Future Facilities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albert De Roeck, Rolf Ent

    2009-10-01

    For the session on future facilities at DIS09 discussions were organized on DIS related measurements that can be expected in the near and medium –or perhaps far– future, including plans from JLab, CERN and FNAL fixed target experiments, possible measurements and detector upgrades at RHIC, as well as the plans for possible future electron proton/ion colliders such as the EIC and the LHeC project.

  19. ORNL calibrations facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL.

  20. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  1. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  2. Canastota Renewable Energy Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Jillian; Hunt, Allen

    2013-12-13

    The project was implemented at the Madison County Landfill located in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York. Madison County has owned and operated the solid waste and recycling facilities at the Buyea Road site since 1974. At the onset of the project, the County owned and operated facilities there to include three separate landfills, a residential solid waste disposal and recycled material drop-off facility, a recycling facility and associated administrative, support and environmental control facilities. This putrescible waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition within the waste mass and generates landfill gas, which is approximately 50% methane. In order to recover this gas, the landfill was equipped with gas collection systems on both the east and west sides of Buyea Road which bring the gas to a central point for destruction. In order to derive a beneficial use from the collected landfill gases, the County decided to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the future use of the generated gas.

  3. Robot Serviced Space Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A robot serviced space facility includes multiple modules which are identical in physical structure, but selectively differing in function. and purpose. Each module includes multiple like attachment points which are identically placed on each module so as to permit interconnection with immediately adjacent modules. Connection is made through like outwardly extending flange assemblies having identical male and female configurations for interconnecting to and locking to a complementary side of another flange. Multiple rows of interconnected modules permit force, fluid, data and power transfer to be accomplished by redundant circuit paths. Redundant modules of critical subsystems are included. Redundancy of modules and of interconnections results in a space complex with any module being removable upon demand, either for module replacement or facility reconfiguration. without eliminating any vital functions of the complex. Module replacement and facility assembly or reconfiguration are accomplished by a computer controlled articulated walker type robotic manipulator arm assembly having two identical end-effectors in the form of male configurations which are identical to those on module flanges and which interconnect to female configurations on other flanges. The robotic arm assembly moves along a connected set or modules by successively disconnecting, moving and reconnecting alternate ends of itself to a succession of flanges in a walking type maneuver. To transport a module, the robot keeps the transported module attached to one of its end-effectors and uses another flange male configuration of the attached module as a substitute end-effector during walking.

  4. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.C.

    1994-04-01

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification.

  5. 76 FR 35026 - Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From Doherty, Including Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Doherty, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business..., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business Facilities, LLC... wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Aramark...

  6. Test facilities for VINCI®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuel, Dirk; Schäfer, Klaus; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    With the replacement of the current upper-stage ESC-A of the Ariane 5 launcher by an enhanced cryogenic upper-stage, ESA's Ariane 5 Midterm Evolution (A5-ME) program aims to raise the launcher's payload capacity in geostationary transfer orbit from 10 to 12 tons, an increase of 20 %. Increasing the in-orbit delivery capability of the A5-ME launcher requires a versatile, high-performance, evolved cryogenic upper-stage engine suitable for delivering multiple payloads to all kinds of orbits, ranging from low earth orbit to geostationary transfer orbit with increased perigee. In order to meet these requirements the re-ignitable liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engine VINCI® currently under development is designated to power the future upper stage, featuring a design performance of 180 kN of thrust and 464 s of specific impulse. Since 2010 development tests for the VINCI® engine have been conducted at the test benches P3.2 and P4.1 at DLR test site in Lampoldshausen under the ESA A5-ME program. For the VINCI® combustion chamber development the P3.2 test facility is used, which is the only European thrust chamber test facility. Originally erected for the development of the thrust chamber of the Vulcain engine, in 2003 the test facility was modified that today it is able to simulate vacuum conditions for the ignition and startup of the VINCI® combustion chamber. To maintain the test operations under vacuum conditions over an entire mission life of the VINCI® engine, including re-ignition following long and short coasting phases, between 2000 and 2005 the test facility P4.1 was completely rebuilt into a new high-altitude simulation facility. During the past two P4.1 test campaigns in 2010 and 2011 a series of important milestones were reached in the development of the VINCI® engine. In preparation for future activities within the frame of ESA's A5-ME program DLR has already started the engineering of a stage test facility for the prospective upper stage

  7. The Multistage Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie

    2004-01-01

    Research and developments of new aerospace technologies is one of Glenn Research Center's specialties. One facility that deals with the research of aerospace technologies is the High-speed Multistage Compressor Facility. This facility will be testing the performance and efficiency of an Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) two-stage compressor. There is a lot of preparation involved with testing something of this caliber. Before the test article can be installed into the test rig, the facility must be fully operational and ready to run. Meaning all the necessary instrumentation must be calibrated and installed in the facility. The test rig should also be in safe operating condition, and the proper safety permits obtained. In preparation for the test, the Multistage Compressor Facility went through a few changes. For instance the facility will now be utilizing slip rings, the gearbox went through some maintenance, new lubrications systems replaced the old ones, and special instrumentation needs to be fine tuned to achieve the maximum amount of accurate data. Slips rings help gather information off of a rotating device - in this case from a shaft - onto stationary contacts. The contacts (or brushes) need to be cooled to reduce the amount of frictional heat produced between the slip ring and brushes. The coolant being run through the slip ring is AK-225, a material hazardous to the ozone. To abide by the safety regulations the coolant must be run through a closed chiller system. A new chiller system was purchased but the reservoir that holds the coolant was ventilated which doesn t make the system truly closed and sealed. My task was to design and have a new reservoir built for the chiller system that complies with the safety guidelines. The gearbox had some safety issues also. Located in the back of the gearbox an inching drive was set up. When the inching drive is in use the gears and chain are bare and someone can easily get caught up in it. So to prevent

  8. Facility research capabilities at Louisiana State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts of LSU are reported to develop research capabilities for supporting the NASA Mississippi Test Facility. Research activities reported include remote sensing technology and salt water encroachment.

  9. Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biehle, James T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how schools in Carroll County, Maryland; Toronto, Ontario; Durham, North Carolina; Englewood, Colorado; and Troy, New York, are renovating their vocational areas for inquiry-based, hands-on science learning. Includes sample floor plans and photographs. (EV)

  10. Structural dynamics verification facility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.; Hirchbein, M. S.; Mcaleese, J. M.; Fleming, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a structural dynamics verification facility to support structures programs was studied. Most of the industry operated facilities are used for highly focused research, component development, and problem solving, and are not used for the generic understanding of the coupled dynamic response of major engine subsystems. Capabilities for the proposed facility include: the ability to both excite and measure coupled structural dynamic response of elastic blades on elastic shafting, the mechanical simulation of various dynamical loadings representative of those seen in operating engines, and the measurement of engine dynamic deflections and interface forces caused by alternative engine mounting configurations and compliances.

  11. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  12. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  13. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  14. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  15. Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Backes, Paul; Steinke, Robert; Tso, Kam; Wales, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing operational facilities for collaboration by multiple experts has begun to take shape as an outgrowth of a project to design such facilities for scientific operations of the planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The methodology could also be applicable to the design of military "situation rooms" and other facilities for terrestrial missions. It was recognized in this project that modern mission operations depend heavily upon the collaborative use of computers. It was further recognized that tests have shown that layout of a facility exerts a dramatic effect on the efficiency and endurance of the operations staff. The facility designs (for example, see figure) and the methodology developed during the project reflect this recognition. One element of the methodology is a metric, called effective capacity, that was created for use in evaluating proposed MER operational facilities and may also be useful for evaluating other collaboration spaces, including meeting rooms and military situation rooms. The effective capacity of a facility is defined as the number of people in the facility who can be meaningfully engaged in its operations. A person is considered to be meaningfully engaged if the person can (1) see, hear, and communicate with everyone else present; (2) see the material under discussion (typically data on a piece of paper, computer monitor, or projection screen); and (3) provide input to the product under development by the group. The effective capacity of a facility is less than the number of people that can physically fit in the facility. For example, a typical office that contains a desktop computer has an effective capacity of .4, while a small conference room that contains a projection screen has an effective capacity of around 10. Little or no benefit would be derived from allowing the number of persons in an operational facility to exceed its effective capacity: At best, the operations staff would be underutilized

  16. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. [Discussion on care management operation of a visiting nurse--a case of increased ADL by the support of independent life].

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Minako

    2002-12-01

    In addition to the visiting nursing service conventionally provided, the Department of Long-term Care Insurance Service of this hospital inaugurated the home care supporting service in April 2000. Senior citizens rated higher in the degree of necessity of care in the initial accreditation and in the renewal accreditation of the Long-term Care Insurance tend to have fewer changes in the services for the last two years. At present, care managers of various professions are involved in the home care supporting services and have no choice but to provide care in non-specialty areas. Under the situation, care management by the visiting nurse helped an elderly increase ADL and live on his own, and the case is introduced in this article. Mr. K.T. developed angina pectoris at the age of 76, had recurrences of complications and repeated transfers of hospitals and was eventually admitted to the hospital. Though he had declined muscular strength and ADL because of the long bed-ridden life, he was discharged from the hospital. Nursing services centered on visiting nursing were provided as the home care supporting service when home medical care for the patient was started. Since Mr. K.T. required medical management, he and his family members were not sure whether it is possible to provide care for him at home and required guidance about health/life and mental supports. Therefore, visiting nursing care was provided by a nurse to assess needs or condition of the person, which reduced anxiety and encouraged the person. As a result, ADL increased and the degree of necessity of care decreased from 4 to 2. This success is attributed to the visiting nurse's appropriate care management based on the medical expertise from the perspective of nursing and the introduction of necessary services at the necessary time based on the appropriate assessment of changes in the physical condition or willingness and the nursing condition of family members. Coordination with the staffs engaged in each

  18. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  19. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., provided the storage facility's certificated physical parameters—including total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided..., provided the storage facility's certificated physical parameters—including total inventory,...

  20. 18 CFR 157.213 - Underground storage field facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., provided the storage facility's certificated physical parameters—including total inventory, reservoir pressure, reservoir and buffer boundaries, and certificated capacity remain unchanged—and provided..., provided the storage facility's certificated physical parameters—including total inventory,...

  1. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  2. 310 Facility chemical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, K.J.

    1997-05-21

    The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

  3. Flexible Educational Facilities. An Annotated Reference List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Howard E.

    These references on flexible educational facilities are abstracted by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities. College material includes an experimental learning center, a college health center, a fine arts center, and university library design. References on schools include secondary school design, flexible high school design, standard…

  4. Nonterrestrial utilization of materials: Automated space manufacturing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Four areas related to the nonterrestrial use of materials are included: (1) material resources needed for feedstock in an orbital manufacturing facility, (2) required initial components of a nonterrestrial manufacturing facility, (3) growth and productive capability of such a facility, and (4) automation and robotics requirements of the facility.

  5. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  6. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  7. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  8. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  9. Looking East on Third Floor of Pellet Plant Including Tops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking East on Third Floor of Pellet Plant Including Tops of Line One and Blenders One, Two, and Three - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pellet Plant, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  10. Looking South at North End of Rod Loading Line Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking South at North End of Rod Loading Line Including Welding Area Within Rod Loading building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Rod Loading Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  11. Looking Northwest Along South End of Rod Loading Building Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northwest Along South End of Rod Loading Building Including Mezzanine and Gad Loading Area - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Rod Loading Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  12. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. View of North End of Oxide Building Interior Including Roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of North End of Oxide Building Interior Including Roof and Wall Juncture and Crane Trolley - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Oxide Building & Oxide Loading Dock, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  14. Looking West From rear (East) End of Office Building Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking West From rear (East) End of Office Building Including Recycle Storage Area, Loading Docks, and Decontamination Zone - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Office, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  15. Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber for Incinerator within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  16. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Water treatment facilities (excluding wastewater facilities). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, costs, and operation of water treatment facilities. Facilities covered include those that provide drinking water, domestic water, and water for industrial use. Types of water treatment covered include reverse osmosis, chlorination, filtration, and ozonization. Waste water treatment facilities are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Succinonitrile Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Succinonitrile (SCN) Purification Facility provides succinonitrile and succinonitrile alloys to several NRA selected investigations for flight and ground research at various levels of purity. The purification process employed includes both distillation and zone refining. Once the appropriate purification process is completed, samples are characterized to determine the liquidus and/or solidus temperature, which is then related to sample purity. The lab has various methods for measuring these temperatures with accuracies in the milliKelvin to tenths of milliKelvin range. The ultra-pure SCN produced in our facility is indistinguishable from the standard material provided by NIST to well within the stated +/- 1.5mK of the NIST triple point cells. In addition to delivering material to various investigations, our current activities include process improvement, characterization of impurities and triple point cell design and development. The purification process is being evaluated for each of the four vendors to determine the efficacy of each purification step. We are also collecting samples of the remainder from distillation and zone refining for analysis of the constituent impurities. The large triple point cells developed will contain SCN with a melting point of 58.0642 C +/- 1.5mK for use as a calibration standard for Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers (SPRTs).

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): TRI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) System. TRI is a publicly available EPA database reported annually by certain covered industry groups, as well as federal facilities. It contains information about more than 650 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment, and includes information about waste management and pollution prevention activities. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to TRI facilities once the TRI data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  20. The Booster Applications Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, David P.

    2001-02-01

    In support of the human exploration program, NASA is providing $33 million to the U.S. Department of Energy to construct a radiation simulator, known as the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The BAF justification is briefly reviewed (e.g., to reduce the radiation risk uncertainties from its present factor of 4 to 15). The BAF beam specifications are provided, as are discussions of the BAF construction schedule and anticipated operating schedules (e.g., initial operation anticipated for October 1, 2002). A breakdown of the BAF construction costs is included and the operating costs are discussed (e.g., $5 to $6 million per year). The BAF laboratory layout and the various types of DOE support for the BAF are summarized, as are the peer reviews of the project. The characteristic parameters of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron are also included. .

  1. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Developing healthcare facilities for a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Campobasso, Fred; Kucharz, Joe

    2012-05-01

    When approaching facility and real estate development, healthcare leaders should: Enhance clinical integration and ensure more patient-friendly facilities. Focus on a facility's business requirements and operating needs. Create a business plan that demonstrates how a project would help deliver better care at lower cost during a time of declining payment levels. Develop an approach that balances the needs of all stakeholders, including payers, staff, and patients.

  3. Alaska SAR Facility mass storage, current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chu, Eugene; Bicknell, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the mass storage systems that are currently in place at the Alaska SAR Facility (SAF). The architecture of the facility will be presented including specifications of the mass storage media that are currently used and the performances that we have realized from the various media. The distribution formats and media are also discussed. Because the facility is expected to service future sensors, the new requirements and possible solutions to these requirements are also discussed.

  4. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-03-24

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  5. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  6. Maine School Library Facilities Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Association of School Libraries.

    This handbook provides guidance to school library specialists and architects for planning new or renovated library facilities that will meet the changing resource and technology needs of students and the community. An overview is provided of the essential library areas, including layout, structural, and climate control needs; the internal…

  7. Biotechnology Facility (BTF) for ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Engineering mockup shows the general arrangement of the plarned Biotechnology Facility inside an EXPRESS rack aboard the International Space Station. This layout includes a gas supply module (bottom left), control computer and laptop interface (bottom right), two rotating wall vessels (top right), and support systems.

  8. Facility siting and public opposition

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, M.H.; Bacow, L.; Sanderson, D.

    1983-01-01

    This book shows developers how to avoid expensive siting disputes that arise over regionally beneficial but locally undesirable facilities, such as prisons, landfills, and oil refineries. It explains the strategy by offering compensation to communities. Guidelines are included for keeping the public informed without increasing opposition.

  9. 1983 Profiles of Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Features photographs, floor plans, and building descriptions of eight American educational facilities, three of which are at universities. Also included are plans for one of the six schools funded by the Southern Italy Earthquake Reconstruction Program, authorized by the United States Government after the 1980 earthquake. (MLF)

  10. Mississippi Test Facility research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Research capabilities of Louisiana State University are reported for sustaining a program which complements the Mississippi Test Facility. Projects reported during this period are discussed and include the development of a spectral analyzer, and investigations of plant physiology. Papers published during this period are also listed.

  11. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SPDPF) are highlighted. The capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of vital Spacelab data to various user facilities around the world are described.

  12. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  13. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  15. Studsvik Processing Facility Update

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

    2003-02-25

    Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet Download

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers

  17. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of haz

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset Download

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of haz

  20. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  1. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  2. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  3. 75 FR 18572 - Facility Control Numbers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... Facilities include refineries (RCN), approved terminals (TCN), biodiesel production facilities (BCN), or... biodiesel production physical location that a registrant in good standing operates. A renewable fuel... that produce methyl esters in the case of biodiesel and denatured alcohol in the case of ethanol...

  4. Sharing Services and Facilities: Making It Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes several examples of cooperative efforts between school districts and municipalities to share facilities and other resources: Loveland, Colorado; Vaughan, Ontario; Yankton, South Dakota; Bangor, Maine; Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; Pamlico County, North Carolina. Also includes two examples of school districts sharing facilities and resources with…

  5. State Requirements for Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This updated, two-volume document provides guidance for those involved in the educational facilities procurement process, and includes recent legislative changes affecting the state of Florida's building code. The first volume is organized by the sequence of steps required in the facilities procurement process and presents state requirements for…

  6. The Educational Facilities Laboratories (EFL): A History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Judy

    This report presents the historical background of the Ford Foundation's Educational Facilities Laboratories (EFL), including its funding sources, guiding principles, leadership, operations, philanthropic ventures, and publications. EFL began in response to the need for new educational facilities because of the baby boom in the 1950s and 1960s. How…

  7. 24 CFR 891.220 - Prohibited facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 202 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly § 891.220 Prohibited facilities. Projects may not include facilities...

  8. Standard Leak Calibration Facility software system

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    A Standard Leak Calibration Facility Software System has been developed and implemented for controlling, and running a standard Leak Calibration Facility. Primary capabilities provided by the software system include computer control of the vacuum system, automatic leak calibration, and data acquisition, manipulation, and storage.

  9. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section applies... financial assistance at a commercial service airport, including parking and ground transportation...

  10. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section applies... financial assistance at a commercial service airport, including parking and ground transportation...

  11. Aeronautical Facilities Catalogue. Volume 1: Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler); Freda, M. S. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Domestic and foreign wind tunnel facilities are enumerated and their technical parameters are described. Data pertinent to managers and engineers are presented. Facilities judged comparable in testing capability are noted and grouped together. Several comprehensive cross-indexes and charts are included.

  12. 7 CFR 1942.17 - Community facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., authority, or other political subdivision of a state. (A) Loans for water or waste disposal facilities will... disposal facilities, the terms rural and rural area will not include any area in any city or town with a... residents for water or waste disposal assistance, or 20,000 residents for essential community...

  13. Tanning facility regulations - the South Carolina experience

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, B.B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the regulation of the tanning industry in South Carolina. Statistics on facility types, registration, inspections, and violations are provided and discussed. Violations include non-equipment violations, equipment violations, and vendor violations. Complaints filed against facilities and problems in the regulatory process are also described. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Facilities Planning for Interactive Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alex

    1997-01-01

    Provides basic information relating to the different aspects of facilities planning for interactive distance education, including site selection, acoustics, lighting, environmental considerations, and electrical power. The importance of facilities planning during the developmental stages of an interactive distance education project is emphasized.…

  15. Data Base Approach to Facility Condition Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Roderick A.; Pack, Andre J.

    1984-01-01

    A process for assessing the condition of nonindustrial physical plant facilities such as campuses, school systems, and office complexes is presented. Text and figures illustrating an assessment performed for the city of Seattle, Washington, include a facility management system flowchart, information records, cost estimates, and a database design.…

  16. Sustainable Facility Development: Perceived Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinnett, Brad; Gibson, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceived benefits and challenges of implementing sustainable initiatives in collegiate recreational sports facilities. Additionally, this paper intends to contribute to the evolving field of facility sustainability in higher education. Design/methodology/approach The design included qualitative…

  17. University of Alaska 1997 Facilities Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Univ., Fairbanks. Statewide Office of Institutional Research.

    This facilities inventory report presents a comprehensive listing of physical assets owned and operated by the University of Alaska and includes, for each asset, data on average age, weighted average age, gross square footage, original total project funding, and the asset's plant investment value adjusted to the current year. Facilities are listed…

  18. PLANNING THE INDOOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASE, GERALD J.; HICK, BASIL L.

    THIS PAMPHLET IS DESIGNED TO HELP ARCHITECTS AND LOCAL SCHOOL OFFICIALS IN THE PREPARATION OF PLANS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES IN NEW AND EXISTING BUILDINGS. FACILITIES MENTIONED INCLUDE--(1) GYMNASIUM, (2) SWIMMING POOL, (3) SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY ROOM, (4) DRESSING AND SHOWERING ROOMS, (5) TEAM ROOM, (6) EQUIPMENT DRYING ROOM, (7) LAUNDRY…

  19. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  20. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  1. FEDFacts: Information about the Federal Electronic Docket Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cleanup status information related to Federal Facilities contained in EPA's Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket. Information includes maps, lists of facilities, dashboard view with graphs, links to community resources, and news items.

  2. A Report on a New School Facilities Capital Plan by the School Facilities Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This report reflects the recommendations of the School Facilities Task Force (appointed for Alberta in February 1997) regarding the development of a new school facilities capital plan. Guiding principles included the needs of students, local decision making, and long-range planning. Nine appendixes include a sample school capital funding scenario;…

  3. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  4. The Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Sampa

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity is an environment with very weak gravitational effects. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) on the International Space Station (ISS) will support the study of fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. The Fluid Combustion Facility's design will permit both independent and remote control operations from the Telescience Support Center. The crew of the International Space Station will continue to insert and remove the experiment module, store and reload removable data storage and media data tapes, and reconfigure diagnostics on either side of the optics benches. Upon completion of the Fluids Combustion Facility, about ten experiments will be conducted within a ten-year period. Several different areas of fluid physics will be studied in the Fluids Combustion Facility. These areas include complex fluids, interfacial phenomena, dynamics and instabilities, and multiphase flows and phase change. Recently, emphasis has been placed in areas that relate directly to NASA missions including life support, power, propulsion, and thermal control systems. By 2006 or 2007, a Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and a Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) will be installed inside the International Space Station. The Fluids Integrated Rack will contain all the hardware and software necessary to perform experiments in fluid physics. A wide range of experiments that meet the requirements of the international space station, including research from other specialties, will be considered. Experiments will be contained in subsystems such as the international standard payload rack, the active rack isolation system, the optics bench, environmental subsystem, electrical power control unit, the gas interface subsystem, and the command and data management subsystem. In conclusion, the Fluids and Combustion Facility will allow researchers to study fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. Additional information is

  5. Is the patient able to watch TV or read the newspaper? A functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL).

    PubMed

    Piccardi, L; Magnotti, L; Tanzilli, A; Aloisi, M; Guariglia, P

    2016-01-01

    We developed a functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL). The scale could assist clinicians in assessing rehabilitation priorities aimed at correcting any persisting errors or omissions. In addition, the scale could also be used by caregivers to observe patients' progress and improve their participation. Two groups of right brain-damaged patients (25 with hemineglect; 27 without hemineglect) were tested twice: at admission and before discharge from hospital. A control group of healthy individuals matched to patients for age and education and patients' caregivers also participated. Two raters (A; B), experts in neuropsychology, observed patients and healthy individuals using the H-ADL. We found that the H-ADL final scores correlated with the standard hemineglect tests. The three groups differed in performance and differences also emerged between the first and the second assessment, suggesting an improvement due to the remission of hemineglect as a consequence of the treatment. Raters A and B did not differ in their observations, but there were some discrepancies with caregivers' observations. Therefore, although caregivers could help clinicians in detecting persistent hemineglect behaviour, the assessment should be performed by experts in neuropsychology.

  6. Reproducibility of the six-minute walk test and Glittre ADL-test in patients hospitalized for acute and exacerbated chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    José, Anderson; Dal Corso, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and the Glittre ADL-test (GT) are used to assess functional capacity and exercise tolerance; however, the reproducibility of these tests needs further study in patients with acute lung diseases. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of the 6MWT and GT performed in patients hospitalized for acute and exacerbated chronic lung diseases. Method: 48 h after hospitalization, 81 patients (50 males, age: 52±18 years, FEV1: 58±20% of the predicted value) performed two 6MWTs and two GTs in random order on different days. Results: There was no difference between the first and second 6MWT (median 349 m [284-419] and 363 m [288-432], respectively) (ICC: 0.97; P<0.0001). A difference between the first and second tests was found in GT (median 286 s [220-378] and 244 s [197-323] respectively; P<0.001) (ICC: 0.91; P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although both the 6MWT and GT were reproducible, the best results occurred in the second test, demonstrating a learning effect. These results indicate that at least two tests are necessary to obtain reliable assessments. PMID:26039036

  7. Relationships among body mass index, activities of daily living and zinc nutritional status in disabled elderly patients in nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Kazue; Yamashita, Sachiko; Ando, Chinatsu; Endo, Yoriaki; Taniguchi, Keiko; Kikunaga, Shigeshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the zinc nutritional status and the factors associated with serum zinc concentration in the elderly patients in two nursing facilities: body mass index (BMI), the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function. The estimations of the hematological constituents, physical index, and dietary survey were made based on the examination carried out of the 26 disabled elderly patients (male 6, female 20, mean age 90±6 y). The results obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: 1) The low activities of daily living (ADL) group showed a low level of serum zinc concentration, although the uptake rate of zinc by subjects was shown to be high when compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes 2010. 2) The high ADL group showed a high level of serum zinc concentration. 3) The results of multiple regression analysis among the serum zinc concentration, the determined serum ingredients, and the physical characteristics showed the significant correlation of serum zinc concentration against the BMI, the level of care, height, Alb and iron values. 4) The BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function of the subjects changed according to the zinc nutritional status. These results suggested that the actual requirements of zinc of the subjects were different according to the BMI, the level of care, the grade of bedriddenness, and the grade of cognitive function.

  8. DKIST facility management system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Charles R.; Phelps, LeEllen

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Observatory is under construction at Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i. When complete, the DKIST will be the largest solar telescope in the world. The Facility Management System (FMS) is a subsystem of the high-level Facility Control System (FCS) and directly controls the Facility Thermal System (FTS). The FMS receives operational mode information from the FCS while making process data available to the FCS and includes hardware and software to integrate and control all aspects of the FTS including the Carousel Cooling System, the Telescope Chamber Environmental Control Systems, and the Temperature Monitoring System. In addition it will integrate the Power Energy Management System and several service systems such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), the Domestic Water Distribution System, and the Vacuum System. All of these subsystems must operate in coordination to provide the best possible observing conditions and overall building management. Further, the FMS must actively react to varying weather conditions and observational requirements. The physical impact of the facility must not interfere with neighboring installations while operating in a very environmentally and culturally sensitive area. The FMS system will be comprised of five Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs). We present a pre-build overview of the functional plan to integrate all of the FMS subsystems.

  9. Los Alamos studies of the Nevada test site facilities for the testing of nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, Michael V.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Nevada test site geographic location; location of NRDA facilities, area 25; assessment program plan; program goal, scope, and process -- the New Nuclear Rocket Program; nuclear rocket engine test facilities; EMAD Facility; summary of final assessment results; ETS-1 Facility; and facilities cost summary.

  10. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics on building construction floor area from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, the total floor area of building construction started in Japan in 2007 was 160,991 thousand square meters, or 14.8% less than the area of the previous year, and the reduction was the first reduction in the past five years. The office markets in Tokyo and Nagoya were active, as represented by the supplies of skyscrapers, and energy saving measures, such as the adoption of high efficiency lighting equipment, the control for initial stage illuminance, daylight harvesting, and the use of occupancy sensors, were well established. In the field of public construction, including museums, multi-purpose halls, and religious buildings, the total area of the new construction was 10.8% less than the total for the previous year, and this reduction was a continuation of an eleven-year trend. In spaces with high ceiling, the innovation for easy replacement of light sources used with reflection mirror systems and optical fibers was noted. Hospitals adapted to the expectation for improved services in their selection of lighting facilities to improve the residential environment for patients while taking into consideration the needs of the aging population, by their use of devices in corridors to help maintain a continuity of light. In libraries, a pendant system was developed to illuminate both ceilings and book shelves. In the field of theaters and halls, the time limit for repairing existing systems had come for the large facilities that were opened during the theater and hall construction boom of the 1960s through 1980s, and around 26 renovations were done. Almost all the renovations were conversions to intelligent dimming systems and lighting control desks. In the field of stores and commercial facilities, the atmosphere and glitter of the selling floor was produced by new light sources, such as ceramic metal halide lamps and LEDs, which have high

  11. Facility Measurement Uncertainty Analysis at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Julia; Hubbard, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides and overview of the measurement uncertainty analysis currently being implemented in various facilities at NASA GRC. This presentation includes examples pertinent to the turbine engine community (mass flow and fan efficiency calculation uncertainties.

  12. 2002 K-12 Educational Facilities Design Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architecture Boston, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents eight Boston Society of Architects award-winning educational facilities. Provides information on the architectural and project teams, contractors, and consultants, and includes a brief description and photographs. (EV)

  13. 24 CFR 1710.114 - Recreational facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... referenced to the appropriate facility listed on the chart by use of an asterisk or other appropriate symbol... asterisk or other appropriate symbol and include the cost information in a paragraph below the chart....

  14. 24 CFR 1710.114 - Recreational facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... referenced to the appropriate facility listed on the chart by use of an asterisk or other appropriate symbol... asterisk or other appropriate symbol and include the cost information in a paragraph below the chart....

  15. Orbiting quarantine facility. The Antaeus report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); Bagby, J. R. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    A mission plan for the Orbiting Quarantine Facility (OQF) is presented. Coverage includes system overview, quarantine and protocol, the laboratory, support systems, cost analysis and possible additional uses of the OQF.

  16. 44 CFR 331.5 - Production facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agencies shall give consideration to labor surplus areas in the selection of sites for Government-financed production facilities, including expansion, to the extent that such selection is consistent with existing...

  17. Research and test facilities for development of technologies and experiments with commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    One of NASA'S agency-wide goals is the commercial development of space. To further this goal NASA is implementing a policy whereby U.S. firms are encouraged to utilize NASA facilities to develop and test concepts having commercial potential. Goddard, in keeping with this policy, will make the facilities and capabilities described in this document available to private entities at a reduced cost and on a noninterference basis with internal NASA programs. Some of these facilities include: (1) the Vibration Test Facility; (2) the Battery Test Facility; (3) the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator Facility; (4) the High Voltage Testing Facility; (5) the Magnetic Field Component Test Facility; (6) the Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility; (7) the High Capacity Centrifuge Facility; (8) the Acoustic Test Facility; (9) the Electromagnetic Interference Test Facility; (10) the Space Simulation Test Facility; (11) the Static/Dynamic Balance Facility; (12) the High Speed Centrifuge Facility; (13) the Optical Thin Film Deposition Facility; (14) the Gold Plating Facility; (15) the Paint Formulation and Application Laboratory; (16) the Propulsion Research Laboratory; (17) the Wallops Range Facility; (18) the Optical Instrument Assembly and Test Facility; (19) the Massively Parallel Processor Facility; (20) the X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Auger Microscopy/Spectroscopy Laboratory; (21) the Parts Analysis Laboratory; (22) the Radiation Test Facility; (23) the Ainsworth Vacuum Balance Facility; (24) the Metallography Laboratory; (25) the Scanning Electron Microscope Laboratory; (26) the Organic Analysis Laboratory; (27) the Outgassing Test Facility; and (28) the Fatigue, Fracture Mechanics and Mechanical Testing Laboratory.

  18. Beta measurements at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L.A.; Swinth, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a two-step process to characterize the current beta measurement practices at DOE facilities. PNL issued a survey questionnaire on beta measurement practices to DOE facilities and reported the results. PNL measured beta doses and spectra at seven selected DOE facilities and compared selected measurement techniques in the facility environment. This report documents the results of the radiation field measurements and the comparison of measurement techniques at the seven facilities. Data collected included beta dose and spectral measurements at seven DOE facilities that had high beta-to-gamma ratios (using a silicon surface barrier spectrometer, a plastic scintillator spectrometer, and a multielement beta dosimeter). Other dosimeters and survey meters representative of those used at DOE facilities or under development were also used for comparison. Field spectra were obtained under two distinct conditions. Silicon- and scintillation-based spectrometer systems were used under laboratory conditions where high beta-to-gamma dose ratios made the beta spectra easier to observe and analyze. In the second case, beta spectrometers were taken into actual production and maintenance areas of DOE facilities. Analyses of beta and gamma spectra showed that /sup 234/Th- /sup 234m/Pa, /sup 231/Th, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y were the major nuclides contributing to beta doses at the facilities visited. Beta doses from other fission products and /sup 60/Co were also measured, but the potential for exposure was less significant. 21 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. The Biological Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is building a research facility, the Biological Flight Research Facility (BFRF), to meet the needs of life scientists to study the long-term effects of variable gravity on living systems. The facility will be housed on Space Station Freedom and is anticipated to operate for the lifetime of the station, approximately thirty years. It will allow plant and animal biologists to study the role of gravity, or its absence, at varying gravity intensities for varying periods of time and with various organisms. The principal difference between current Spacelab missions and those on Space Station Freedom, other than length of mission, will be the capability to perform on-orbit science procedures and the capability to simulate earth gravity. Initially the facility will house plants and rodents in habitats which can be maintained at microgravity or can be placed on a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge. However, the facility is also being designed to accommodate future habitats for small primates, avian, and aquatic specimens. The centrifuge will provide 1 g for controls and will also be able to provide gravity from 0.01 to 2.0 g for threshold gravity studies as well as hypergravity studies. Included in the facility are a service unit for providing clean chambers for the specimens and a glovebox for manipulating the plant and animal specimens and for performing experimental protocols. The BFRF will provide the means to conduct basic experiments to gain an understanding of the effects of microgravity on the structure and function of plants and animals, as well as investigate the role of gravity as a potential countermeasure for the physiological changes observed in microgravity.

  20. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 4: Engineering flight simulation facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Capelluro, L. P.; Harrison, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    The general purpose capabilities of government and industry in the area of real time engineering flight simulation are discussed. The information covers computer equipment, visual systems, crew stations, and motion systems, along with brief statements of facility capabilities. Facility construction and typical operational costs are included where available. The facilities provide for economical and safe solutions to vehicle design, performance, control, and flying qualities problems of manned and unmanned flight systems.

  1. A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident

    SciTech Connect

    Brumburgh, G.

    1994-08-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

  2. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  3. Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) Design Guide. Army Reserve Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    compressed air piping system for maintenance bay service tools , typically the air compressor is located in the mechanical room. Other maintenance building...Including Change 3, 1 February 2010 FOREWORD The Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) system is prescribed by MIL-STD 3007 and provides...Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency (AFCESA) are responsible for administration of the UFC system . Defense agencies

  4. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a User Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL, operational since March 2009, is conducting experiments in ICF ignition and other scientific areas. The NIF ignition program is conducted by the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). In addition to execution of the ignition program, the NIC is providing the necessary infrastructure for operation of NIF as a user facility open to both US and international scientists. NIF has made significant progress towards operation as a user facility. The NIF laser has demonstrated the necessary performance, including energy, power, precision, and reproducibility, to support NIC and other experiments. NIF has demonstrated full energy and power (1.8 MJ, 500 TW) operation at 0.35-μm. Over 50 diagnostics are operational, and a broad range of target fabrication capabilities is in place. Initial experiments by university users and other scientists external to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratory system have been conducted, and additional experiments developed by the broader user community are in process and planned. A governance model has been established, and a NIF User Group has been formed. This presentation will discuss implementation of NIF as a user facility, with emphasis on activities at NIF in fundamental science and other areas carried out in addition to the NIC.

  5. Developing a facility strategy.

    PubMed

    Capps, D M

    1994-05-01

    Successful planning for capital investment relies upon the ability of the management team to establish a cogent and comprehensive direction for facility development. The selection of an appropriate strategy integrates multiple issues: mission, service needs of the community, the external environment, the organization's ethos, current physical resources, operational systems, and vision. This paper will identify and discuss key components and data integral to formulating a facility strategy that outlines the basic direction for developing a facility master plan. The process itself will be presented as a working methodology that can be applied to the organization's resources and vision to generate a coherent facility strategy.

  6. 42 CFR 409.10 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., furnished by a hospital or a critical access hospital that has a swing-bed approval. (2) Nursing facility... XIX of the Act in a swing-bed hospital that has an approval to furnish nursing facility services....

  7. Near-facility environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the routine near-facility environmental monitoring programs which are presently being conducted at the Hanford Site. Several types of environmental media are sampled near nuclear facilities to monitor the effectiveness of waste management and restoration activities, and effluent treatment and control practices. These media include air, surface water and springs, surface contamination, soil and vegetation, investigative sampling (which can include wildlife), and external radiation. Sampling and analysis information and analytical results for 1994 for each of these media are summarized in this section. Additional data and more detailed information may be found in Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Annual Report, Calendar Year 1994.

  8. 7 CFR 70.15 - Equipment and facilities for graders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment and facilities for graders. 70.15 Section 70... Products General § 70.15 Equipment and facilities for graders. Equipment and facilities to be furnished by the applicant for use of graders in performing service on a resident basis shall include, but not...

  9. 7 CFR 70.15 - Equipment and facilities for graders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment and facilities for graders. 70.15 Section 70... Products General § 70.15 Equipment and facilities for graders. Equipment and facilities to be furnished by the applicant for use of graders in performing service on a resident basis shall include, but not...

  10. 7 CFR 70.15 - Equipment and facilities for graders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment and facilities for graders. 70.15 Section 70... Products General § 70.15 Equipment and facilities for graders. Equipment and facilities to be furnished by the applicant for use of graders in performing service on a resident basis shall include, but not...

  11. 49 CFR 1544.225 - Security of aircraft and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.225 Security of aircraft and facilities. Each aircraft operator must use the procedures included, and the facilities and equipment described, in its... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security of aircraft and facilities....

  12. 42 CFR 410.33 - Independent diagnostic testing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The physical facility, including mobile units, must contain space for equipment appropriate to the... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent diagnostic testing facility. 410.33... § 410.33 Independent diagnostic testing facility. (a) General rule. (1) Effective for...

  13. 40 CFR 160.45 - Test system supply facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... aquatic plants. (2) Facilities for plant growth, including, but not limited to greenhouses, growth chambers, light banks, and fields. (c) When appropriate, facilities for aquatic animal tests shall be... preserved by appropriate means. (b) When appropriate, plant supply facilities shall be provided....

  14. Urban Watershed Research Facility at Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Urban Watershed Research Facility (UWRF) is an isolated, 20-acre open space within EPA’s 200 acre Edison facility established to develop and evaluate the performance of stormwater management practices under controlled conditions. The facility includes greenhouses that allow ...

  15. Teaching Paleontology with an Acid-Leaching Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talent, John A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Described is an acid-leaching facility at Macquarie University in Australia for teaching paleontology. The facility is used for teaching both undergraduate and graduate students and for research by staff and graduate students. Drawings of the facility are included and courses are described. (Author/RH)

  16. 77 FR 48992 - Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facility Visits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facility Visits AGENCY: Food... Manufacturing Facility Visits. This program is intended to give FDA staff an opportunity to visit facilities involved in the manufacturing of tobacco products, including any related laboratory testing, and...

  17. 75 FR 77954 - Transfer of Federally Assisted Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Charlottesville Facilities Maintenance Division of Public Works. The facility and land sit within a secure Public... Charlottesville Public Works Yard, and includes no street frontage. The north side of the facility is bounded by... adjoining Public Works Yard. The railway embankment to the north of the buildings is steep, wooded, and...

  18. Charter School Facilities: A Resource Guide on Development and Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski, Lara

    This manual provides information to help charter schools navigate the facility development process, including worksheets that can be customized to suit a particular school's needs. Sections cover how facility planning fits into business planning for charter schools, review a process for assessing a school's facility needs, and summarize how to…

  19. Explosive components facility certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

  20. Apollo experience report: Real-time auxiliary computing facility development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allday, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo real time auxiliary computing function and facility were an extension of the facility used during the Gemini Program. The facility was expanded to include support of all areas of flight control, and computer programs were developed for mission and mission-simulation support. The scope of the function was expanded to include prime mission support functions in addition to engineering evaluations, and the facility became a mandatory mission support facility. The facility functioned as a full scale mission support activity until after the first manned lunar landing mission. After the Apollo 11 mission, the function and facility gradually reverted to a nonmandatory, offline, on-call operation because the real time program flexibility was increased and verified sufficiently to eliminate the need for redundant computations. The evaluation of the facility and function and recommendations for future programs are discussed in this report.

  1. Industrial Facility Combustion Energy Use

    DOE Data Explorer

    McMillan, Colin

    2016-08-01

    Facility-level industrial combustion energy use is calculated from greenhouse gas emissions data reported by large emitters (>25,000 metric tons CO2e per year) under the U.S. EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP, https://www.epa.gov/ghgreporting). The calculation applies EPA default emissions factors to reported fuel use by fuel type. Additional facility information is included with calculated combustion energy values, such as industry type (six-digit NAICS code), location (lat, long, zip code, county, and state), combustion unit type, and combustion unit name. Further identification of combustion energy use is provided by calculating energy end use (e.g., conventional boiler use, co-generation/CHP use, process heating, other facility support) by manufacturing NAICS code. Manufacturing facilities are matched by their NAICS code and reported fuel type with the proportion of combustion fuel energy for each end use category identified in the 2010 Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS, http://www.eia.gov/consumption/manufacturing/data/2010/). MECS data are adjusted to account for data that were withheld or whose end use was unspecified following the procedure described in Fox, Don B., Daniel Sutter, and Jefferson W. Tester. 2011. The Thermal Spectrum of Low-Temperature Energy Use in the United States, NY: Cornell Energy Institute.

  2. Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

  3. 42 CFR 409.10 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Nursing services and other related services. (3) Use of hospital or CAH facilities. (4) Medical social..., furnished by a hospital or a critical access hospital that has a swing-bed approval. (2) Nursing facility... XIX of the Act in a swing-bed hospital that has an approval to furnish nursing facility services....

  4. 42 CFR 409.10 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Nursing services and other related services. (3) Use of hospital or CAH facilities. (4) Medical social..., furnished by a hospital or a critical access hospital that has a swing-bed approval. (2) Nursing facility... XIX of the Act in a swing-bed hospital that has an approval to furnish nursing facility services....

  5. The Glittre-ADL test reflects functional performance measured by physical activities of daily living in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Karloh, Manuela; Araujo, Cintia L. P.; Gulart, Aline A.; Reis, Cardine M.; Steidle, Leila J. M.; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The Glittre-ADL test (TGlittre) is a valid and reliable test for the evaluation of functional capacity and involves multiple physical activities of daily living (PADL), which are known to be troublesome to patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, it is still unknown if this test is also able to reflect the functional performance of patients with COPD. Objective To investigate whether the TGlittre reflects the functional performance of COPD patients and whether the necessary time to complete the TGlittre and the PADL varies according to disease severity. Method Thirty-eight patients with COPD (age 65, SD=7 years; forced expiratory volume in the first second 41.3, SD=15.2% predicted) underwent anthropometric and lung function assessments and were submitted to the TGlittre and PADL measurement. Results TGlittre performance correlated significantly (p<0.05) with PADL variables, such as time sitting (r=0.50), walking (r=-0.46), number of steps taken (r=–0.53), walking movement intensity (r=–0.66), walking energy expenditure (r=-0.50), and total energy expenditure (r=–0.33). TGlittre performance was not significantly different in patients among the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD) spirometric stages, but walking and sitting time were significantly lower and greater, respectively, in severe and very severe patients compared to those with moderate disease (p<0.05). Conclusion The performance on the TGlittre correlates with walking and sitting time and other real life PADL measurements. The severity of the disease is associated with the differences in the level of physical activity in daily life more than in functional capacity. PMID:27437713

  6. Research at a European Planetary Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, Jonathan; Alois, Stefano; Iversen, Jens Jacob

    2016-04-01

    A unique environmental simulation facility will be presented which is capable of re-creating extreme terrestrial or other planetary environments. It is supported by EU activities including a volcanology network VERTIGO and a planetology network Europlanet 2020 RI. It is also used as a test facility by ESA for the forthcoming ExoMars 2018 mission. Specifically it is capable of recreating the key physical parameters such as temperature, pressure (gas composition), wind flow and importantly the suspension/transport of dust or sand particulates. This facility is available both to the scientific and industrial community. Details of this laboratory facility will be presented and some of the most recent activities will be summarized. For information on access to this facility please contact the author.

  7. Sandia's Z-Backlighter Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Smith, I.; Kimmel, M.; Speas, C.; Shores, J.; Armstrong, D.; Bellum, J.; Field, E.; Kletecka, D.; Porter, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories was developed to enable high energy density physics experiments in conjunction with the Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on backlighting. Since the first laser system there became operational in 2001, the facility has continually evolved to add new capability and new missions. The facility currently has several high energy laser systems including the nanosecond/multi-kilojoule Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL), the sub-picosecond/kilojoule- class Z-Petawatt (ZPW) Laser, and the smaller nanosecond/100 J-class Chaco laser. In addition to these, the backlighting mission requires a regular stream of coated consumable optics such as debris shields and vacuum windows, which led to the development of the Sandia Optics Support Facility to support the unique high damage threshold optical coating needs described.

  8. Facility requirements for hypersonic propulsion system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Lordi, J. A.; Wittliff, C. E.; Holden, M. S.

    Facility requirements and capabilities for hypersonic propulsion system testing are reviewed with emphasis on short-duration test facilities. Past and current hypersonic facility studies are reviewed, and some of the many problems currently associated with wing-body hypersonic aircraft and several currently operational ground-based facilities or facilities in the development stage are described. Limitations on the short-duration shock tunnel are examined, including problem areas where this device can make significant contributions to the type of unified computational, ground-test, and flight-experiment program that will be necessary to resolve complex issues associated with the development of either a SSTO vehicle or an air-breathing/rocket-assist-to-orbit vehicle.

  9. Relocatale Learning Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This document supplies guidelines for the future design of structures within one category of relocatable learning facilities--divisible facilities. The current use and average cost of portables; and teacher, student, and community reactions are discussed. Four types of relocatable structures are described: portable, mobile, divisible, and…

  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FACILITIES INFORMATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    PERSONNEL OF THE FACILITIES INFORMATION SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR COLLEGES COMPILED THIS LISTING OF BOOKS, ARTICLES, MONOGRAPHS, AND OTHER PRINTED MATERIALS RELEVANT TO JUNIOR COLLEGE FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION. IN ADDITION TO A "GENERAL" CATEGORY, REFERENCES ARE GROUPED UNDER HEADINGS OF AUDITORIUMS, COLLEGE…

  11. Shaping Campus Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calcara, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Explains how colleges and universities, faced with emerging trends and increased competition, can utilize their facilities as strategic resources. Examines technology changes in the classroom and the effects on user needs, the trend toward real-world learning environments, and facility design planning that responds to social interaction and…

  12. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  13. Long Range Facilities Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Richard Muther range facilities Many alterna- analysis indi- cated that if NASSCO ever expected to surpass its output of the last several years, current...Marine Engineers (SNAME) SP-1 Panel Meeting. The Maritime Administration had Richard Muther (an authority on long range facility planning) address a

  14. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF). Volume 1: Stage 1 facility definition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    1993-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) is a facility-type payload to be included in the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The GGSF is a multidisciplinary facility that will accommodate several classes of experiments, including exobiology, planetary science, atmospheric science, and astrophysics. The physical mechanisms envisioned to be investigated include crystal growth, aggregation, nucleation, coagulation, condensation, collisions, fractal growth, cycles of freezing and evaporation, scavenging, longevity of bacteria, and more. TRW performed a Phase A study that included analyses of the science and technical (S&T) requirements, the development of facility functional requirements, and a conceptual design of the facility. The work that was performed under Stage 1 of the Phase A study and the results to date are summarized. In this stage, facility definition studies were conducted in sufficient detail to establish the technical feasibility of the candidate strawman experiments. The studies identified technical difficulties, identified required facility subsystems, surveyed existing technology studies and established preliminary facility weight, volume, power consumption, data systems, interface definition, and crew time requirements. The results of this study served as the basis for Stage 2 of the Phase A study in which a conceptual design and a reference design were performed. The results also served as a basis for a related study for a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM), which is an apparatus intended to perform a subset of the GGSF experiments on board a low-Earth-orbiting platform.

  15. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF). Volume 1: Stage 1 facility definition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Nahum

    1993-03-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) is a facility-type payload to be included in the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The GGSF is a multidisciplinary facility that will accommodate several classes of experiments, including exobiology, planetary science, atmospheric science, and astrophysics. The physical mechanisms envisioned to be investigated include crystal growth, aggregation, nucleation, coagulation, condensation, collisions, fractal growth, cycles of freezing and evaporation, scavenging, longevity of bacteria, and more. TRW performed a Phase A study that included analyses of the science and technical (S&T) requirements, the development of facility functional requirements, and a conceptual design of the facility. The work that was performed under Stage 1 of the Phase A study and the results to date are summarized. In this stage, facility definition studies were conducted in sufficient detail to establish the technical feasibility of the candidate strawman experiments. The studies identified technical difficulties, identified required facility subsystems, surveyed existing technology studies and established preliminary facility weight, volume, power consumption, data systems, interface definition, and crew time requirements. The results of this study served as the basis for Stage 2 of the Phase A study in which a conceptual design and a reference design were performed. The results also served as a basis for a related study for a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM), which is an apparatus intended to perform a subset of the GGSF experiments on board a low-Earth-orbiting platform.

  16. Higher Education Facilities Comprehensive Planning Program. Facilities Inventory Manual for New York State. Revised 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Higher Education Planning.

    Guidelines are presented to assist New York institutions of higher education in classifying building data by means of a uniform system that will be compatible with a similar coding system in use throughout the United States. This facilities inventory manual includes a description of the Higher Education Facilities Comprehensive Planning Program…

  17. Guide to Regulated Facilities in ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There are multiple ways ECHO can be used to search compliance data. By default, ECHO searches focus on larger, more regulated facilities. Each search page allows users to search a more comprehensive group of facilities by electing to search for minor or smaller facilities. Information is presented that explains the types and approximate numbers of facilities that are included in searches when the default and custom options are used.

  18. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  19. The Impact of Special Focus Facility Nursing Homes on Market Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Sonon, Kristen; Antonova, Jenya

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Special Focus Facilities (SFFs) are nursing facilities designated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to be of chronic poor quality. Relatively few nursing facilities are included in this initiative. The purpose of this research was to examine whether nursing facilities included in the 2007 SFF initiative subsequently…

  20. Facility design, construction, and operation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    France has been disposing of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM) since 1969 and now at the Centre de Stockage de l`Aube (CSA) since 1992. In France, several agencies and companies are involved in the development and implementation of LLW technology. The Commissariat a l`Energie Atomic (CEA), is responsible for research and development of new technologies. The Agence National pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs is the agency responsible for the construction and operation of disposal facilities and for wastes acceptance for these facilities. Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires provides fuel services, including uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, and fuel reprocessing, and is thus one generator of LLW. Societe pour les Techniques Nouvelles is an engineering company responsible for commercializing CEA waste management technology and for engineering and design support for the facilities. Numatec, Inc. is a US company representing these French companies and agencies in the US. In Task 1.1 of Numatec`s contract with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Numatec provides details on the design, construction and operation of the LLW disposal facilities at CSM and CSA. Lessons learned from operation of CSM and incorporated into the design, construction and operating procedures at CSA are identified and discussed. The process used by the French for identification, selection, and evaluation of disposal technologies is provided. Specifically, the decisionmaking process resulting in the change in disposal facility design for the CSA versus the CSM is discussed. This report provides` all of the basic information in these areas and reflects actual experience to date.

  1. PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N

    2007-07-08

    This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully

  2. PFBC HGCU Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

  3. 17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards south. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  4. 18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Federal Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal facilities have responsibilities with hazardous waste under RCRA, including the generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). .

  6. Research at a European Planetary Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J.; Iversen, J. J.; Alois, S.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2015-10-01

    This unique environmental simulation facility is capable of re-creating extreme terrestrial, Martian and other planetary environments. It is supported by EU activities including Europlanet RI and a volcanology network VERTIGO. It is also used as a test facility by ESA for the forthcoming ExoMars 2018 mission. Specifically it is capable of recreating the key physical parameters such as temperature, pressure (gas composition), wind flow and importantly the suspension/transport of dust or sand particulates. This facility is available both to the scientific and Industrial community. The latest research and networking activities will be presented.

  7. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  8. Establishing molecular microbiology facilities in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salman S; Alp, Emine; Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Doganay, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology laboratories play an important role in epidemiology and infection control programs. Within microbiology laboratories, molecular microbiology techniques have revolutionized the identification and surveillance of infectious diseases. The combination of excellent sensitivity, specificity, low contamination levels and speed has made molecular techniques appealing methods for the diagnosis of many infectious diseases. In a well-equipped microbiology laboratory, the facility designated for molecular techniques remains indiscrete. However, in most developing countries, poor infrastructure and laboratory mismanagement have precipitated hazardous consequences. The establishment of a molecular microbiology facility within a microbiology laboratory remains fragmented. A high-quality laboratory should include both conventional microbiology methods and molecular microbiology techniques for exceptional performance. Furthermore, it should include appropriate laboratory administration, a well-designed facility, laboratory procedure standardization, a waste management system, a code of practice, equipment installation and laboratory personnel training. This manuscript lays out fundamental issues that need to be addressed when establishing a molecular microbiology facility in developing countries.

  9. Skylab materials processing facility experiment developer's report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the Skylab M512 Materials Processing Facility is traced from the design of a portable, self-contained electron beam welding system for terrestrial applications to the highly complex experiment system ultimately developed for three Skylab missions. The M512 experiment facility was designed to support six in-space experiments intended to explore the advantages of manufacturing materials in the near-zero-gravity environment of Earth orbit. Detailed descriptions of the M512 facility and related experiment hardware are provided, with discussions of hardware verification and man-machine interfaces included. An analysis of the operation of the facility and experiments during the three Skylab missions is presented, including discussions of the hardware performance, anomalies, and data returned to earth.

  10. National Facilities study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This study provides a set of recommendations for improving the effectiveness of our nation's aeronautics and space facilities. The study plan considers current and future government and commercial needs as well as DOD and NASA mission requirements through the year 2023. It addresses shortfalls in existing capabilities, new facility requirements, upgrades, consolidations, and phase-out of existing facilities. If the recommendations are implemented, they will provide world-class capability where it is vital to our country's needs and make us more efficient in meeting future needs.

  11. Analysis of the Hazardous Material Reutilization Facilities at SUBASE Bangor and NS San Diego

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    analyzes the operations at two already established facilities: 1) SUBASE Bangor, Washington, which serves as a mature facility example, and 2) Naval... mature SUBASE Bangor facility. Chapter IV presents the facility layout and operation of the infant hazardous material reutilization facility at Naval...intended to direct the operator in formulating a viable program which includes a mature , self-sustaining reutilization facility. Chapter V examines the

  12. NASA Dryden Flight Loads Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sefic, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Loads Research Facility (NASA) and the associated equipment for simulating the loading and heating of aircraft or their components are described. Particular emphasis is placed on various fail-safe devices which are built into the equipment to minimize the possibility of damage to flight vehicles. The equipment described includes the ground vibration and moment of inertia equipment, the data acquisition system, and the instrumentation available in the facility for measuring load, position, strain, temperature, and acceleration.

  13. Facility Search Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search for compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Facility Search - All Data | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. Facility Search - Drinking Water | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Detailed Facility Report | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Facility Search - Hazardous Waste | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  18. Facility Search - Air | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  19. Facility Search - Water | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  20. Naval Research Laboratory Major Facilities 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    optical fiber fusion splicers, annealing facilities for magnetic materials, and facilities for degassing adhesives for potting purposes. The...characterizing the surface emissive and reflective properties of IR paints and materials. Measurements are made on transmittance, specular reflectance...systematic studies of material treatments and paint pigment, for example. This lab has been essential for NRL’s efforts, including in-house research and

  1. Facility Search Results | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  2. Improving Healthcare Facility Locations in Bamyan, Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    including: diagnosis and treatment of malaria, diarrhea and acute respiratory infection; distribution of condoms and oral contraceptives ; and...operating cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the...cost, and accessibility of the existing and future healthcare facilities. We also look into the ethnicity problem that would affect the selection of

  3. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... denied message goes here Share Share Print Share Facility List From: Receiver(s): Add Receiver Message: Additional Comments: ... Sort Filter and Sort Sort by: Filter by: Facility name Facility address Phone number Apply Clear Cancel ...

  4. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  5. Phased Demolition of an Occupied Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, Lawrence M.; Lauterbach, Merl J.; Witt, Brandon W.; McCague, James

    2008-01-15

    The U.S. government constructed the K-1401 facility in the late 1940's as a support building for various projects supporting the uranium gaseous diffusion process. In 2004 the U.S. Department of Energy authorized Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to decontaminate and demolish the facility. The K-1401 facility was used for a variety of industrial purposes supporting the gaseous diffusion process. Many different substances were used to support these processes over the years and as a result different parts of the facility were contaminated with fluorine, chlorine trifluoride, uranium and technetium radiological contamination, asbestos, and mercury. The total facility area is 46,015 m{sup 2} (495,000 sf) including a 6,800 m{sup 2} basement (73,200 sf). In addition to the contamination areas in the facility, a large portion was leased to businesses for re-industrialization when the D and D activities began. The work scope associated with the facility included purging and steam cleaning the former fluorine and chlorine trifluoride systems, decontaminating loose radiologically contaminated and mercury spill areas, dismantling former radiological lines contaminated with uranium oxide compounds and technetium, abating all asbestos containing material, and demolishing the facility. These various situations contributed to the challenge of successfully conducting D and D tasks on the facility. In order to efficiently utilize the work force, demolition equipment, and waste hauling trucks the normal approach of decontaminating the facility of the hazardous materials, and then conducting demolition in series required a project schedule of five years, which is not cost effective. The entire project was planned with continuous demolition as the goal end state. As a result, the first activities, Phase 1, required to prepare sections for demolition, including steam cleaning fluorine and chlorine trifluoride process lines in basement and facility asbestos abatement, were conducted

  6. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  7. Future School Facility Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Dan

    1994-01-01

    Educational facility planners can work with educators to design learning environments for the future as places that will be flexible, adaptable, and readily reconfigured when appropriate. Planners and educators need to understand the effectiveness of learners, teachers, and organizations. (MLF)

  8. Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida marked the finish line for space shuttle missions since 1984. It is also staffed by a group of air traffic controllers who wor...

  9. A cryogenic test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  10. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines three renovated college facilities that offer student-friendly dining space. Renovation problems in the areas of food and entertainment, service and choice, and image versus architectural history preservation are addressed. (GR)

  11. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  12. X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray & Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) Handbook is a guide for planning operations at the facility. A summary of the capabilities, policies, and procedures is provided to enhance project coordination between the facility user and XRCF personnel. This handbook includes basic information that will enable the XRCF to effectively plan and support test activities. In addition, this handbook describes the facilities and systems available at the XRCF for supporting test operations. 1.2 General Facility Description The XRCF was built in 1989 to meet the stringent requirements associated with calibration of X-ray optics, instruments, and telescopes and was subsequently modified in 1999 & 2005 to perform the challenging cryogenic verification of Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared mirrors. These unique and premier specialty capabilities, coupled with its ability to meet multiple generic thermal vacuum test requirements for large payloads, make the XRCF the most versatile and adaptable space environmental test facility in the Agency. XRCF is also recognized as the newest, most cost effective, most highly utilized facility in the portfolio and as one of only five NASA facilities having unique capabilities. The XRCF is capable of supporting and has supported missions during all phases from technology development to flight verification. Programs/projects that have benefited from XRCF include Chandra, Solar X-ray Imager, Hinode, and James Webb Space Telescope. All test programs have been completed on-schedule and within budget and have experienced no delays due to facility readiness or failures. XRCF is currently supporting Strategic Astrophysics Technology Development for Cosmic Origins. Throughout the years, XRCF has partnered with and continues to maintain positive working relationships with organizations such as ATK, Ball Aerospace, Northrop Grumman Aerospace, Excelis (formerly Kodak/ITT), Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Alabama

  13. Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, C.C. ); Brewer, D.W. )

    1991-10-01

    The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  15. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  16. Space simulation facilities providing a stable thermal vacuum facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellalian, Martin L.

    1990-01-01

    CBI has recently constructed the Intermediate Thermal Vacuum Facility. Built as a corporate facility, the installation will first be used on the Boost Surveillance and Tracking System (BSTS) program. It will also be used to develop and test other sensor systems. The horizontal chamber has a horseshoe shaped cross section and is supported on pneumatic isolators for vibration isolation. The chamber structure was designed to meet stability and stiffness requirements. The design process included measurement of the ambient ground vibrations, analysis of various foundation test article support configurations, design and analysis of the chamber shell and modal testing of the chamber shell. A detailed 3-D finite element analysis was made in the design stage to predict the lowest three natural frequencies and mode shapes and to identify local vibrating components. The design process is described and the results are compared of the finite element analysis to the results of the field modal testing and analysis for the 3 lowest natural frequencies and mode shapes. Concepts are also presented for stiffening large steel structures along with methods to improve test article stability in large space simulation facilities.

  17. 37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PLAN OF ACCESS CORRIDOR PIPING INCLUDES WASTE HOLD TANK CELL, OFFGAS CELL, ADSORBER CELL, AND OFFGAS FILTER CELL. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106453. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-P-58. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. SECTIONS OF ACCESS CORRIDOR, INCLUDES SECTION SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF NAVY GUN BARRELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106454. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-59. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  20. Chemical facility vulnerability assessment project.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Calvin D

    2003-11-14

    Sandia National Laboratories, under the direction of the Office of Science and Technology, National Institute of Justice, conducted the chemical facility vulnerability assessment (CFVA) project. The primary objective of this project was to develop, test and validate a vulnerability assessment methodology (VAM) for determining the security of chemical facilities against terrorist or criminal attacks (VAM-CF). The project also included a report to the Department of Justice for Congress that in addition to describing the VAM-CF also addressed general observations related to security practices, threats and risks at chemical facilities and chemical transport. In the development of the VAM-CF Sandia leveraged the experience gained from the use and development of VAs in other areas and the input from the chemical industry and Federal agencies. The VAM-CF is a systematic, risk-based approach where risk is a function of the severity of consequences of an undesired event, the attack potential, and the likelihood of adversary success in causing the undesired event. For the purpose of the VAM-CF analyses Risk is a function of S, L(A), and L(AS), where S is the severity of consequence of an event, L(A) is the attack potential and L(AS) likelihood of adversary success in causing a catastrophic event. The VAM-CF consists of 13 basic steps. It involves an initial screening step, which helps to identify and prioritize facilities for further analysis. This step is similar to the prioritization approach developed by the American Chemistry Council (ACC). Other steps help to determine the components of the risk equation and ultimately the risk. The VAM-CF process involves identifying the hazardous chemicals and processes at a chemical facility. It helps chemical facilities to focus their attention on the most critical areas. The VAM-CF is not a quantitative analysis but, rather, compares relative security risks. If the risks are deemed too high, recommendations are developed for

  1. Nevada Test Site Sensor Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, B.J.; Boyer, W.B.

    1996-12-01

    A Sensor Test Facility (STF) was recently established at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). It has been used for a series of sensor tests that have demonstrated the usefulness of the testbed. The facility consists of a cut-and-cover bunker complex and the two square mile surrounding area. The STF was developed as a scientific testbed optimized for the development and evaluation of advanced sensor systems, including ground sensor systems designed to identify and detect hardened underground facilities. This was accomplished by identifying a facility in a remote location where seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference would be minimal, establishing a testbed that would be accommodating to field testing, and conducting a thorough geophysical characterization of the area surrounding the facility in order to understand the local geology and its effects on geophysical signals emanating from the facility. The STF is representative of a number of cut-and-cover bunkers around the world that are used for the manufacture and/or storage of weapons of mass destruction. This paper provides a general description of the Nevada Test Site, the Sensor Test Facility, and the Geophysical Site Characterization.

  2. Requesting use of NSF facilities for education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitín, J. G.; Baeuerle, B. G.

    2009-12-01

    Research in the geosciences often requires specialized facilities and instrumentation to carry out field work that is needed to understand complex, interdependent processes, covering all regions of the globe. The National Science Foundation (NSF), Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities (LAOF) Program consists of multi-user national facilities sponsored by NSF for the geosciences community. These facilities are made available to collect large and sometimes unique data sets in support of scientific research. The LAOF are managed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Colorado State University, University of Wyoming, and the Center for Severe Weather Research. The NSF reserves a portion of the LAOF funding for use by educators wishing to gain access to these observational facilities for classroom instruction and hands-on learning experience. This includes requesting that a facility be deployed to a university for a short period of time. A description of the available facilities and examples of previous educational deployments will be presented. Guidelines for submitting proposals will be discussed.

  3. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Laser Guide Star Facility Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S.; Calia, D. B.; Buzzoni, B.; Duhoux, P.; Fischer, G.; Guidolin, I.; Haimerl, A.; Hackenberg, W.; Hinterschuster, R.; Holzlöhner, R.; Jolley, P.; Pfrommer, T.; Popovic, D.; Alvarez, J.-L.; Beltran, J.; Girard, J.; Pallanca, L.; Riquelme, M.; Gonte, F.

    2014-03-01

    The Laser Guide Star Facility is part of VLT Unit Telescope 4 and provides a single centre-launched sodium beacon for the two adaptive optics instruments SINFONI and NACO. The original facility, installed in 2006, employed a high-power dye laser source, PARSEC, producing an output beam that was delivered via a single-mode optical fibre to launch optics located behind the telescope secondary mirror. We recently installed a new prototype laser source, PARLA, based on Raman optical fibre technology. Requirements for the new laser include start-up times compatible with flexible observing, an output beam appropriate for the existing fibre-delivery system and an on-sky power of up to 7 watts. This is the first time that this type of laser has been deployed at a major observing facility, and it has a pathfinder role for future adaptive optics systems. Reported here are the main results of the development, deployment and early operation since the resumption of science operation in February 2013.

  7. Engineering the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J; Hackel, R; Larson, D; Manes, K; Murray, J; Sawicki, R

    1998-08-19

    The engineering team of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has developed a highly optimized hardware design that satisfies stringent cost, performance and schedule requirements. After a 3-year effort, the design will culminate at the end of FY98 with the completion of major Title II design reviews. Every element of the facility from optic configuration, facility layout and hardware specifications to material selection, fabrication techniques and part tolerancing has been examined to assure the minimum cost per joule of laser energy delivered on target. In this paper, the design of the major subsystems will be discussed from the perspective of this optimization emphasis. Focus will be placed on the special equipment hardware which includes laser, beam transport, opto-mechanical , system control and target area systems. Some of the unique features in each of these areas will be discussed to highlight how significant cost savings have been achieved while maintaining reasonable and acceptable performance risk. Key to the success has also been a vigorous development program that commenced nearly 4 years ago and has been highly responsive to the specific needs of the NIF project. Supporting analyses and prototyping work that evolved from these parallel activities will also be discussed.

  8. NASA Dryden flow visualization facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the Flow Visualization Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This water tunnel facility is used primarily for visualizing and analyzing vortical flows on aircraft models and other shapes at high-incidence angles. The tunnel is used extensively as a low-cost, diagnostic tool to help engineers understand complex flows over aircraft and other full-scale vehicles. The facility consists primarily of a closed-circuit water tunnel with a 16- x 24-in. vertical test section. Velocity of the flow through the test section can be varied from 0 to 10 in/sec; however, 3 in/sec provides optimum velocity for the majority of flow visualization applications. This velocity corresponds to a unit Reynolds number of 23,000/ft and a turbulence level over the majority of the test section below 0.5 percent. Flow visualization techniques described here include the dye tracer, laser light sheet, and shadowgraph. Limited correlation to full-scale flight data is shown.

  9. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  10. Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.D.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Lunar base launch and landing facilities conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Paul G.; Simonds, Charles H.; Stump, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a first look at the requirements for launch and landing facilities for early lunar bases and to prepared conceptual designs for some of these facilities. The emphasis of the study is on the facilities needed from the first manned landing until permanent occupancy, the Phase 2 lunar base. Factors including surface characteristics, navigation system, engine blast effects, and expected surface operations are used to develop landing pad designs, and definitions fo various other elements of the launch and landing facilities. Finally, the dependence of the use of these elements and the evolution of the facilities are established.

  12. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  13. First Steps in Planning for Facilities Renovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how to plan for a new school library media center or renovate an existing facility. Highlights include the importance of a planning team; the role of the architect; brainstorming, including instructional needs, patron services, library administration, and technology infrastructure; site visits to other media centers; and needs…

  14. Design Portfolio, 1995. The Educational Facility Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Educational Facility Planner, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This document contains nationally recognized educational-facility designs, including the 1994 James D. MacConnell Award Winner--Heritage Oak Elementary School in Roseville, California. The architectural designs of other schools are also included--10 elementary schools, 6 high schools, 1 vocational school, 3 institutes of higher education, 1…

  15. Environmental practices for biomedical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Medlin, E L; Grupenhoff, J T

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment, the Facilities Committee focused its work on the development of best environmental practices at biomedical research facilities at the university and independent research facility level as well as consideration of potential involvement of for-profit companies and government agencies. The designation "facilities" includes all related buildings and grounds, "green auditing" of buildings and programs, purchasing of furnishings and sources, energy efficiency, and engineering services (lighting, heating, air conditioning), among other activities. The committee made a number of recommendations, including development of a national council for environmental stewardship in biomedical research, development of a system of green auditing of such research facilities, and creation of programs for sustainable building and use. In addition, the committee recommended extension of education and training programs for environmental stewardship, in cooperation with facilities managers, for all research administrators and researchers. These programs would focus especially on graduate fellows and other students, as well as on science labs at levels K--12. PMID:11121360

  16. The National Transonic Facility: A Research Retrospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) from a research utilization perspective is provided. The facility was born in the 1970s from an internationally recognized need for a high Reynolds number test capability based on previous experiences with preflight predictions of aerodynamic characteristics and an anticipated need in support of research and development for future aerospace vehicle systems. Selection of the cryogenic concept to meet the need, unique capabilities of the facility, and the eventual research utilization of the facility are discussed. The primary purpose of the paper is to expose the range of investigations that have used the NTF since being declared operational in late 1984; limited research results are included, though many more can be found in the references.

  17. Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne`s AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  19. Competitive Facility Location with Fuzzy Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2010-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops, with uncertainty and vagueness including demands for the facilities in a plane. By representing the demands for facilities as fuzzy random variables, the location problem can be formulated as a fuzzy random programming problem. For solving the fuzzy random programming problem, first the α-level sets for fuzzy numbers are used for transforming it to a stochastic programming problem, and secondly, by using their expectations and variances, it can be reformulated to a deterministic programming problem. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic oscillation. The efficiency of the proposed method is shown by applying it to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  20. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Ken

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility project is to provide a microgravity laboratory to facilitate research relevant to exobiology (the study of the origin and evolution of life in the universe). Such a facility will also be useful in other areas of study important to NASA including planetary science, biology, atmospheric science, astrophysics, chemistry, and physics. To achieve this goal, the project will develop and support the GGSF, a modular facility-class payload planned for inclusion on Space Station Freedom. The GGSF will consist of the following: an experiment chamber(s) supported by subsystems that provide chamber environment regulation and monitoring capabilities; sample generation, injection, positioning, and retrieval capabilities; and computer control, data acquisition, and housekeeping capabilities. The facility will also provide analytical tools such as light-scattering measurement systems, aerosol size-spectrum measurement devices, and optical imaging systems.

  1. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  2. Characterizing User Communities of Large Multi-Disciplinary Research Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale multi-user research facilities are a critical component of the federal science and engineering research enterprise. Developing infrastructure for multidisciplinary research requires large investments over long periods of time and typically involves partnerships across many institutions. Consequently, multiple policy questions surround federal investments in large research facilities including what is the best way to maximize scientific productivity? How should investments in infrastructure be balanced with support for individual or small group research? For many facilities, the answers to these questions become focused on the activities of the users: the individuals who are interacting with the facility for furthering scientific research and/or education. This independent study provides the first known analysis of facility utilization. Four facilities supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) are used as case studies to create a conceptual framework for characterizing facility utilization, to examine changes in facility use over time, and to define how lessons learned can be applied to facility management and planning. Results show that there is a broad spectrum of users who interact with each facility in different ways and that for some facilities, unanticipated users are driving new areas of research. This work also shows that cyberinfrastructure-enabled facilities are experiencing rapid increases in data use and in some cases, the next generation of facility users appears to be developing new skills for working in an increasingly data-intensive research environment. Characterizing and quantifying large facility use will likely become increasingly important as the federal government continues to focus on developing metrics and evaluation tools for its investments in science and engineering research. This work establishes a foundation for assessing facility utilization and shows that this area is ripe for future work that may include portfolio

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_EPLAN

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Emergency Response Information System (E-PLAN) provides first responders and other emergency response personnel with on-site hazardous chemical information for facilities across the us. It provides EPA's tier II reporting data along with other important information including maps of all facilities with a specified hazardous material, chemical hazards response information system (CHRIS) data, material safety data sheets (MSDS), chemical profiles, emergency response guidebook (ERG) pages, national fire protection association (NPA) codes, and facility risk management plans (RMPs). Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to E-PLAN facilities once the E-PLAN data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  4. Consolidated Incineration Facility model videotape

    SciTech Connect

    Krolewski, J F; Augsburger, S T

    1988-01-01

    A Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is in final design for construction at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF will detoxify and volume reduce combustible radioactive, hazardous and mixed waste. A study model was constructed during scope development for project authorization to assist with equipment layout and insure sufficient maintenance access. To facilitate the Department of Energy Validation process, a videotape of the model was developed. This ten minute videotape includes general information about the incineration process and a tour of the study model with a discussion of activities in each area. The videotape will be shown and the current status and schedule for the CIF presented.

  5. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  6. Wireless remote monitoring of critical facilities

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Hanchung; Anderson, John T.; Liu, Yung Y.

    2016-12-13

    A method, apparatus, and system are provided for monitoring environment parameters of critical facilities. A Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) apparatus is provided for monitoring environment parameters of critical facilities. The RAMM apparatus includes a battery power supply and a central processor. The RAMM apparatus includes a plurality of sensors monitoring the associated environment parameters and at least one communication module for transmitting one or more monitored environment parameters. The RAMM apparatus is powered by the battery power supply, controlled by the central processor operating a wireless sensor network (WSN) platform when the facility condition is disrupted. The RAMM apparatus includes a housing prepositioned at a strategic location, for example, where a dangerous build-up of contamination and radiation may preclude subsequent manned entrance and surveillance.

  7. MANUAL OF STANDARDS FOR REHABILITATION CENTERS AND FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANIFF, CHARLES E.; AND OTHERS

    A 5-YEAR PROJECT TO SPECIFY STANDARDS OF REHABILITATION CENTERS AND FACILITIES RESULTED IN THREE PUBLICATIONS. THIS MANUAL INCLUDES THE CHARACTERISTICS AND GOALS OF REHABILITATION FACILITIES. THE STANDARDS FOR ORGANIZATION, SERVICES THAT SHOULD BE PROVIDED, PERSONNEL INCLUDED, RECORDS AND REPORTS, FISCAL MANAGEMENT, AND THE PHYSICAL PLANT ARE…

  8. 33 CFR 105.215 - Security training for all other facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.215 Security training for all other facility personnel. All other facility personnel, including contractors... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security training for all...

  9. 33 CFR 105.215 - Security training for all other facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.215 Security training for all other facility personnel. All other facility personnel, including contractors... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security training for all...

  10. 33 CFR 105.215 - Security training for all other facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Facility Security Requirements § 105.215 Security training for all other facility personnel. All other facility personnel, including contractors... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security training for all...

  11. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What transit facilities and activities are eligible for... Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.152 What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding? Transit facilities and activities eligible for IRR Program funding include, but are not...

  12. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What transit facilities and activities are eligible for... Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.152 What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding? Transit facilities and activities eligible for IRR Program funding include, but are not...

  13. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What transit facilities and activities are eligible for... Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.152 What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding? Transit facilities and activities eligible for IRR Program funding include, but are not...

  14. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What transit facilities and activities are eligible for... Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.152 What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding? Transit facilities and activities eligible for IRR Program funding include, but are not...

  15. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What transit facilities and activities are eligible for... Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.152 What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding? Transit facilities and activities eligible for IRR Program funding include, but are not...

  16. Facilities Planning Conference for Community-Junior College State-Level Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Inst. of Higher Education.

    This report on planning and developing facilities for community-junior colleges includes papers presented at a conference for state-level facility planners. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) development of physical facilities responsive to educational programs and community needs; (2) efficient use of existing facilities through…

  17. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  18. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  19. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  20. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facility prospective payment system. 412.428 Section 412.428 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Psychiatric Facilities § 412.428 Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective... inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. This information includes: (a) A description...

  1. Mars ultraviolet simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Zill, L P; Mack, R; DeVincenzi, D L

    1979-12-01

    A facility was established for long-duration ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure of natural and synthetic materials in order to test hypotheses concerning Martian soil chemistry observed by the Viking Mars landers. The system utilized a 2500 watt xenon lamp as the radiation source, with the beam passing through a heat-dissipating water filter before impinging upon an exposure chamber containing the samples to be irradiated. The chamber was designed to allow for continuous tumbling of the samples, maintenance of temperatures below 0 degrees C during exposure, and monitoring of beam intensity. The facility also provided for sample preparation under a variety of atmospheric conditions, in addition to the Mars nominal. As many as 33 sealed sample ampules have been irradiated in a single exposure. Over 100 samples have been irradiated for approximately 100 to 700 h. The facility has performed well in providing continuous UV irradiation of multiple samples for long periods of time under simulated Mars atmospheric and thermal conditions.

  2. Facility capability assessment.

    PubMed

    McCandless, J

    1994-06-01

    An inspection and evaluation procedure has been developed to assess the capabilities of contract toxicology laboratories. This procedure has been used for the inspection of 18 different contract toxicology laboratories. There are 10 areas inspected: 1. Facility 2. Personnel 3. Operations 4. Animals/Animal Care 5. Standard Operating Procedures 6. Quality Assurance 7. Equipment 8. Test Article 9. Data 10. Archives. Each of these areas is divided into categories with each category divided further into specific topics. Points are assigned to each topic. The points earned by the laboratory reflect the inspector's assessment of the laboratory's quality in each area. Area scores are added and a percentage score for the facility is calculated. This approach provides a clear distinction among the laboratories evaluated. The facility inspection and rating system played an important role in screening laboratories when the author worked for the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) corporate toxicology department. It highlighted strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories.

  3. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  4. A Materials Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Avery, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Materials Exposure Facility (MEF) is to provide a test bed in space for conducting long-term (greater than one year) materials experiments which require exposure to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The proposed MEF is planned to be an integral part of the agency's Space Environments and Effects Research Program. The facility will provide experiment trays similar to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Each tray location is planned to have a power and data interface and robotic installation and removal provisions. Space environmental monitoring for each side of the MEF will also be provided. Since routine access to MEF for specimen retrieval is extremely important to the materials research, Space Station Freedom has been chosen as the preferred MEF carrier.

  5. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  6. DFL, Canada's Space AIT Facilities - Current and Planned Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R.; Mishra, S.; Choueiry, E.; Dumoulin, J.; Ahmed, S.

    2004-08-01

    The David Florida Laboratory (DFL) of the Canadian Space Agency is the Canadian national ISO 9001:2000 registered facility for the assembly, integration, and (environmental) testing of space hardware. This paper briefly describes the three main qualification facilities: Structural Qualification Facilities (SQF); Radio Frequency Qualification Facilities (RFQF); and Thermal Qualification Facilities (TQF). The paper also describes the planned/new upgrades/improvements to the DFL's existing capabilities. These include: cylindrical near-field antenna measurement system, current capabilities in multi-frequency multi-band passive intermodulation (PIM) measurement; combined thermal/vibration test facility, improvement in efficiency and performance of the photogrammetry capability, acquisition of an additional mass properties measurement system for small and micro-satellites; combined control and data acquisition system for all existing thermal vacuum facilities, plus a new automatic thermal control system and hypobaric chamber.

  7. The National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  8. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  9. Current personnel dosimetry practices at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1981-05-01

    Only three parameters were included in the personnel occupational exposure records by all facilities. These are employee name, social security number, and whole body dose. Approximate percentages of some other parameters included in the record systems are sex (50%), birthdate (90%), occupation (26%), previous employer radiation exposure (74%), etc. Statistical analysis of the data for such parameters as sex versus dose distribution, age versus dose distribution, cumulative lifetime dose, etc. was apparently seldom done. Less than 50% of the facilities reported having formal documentation for either the dosimeter, records system, or reader. Slightly greater than 50% of facilities reported having routine procedures in place. These are considered maximum percentages because some respondents considered computer codes as formal documentation. The repository receives data from DOE facilities regarding the (a) distribution of annual whole body doses, (b) significant internal depositions, and (c) individual doses upon termination. It is expected that numerous differences exist in the dose data submitted by the different facilities. Areas of significant differences would likely include the determination of non-measurable doses, the methods used to determine previous employer radiation dose, the methods of determining cumulative radiation dose, and assessment of internal doses. Undoubtedly, the accuracy of the different dosimetry systems, especially at low doses, is very important to the credibility of data summaries (e.g., man-rem) provided by the repository.

  10. Economics of electron beam accelerator facilities: Concept vs actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minbiole, Paul R.

    1995-02-01

    Electron beam accelerator facilities continue to demonstrate their ability to "add value" to a wide range of industrial products. The power, energy, and reliability of commercially available accelerators have increased steadily over the past several decades. The high throughput potential of modern electron beam facilities, together with the broad spectrum of commercial applications, result in the concept that an electron beam facility is an effective tool for adding economic value to industrial products. However, the high capital costs of such a facility (including hidden costs), together with practical limitations to high throughput (including several layers of inefficiencies), result in profit-and-loss economics which are more tenuous than expected after first analysis.

  11. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  12. Administering the Preschool Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonrod, Debbie

    Securing the right environment for a preschool program requires planning and research. Administrators or searching parties are advised to study zoning codes to become acquainted with state sanitation and safety regulations and laws, to involve teachers in cooperative planning, to design facilities which discourage vandalism, facilitate…

  13. Optimal Facility-Location.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A J

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.

  14. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  15. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  16. Aid for Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Even before the state fire marshal ordered the Somersworth (N.H.) School District in 2007 to abandon the top two floors of Hilltop Elementary School because of safety concerns, folks in the city of 12,000 had been debating whether the aging facility should be replaced--and how to pay for it. Finally, in February 2009, the city council approved…

  17. Facilities of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The bricks-and-mortar infrastructure of community colleges has not nearly kept pace with increases in student enrollments. Not only are colleges bursting at the proverbial seams, but, according to the American Graduation Initiative, many two-year institutions "face large needs due to deferred maintenance or lack the modern facilities and…

  18. Facility effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  19. Revitalization of School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Andrea Barlow

    This study analyzed current practices in the revitalization of school buildings and assimilates data that can be used by school administrators when deciding on revitalization issues. Data from nine revitalized schools since 1985 and a literature review of the elements for planning the revitalization of school facilities indicate that structural…

  20. Facilities Data System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acridge, Charles W.; Ford, Tim M.

    The purposes of this manual are to set forth the scope and procedures for the maintenance and operation of the University of California facilities Data System (FDX) and to serve as a reference document for users of the system. FDX is an information system providing planning and management data about the existing physical plant. That is, it…

  1. Science and Technology Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonen, Jean-Marie; Buono, Nicolas; Handfield, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    These four articles relate to science and technology infrastructure for secondary and tertiary institutions. The first article presents a view on approaches to teaching science in school and illustrates ideal science facilities for secondary education. The second piece reports on work underway to improve the Science Complex at the "Universite…

  2. Facilities of Environmental Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Three of nine school buildings that have won the latest Educational Facility Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education stand out from the crowd of other school buildings because they are sustainable and are connected to the nature that surrounds them. They are: (1) Thurston Elementary…

  3. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  4. Industrial Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Instruction, Lansing.

    Factors for consideration by an industrial education planning committee are discussed. Selection, purchasing, and storage of new types of equipment and supplies, in addition to students' project storage, are noted as worthy of consideration in planning the shop facility. Planning factors for the various types of industrial arts laboratories are…

  5. Financing School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyman, David S., Ed.

    Millions of students are attending classes in substandard schools, a condition that is becoming a major concern for many public school parents, teachers, students, and administrators. This report is the result of research investigating school facility issues, assessing the scope of the problem, and making recommendations to the membership of the…

  6. NRL Tropical Exposure Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-04-01

    canal. To the east, on the opposite side of Limon Bay, lies Cristobal , Coco Solo, and Colon . Travel between Fort Sherman and Cristobal is accomplished...precision equipment. I 4 NRL TROPICAL EXPOSURE FACILITIES 5 Accessibility Proximity of the station to the port of Cristobal and to the Naval Air Station

  7. Surveying School Facilities Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Harry J.; Dennell, James

    1990-01-01

    Ralston (Nebraska) Public School District's communitywide survey helped set school facilities priorities while keeping the district's finite resources firmly in mind. With an outline of maintenance costs for the next 10 years, the district can develop a strategic construction schedule. The board also has the option of financing projects through a…

  8. Facility Safeguardability Analysis In Support of Safeguards-by-Design

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Casey Durst; Roald Wigeland; Robert Bari; Trond Bjornard; John Hockert; Michael Zentner

    2010-07-01

    The following report proposes the use of Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) to: i) compare and evaluate nuclear safeguards measures, ii) optimize the prospective facility safeguards approach, iii) objectively and analytically evaluate nuclear facility safeguardability, and iv) evaluate and optimize barriers within the facility and process design to minimize the risk of diversion and theft of nuclear material. As proposed by the authors, Facility Safeguardability Analysis would be used by the Facility Designer and/or Project Design Team during the design and construction of the nuclear facility to evaluate and optimize the facility safeguards approach and design of the safeguards system. Through a process of “Safeguards-by-Design” (SBD), this would be done at the earliest stages of project conceptual design and would involve domestic and international nuclear regulators and authorities, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The benefits of the Safeguards-by-Design approach is that it would clarify at a very early stage the international and domestic safeguards requirements for the Construction Project Team, and the best design and operating practices for meeting these requirements. It would also minimize the risk to the construction project, in terms of cost overruns or delays, which might otherwise occur if the nuclear safeguards measures are not incorporated into the facility design at an early stage. Incorporating nuclear safeguards measures is straight forward for nuclear facilities of existing design, but becomes more challenging with new designs and more complex nuclear facilities. For this reason, the facility designer and Project Design Team require an analytical tool for comparing safeguards measures, options, and approaches, and for evaluating the “safeguardability” of the facility. The report explains how preliminary diversion path analysis and the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PRPP) evaluation

  9. Ballistocraft: a novel facility for microgravity research.

    PubMed

    Mesland, D; Paris, D; Huijser, R; Lammertse, P; Postema, R

    1995-05-01

    One of ESA's aims is to provide the microgravity research community with various microgravity exposure facilities. Those facilities include drop towers, sounding rockets, and parabolic flights on board aircraft, in addition to orbital spacecraft. Microgravity flights are usually achieved using large aircraft like the French 'Caravelle' that offer a large payload volume and where a person can be present to perform the experiments and to participate as a human test-subject. However, the microgravity community is also very interested in a flexible, complementary facility that would allow frequent and repetitive exposure to microgravity for a laboratory-type of payload. ESA has therefore undertaken a study of the potential of using a 'ballistocraft', a small unmanned aircraft, to provide a low-cost facility for short-duration (30-40 seconds) microgravity experimentation. Fokker Space & Systems performed the study under an ESA contract, supported by Dutch national funding. To assess the ballistocraft, a simple breadboard of the facility was built and flight tests were performed. The ability of the on-board controller to achieve automated parabolic flights was demonstrated, and the performance of the controller in one-g level flights, and in flights with both zero-g and partial-g setpoints, was evaluated. The partial-g flights are a unique and valuable feature of the facility.

  10. Hybrid power technology for remote military facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.N.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) operates hundreds of test, evaluation, and training facilities across the US and abroad. Due to the nature of their missions, these facilities are often remote and isolated from the utility grid. The preferred choice for power at these facilities has historically been manned diesel generators. The DoD Photovoltaic Review Committee, estimates that on the order of 350 million gallons of diesel fuel is burned each year to generate the 2000 GWh of electricity required to operate these remote military facilities. Other federal agencies, including the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service use diesel generators for remote power needs as well. The generation of power diesel generators is both expensive and detrimental to the environment. The augmentation of power from diesel generators with power processing and battery energy storage enhances the efficiency and utilization of the generator resulting in lower fuel consumption and lower generator run- time in proportion to the amount of renewables added. The hybrid technology can both reduce the cost of power and reduce environmental degradation at remote DoD facilities. This paper describes the expected performance and economics of photovoltaic/diesel hybrid systems. Capabilities and status of systems now being installed at DoD facilities are presented along with financing mechanisms available within DoD.

  11. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  12. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, P.; Wisoff, Jeff

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  13. Report of the committee on a commercially developed space facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Joseph F.; Stever, H. Guyford; Cutter, W. Bowman, III; Demisch, Wolfgang H.; Fink, Daniel J.; Flax, Alexander H.; Gatos, Harry C.; Glicksman, Martin E.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Logsdon, John M., III

    1989-01-01

    Major facilities that could support significant microgravity research and applications activity are discussed. The ground-based facilities include drop towers, aircraft flying parabolic trajectories, and sounding rockets. Facilities that are intrinsically tied to the Space Shuttle range from Get-Away-Special canisters to Spacelab long modules. There are also orbital facilities which include recoverable capsules launched on expendable launch vehicles, free-flying spacecraft, and space stations. Some of these existing, planned, and proposed facilities are non-U.S. in origin, but potentially available to U.S. investigators. In addition, some are governmentally developed and operated whereas others are planned to be privately developed and/or operated. Tables are provided to show the facility, developer, duration, estimated gravity level, crew interaction, flight frequency, year available, power to payload, payload volume, and maximum payload mass. The potential of direct and indirect benefits of manufacturing in space are presented.

  14. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Facilities at NIST.

    PubMed

    Nico, J S; Arif, M; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Gilliam, D M; Huffman, P R; Jacobson, D L; Thompson, A K

    2005-01-01

    The program in fundamental neutron physics at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) began nearly two decades ago. The Neutron Interactions and Dosimetry Group currently maintains four neutron beam lines dedicated to studies of fundamental neutron interactions. The neutrons are provided by the NIST Center for Neutron Research, a national user facility for studies that include condensed matter physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry, and biological science. The beam lines for fundamental physics experiments include a high-intensity polychromatic beam, a 0.496 nm monochromatic beam, a 0.89 nm monochromatic beam, and a neutron interferometer and optics facility. This paper discusses some of the parameters of the beam lines along with brief presentations of some of the experiments performed at the facilities.

  15. The status of LILW disposal facility construction in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Seok; Chung, Myung-Sub; Park, Kyu-Wan

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experiences during the construction of the first LILW disposal facility in South Korea. In December 2005, the South Korean Government designated Gyeongju-city as a host city of Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste(LILW) disposal site through local referendums held in regions whose local governments had applied to host disposal facility in accordance with the site selection procedures. The LILW disposal facility is being constructed in Bongilri, Yangbuk-myeon, Gyeongju. The official name of the disposal facility is called 'Wolsong Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center (LILW Disposal Center)'. It can dispose of 800,000 drums of radioactive wastes in a site of 2,100,000 square meters. At the first stage, LILW repository of underground silo type with disposal capacity of 100,000 drums is under construction expected to be completed by June of 2014. The Wolsong Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center consists of surface facilities and underground facilities. The surface facilities include a reception and inspection facility, an interim storage facility, a radioactive waste treatment building, and supporting facilities such as main control center, equipment and maintenance shop. The underground facilities consist of a construction tunnel for transport of construction equipment and materials, an operation tunnel for transport of radioactive waste, an entrance shaft for workers, and six silos for final disposal of radioactive waste. As of Dec. 2012, the overall project progress rate is 93.8%. (authors)

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_TRI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) System. TRI is a publicly available EPA database reported annually by certain covered industry groups, as well as federal facilities. It contains information about more than 650 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment, and includes information about waste management and pollution prevention activities. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to TRI facilities once the TRI data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  17. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_WWTP_NPDES

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of Waste Water Treatment Plant facilities that link to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). ICIS tracks NPDES surface water permits issued under the Clean Water Act. Under NPDES, all facilities that discharge pollutants from any point source into waters of the United States are required to obtain a permit. The permit will likely contain limits on what can be discharged, impose monitoring and reporting requirements, and include other provisions to ensure that the discharge does not adversely affect water quality. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to NPDES facilities once the ICIS-NPDES data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  18. Mineral facilities of Asia and the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,500 records of mineral facilities throughout the continent of Asia and the countries of the Pacific Ocean. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the 2008 U.S. Geological Survey Minerals Yearbook (Asia and the Pacific volume), (2) minerals statistics and information from the U.S. Geological Survey Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/), and (3) data collected by U.S. Geological Survey minerals information country specialists. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  19. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  20. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): PCS_NPDES_MAJOR

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that are Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) dischargers of pollutants into waters of the United States. These facilities are tracked in the Permit Compliance System (PCS), which is being incrementally replaced by the NPDES module of the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). For Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), Major dischargers include all facilities with design flows equal to or greater than one million gallons per day, or serve a population of 10,000 or more, or cause significant water quality impacts. Non-POTW discharges are classified as Major facilities on the basis of the number of points accumulated using a Rating worksheet, which evaluates the significance of a facility using several criteria, including toxic pollutant potential, flow volume, and water quality factors such as impairment of the receiving water or proximity of the discharge to coastal waters. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of co

  2. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING FACILITY NO. 525 AND HOSPITAL (FACILITY No. 515) BEYOND. See CA-2398-CP-8 for detail of the stairway in the distance - Hamilton Field, Amphitheater, North Oakland Drive near East Hospital Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  3. View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Facility 222 (on right) and Facility 221 through trees (parapet of latter above trees) from the parade ground. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gymnasium & Theater, Neville Way, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; Wert, Jerry; Foster, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  5. CP-50 calibration facility radiological safety assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, M.W.; Hill, R.L.; Eubank, B.F.

    1980-03-01

    The CP-50 Calibration Facility Radiological Safety Assessment document, prepared at the request of the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy to satisfy provisions of ERDA Manual Chapter 0531, presents design features, systems controls, and procedures used in the operation of the calibration facility. Site and facility characteristics and routine and non-routine operations, including hypothetical incidents or accidents are discussed and design factors, source control systems, and radiation monitoring considerations are described.

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility radioactive operations -- Part 2, Glass making

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.; Rueter, K.J.; Ray, J.W.; Hodoh, O.

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly 3 year non-radioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March, 1996. The results of the first 8 months of radioactive operations are presented. Topics include facility production from waste preparation batching to canister filling.

  7. Design issues for a laboratory high gain fusion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.

    1987-11-02

    In an inertial fusion laboratory high gain facility, experiments will be carried out with up to 1000 MJ of thermonuclear yield. The experiment area of such a facility will include many systems and structures that will have to operate successfully in the difficult environment created by the sudden large energy release. This paper estimates many of the nuclear effects that will occur, discusses the implied design issues and suggests possible solutions so that a useful experimental facility can be built. 4 figs.

  8. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high

  9. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-05-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam

  10. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Biotechnology System Facility: Risk Mitigation on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R., III; Galloway, Steve R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is working with its international partners to develop space vehicles and facilities that will give researchers the opportunity to conduct scientific investigations in space. As part of this activity, NASA's Biotechnology Cell Science Program (BCSP) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a world-class biotechnology laboratory facility for the International Space Station (ISS). This report describes the BCSP, including the role of the BTS. We identify the purpose and objectives of the BTS and a detailed description of BTS facility design and operational concept, BTS facility and experiment-specific hardware, and scientific investigations conducted in the facility. We identify the objectives, methods, and results of risk mitigation investigations of the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on the BTS data acquisition and control system. These results may apply to many other space experiments that use commercial, terrestrial-based data acquisition technology. Another focal point is a description of the end-to-end process of integrating and operating biotechnology experiments on a variety of space vehicles. The identification of lessons learned that can be applied to future biotechnology experiments is an overall theme of the report. We include a brief summary of the science results, but this is not the focus of the report. The report provides some discussion on the successful 130-day tissue engineering experiment performed in BTS on Mir and describes a seminal gene array investigation that identified a set of unique genes that are activated in space.

  13. Orion: a commissioned user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadwell, P. A.; Allan, P.; Cann, N.; Danson, C.; Duffield, S.; Elsmere, S.; Edwards, R.; Egan, D.; Girling, M.; Gumbrell, E.; Harvey, E.; Hill, M.; Hillier, D.; Hoarty, D.; Hobbs, L.; Hopps, N.; Hussey, D.; Oades, K.; James, S.; Norman, M.; Palmer, J.; Parker, S.; Winter, D.; Bett, T.

    2013-05-01

    The Orion Laser Facility at AWE in the UK consists of ten nanosecond beamlines and two sub-picosecond beamlines. The nanosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 351 nm in a 1 ns square temporal profile, but can also deliver a user-definable temporal profile with durations between 0.1 ns and 5 ns. The sub-picosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 1053 nm in a 500 fs pulse, with a peak irradiance of greater than 1021 W/cm2. One of the sub-picosecond beamlines can also be frequency-converted to deliver 100 J at 527 nm in a 500 fs pulse, although this is at half the aperture of the 1053 nm beam. Commissioning of all twelve beamlines has been completed, including the 527 nm sub-picosecond option. An overview of the design of the Orion beamlines will be presented, along with a summary of the commissioning and subsequent performance data. The design of Orion was underwritten by running various computer simulations of the beamlines. Work is now underway to validate these simulations against real system data, with the aim of creating predictive models of beamline performance. These predictive models will enable the user's experimental requirements to be critically assessed ahead of time, and will ultimately be used to determine key system settings and parameters. The facility is now conducting high energy density physics experiments. A capability experiment has already been conducted that demonstrates that Orion can generate plasmas at several million Kelvin and several times solid density. From March 2013 15% of the facility operating time will be given over to external academic users in addition to collaborative experiments with AWE scientists.

  14. 30 CFR 285.702 - What must I include in my Fabrication and Installation Report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Installation Report? 285.702 Section 285.702 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Facility Design, Fabrication, and Installation Reports § 285.702 What must I include in my Fabrication and... fabricated and installed in accordance with the design criteria identified in the Facility Design...

  15. 30 CFR 250.241 - What must the DPP or DOCD include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the DPP or DOCD include? 250.241 Section 250.241 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... facilities, umbilicals, and other facilities you will use to conduct your proposed development and...

  16. Description of the warm core turbine facility and the warm annular cascade facility recently installed at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, W. J.; Stabe, R. G.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The two new facilities have been installed and operated at their design or rated conditions. The important feature of both of these facilities is that the ratio of turbine inlet temperature to coolant temperature encountered in high temperature engines can be duplicated at moderate turbine inlet temperature. Included in the discussion are the limits of the facilities with regard to maximum temperature, maximum pressure, maximum mass flow rate, turbine size, and dynamometer torque-speed characteristics.

  17. Facilities evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

  18. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SDPF) processes, monitors, and accounts for the payload data from Spacelab and other Shuttle missions and forwards relevant data to various user facilities worldwide. The SLDPF is divided into the Spacelab Input Processing System (SIPS) and the Spacelab Output Processing System (SOPS). The SIPS division demultiplexes, synchronizes, time tags, quality checks, accounts for the data, and formats the data onto tapes. The SOPS division further edits, blocks, formats, and records the data on tape for shipment to users. User experiments must conform to the Spacelab's onboard High Rate Multiplexer (HRM) format for maximum process ability. Audio, analog, instrumentation, high density, experiment data, input/output data, quality control and accounting, and experimental channel tapes along with a variety of spacelab ancillary tapes are provided to the user by SLDPF.

  19. Enrollment Forecasting. Educational Facilities Digest 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip; Wright, Darrell

    Enrollment forecasting is a subject for scholars of varied interests and concerns. The literature reflects several perspectives, including those of school administrators, facilities planners, mathematicians, statisticians, demographers, and computer programmers. This pamphlet contains an analysis and annotated bibliographies of 29 publications on…

  20. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  1. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, M.; Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Liu, F. -C.

    2001-01-01

    We will describe the LTMPF, its objectives, its science requirements, and provide a brief description of the science investigations. The current status of the project and the facility design including results on the performance of flight-like subsystems will also be presented.

  2. Podiatric Medical Education: The Physical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Abe

    1979-01-01

    A gross inventory of the teaching and clinical learning resources of the five U.S. colleges of podiatric medicine is described. A descriptive breakdown is provided along with illustrations of facilities. Some categories included in space allocation data are instructional staff, administrative staff, laboratory, outpatient clinic, learning…

  3. Alternatives for Financing Higher Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Larry L.; Felix, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    How state governments should finance public college and university facilities is discussed. A framework for analyzing the capital financing alternatives available to state governments is described. Several alternatives in Arizona--including state appropriations, leasing, and revenue bonding--are considered as an illustration. (Author/MLW)

  4. Standards for Community College Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report contains proposed standards for community college library facilities developed by the California Postsecondary Education Commission. Formulae for calculating stack space, staff space, reader station space, and total space are included in the report. Three alternative models for revising the present library standards were considered:…

  5. Planning the Successful Performing Arts Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brase, Wendell

    1990-01-01

    Causes of project failure and common programing and design problems are discussed, including vague expectations, lack of architectural program detail, unwillingness to understand compromises, misunderstanding economics of audience size, site impact on budget, making a smaller facility less versatile, lobby expenses, late value engineering,…

  6. 24 CFR 891.315 - Prohibited facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... advances under the Section 811 Program, as well as loans financed under subpart E of this part. Project facilities may not include infirmaries, nursing stations, spaces dedicated to the delivery of medical... for from sources other than the HUD capital advance or loan. Except for office space used by the...

  7. 24 CFR 891.315 - Prohibited facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... advances under the Section 811 Program, as well as loans financed under subpart E of this part. Project facilities may not include infirmaries, nursing stations, spaces dedicated to the delivery of medical... for from sources other than the HUD capital advance or loan. Except for office space used by the...

  8. Design Standards for School Art Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Art Education Association, Reston, VA.

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) began work on this general planning reference for school art facilities in 1989, basing its initial draft on a survey of over 90 different groups, including school districts and state education agencies. The final publication represents the views of a broad-based constituency. Photographs of existing…

  9. The Six Principles of Facilities Stewardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.; Klein, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Facilities stewardship means high-level and pervasive commitment to optimize capital investments, in order to achieve a high-functioning and attractive campus. It includes a major commitment to capital asset preservation and quality. Stewardship is about the long view of an institution's past and future. It ultimately forms the backdrop for…

  10. Fundraising Basics for Private School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Arthur H.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the process behind setting up and implementing a "capital campaign": a program for raising money for new or renovated facilities at private K-12 schools. The report covers tax information regarding gifts to institutions then offers advice for setting up a comprehensive development program, including fundraising software and…

  11. Ten Commandments for Microcomputer Facility Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinosa, Leonard J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents factors involved in designing a microcomputer facility, including how computers will be used in the instructional program; educational specifications; planning committees; user input; quality of purchases; visual supervision considerations; location; workstation design; turnkey systems; electrical requirements; local area networks;…

  12. Mineral facilities of Northern and Central Eurasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays almost 900 records of mineral facilities within the countries that formerly constituted the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2

  13. Perspectives on Leadership in Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Charles W. Ed.

    This collection of papers examines issues concerning leadership in facilities management in higher education. Chapters include: (1) "Catch the Spirit of Leadership" (Jack Hug); (2) "Visionary Leadership: Creating a New Tomorrow" (Burt Nanus); (3) "Some Thoughts on Leadership" (Charles W. Jenkins); (4) "Educational Leadership: The Role of…

  14. LIBRARY FACILITIES FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    MODERN METHODS OF TEACHING REQUIRE INCREASED RESEARCH, INDEPENDENT STUDY, READING, LISTENING, AND VIEWING. NEW DESIGNS FOR LIBRARY FACILITIES ARE NECESSARY. SOME OF THE INNOVATIONS IN LIBRARY SERVICE AND DESIGN INCLUDE--THE USE OF CARRELS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDY, PROVISION OF A LIBRARY CLASSROOM FOR USE IN TEACHING LIBRARY RESEARCH TECHNIQUES, A…

  15. 24 CFR 891.315 - Prohibited facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities may not include infirmaries, nursing stations, spaces dedicated to the delivery of medical treatment or physical therapy, padded rooms, or space for respite care or sheltered workshops, even if paid for from sources other than the HUD capital advance or loan. Except for office space used by the...

  16. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... program includes: (i) Standard operating procedures to provide a food safety foundation; (ii) Menu items... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. (a) Health standards. The school food authority shall ensure that food storage, preparation and service is in accordance with the sanitation and health...

  17. UNISOR Nuclear Orientation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Girit, I.C.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of an on-line isotope separator and a dilution refrigerator has increased the applicability of the nuclear orientation technique to a wide range of nuclei, especially those very far from stability. The UNISOR Nuclear Orientation Facility (UNISOR/NOF) is among the two (the other being NICOLE at CERN) that have recently become operational. The following is an overall view of the UNISOR system and recent results. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. TACS Central Control Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-12

    Central Control Facility 6 3. System Management Data Flow 7 B. Hardware Operating Environment 9 1. Computer 9 2. TACS Interfaces 9 3. Other Central...TERMINATION TIMING 131 Appendix C SYSTEM MANAGEMENT DATA FORMATS 135 Appendix D FIVE- AND NINE-SLOT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION DIFFERENCES 147 Appendix E...control burst management ) 26 2-7 Call Progress Messages 29 2-8 Flowchart of Assignment/Blockage Decision Process for All-Member Net Requests 30 2-9

  20. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  1. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  2. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-02-06

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5-ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  3. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  4. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-30

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 deg. C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  5. The Francium facility at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Chen, G.; Collister, R.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gomez, E.; Gwinner, G.; Jackson, K. P.; Melconian, D.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Ruiz, M. C.; Sheng, D.; Shin, Y. H.; Sprouse, G. D.; Tandecki, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We present the current status of the Francium Trapping Facility at ISAC at TRIUMF. The facility will enable future experiments on the weak interaction with measurements of atomic parity non-conservation laser-cooled samples of artificially produced francium. These experiments require a precisely controlled environment, which the facility is designed to provide. The facility has been constructed and is being prepared for a series of commissioning runs.

  6. Free floodplains of hazwaste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.P. )

    1994-03-01

    Only when the waters from last year's flooding along the Mississippi River fully recede will the extent of the damage be known. However, property losses are only the most obvious effects; floods also pose less visible threats by spreading contaminated water and sediment over wide areas. Factories, oil-tank farms, bulk-chemical storage facilities and sewage treatment plants historically have been located along water-ways and within floodplains. Such facilities are built to withstand some flooding; however, a major flood can destroy barriers, rupture storage tanks, and wash out material from hazardous and solid waste landfills, and surface impoundments. Water infiltration can lead to increased leachate production, contaminating groundwater and adjacent surface water. The long-term effects from hazardous materials and waste entering floodwaters during the 1993 flood are significant and difficult to mitigate. Regulations and policies should be evaluated, and practical changes instituted to reduce long-term effects from contaminated floodwaters. Such changes include prohibiting hazardous waste management units in floodplains.

  7. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  8. School Nutrition Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy VanEgmond

    This publication is designed to help superintendents, local facilities coordinators, and food-service directors in planning the remodeling of an outdated food-service facility or the building of a new one. The introduction describes the roles of the local facility coordinator, the local child-nutrition director, the architect, the food-service…

  9. Physical Recreation Facilities. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    New goals in physical education are leading instructors to seek new kinds of athletic facilities. School administrators are in the process of rethinking the classical facilities, i.e., the box-shaped gymnasium -- facilities designed without sensitivity to the students' desire to participate in the games they can continue to play after graduation.…

  10. DTRA National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-16

    DTRA National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) ___________________________________ JSR-08- 800 September 29...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DTRA National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...only). 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT JASON was asked to address the utility of the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) to the Defense Threat

  11. Workforce Development Education Facilities Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This publication, a supplement to the "North Carolina Public Schools Facilities Guidelines," describes work force development education programs and facilities. It is intended as a resource that can assist design professionals in planning facilities that meet the evolving needs of public schools in the state. The first part of the guide…

  12. Industrial Arts Facility Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.; And Others

    This guidebook presents facility guidelines to aid the school planner in determining appropriate facilities for a model curriculum. The first of four major sections, The Intent of Industrial Arts, discusses the mission and goals, instructional objectives, function of industrial arts, and the model curriculum. Section 2 focuses on facilities for…

  13. Education Funding for Residential Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    About 167 residential facilities in Ohio serve approximately 7,000 youth on any given day. Youth are placed in residential facilities because they have committed a crime or have behavioral problems. An "education provider" operates an on-grounds school in most facilities. Because of ongoing concerns about education funding for youth in…

  14. Triservice/NASA cathode life test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windes, D.; Dutkowski, J.; Kaiser, R.; Justice, R.

    1999-05-01

    Since December 1992, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane Division (NSWCCD) has logged over 1,318,000 h of cathode life testing on 6 different cathode systems in the Triservice/NASA Cathode Life Test Facility. These include two types of reservoir cathodes designated as MK (Siemens), and RV (CPI, formerly Varian), and impregnated matrix cathodes designated M type (manufactured by Semicon and Hughes), TM (Transition Metal cathodes-CPI) and MMM (Mixed Metal Matrix cathodes-CPI). This paper will present results of the cathode life testing at this facility.

  15. Pyroshock testing-shock simulation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Vesta I.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of shock simulation facilities are available to simulate pyroshock events. These facilities range from bounded impact shock machines and electrodynamic shakers to resonant fixture techniques. This presentation will focus on the use of general purpose and tuned resonant fixture techniques including a unique tunable beam apparatus developed at SNL. Examples of application of the resonant fixture technique for both component and full-scale structure pyroshock simulations will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed along with the usable frequency content and bandwidth.

  16. Automated Facility For Cleaning Large Flex Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Louis E.

    1995-01-01

    Technicians no longer exposed to hazardous cleaning materials. Proposed computer-controlled facility cleans bellow-type expansion joints and large flex hoses. Major portions of automated cleaning facility contained in clean room. One piece of equipment in clean room tower in which hose or expansion joint to be cleaned hoisted by hydraulic machinery and hung vertically. Once hose or expansion joint hung in required position, technician initiates programmed cleaning procedure from console on computer monitoring system. Procedure includes degreasing, cleaning with detergents, rinsing, pickling, and passivating operations. After cleaning completed, technician removes hose or expansion joint from tower and wraps open ends to prevent recontamination of interior.

  17. The F-18 systems research aircraft facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitz, Joel R.

    1992-01-01

    To help ensure that new aerospace initiatives rapidly transition to competitive U.S. technologies, NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility has dedicated a systems research aircraft facility. The primary goal is to accelerate the transition of new aerospace technologies to commercial, military, and space vehicles. Key technologies include more-electric aircraft concepts, fly-by-light systems, flush airdata systems, and advanced computer architectures. Future aircraft that will benefit are the high-speed civil transport and the National AeroSpace Plane. This paper describes the systems research aircraft flight research vehicle and outlines near-term programs.

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  19. Management of pesticide mixing and loading facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dwinell, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Many pesticide applicators have decided that a Chemical Mixing Facility (CMF) is the best way to manage problems of soil and water contamination at pesticide mixing and loading sites. These facilities must be managed properly to avoid the accumulation of potentially hazardous wastes, the creation of a point source of pollution, and possible fines for violation of environmental protection laws. Proper management must include pesticide containers, equipment rinsewater, sludge and sediments that accumulate on the pad, and materials used to contain and collect spills.

  20. Simulation analysis of an outpatient services facility.

    PubMed

    Levy, J L; Watford, B A; Owen, V T

    1989-11-01

    Anderson Memorial Hospital in Anderson, South Carolina is in the process of constructing a new Outpatient Services Center. The Outpatient Services Center will combine existing outpatient services within the hospital and offsite services at the Outpatient Diagnostic Center. A simulation model of the proposed facility has been developed based on historical data. The information obtained from the simulation model includes the analysis of outpatient services utilization, patient waiting and flow times, and service area queue sizes. This information has been used to determine minimum facility design requirements, such as waiting room size, based on the expected demands.