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Sample records for administered dose excreted

  1. Urinary excretion of orally administered oxalic acid in saccharin and o-phenylphenol-fed NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1986-01-01

    Both saccharin and o-phenylphenol have been suggested to be carcinogenic to the urinary bladder in experimental animals, but the mechanism has remained unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary saccharin and o-phenylphenol on the urinary excretion of dietary oxalic acid. Male NMRI mice were gradually adapted to either 3% o-phenylphenol or 5% saccharin in their diet. Having being adapted to these diets for 1 week or after consuming them for 3 months, the animals were fasted for 6 h and given a 2.5-microCi oral dose of U-14C-oxalic acid. Dosed animals were kept in metabolism cages for 48 h to monitor urinary and fecal excretion of the label. Adaptation to dietary o-phenylphenol appeared to increase the urinary excretion of orally administered U-14C-oxalic acid when food and water were available during urinary and fecal collections. Adaptation to dietary saccharin had little effect on urinary oxalate levels when compared to control animals. These results indicate that changes in urinary oxalate levels should be more carefully studied in connection with potential urinary bladder carcinogens to avoid the possibility of bladder irritation by increased urinary oxalate excretion.

  2. Metabolism and excretion of orally administered arsenobetaine in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, H.; Kaise, T.; Yamamura, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Arsenobetaine, one of the trimethylarsenic compounds (TMA), occurs abundantly in seafoods. The urinary excretion pattern of arsenic in man following oral ingestion of TMA contained in fishes once only indicates that the most portion of the TMA is excreted in urine. These experiments in humans have used fish arsenic but no authentic arsenobetaine. From previous experiments in mice, rats and rabbits using/sup 73/As-labeled arsenobetaine, it was reported that arsenobetaine is not converted in vivo into any other chemical species of arsenic. The metabolic and excretory patterns of arsenic compounds in the hamster seem to be similar to those in humans. In the present study, the authors examined arsenobetaine-treated hamsters for what chemical species of arsenic this arsenic compound (arsenobetaine) would be metabolized into in vivo and also for its excretory patterns in urine and feces with time.

  3. Tissular localization and excretion of intravenously administered silica nanoparticles of different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guangping; Sun, Jiao; Zhong, Gaoren

    2012-01-01

    The nanotoxicology as a new subdiscipline of nanotechnology needs to be studied in vivo. To do so, it is essential to understand certain pharmacological information of the nanoparticles in vivo. Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been developed for a number of biomedical uses; however, research on their tissular localization and excretion has been limited. In this study, we analyzed the localization of intravenously administered SiNPs with sizes of 20 and 80 nm in liver and spleen and quantitatively investigated the excretion of SiNPs through urine and feces. The results of the tissular localization study showed that the SiNPs were located in liver evenly; however, they were mainly accumulated in the white pulp of spleen. The quantitative excretory assay found the renal excretion being the main excretion pathway of SiNPs and indicated that the accumulated excretory rate of 80 nm SiNPs through urine was higher than that of 20 nm SiNPs because of the higher hemoconcentration. Further analysis of radioactive substances in the excreta showed the convincing confirmatory evidence that the SiNPs of both the sizes of 20 and 80 nm could be excreted through urine. These results provide important information on in vivo distribution and excretion of SiNPs.

  4. Sex and age differences in mercury distribution and excretion in methylmercury-administered mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, K.; Yasutake, A.

    1986-01-01

    Sex differences in mercury distribution and excretion after single administration of methylmercury chloride (MMC, 5 mg/kg were studied in mice. A sex difference in urinary mercury excretion was found in sexually mature mice (age of 7 wk) of C57BL/6N and BALB/cA strains. Males showed higher mercury levels in urine than females, though no significant difference was found in fecal mercury levels 24 h post exposure to MMC. The higher urinary excretion rates in males accounted for significant lowering of mercury levels in the brain, liver, and blood, but not in the kidney, which showed higher values. At 5 min, however, the sex difference was found only in the kidney, showing higher levels in males. Changes in mercury distribution with time were studied in C57BL/6N mice. The brain mercury increased in both sexes up to 3 d, and decreased only in males on d 5. Liver and blood mercury decreased with time in both sexes, and these were constantly higher in females than in males. Renal mercury in males decreased to similar levels to females on d 3. The sex differences at various ages were studied with C57BL/6N mice 24 h after dosing. Two-week-old mice did not show significant sex differences in the mercury distribution and excretion, and their urinary mercury levels were much lower as compared to the older mice. Urinary mercury excretion in both sexes increased at 4 wk of age and then decreased at 45 wk of age. At 4, 7, 10, and 45 wk of age, males showed higher urinary mercury levels than females. From these findings, it has been suggested that urinary mercury excretion may be related to sex hormones, especially androgens.

  5. Retention, organ distribution, and excretory pattern of cadmium orally administered in a single dose to two monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Taguchi, T.

    1980-07-01

    Retention, excretion, and organ distribution of radioactive Cd were observed after a single oral dose of two monkeys. The retention rate of Cd 19 d after the administration of radiocadmium (/sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/, carrier-free) to one monkey was 5.2% of the administered dose; 73.4% of the dose was excreted in the feces and 0.7% in the urine. The largest fractions of the administered dose were found in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. The absorption rate of Cd 25 d after the administration of radiocadmium with 1.0 mg cold Cd as CdCl/sub 2/ solution to the other monkey was 6.3% of the administered dose; 75.5% of the dose was excreted in the feces and 0.9% in the urine. Setting the whole body retention equal to 100% on d 19 or 25, the largest fractions were found in the small intestines (51.5 and 36.3%), livers (21.8 and 29.6%), and kidneys (13.4 and 21.0%) of the respective monkeys). The effect of carrier Cd on absorption, excretion, and organ distribution was not pronounced. The highest concentration and greatest retention of Cd was observed in the upper small intestinal wall and the content of the small intestine, indicating the importance of enteroenteric circulation of the element; this finding was different from the results for Cd metabolism in rodents.

  6. Dose-, route-, and sex-dependent urinary excretion of phenol metabolites in B6C3F, mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, E.M.; Seeley, M.E.; Janszen, D.; Medinsky, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Phenol is the major oxidized metabolite of benzene, a known human leukemogen and ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Unlike benzene, phenol does not induce tumors in mice following oral exposure; benzene also exhibits sex-related differences in genotoxicity to bone marrow cells that are not observed following phenol administration. We studied the urinary excretion of phenol metabolites in mice as a means to further investigate the metabolic basis for differences in benzene- and phenol-induced toxicity. Male and female B6C3F, mice (n = 3/group) were exposed to 15, 40, 100, or 225 {mu}mol [{sup 14}C]phenol/kg by iv tail vein injection (6 {mu}Ci/mouse). First-pass intestinal metabolism of phenol was evaluated by comparison of urinary excretion of phenol metabolites following iv administration with additional groups of male mice that received the same dose levels by oral gavage. Mice were placed in glass metabolism cages, and urine was collected over dry ice for 48 h. Urinary metabolites were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Urinary excretion of conjugated metabolites of phenol was dose-dependent in both male and female mice administered phenol by iv injection or gavage. The major urinary metabolites of phenol were phenol sulfate (PS), phenol glucuronide (PG), and hydroquinone glucoronide (HQG). Sulfation was the dominant pathway at all dose levels, but decreased as a percent of the excreted dose with a concomitant increase in glucorodination as the dose level increased. Male mice consistently excreted a higher proportion of phenol as the oxidized conjugated metabolite, HQG, compared to female mice, suggesting that male mice oxidize phenol to hydroquinone more rapidly than female mice. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Fate of tritiated didemnin B in mice: excretion and tissue concentrations after an intraperitoneal dose.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Val R; Bruno, Sally J; Burner, John S; Choi, Byoung W; Rinehart, Kenneth L; Koritz, Gary D; Levengood, Jeffrey M

    2005-11-01

    Didemnin B has undergone trials in cancer patients, and has antiviral and immunosuppressive properties. [(3)H]didemnin B was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice at 320 or 1280 microg/kg. Urine and feces were collected until 168 h, at which time the mice were killed and tissues collected. Additionally, [(3)H]didemnin B was given i.p. at 320 microg/kg, and mice were killed at 1-120 h post-dosing. Radiolabel increased rapidly in blood then rapidly declined. Most radiolabel in urine, feces and tissues represented parent compound. Concentrations of [(3)H]didemnin B were greatest in the liver > gallbladder > lower digestive tract congruent with pancreas > spleen > kidney congruent with adipose tissue congruent with urinary bladder with urine. The pancreas had the longest terminal half-life of the tissues and the highest radioactivity at 7 days. Intermediate concentrations were in the duodenum congruent with jejunum > lung > iliopsoas > stomach congruent with testes congruent with skin > heart. Low concentrations were in the humerus congruent with femur congruent with quadriceps congruent with triceps > brain. Fecal excretion accounted for 45.9%-58.3% of the dose and declined after 24 h, followed by an increase, suggesting possible enterohepatic recycling or an impact of circadian rhythms. Urinary excretion accounted for 18.4%-25.2% of the dose, but was minimal after 24 h. The concentrations were highest in organs previously found to be sensitive in animals and humans. Didemnin B should be evaluated in animal models for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Human pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose metronidazole administered orally and intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    Urtasun, R.C.; Rabin, H.R.; Partington, J.

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a clinical program to assess the use of nitroimidazoles as radiosensitizers of hypoxic tumor cells. A total of 37 patients with malignant tumors have been entered into the study to receive oral high-dose metronidazole in conjunction with radiation. Twenty-eight patients with malignant brain tumors received 6 gm/m2 three times a week for 3 weeks (a mean total dose of 5.3 gm/m2). Maximum mean plasma drug concentration of 1 mM was obtained at 4 hours after drug ingestion with a mean half-life of 13 hours. Tissue and cerebrospinal fluid levels of 80% to 90% of the plasma levels were obtained at 4 to 6 hours. A linear relationship between increased drug dose and increased plasma concentration was observed at doses of 2.5 gm/m2 up to 6 gm/m2. Acute gastrointestinal and central nervous system toxicity was the dose-limiting factor (50% and 25%, respectively, at total doses of 5.3 gm/m2). Pharmacokinetic studies of intravenous metronidazole were performed in eight consenting patients. Single doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 gm were administered intravenously by zero-order infusion pump. Seven of the eight patients received a second identical dose orally 1 week later and the results were compared. Open two-compartment kinetic characteristics of metronidazole were computed from simultaneous plasma infusion and urine excretion rate equations, by use of a nonlinear least-squares regression analysis program (NONLIN). The mean (+/- SD) for alpha half-life was 1.2 +/- 1.3 hours, and that for the beta half-life was 9.8 +/- 5.9 hours. The absolute oral bioavailability was estimated to approximate 100%.

  9. Potassium Bicarbonate Supplementation Lowers Bone Turnover and Calcium Excretion in Older Men and Women: A Randomized Dose-Finding Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Palermo, Nancy J; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Shea, M Kyla; Fielding, Roger A; Ceglia, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The acid load accompanying modern diets may have adverse effects on bone and muscle metabolism. Treatment with alkaline salts of potassium can neutralize the acid load, but the optimal amount of alkali is not established. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of two doses of potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3) compared with placebo on biochemical markers of bone turnover, and calcium and nitrogen (N) excretion. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 244 men and women age 50 years and older were randomized to placebo or 1 mmol/kg or 1.5 mmol/kg of KHCO3 daily for 3 months; 233 completed the study. The primary outcomes were changes in 24-hour urinary N-telopeptide (NTX) and N; changes in these measures were compared across the treatment groups. Exploratory outcomes included 24-hour urinary calcium excretion, serum amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP), and muscle strength and function assessments. The median administered doses in the low-dose and high-dose groups were 81 mmol/day and 122 mmol/day, respectively. When compared with placebo, urinary NTX declined significantly in the low-dose group (p =0.012, after adjustment for baseline NTX, gender, and change in urine creatinine) and serum P1NP declined significantly in the low-dose group (p =0.004, adjusted for baseline P1NP and gender). Urinary calcium declined significantly in both KHCO3 groups versus placebo (p < 0.001, adjusted for baseline urinary calcium, gender, and changes in urine creatinine and calcium intake). There was no significant effect of either dose of KHCO3 on urinary N excretion or on the physical strength and function measures. KHCO3 has favorable effects on bone turnover and calcium excretion and the lower dose appears to be the more effective dose. Long-term trials to assess the effect of alkali on bone mass and fracture risk are needed. PMID:25990255

  10. Single dose povidone-iodine on thyroid functions and urinary iodine excretion.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Deniz; Teziç, H Tahsin; Zorlu, Pelin; Firat, Serap; Bilaloğlu, Eriş; Kutlu, Alev Oğuz

    2003-08-01

    The effect of single dose povidone-iodine on serum thyrotropin and thyroxine levels and urinary iodine excretion in 30 preterm, 40 full-term newborns and 50 infants at Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital was studied. There was no significant change of thyroid function in any of the groups (p>0.05). Urinary iodine excretion in preterm and full-term groups elevated significantly (p<0.05). The authors conclude that patients who receive single dose povidone-iodine for skin disinfection are not at risk for thyroid disorders.

  11. Anthocyanin excretion increases linearly with increasing strawberry dose.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A clinical study was conducted to investigate the dose response and metabolism of strawberry anthocyanins. In a crossover study design, twelve healthy adults consumed each of three strawberry treatments. The treatments were 100 g, 200 g, and 400 g of pureed strawberries, delivering 15 micromol, 30 m...

  12. Evaluation of administered dose using portal images in craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carina Marques; Calçada, Raquel; Rodrigues, Sofia; Barragán, Juan Antonio; Sá, Ana Cravo; Macedo, Ana Paula; de Fátima Monsanto, Maria

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to assess the administered dose based on portal imaging in craniospinal pediatric irradiation by evaluating cases in which portal images did or did not account for the total administered dose. We also intended to calculate the mean increase in total administered dose. Data were collected from General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón; we evaluated the total dose administered, total dose planned, number of portal images per treatment and corresponding monitor units of two different groups: one in which the dose from portal images is deducted from the total administered dose (D), and another in which it was not (N). We used descriptive statistics to analyze the collected data, including the mean and respective standard deviation. We used the Shapiro-Wilk and Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests and estimated the linear regression coefficients. Patients in group D received a mean dose of 29.00 ± 10.28 cGy based on the verification portal images, a quantity that was deducted from the planned dose to match the total administered dose. Patients in group N received a mean dose of 41.50 ± 30.53 cGy, which was not deducted from the planned dose, evidencing a mean increase of 41.50 ± 30.55 cGy over the total administered dose. The acquisition of the set-up verification portal images, without their inclusion in the total administered dose, reflects an average increase in total dose for craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients. Subtraction of the monitor units used to acquire the verification images is recommended.

  13. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  14. A Phase 1 dose-ranging study examining the effects of a superabsorbent polymer (CLP) on fluid, sodium and potassium excretion in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background CLP is an orally administered, non-absorbed, superabsorbent polymer being developed to increase fecal excretion of sodium, potassium and water in patients with heart failure and end-stage renal disease. This study was conducted to evaluate the safety of CLP, and to explore dose-related effects on fecal weight, fecal and urine sodium and potassium excretion, and serum electrolyte concentrations. Methods This Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study included 25 healthy volunteers, who were administered CLP orally immediately prior to four daily meals for 9 days at doses of 7.5, 15.0, and 25.0 g/day (n = 5/group). An additional dose group received 15.0 g/day CLP under fasting conditions, and an untreated cohort (n = 5) served as control. Twenty-four-hour fecal and urinary output was collected daily. Samples were weighed, and sodium, potassium, and other ion content in stool and urine were measured for each treatment group. Effects on serum cation concentrations, other standard laboratory values, and adverse events were also determined. Results At doses below 25.0 g/day, CLP was well tolerated, with a low frequency of self-limiting gastrointestinal adverse events. CLP increased fecal weight and fecal sodium and potassium content in a dose-related manner. Concomitant dose-related decreases in urinary sodium and potassium were observed. All serum ion concentrations remained within normal limits. Conclusions In this study, oral CLP removed water, sodium and potassium from the body via the gastrointestinal tract in a dose related fashion. CLP could become useful for patients with fluid overload and compromised kidney function in conditions such as congestive heart failure, salt sensitive hypertension, chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Trial registration NCT01944007 PMID:24460668

  15. Human metabolism and excretion kinetics of aniline after a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Modick, Hendrik; Weiss, Tobias; Dierkes, Georg; Koslitz, Stephan; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger Martin

    2016-06-01

    Aniline is an important source material in the chemical industry (e.g., rubber, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals). The general population is known to be ubiquitously exposed to aniline. Thus, assessment of aniline exposure is of both occupational and environmental relevance. Knowledge on human metabolism of aniline is scarce. We orally dosed four healthy male volunteers (two fast and two slow acetylators) with 5 mg isotope-labeled aniline, consecutively collected all urine samples over a period of 2 days, and investigated the renal excretion of aniline and its metabolites by LS-MS/MS and GC-MS. After enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, N-acetyl-4-aminophenol was the predominant urinary aniline metabolite representing 55.7-68.9 % of the oral dose, followed by the mercapturic acid conjugate of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol accounting for 2.5-6.1 %. Acetanilide and free aniline were found only in minor amounts accounting for 0.14-0.36 % of the dose. Overall, these four biomarkers excreted in urine over 48 h post-dose represented 62.4-72.1 % of the oral aniline dose. Elimination half-times were 3.4-4.3 h for N-acetyl-4-aminophenol, 4.1-5.5 h for the mercapturic acid conjugate, and 1.3-1.6 and 0.6-1.2 h for acetanilide and free aniline, respectively. Urinary maximum concentrations of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol were reached after about 4 h and maximum concentrations of the mercapturic acid conjugate after about 6 h, whereas concentrations of acetanilide and free aniline peaked after about 1 h. The present study is one of the first to provide reliable urinary excretion factors for aniline and its metabolites in humans after oral dosage, including data on the predominant urinary metabolite N-acetyl-4-aminophenol, also known as an analgesic under the name paracetamol/acetaminophen.

  16. Fecal Excretion of Orally Administered Collagen-Like Peptides in Rats: Contribution of the Triple-Helical Conformation to Their Stability.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Taira, Kazuma B; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Orally ingested peptides are generally digested in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and absorbed in the form of oligopeptides. We previously reported that intravenously administered collagen-like triple-helical peptides circulated in the bloodstream and were excreted in their intact forms in urine nearly quantitatively. In the present study, we investigated the fates of orally administered collagen-like peptides in rats. (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 (Hyp: 4-hydroxyproline), which formed a stable triple-helical structure, was stable in the GI tract, and 72.3±13.0% of the peptide was excreted in the feces. Its recovery ratio was similar to that of all-D-(Pro-Pro-Gly)10 (75.1±15.7%), the indigestible control. In contrast, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 and (Pro-Pro-Gly)10, the random coil conformations of which were dominant at body temperature, were not detected in fecal samples, indicating that they were digested by proteases. The high stability of the triple-helical conformation in mammalian bodies suggests the potential use of collagen-like peptides as novel scaffolds of peptide drugs.

  17. Biliary excretion of diazepam in rats: influence of the route of administration and dosage.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R; Plaa, G L

    1981-01-01

    The biliary excretion of diazepam metabolites was found in rats. Equivalent dosages of diazepam were administered orally and intraperitoneally. The biliary excretion was dose-dependent and was greater following intraperitoneal administration. After intravenous administration, a greater percentage of the diazepam dosage administered was excreted into the bile. Repetitive intravenous administrations yielded results which approached those observed after intraperitoneally administered dosages given as a bolus.

  18. Dose and elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kearns, David N; Silberberg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The present experiment tested whether the elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats is dose-dependent. Subjects lever pressed for three different doses of intravenous cocaine - 0.11, 0.33, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion - on a demand procedure where the number of lever presses required per infusion increased within a session. The main finding was that demand for the 0.11 mg/kg dose was more elastic than it was for the two larger doses. There was no difference in demand elasticity between the 0.33 and 1.0 mg/kg doses. These results parallel findings previously reported in monkeys. The present study also demonstrated that a within-session procedure can be used to generate reliable demand curves.

  19. Low-dose caffeine administered in chewing gum does not enhance cycling to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Edward J; Kim, Chul-Ho; Muller, Matthew D; Bellar, David M; Barkley, Jacob E; Bliss, Matthew V; Jankowski-Wilkinson, Andrea; Russell, Morgan; Otterstetter, Ronald; Macander, Daniela; Glickman, Ellen L; Kamimori, Gary H

    2012-03-01

    Low-dose caffeine administered in chewing gum does not enhance cycling to exhaustion. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the effect of low-dose caffeine (CAF) administered in chewing gum at 3 different time points during submaximal cycling exercise to exhaustion. Eight college-aged (26 ± 4 years), physically active (45.5 ± 5.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) volunteers participated in 4 experimental trials. Two pieces of caffeinated chewing gum (100 mg per piece, total quantity of 200 mg) were administered in a double-blind manner at 1 of 3 time points (-35, -5, and +15 minutes) with placebo at the other 2 points and at all 3 points in the control trial. The participants cycled at 85% of maximal oxygen consumption until volitional fatigue and time to exhaustion (TTE) were recorded in minutes. Venous blood samples were obtained at -40, -10, and immediately postexercise and analyzed for serum-free fatty acid and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, glucose, lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, and perceived leg pain measures were obtained at baseline and every 10 minutes during cycling. The results showed that there were no significant differences between the trials for any of the parameters measured including TTE. These findings suggest that low-dose CAF administered in chewing gum has no effect on TTE during cycling in recreational athletes and is, therefore, not recommended.

  20. Comparison of pharmacokinetics and urinary iron excretion of two single doses of deferiprone in β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrat, Supot; Yamanont, Pavena; Tankanitlert, Jeeranut; Chantraraksri, Udom; Fucharoen, Suthat; Morales, Noppawan Phumala

    2012-01-01

    Dose-related pharmacokinetics and urinary iron excretion (UIE) of an orally active iron chelator, deferiprone (L1), was investigated in 12 severe β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E patients. The patients received two single doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg with a 2-week washout period. Deferiprone was rapidly absorbed and reached maximum concentration (C(max)) within 1 h after administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters including C(max) and area under concentration time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) as well as urinary excretion of non-conjugated and glucuronide-conjugated deferiprone (L1 and L1-G) increased proportionally with the dose of deferiprone. A constant ratio of AUC(0-∞) of L1-G to L1 and a percentage of urinary excretion of L1-G indicated that increasing the dosage does not influence deferiprone biotransformation. Longer terminal elimination half-lifeand higher volume of distribution of L1 were observed with the high dose and correlated with deferiprone-chelated iron in serum. Unexpectedly, UIE did not show a linear relationship with the increased dose of deferiprone. The correlation between UIE and creatinine clearance suggested the possibility of L1-iron complex redistribution in patients with renal impairment treated with high-dose deferiprone.

  1. Urinary excretion of metabolites following a single dermal dose of [14C]methyl parathion in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, A W; Abou-Donia, M B

    2000-09-07

    The identification and kinetics of urinary excretion of metabolites of uniformly phenyl-labeled O,O-dimethyl O-4-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate ([14C]methyl parathion) were carried out following a single dermal dose of 10.0 mg (10 microCi)/kg in pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats at 14-18 days of gestation. Urine was collected at each time interval of 1, 2, 4, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after dosing. Total p-nitrophenol in the conjugated and non-conjugated metabolites was measured as a marker of methyl parathion exposure. Elimination of radioactivity in the urine was rapid. Of the total 14C urinary excretion, 30% of the dose was excreted within 4 h, while 50 and 90% of the dose were recovered in the urine by 24 and 96 h, respectively. Excretion rate of total radioactivity was 60 microgram methyl parathion equivalent/h (1.4 mg/day). By the end of the 96-h experiment, conjugated and non-conjugated metabolites accounted for 78.1 and 21.9%, respectively. Of the non-conjugated metabolites, p-nitrophenol and O,O-dimethyl O-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (methyl paraoxon) were identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) that accounted for 20%, and 1.9% of total urinary excretion, respectively. Appearance and disappearance rate constants of p-nitrophenol in urine were 0.12 and 0.048 microgram/h, respectively. Conjugated metabolites were classified as: glucuronides 12% of urinary excretion, sulfates 3%, hot sulfuric acid hydrolysable residues 47% and 16.1% remained as unidentified water soluble metabolites. Direct hot acid hydrolysis of urine yielded 49% of extractable 14C-radioactivity compared to 62% when hot acid hydrolysis followed the enzymatic hydrolysis. The presence of the conjugated metabolites as the major class of metabolites of the total excretion indicates that determining only unbound p-nitrophenol as a biological marker for methyl parathion exposure underestimates total urinary excretion of p-nitrophenol. Sequential enzymatic and acid hydrolyses of urine prior

  2. Validity of a self-administered diet history questionnaire for assessment of sodium and potassium: comparison with single 24-hour urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Yanagibori, R; Amano, K

    1998-06-01

    We developed a self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ) for use in prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases and cancer, and validated it by comparison with single 24-h urinary excretion of sodium (Na) and potassium (K). The subjects were 154 male and 69 female freshmen university students. Mean intakes (mmol/day) assessed by DHQ and the urinary excretion of Na were 196 and 165 respectively for men and 179 and 136 respectively for women. Those of K were 61.5 and 43.9 respectively for men and 56.8 and 41.6 respectively for women. The ratios of urinary excretion to dietary intake of Na were 0.97 in men and 0.84 in women. Those of K were 0.78 in men and 0.80 in women. The results for both Na and K were reasonable, except for Na in men. When Pearson correlation was examined between dietary and urinary Na and K, no significant correlations for Na in men (r=0.14) or women (r=0.23, p=0.06), or significant correlations for K in men (r=0.34, p<0.001) or women (r=0.40, p<0.001) were observed. The results suggest a reasonable ability to estimate a subject mean for Na in women, K in both sexes, and individual level for K for both sexes. The validity for individual level for Na intake is not conclusive because the duration of urine collection was too short.

  3. [Activities of administered radiopharmaceuticals and population dose from nuclear medicine in Czechoslovakia].

    PubMed

    Gushak, V; Rzhichkova, G

    1991-01-01

    The authors assessed by means of questionnaires the activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered in departments of nuclear medicine in Czechoslovakia. The mean activities of individual radiopharmaceuticals are roughly equal as in Great Britain but lower than in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The differences of activities used in different departments are approximately equal in all compared countries. In the Czech Republic the annual collective effective dose equivalent from nuclear medicine was 433 Sv in 1983 and 609 Sv in 1987. The mean effective dose equivalent per examination was 2.23 mSv in 1983 and 2.44 mSv in 1987. The mean effective dose equivalent per inhabitant of the Czech Republic was 0.042 mSv in 1983 and 0.059 mSv in 1987. The radiation dose of the Czech population from nuclear medicine amounts approximately to one tenth of the load from radiodiagnostics.

  4. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions.

  5. Effect of single dose of diuretics on renal magnesium excretion in man, with special reference to their site of action.

    PubMed

    Sotorník, I; Schück, O

    1976-01-01

    The administration of a single dose of furosemide, ethacrynic acid and polythiazide to healthy individuals under conditions of maximum water diuresis produces a significant increase in renal magnesium excretion. Elevated Mg excretion displayed a direct correlation to renal sodium excretion after furosemide (r=0.689, p less than 0.001), ethacrynic acid (r=0.869, p less than 0.001) and polythiazide (r=0.586, p less than 0.01). The slopes of the various regression lines did not differe significantly from each other or from the slope of the regression line characterizing this correlation for mannitol (r= 0.603, p less than 0.01). A significant linear correlation was likewise found between the excretion of Mg and total osmotically active substances after furosemide (r=0.783, p less than 0.001), ethacrynic acid (r=0.88, p less than 0.001) and polythiazide (r=0.646, p less than 0.01). The regression lines of the given correlations did not differ significantlyfrom each other, but their slopes were significantly higher than that of the regression line for the correlation after mannitol (r=0.454, p less than 0.01). The findings indicate that tubular Mg transport is influenced both by a decrease in tubular Na resorption in the diluting segment (polythiazide) and by an effect on Na resorption in the parts of the nephron proximal to the diluting segment of the nephron (furosemide, ethacrynic acid).

  6. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  7. [Dose estimation for renal-excretion drugs in neonates and infants based on physiological development of renal function].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Murayama, Yuka; Sugiyama, Erika; Sekiyama, Masao; Sato, Hitoshi

    2009-07-01

    We established dose estimation formulae for renal-excretion drugs using the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), tubular secretion clearance (Sc), and unbound fraction of drug in plasma (fp) as a renal function index of physiological development in neonates and infants not more than 2 years of age. A dose ratio of (DC/DA)=clearance ratio of (CLC/CLA) congruent with(fpC.GFRC)/(fpA.GFRA) for neonates and infants/adults was applied to drugs with fp.GFR>Sc, while DC/DA=CLC/CLA congruent with(beta.BSAC+fpC.GFRC)/(beta.BSAA+fpA.GFRA) was applied to drugs with Sc>fp.GFR using the coefficient of each drug (beta) and body surface area (BSA). Validity of the estimation formulae was investigated in drugs with fp.GFR>Sc such as vancomycin (VCM), arbekacin (ABK), fosfomycin (FOM) and norfloxacin (NFLX), and in drugs with Sc>fp.GFR such as digoxin (DGX) and amoxicillin (AMPC). First, we compared the clearance ratio (CLC/ CLA) of VCM, ABK, and DGX estimated by our method with those calculated using the Japanese population clearance values and those estimated allometrically (BSAC/BSAA). Next, we compared the established doses of all drugs investigated with the doses for neonates and infants calculated from the conventional dose estimation methods for children and our estimation formulae, and evaluated our method. As a result, favorable consistency was observed in the CL ratio for all drugs, and the doses of VCM, FOM, NFLX and AMPC calculated from our estimation formulae approximated the established doses. In conclusion, the validity of the dose estimation method using pharmacokinetic factors related to physiological development (i.e., GFR, fp, Sc) for renal-excretion drugs in neonates and infants was demonstrated.

  8. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Intrarenal distribution of mercury in the rat: effect of administered dose of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K.; Diamond, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors recently observed that the distribution of mercury in the hypertrophied remnant kidneys of uninephrectomized rats was different from that in the kidneys of sham-operated rats when given the same non-toxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/; 0.5 ..mu..mol/kg). These observations are quite significant, since the altered intrarenal distribution of mercury in uninephrectomized rats may cause uninephrectomized rats to develop more severe tubular necrosis in the outer medulla than sham-operated rats. In the experiments described above, the mercury burden of the hypertrophied remnant kidneys from the uninephrectomized rats was approximately twice that of each of the kidneys from the sham-operated rats. Thus, the altered intrarenal distribution of mercury in the uninephrectomized rats may be, in part, the result of the remnant kidney being exposed to more mercury. Implicit in this hypothesis is the idea that the manner in which the kidney accumulates mercury is dependent on the amount of mercury it is exposed to. If this is the case, then one would predict that the intrarenal accumulation of mercury in rats with two kidneys would change as the administered dose of HgCl/sub 2/ is increased from the dose of 0.5 ..mu..mol/kg. The principal aim of this study was to test this hypothesis.

  10. Selenium absorption, distribution, and excretion in white sturgeon orally dosed with l-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Diran H; Hung, Silas S O

    2006-10-01

    The usefulness of a newly developed, combined technique consisting of esophageal intubation, dorsal aortic cannulation, and urinary catheterization to deliver Se orally and to monitor Se uptake, accumulation, and excretion in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) was explored. Groups of five yearling sturgeon (1-2 kg) each were intubated with 0 (sham), 250, 500, or 1,000 microg Se/kg body weight in the form of L-selenomethionine, an ecologically relevant organic form of Se. Selenium concentrations in whole blood, plasma, and red blood cells did not change in the sham group but began to rise within 2 h postintubation in the other groups, and levels remained near maximum concentrations throughout the 48-h sampling period. Average urinary Se excretion rates over the entire 48-h period were 0.05, 0.46, 0.61, and 2.15 microg Se/kg/h in sturgeon intubated with 0, 250, 500, and 1,000 microg Se/kg, respectively. Selenium excretion rates were highest within the first 6 h in all treatment groups except the sham group. Selenium concentrations in the liver were positively correlated with the intubated Se dosage.

  11. Biochemical and histologic presentations of female Wistar rats administered with different doses of paracetamol/methionine.

    PubMed

    Iyanda, A A; Adeniyi, F A A

    2011-12-20

    This study was carried out to compare the hepatoprotective effect of methionine on paracetamol treated rats at both the peaks of toxicity and absorption. Female Wistar rats were divided into 17 groups consisting of eight rats per group and treated with different doses of paracetamol/methionine (5:1). Each control rat received 5 ml of physiologic saline. The study was terminated at two different end points -the 4th and 16th hours. Results show that rats administered with toxic doses (1000 mg/kg, 3000 mg/kg, 5000 mg/kg BW) of paracetamol exhibited significant increases in the levels of ALT, AST, γ- GT compared with controls. These increases were much higher at the 16th than 4th hour but serum total protein, albumin and globulin were significantly decreased by the end of the 16th hour. Histology results of rats in the 3000 and 5000 mg/kg (by the end of the 16th hour) confirmed hepatic damage, light microscopic evaluation of liver showed remarkable centrilobular necrosis. Moreover, the presence of mononuclear cells in liver section of rats intoxicated with APAP (5000 mg/kg) suggests a possible involvement of inflammatory process which resulted in regurgitation of bilirubin leading to its elevated level as well as increase activity of ALP. The hepatoprotective effect of methionine, on the other hand, was demonstrated in these rats at the 4th and 16th hours, and both results were comparable and therefore not significantly different but elevation in GGT level still persisted. In conclusion, data obtained from this study suggest that these agents may be capable of inducing GGT, although further study is required to establish a possible relationship between methionine and this enzyme in some other animal species.

  12. Concentrations in plasma, urinary excretion, and bactericidal activity of linezolid (600 milligrams) versus those of ciprofloxacin (500 milligrams) in healthy volunteers receiving a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Wydra, Stephan; Onda, Hajime; Kinzig-Schippers, Martina; Sörgel, Fritz; Naber, Kurt G

    2003-12-01

    In a randomized crossover study, 12 volunteers (6 males, 6 females) received a single oral dose of 600 mg of linezolid or 500 mg of ciprofloxacin to assess the concentrations in plasma (up to 24 h), urinary excretion (by high-pressure liquid chromatography), and bactericidal titers in urine (UBT) at intervals up to 120 h. The mean maximum concentration of linezolid in plasma was 13.1 mg/liter, and that of ciprofloxacin was 2.46 mg/liter. The median cumulative levels of renal excretion of the administered dose of the parent drug were 44% for linezolid (range, 28 to 47%; mean +/- standard deviation, 40% +/- 7.8%) and 43% for ciprofloxacin (range, 20 to 56%; mean +/- standard deviation, 40% +/- 9.3%). The UBTs, i.e., the highest twofold dilution (with antibiotic-free urine used as the diluent) of urine that was still bactericidal, were determined for a reference strain and five gram-positive clinical uropathogens for which the MICs of linezolid and ciprofloxacin were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 27278, 2 and 0.25 mg/liter, respectively; Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin susceptible), 1 and 16 mg/liter, respectively; Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistant), 2 and 64 mg/liter, respectively; Staphylococcus saprophyticus (methicillin susceptible), 1 and 0.25 mg/liter, respectively; Enterococcus faecalis, 2 and 1 mg/liter, respectively; and Enterococcus faecium, 2 and 1 mg/liter, respectively. The median UBTs of linezolid measured within the first 6 h were 1:96 for each of the two enterococcal strains and between 1:128 and 1:256 for the four staphylococcal strains. The median UBTs of ciprofloxacin were 1:64 for the two enterococcal strains; between 1:384 and 1:512 for the two ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains; and 1 (bactericidal activity of undiluted urine only) and 1:2 for the two resistant staphylococcal strains, respectively. The areas under the UBT-time curve (AUBT) for linezolid and ciprofloxacin showed no statistically significant (P<0

  13. Short-term repeated-dose toxicity profile of archaeosomes administered to mice via intravenous and oral routes.

    PubMed

    Omri, Abdelwahab; Agnew, Brian J; Patel, Girishchandra B

    2003-01-01

    Archaeosomes, liposomes made from polar ether lipids of archaea, show promise for vaccine and drug delivery applications. The potential toxicity of intravenously (14, 70, or 140 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days) and orally (gavaged at 55, 275, or 550 mg/kg/day for 10 consecutive days) administered unilamellar archaeosomes, prepared from the total polar lipids (TPLs) extracted from several species of archaea, was assessed in female BALB/c mice. Liposomes prepared from an ester phospholipid composition were included for comparative purposes. Control groups of mice were administered 0.1 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by either route. Animals were monitored at least once daily for temperature, body weight, and clinical signs of adverse reactions. One day after the last dose, the mice were sacrificed. Blood was collected for selected biochemical/enzyme analyses, and the major organs (heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys) were weighed and examined macroscopically. In addition, the spleens were examined histologically. At the two lower dosages of intravenously administered vesicles, there were no significant indications of toxicity, as compared with the PBS-administered control group. At the highest intravenous dose of 140 mg/kg/day, archaeosomes prepared from the TPL of the extreme halophiles, Halobacterium salinarum and Natronobacterium magadii, indicated potential toxicity, as evidenced by clinical signs (hyperactivity and/or piloerection), drop in body temperature, and loss in body weight. Spleens from mice administered some archaeosomes types, primarily at the highest intravenous dose tested, were enlarged, had increased organ weight, and microscopic examination revealed mild to moderate expansion of the red pulp with increased numbers of hematopoietic cells, but no changes in the white pulp. There were similar clinical signs at one or more of the higher oral doses of the ester liposomes and some of the archaeosome types; however, no other apparent toxicity was

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of Omadacycline following a Single Intravenous or Oral Dose of 14C-Omadacycline in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen; Flarakos, Jimmy; Du, Yancy; Hu, Wenyu; He, Handan; Mangold, James; Tanaka, S. Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of omadacycline, a first-in-class aminomethylcycline antibiotic with a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, anaerobic, and atypical bacteria, were evaluated in rats. Tissue distribution was investigated by quantitative whole-body autoradiography in male Long-Evans Hooded (LEH) rats. Following an intravenous (i.v.) dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight, radioactivity widely and rapidly distributed into most tissues. The highest tissue-to-blood concentration ratios (t/b) were observed in bone mineral, thyroid gland, and Harderian gland at 24 h post-i.v. dose. There was no evidence of stable accumulation in uveal tract tissue, suggesting the absence of a stable binding interaction with melanin. Following a 90 mg/kg oral dose in LEH rats, the highest t/b were observed in bone mineral, Harderian gland, liver, spleen, and salivary gland. The plasma protein binding levels were 26% in the rat and 15% to 21% in other species. Omadacycline plasma clearance was 1.2 liters/h/kg, and its half-life was 4.6 h; the steady-state volume of distribution (Vss) was 6.89 liters/kg. Major circulating components in plasma were intact omadacycline and its epimer. Consistent with observations in human, approximately 80% of the dose was excreted into the feces as unchanged omadacycline after i.v. administration. Fecal excretion was primarily the result of biliary excretion (∼40%) and direct gastrointestinal secretion (∼30%). However, urinary excretion (∼30%) was equally prominent after i.v. dosing. PMID:27821446

  15. Influence of low-dose proton pump inhibitors administered concomitantly or separately on the anti-platelet function of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kodaira, Chise; Nishino, Masafumi; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) at low doses can effectively prevent gastrointestinal bleeding due to aspirin and are widely used in Japan for gastroprotection in patients taking anti-platelet agents. We examined the influence of different PPIs at low doses administered concomitantly or separately on anti-platelet functions of clopidogrel. In 41 healthy Japanese volunteers with different CYP2C19 genotypes who took clopidogrel 75 mg in the morning alone, or with omeprazole 10 mg, esomeprazole 10 mg, lansoprazole 15 mg, or rabeprazole 10 mg, either concomitantly in the morning or separately in the evening, we measured the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, %) using VerifyNow P2Y12 assay at 4 h after the last clopidogrel dose on Day 7 of each regimen. IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime, approximately 4 h after clopidogrel, was also measured. Mean IPAs in those concomitantly receiving omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole or rabeprazole (47.2 ± 21.1%, 43.2 ± 20.2%, 46.4 ± 18.8%, and 47.3 ± 19.2%, respectively) were significantly decreased compared with those receiving clopidogrel alone (56.0%) (all ps < 0.001). This decrease was observed when PPIs were administered separately in the evening. However, IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime was 51.6%, which was markedly similar to that of clopidogrel alone (p = 0.114). All tested PPIs reduce the efficacy of clopidogrel when administered concomitantly. Our preliminary data suggest that administration of rabeprazole 4 h following clopidogrel may minimize potential drug-drug interactions.

  16. Comparative serum bactericidal activities of three doses of ciprofloxacin administered intravenously.

    PubMed Central

    Dan, M; Poch, F; Quassem, C; Kitzes, R

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and serum bactericidal activities of three intravenous doses of ciprofloxacin were studied comparatively in 30 patients. Single 200-, 300-, and 400-mg intravenous doses of ciprofloxacin were given over 30 min to 10 patients each, and serum samples were obtained at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 h after the start of the infusion. Serum drug concentrations were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by using noncompartmental analysis methods. Serum bactericidal activity against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Staphylococcus aureus was determined for samples obtained at 0.5, 4, 8, and 12 h. Excellent activity was demonstrated up to 12 h by all doses against E. coli and E. cloacae. Much poorer titers were observed for the remaining organisms, although the 400-mg dose prompted improved results against P. aeruginosa with a mean bactericidal titer of 1:2.9 at 8 h. In conclusion, while the 200-mg dose appears to be largely adequate for infections caused by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it seems that when P. aeruginosa is involved, 400 mg twice a day or even three times a day is more appropriate. Intravenous ciprofloxacin performs poorly against A. calcoaceticus and S. aureus, even at a higher dose. PMID:8031055

  17. Sorghum bran in the diet dose dependently increased the excretion of catechins and microbial-derived phenolic acids in female rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liwei; House, Suzanne E; Rooney, Lloyd; Prior, Ronald L

    2007-06-27

    Sorghum bran is concentrated with procyanidins (predominately polymers), which may be beneficial for health in humans; however, the bioavailability of procyanidins is not well-understood. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an AIN93G diet containing 0, 5, 10, 20, or 40% Hi-tannin sorghum bran (n = 5-7 for each group) for 50 days. Sorghum bran contained 23.3 mg/g of procyanidins. The urinary excretions of catechin, epicatechin, methylated catechins, and phenolic acids were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sorghum bran dose dependently increased the urinary excretion of catechin (0-2.2 nmol/day) and 3'-O-methylcatechin (0-9.5 nmol/day). Their serum concentrations also increased with dose (range of 0-14 nM for 3'-O-methylcatechin). Among the 14 phenolic acids analyzed, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid dominated in the serum (1.8-8 micromol/L). In the urine, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid dominated and their excretion increased significantly with the level of sorghum bran in the diet. The summed phenolic acid excretion was 0.8 micromol/day in the control group and increased to 23 micromol/day for 40% sorghum bran group. The hippuric acid excretion ranged from 2.2 to 16.2 micromol/day and peaked in the 10% sorghum bran group. On the basis of chromic oxide, a nonabsorbable marker, total procyanidins and polymers disappeared progressively, and significant degradation occurred in the cecum and colon. Catechins and procyanidins in sorghum were bioavailable; however, bacteria-derived phenolic acids were the predominant metabolites of procyanidins. Procyanidins degraded in the gastrointestinal tract. Depolymerization was not observed.

  18. Milk residues and performance of lactating dairy cows administered high doses of monensin.

    PubMed

    Bagg, Randal; Vessie, Gordon H; Dick, C Paul; Duffield, Todd; Wilson, Jeff B; Aramini, Jeff J

    2005-07-01

    Milk residues and performance were evaluated in lactating cows that were fed up to 10 times the recommended dose of monensin. Following an acclimatization period of 14 d, during which cows were fed a standard lactating cow total mixed ration containing 24 ppm monensin, 18 lactating Holstein dairy cows were grouped according to the level of feed intake and then randomly assigned within each group to 1 of 3 challenge rations delivering 72, 144, and 240 ppm monensin. Outcome measurements included individual cow daily feed intakes, daily milk production, body weights, and monensin residues in composite milk samples from each cow. There were no detectable monensin residues (< 0.005 microg/mL) in any of the milk samples collected. Lactating cows receiving a dose of 72 ppm monensin exhibited up to a 20% reduction in dry matter intake, and a 5% to 15% drop in milk production from the pre-challenge period. Cows receiving doses of 144 and 240 ppm monensin exhibited rapid decreases in feed intake of up to 50% by the 2nd d and milk production losses of up to 20% and 30%, respectively, within 4 d. Lactating cows receiving up to 4865 mg monensin per day had no detectable monensin residues (< 0.005 microg/mL) in any of the milk samples collected. Results of this study confirm that food products derived from lactating dairy cattle receiving monensin at recommended levels are safe for human consumption.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and hydrolysis of oral pyrroloquinazolinediamines administered in single and multiple doses in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qigui; Kozar, Michael P; Shearer, Todd W; Xie, Lisa H; Lin, Ai J; Smith, Kirsten S; Si, Yuanzheng; Anova, Lalaine; Zhang, Jing; Milhous, Wilbur K; Skillman, Donald R

    2007-08-01

    Pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD) derivatives such as tetra-acetamide PQD (PQD-A4) and bis-ethylcarbamyl PQD (PQD-BE) were much safer (with therapeutic indices of 80 and 32, respectively) than their parent compound, PQD (therapeutic index, 10). Further evaluation of PQD-A4 and PQD-BE in single and multiple pharmacokinetic (PK) studies as well as corresponding toxicity studies was conducted with rats. PQD-A4 could be converted to two intermediate metabolites (monoacetamide PQD and bisacetamide PQD) first and then to the final metabolite, PQD, while PQD-BE was directly hydrolyzed to PQD without precursor and intermediate metabolites. Maximum tolerant doses showed that PQD-A4 and PQD-BE have only 1/12 and 1/6, respectively, of the toxicity of PQD after a single oral dose. Compared to the area under the concentration-time curve for PQD alone (2,965 ng.h/ml), values measured in animals treated with PQD-A4 and PQD-BE were one-third (1,047 ng.h/ml) and one-half (1,381 ng.h/ml) as high, respectively, after an equimolar dosage, suggesting that PQD was the only agent to induce the toxicity. Similar results were also shown in multiple treatments; PQD-A4 and PQD-BE generated two-fifths and three-fifths, respectively, of PQD concentrations, with 8.8-fold and 3.8-fold safety margins, respectively, over the parent drug. PK data indicated that the bioavailability of oral PQD-A4 was greatly limited at high dose levels, that PQD-A4 was slowly converted to PQD via a sequential three-step process of conversion, and that PQD-A4 was significantly less toxic than the one-step hydrolysis drug, PQD-BE. It was concluded that the slow and smaller release of PQD was the main reason for the reduction in toxicity and that the active intermediate metabolites can still maintain antimalarial potency. Therefore, the candidate with multiple-step hydrolysis of PQD could be developed as a safer potential agent for malaria treatment.

  20. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): Phase I-Quality Assurance of Organ Doses and Excretion Rates From Internal Exposures of Plutonium-239 for the Mayak Worker Cohort.

    PubMed

    Dorrian, M-D; Birchall, A; Vostrotin, V

    2016-06-20

    The calculation of reliable and realistic doses for use in epidemiological studies for the quantification of risk from internal exposure to radioactive material is fundamental to the development of advice, guidance and regulations for the control and use of radioactive material. Thus, any programme of work carried out which requires the calculation of doses for use by epidemiologists ideally should contain a rigorous program of quality assurance (QA). This paper describes the initial QA (Phase I) implemented by Public Health England (PHE) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI) as part of the work programme on internal dosimetry in the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research Project 2.4 for the 2013 Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. SUBI designed and implemented new software (PANDORA) to include the latest Mayak Worker Dosimetry System and to calculate organ burdens, urinary excretion rates, intakes and absorbed doses, while PHE modified their commercially available IMBA Professional Plus software package. Comparisons of output from the two codes for the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 showed calculated values of absorbed doses, intakes, organ burdens and urinary excretion agreed to within 1%. The 1% discrepancy can be explained by the approximation used in IMBA to speed up dose calculations.

  1. Histopathology of myocardium of copper-deficient rats administered a toxic dose a cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, W.; Bielenberg, U.; Seung, S.K.; Reddy, P.P.; Dulin, A.M.; Smith, J.C. )

    1989-02-15

    The present study examined the effects of a single dose of cocaine (Coc) on cardiac ultrastructure in rats fed copper sufficient (Cus) compared to copper deficient (CuD) diets. Weanling males were fed either CuS (n-13) or CuD (n-12) for 7 wk. Ten in each group, (paired for Cu status), were injected (ip) with Coc-HCl (80-90mg/kg bw) 5 served as controls. Rats which survived for >15 min, (CuD 40% CuS (80%) controls), were killed and tissues obtained for histology and Cu analysis. Lower Cu concentrations in heart, liver and serum confirmed the CuD. The hearts were examined by light (Lm) and transmission electron microscopy. Myocardial foci showed necrosis, fibrosis, and inflammation in all given Coc but were more severe in the CuD group. CuS controls (no Coc) showed no similar lesions. Ultrastructural observations supported Lm findings. There was an apparent increase in number of mitochondria (Mito) of variable sizes and shapes. Foci of molding Mito and some with crystalline configuration of cristae were also observed. This was most pronounced in the CuD rats given Coc but absent in CuS animals (no Coc). The data support previous findings of myocardial lesionsin CuD rats the effect of Coc in exacerbation these lesions requires further elucidation.

  2. DEHP (DI-N-ETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE), WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION, INDUCES DOSE DEPENDENT DECREASES IN FETAL TESTIS GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEHP (di-n-ethylhexyl phthalate), when administered during sexual differentiation, induces dose dependent decreases in fetal testis gene expression and steroid hormone synthesis.
    Vickie S. Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Kathy Bobseine, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, and ...

  3. The atypical excretion profile of meldonium: Comparison of urinary detection windows after single- and multiple-dose application in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Bosse, Christina; Geyer, Hans; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2017-05-10

    Following a one-year monitoring program providing unequivocal analytical evidence for a high prevalence in international elite sports, meldonium has been included in the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) list of prohibited substances that came into effect on 1 January 2016. Despite of the polar and hydrophilic nature of the molecule, an unusual long detection window was observed in pilot elimination studies. Consequently, in the present study, urinary excretion profiles after single-dose (5 volunteers, 1×500mg) and multiple-dose oral application (5 volunteers; 2×500mg/day for 6days) were determined in order to facilitate the result management concerning meldonium findings in doping controls. Particularly the option to differentiate between recent use and tapering concentrations was studied. Urinary meldonium concentrations were determined using an analytical approach based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. The study corroborates the hypothesis of a non-linear, dose-depended and biphasic excretion profile after oral application of meldonium and demonstrates that urinary detection windows are of considerable extent with up to 65 and 117days (concentrations>LOQ of 10ng/mL) following single- and multiple-dose applications, respectively.

  4. Relative Bioavailability of a Single Dose of Belimumab Administered Subcutaneously by Prefilled Syringe or Autoinjector in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Thomas; Gilbert, Jane; Barton, Matthew E.; Fire, Joseph; Groark, James; Fox, Norma Lynn; Roth, David; Gordon, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravenous belimumab is approved for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus; subcutaneous self‐administration would enable greater patient access. This study assessed relative bioavailability, tolerability, and safety of 1 subcutaneous dose of self‐administered belimumab by healthy subjects using a single‐use autoinjector or prefilled syringe. Subjects (randomized 1:1:1:1) self‐administered belimumab 200 mg subcutaneously (abdomen or thigh) by prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Pharmacokinetics, adverse events (AEs), injection‐site pain, and administration errors were recorded. Of 81 subjects, 5 experienced administration errors and were excluded from pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean serum belimumab concentration profiles were similar for both devices, with a weak trend toward higher concentrations for thigh injection compared with abdominal injections. Maximum observed serum concentration was slightly higher with the autoinjector (27.0 vs 25.3 µg/mL) and area under the concentration–time curve slightly lower (701 vs 735 day · μg/mL), compared with the prefilled syringe. Incidence of AEs was 51% (41 of 81 subjects; headache was most common), with no serious or severe AEs. Median injection‐site pain scores were low (0 after 1 hour). Device handling was reported as acceptable by ≥95% of autoinjector users and ≥90% of prefilled syringe users for each characteristic assessed. These results support the use of either device for belimumab subcutaneous administration. PMID:27163500

  5. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Danofloxacin Administered by Two Dosing Regimens in Calves Infected with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Sarasola, Patxi; Lees, Peter; Shojaee AliAbadi, Fariborz; McKellar, Quintin A.; Donachie, William; Marr, Kate A.; Sunderland, Simon J.; Rowan, Tim G.

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of danofloxacin in calves with induced Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica pneumonia were evaluated. Calves received either saline as an intravenous (IV) bolus or danofloxacin (0.738 mg/kg of body weight) administered as either a single IV bolus or a 36-h continuous IV infusion. Blood samples and bronchial secretions were collected before and at predetermined times over 48 h following the start of treatment. Calves were assessed clinically throughout, and lung consolidation was assessed at necropsy. Bronchial secretions and lung tissue were cultured for M. haemolytica. Bolus administration of danofloxacin produced a high maximum drug concentration-to-MIC ratio (Cmax:MIC) of 14.5 and a time period of 9.1 h when plasma danofloxacin concentrations exceeded the MIC (T>MIC). Following danofloxacin infusion, the Cmax:MIC was low (2.3), with a long T>MIC (33.3 h). The area under the curve-to-MIC ratios were 43.3 and 49.1 for the bolus and infusion administrations, respectively. The single bolus of danofloxacin was more effective than the same dose administered by continuous infusion, as indicated by a significantly lower (P < 0.05) number of animals with M. haemolytica in bronchial secretions after treatment and lower rectal temperatures in the 24 h after the start of treatment. Thus, danofloxacin exhibited concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity in cattle with respiratory disease caused by M. haemolytica. PMID:12183261

  6. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of voriconazole administered orally with and without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus).

    PubMed

    Parsley, Ruth A; Tell, Lisa A; Gehring, Ronette

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments. ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, hawks were randomly assigned to first receive voriconazole (15 mg/kg, PO) injected into a dead mouse (n = 3; fed birds) or without food (4; unfed birds). Sixteen days later, treatments were reversed. Blood samples were collected at various points to measure plasma voriconazole concentrations by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and fit to a compartmental model through nonlinear mixed-effects regression, with feeding status and body weight investigated as covariates. RESULTS Voriconazole was well absorbed, with quantifiable plasma concentrations up to 24 hours after administration. Mean plasma half-life was approximately 2 hours in fed and unfed birds. Administration of the voriconazole in food delayed absorption, resulting in a significant delay in time to maximum plasma concentration. The final compartmental model included a categorical covariate to account for this lag in absorption as well as body weight as a covariate of total body clearance (relative to unknown bioavailability). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A single dose of voriconazole (15 mg/kg) administered PO to red-tailed hawks resulted in mean plasma voriconazole concentrations greater than the targeted value (1 μg/mL). Additional studies with larger sample sizes and multidose regimens are required before the model developed here can be applied in clinical settings.

  8. Effect of sonication on particle dispersion, administered dose and metal release of non-functionalized, non-inert metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sulena; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wold, Susanna; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we elucidate the effect of different sonication techniques to efficiently prepare particle dispersions from selected non-functionalized NPs (Cu, Al, Mn, ZnO), and corresponding consequences on the particle dose, surface charge and release of metals. Probe sonication was shown to be the preferred method for dispersing non-inert, non-functionalized metal NPs (Cu, Mn, Al). However, rapid sedimentation during sonication resulted in differences between the real and the administered doses in the order of 30-80 % when sonicating in 1 and 2.56 g/L NP stock solutions. After sonication, extensive agglomeration of the metal NPs resulted in rapid sedimentation of all particles. DLVO calculations supported these findings, showing the strong van der Waals forces of the metal NPs to result in significant NP agglomeration. Metal release from the metal NPs was slightly increased by increased sonication. The addition of a stabilizing agent (bovine serum albumin) had an accelerating effect on the release of metals in sonicated solutions. For Cu and Mn NPs, the extent of particle dissolution increased from <1.6 to 5 % after sonication for 15 min. A prolonged sonication time (3-15 min) had negligible effects on the zeta potential of the studied NPs. In all, it is shown that it is of utmost importance to carefully investigate how sonication influences the physico-chemical properties of dispersed metal NPs. This should be considered in nanotoxicology investigations of metal NPs.

  9. Plasma levels, tissue distribution, and excretion of radioactivity after single-dose administration of (3H)-oleic acid added to D-004, a lipid extract of the fruit of Roystonea regia, in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, L. Yohani; Menéndez, Roberto; Más, Rosa; González, Rosa M.

    2006-01-01

    , and urine samples of rats that did not receive (3H)-oleic acid were used as controls. Excretion was expressed as the percentage of the radioactivity excreted via each route with respect to the total radioactive dose administered to each rat. Results: A total of 50 rats were included in the experiment (mean age, 4 weeks; mean weight, 310 g). Absorption was rapid; mean Cmax was 195.56 (31.12) μgEq/mL, and mean Tmax was 2 hours. Thereafter, a biphasic decay of TR was found: a rapid first phase (t1/2α, 1.33 hours), followed by a slower second elimination phase (t1/2β, 36.07 hours). Radioactivity was rapidly and broadly distributed throughout the tissues, with more accumulating in the prostate than elsewhere. In the first 8 hours, accumulation of TR was greatest in the prostate, followed by the liver, small intestine, and plasma. Subsequently, TR increased in the small intestine, while it decreased in the liver and plasma. In contrast, over the periods of 24 and 144 hours after administration, TR increased in the adipose tissue, while it decreased in the other tissues and plasma. During those intervals, TR was greatest in the prostate, followed by adipose tissue. Mean peak radioactivity in the prostate (562.41 μgEq/g) was reached at 4 hours and decreased slowly thereafter. The prostate had the highest values of t1/2β and cumulative AUC compared with the other tissues and plasma. Mean (SD) TR was similar in feces (33.48% [4.90%]) and urine (28.96% [5.32%]), with total excretion being 62.40% (5.90%) of the administered dose. Conclusions: In this experimental study, after single-dose administration of oral D-004 radiolabeled with (3H)-oleic acid in rats, TR was rapidly and widely distributed across the tissues, with the prostate having the highest accumulation of radioactivity. Excretion of TR was limited, with similar amounts being excreted in feces and urine. The broad distribution of radiolabeled oleic acid and/or its metabolites suggests (SD) pharmacokinetic

  10. Efficacy of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a low dose for the treatment of porcine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Salichs, M; Sabaté, D; Homedes, J

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral solution of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a lower dose as a complement to antimicrobial therapy in a mild outbreak of porcine respiratory disease complex. The study was performed with 120 pigs with rectal temperature between 39.9 and 41°C and at least 1 sign indicating porcine respiratory disease complex (dyspnea, cough, nasal discharge, or depression). Animals were randomly allocated in 2 groups (treated and control group). Animals in both groups received etiological therapy with doxycycline at 10 mg · kg(-1) in drinking water for 5 d. The animals in the treated group also received 1.5 mg · kg(-1) of ketoprofen during the first 3 d. The reduction in rectal temperature in the treated group was significantly greater during the days of ketoprofen administration and up to 1 d after the end of treatment (P < 0.05). The percentage of dyspneic animals was significantly less (P < 0.05) in the treated group from d 2 to 5 of the study. Also, a significant improvement regarding depression and cough was seen in the animals of the treated group. No statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences were evidenced in productive variables. In conclusion, oral treatment with ketoprofen at 1.5 mg · kg(-1) in combination with antimicrobial therapy was found to be a clinically effective approach in outbreaks of mild porcine respiratory disease complex.

  11. Healthy birth weight results in higher vitamin A storage in neonate piglets administered high-dose supplements

    PubMed Central

    Heying, Emily K; Hovel, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A proposed intervention for newborn infants in countries with suspected vitamin A (VA) deficiency is to administer 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate at birth to reduce mortality risk. However, no studies have investigated birth weight effects. In this study, low birth weight (LBW; <1 kg, n = 18) and healthy birth weight (HBW) piglets (>1.5 kg, n = 18) from VA-depleted sows were dosed with 25,000 or 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate (26.2 or 52.4 µmol retinol equivalents) at birth to compare VA reserves. Blood was collected at varying times (n = 3–5/time/dose), and piglets were killed at 12 or 24 h for blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, adrenal gland, and intestinal contents. HBW piglets had significantly higher birth, death, and organ weights than LBW (P < 0.0001 for all). HBW and LBW piglets, which received VA, had higher liver and kidney VA concentrations (0.18 ± 0.09, 0.24 ± 0.10 µmol/g liver and 13.4 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.5 nmol/g kidney, respectively) than controls (n = 10) (0.051 ± 0.01 µmol/g liver and 1.01 ± 0.43 nmol/g kidney) (P = 0.0061 and < 0.0001, respectively). Total liver (9.75 ± 5.16 µmol) and kidney retinol (204 ± 79.1 nmol) were higher in HBW than LBW piglets (P < 0.0001). Extrahepatic tissues, except lung, had higher VA concentration than controls (P < 0.0001). Serum retinol and ester concentrations were higher in treated than control piglets (P = 0.0028, P < 0.0001, respectively), and significantly changed during the times sampled (P = 0.022, P = 0.011, respectively). Peak serum retinyl ester concentrations, which occurred at 3 h, were higher in piglets that received 50,000 IU (4.2 ± 4.4 µmol/L) than 25,000 IU (2.7 ± 2.3 µmol/L) (P = 0.031). Regardless of dose amount, HBW piglets stored more supplemental VA than LBW piglets when administered at birth. PMID:25681469

  12. Immune response to the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule up to 4 years after vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda M; Ferguson, Murdo; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Schulze, Karin; Ramjattan, Brian; Hillemanns, Peter; Behre, Ulrich; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, partially-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT00541970) evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of 2-dose (2D) schedules of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Results to month (M) 24 have been reported previously and we now report data to M48 focusing on the licensed vaccine formulation (20 μg each of HPV-16 and -18 antigens) administered at M0,6 compared with the standard 3-dose (3D) schedule (M0,1,6). Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 years) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (n = 240) or 3D at M0,1,6 (n = 239). In the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort, all initially seronegative subjects seroconverted for HPV-16 and -18 antibodies and remained seropositive up to M48. For both HPV-16 and -18, geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) ratios (3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years divided by 2D schedule in girls aged 9–14 years) at M36 and M48 were close to 1, as they were at M7 when non-inferiority was demonstrated. The kinetics of HPV-16, -18, -31, and -45 antibody responses were similar for both groups and HPV-16 and -18 GMTs were substantially higher than natural infection titers. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In summary, antibody responses to a 2D M0,6 schedule of the licensed vaccine formulation in girls aged 9–14 years appeared comparable to the standard 3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years up to 4 years after first vaccination. A 2D schedule could facilitate implementation of HPV vaccination programs and improve vaccine coverage and series completion rates. PMID:24576907

  13. Comparative bioavailability of two oral formulations of clozapine in steady state administered in schizophrenic volunteers under individualized dose regime.

    PubMed

    do Carmo Borges, Ney C; Astigarraga, Rafael B; Sverdloff, Carlos E; Galvinas, Paulo R; Borges, Bruno C; Moreno, Ronilson A

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, a novel, fast, sensitive and robust method to quantify clozapine in human plasma using quetiapine as the internal standard (IS) is described. The analyte and the IS were extracted from plasma using a single protein precipitation extraction technique with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to the electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method was linear over the range 20 to 1500 ng.mL-1. The intra-assay precisions ranged from 3.8 to 5.9%, while inter-assay precisions ranged from 4.2 to 6.0%. The intra-assay accuracies ranged from 99.3 to 107.5%, while the inter-assay accuracies ranged from 98.9 to 101.7%. This method agrees with the requirements proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration of high sensitivity, specificity and high sample throughput and was used to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles and bioequivalence of the two clozapine formulations in twenty six schizophrenic patients affected by refractory schizophrenia under steady-state conditions. During the hospitalization period the patients received the 100 mg clozapine formulation tablets corresponding to the same dose they were using 14 days before hospitalization. The clozapine pharmacokinetic did not differ significantly after administration of both test and the reference formulations. The Tmax and T1/2 for the test formulation were 2.26 and 10.92 h, respectively. In addition, the Tmax and T1/2 for the reference formulation were 2.44 and 11.08 h, respectively. The 90% confidence interval of the mean ratio of lnAUC0-t was within 0.80-1.25 range which indicates that the test formulation was bioequivalent to the reference formulation when orally administered to schizophrenic patients regarding both the rate and extent of absorption.

  14. Safety and efficacy of total dose infusion of 1,020 mg of ferumoxytol administered over 15 min.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael; Strauss, William; Auerbach, Sarah; Rineer, Stella; Bahrain, Huzefa

    2013-11-01

    For the majority of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), a full course of intravenous (IV) iron is 1 g. Most IV irons require 5-10 administrations of 100-300 mg. We have successfully employed 1 g low molecular weight iron dextran over 1 hr. For further convenience for patients and physicians, we explored the administration of 1.02 g of ferumoxytol over 15 min instead of the approved 2 × 510 mg injections. Sixty patients with IDA, (hemoglobin <11 g/dL, transferrin saturation [TSAT] ≤20%, and ferritin <100 ng/mL) with an inadequate response or intolerance to oral iron, received 1020 mg ferumoxytol over 15 min. Vital signs were measured for 1 hr. Adverse events (AEs) were collected via telephone at 1, 2, and 7 days. Follow-up visits occurred at 4 and 8 weeks for efficacy assessments. The primary endpoint was safety and tolerability. Secondary efficacy endpoints included mean change in hemoglobin, TSAT, and red cell distribution width. No serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred. Fifty-eight patients received the planned dose. Twenty-six out of sixty (43.3%) patients reported AEs of which 13 were mild and transient during infusion. All resolved within minutes. Fourteen patients reported self-limited arthralgias, myalgias, and/or headache within 24-48 hr. At Baseline, the mean hemoglobin was 9.4 g/dL. The mean increments at Week 4 and 8 were 2.1 and 2.6 g/dL, respectively. Ferumoxytol, administered as 1.02 g infusion over 15 min was well tolerated with no SAEs and demonstrated excellent efficacy. If corroborated in future studies this represents an improved method of treating IDA.

  15. Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion of Cranberry (Poly)phenols in Humans: A Dose Response Study and Assessment of Inter-Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P.; Mills, Charlotte E.; Istas, Geoffrey; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial health effects of cranberries have been attributed to their (poly)phenol content. Recent studies have investigated the absorption, metabolism and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols; however, little is known about whether they follow a dose response in vivo at different levels of intake. An acute double-blind randomized controlled trial in 10 healthy men with cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534 and 1910 mg total (poly)phenols was performed. Blood and urine were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Sixty metabolites were identified in plasma and urine including cinnamic acids, dihydrocinnamic, flavonols, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, valerolactones, hippuric acids, catechols, and pyrogallols. Total plasma, but not excreted urinary (poly)phenol metabolites, exhibited a linear dose response (r2 = 0.74, p < 0.05), driven by caffeic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, quercetin-3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, ferulic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid 3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, sinapic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate, (4R)-5-(3′-hydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone-4′-O-sulfate, 4-methylgallic acid-3-O-sulfate, and isoferulic acid 3-O-sulfate (all r2 ≥ 0.89, p < 0.05). Inter-individual variability of the plasma metabolite concentration was broad and dependent on the metabolite. Herein, we show that specific plasma (poly)phenol metabolites are linearly related to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed in cranberry juice. The large inter-individual variation in metabolite profile may be due to variations in the gut microbiome. PMID:28287476

  16. A first-in-human, phase 1, dose-escalation study of dinaciclib, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, administered weekly in subjects with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dinaciclib, a small-molecule, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, inhibits cell cycle progression and proliferation in various tumor cell lines in vitro. We conducted an open-label, dose-escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability, and bioactivity of dinaciclib in adults with advanced malignancies. Methods Dinaciclib was administered starting at a dose of 0.33 mg/m2, as a 2-hour intravenous infusion once weekly for 3 weeks (on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle), to determine the maximum administered dose (MAD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and safety and tolerability. Pharmacodynamics of dinaciclib were assessed using an ex vivo phytohemagglutinin lymphocyte stimulation assay and immunohistochemistry staining for retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation in skin biopsies. Evidence of antitumor activity was assessed by sequential computed tomography imaging after every 2 treatment cycles. Results Forty-eight subjects with solid tumors were treated. The MAD was found to be 14 mg/m2 and the RP2D was determined to be 12 mg/m2; DLTs at the MAD included orthostatic hypotension and elevated uric acid. Forty-seven (98%) subjects reported adverse events (AEs) across all dose levels; the most common AEs were nausea, anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. Dinaciclib administered at the RP2D significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation, demonstrating a pharmacodynamic effect. Ten subjects treated at a variety of doses achieved prolonged stable disease for at least 4 treatment cycles. Conclusions Dinaciclib administered every week for 3 weeks (on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle) was generally safe and well tolerated. Initial bioactivity and observed disease stabilization support further evaluation of dinaciclib as a treatment option for patients with advanced solid malignancies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00871663 PMID:24131779

  17. Potassium bicarbonate supplementation lowers bone turnover and calcium excretion in older men and women a randomized dose-finding trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acid load accompanying modern diets may have adverse effects on bone and muscle metabolism. Treatment with alkaline salts of potassium can neutralize the acid load, but the optimal amount of alkali is not established. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of two doses of potassium bic...

  18. Glucocorticoids increase salt appetite by promoting water and sodium excretion.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2007-09-01

    Glucocorticoids [e.g., corticosterone and dexamethasone (Dex)], when administered systemically, greatly increase water drinking elicited by angiotensin and sodium ingestion in response to mineralocorticoids [e.g., aldosterone and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)], possibly by acting in the brain. In addition, glucocorticoids exert powerful renal actions that could influence water and sodium ingestion by promoting their excretion. To test this, we determined water and sodium intakes, excretions, and balances during injections of Dex and DOCA and their coadministration (DOCA+Dex) at doses commonly employed to stimulate ingestion of water and sodium. In animals having only water to drink, Dex treatment greatly increased water and sodium excretion without affecting water intake, thereby producing negative water and sodium balances. Similar results were observed when Dex was administered together with DOCA. In animals having water and saline solution (0.3 M NaCl) to drink, Dex treatment increased water and sodium excretion, had minimal effects on water and sodium intakes, and was associated with negative water and sodium balances. DOCA treatment progressively increased sodium ingestion, and both water and sodium intakes exceeded their urinary excretion, resulting in positive water and sodium balances. The combination of DOCA+Dex stimulated rapid, large increases in sodium ingestion and positive sodium balances. However, water excretion outpaced total fluid intake, resulting in large, negative water balances. Plasma volume increased during DOCA treatment and did not change during treatment with Dex or DOCA+Dex. We conclude that increased urinary excretion, especially of water, during glucocorticoid treatment may explain the increased ingestion of water and sodium that occurs during coadministration with mineralocorticoids.

  19. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Galen, Katy A.; Nellen, Jeannine F.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR) of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03–1.71)). Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00–2.13)). We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only. PMID:25276422

  20. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    van Galen, Katy A; Nellen, Jeannine F; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR) of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.71)). Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00-2.13)). We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only.

  1. The effect of administered dose of lipid-based formulations on the in vitro and in vivo performance of cinnarizine as a model poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathy Wai Yu; Porter, Christopher J H; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-02-01

    The influence of varying the amount of lipid co-administered with the drug on drug solubilisation and absorption is poorly understood. In the current study, the effect of lipid dose on the in vitro drug distribution is compared with the in vivo absorption of cinnarizine (CZ) when formulated using long-chain triacylglyceride (LCT) and medium-chain triacylglycerides (MCT). At a fixed drug-lipid ratio, in the closed in vitro model, the drug concentrations in the aqueous phase increased and decreased for MCT and LCT, respectively, with increasing lipid dose. However, in vivo, the oral bioavailability (F%) of CZ was independent of the quantity of lipid administered for both MCT and LCT, but was higher for LCT (32.1 ± 2.3%) than for MCT (16.6 ± 2.3%). Increasing the quantity of lipid relative to the dose of CZ resulted in an increase in the oral F% when the lipid mass was increased from 125 to 250 mg, but was no greater at 500 mg lipid dose. The results confirm the limitations of the in vitro model but positively indicate that the use of the rat as a pre-clinical model for studying the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs is not compromised by the mass of formulation administered.

  2. Estimates of radiation absorbed dose for intraperitoneally administered iodine-131 radiolabeled B72. 3 monoclonal antibody in patients with peritoneal carcinomatoses

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Colcher, D.C.; Yokoyama, K.; Reynolds, J.C.; Bacharach, S.A.; Raubitchek, A.; Pace, L.; Finn, R.D.; Rotman, M. )

    1991-09-01

    Using a newly available model for determining estimates of radiation absorbed dose of radioisotopes administered intraperitoneally, the authors have calculated absorbed dose to tumor and normal tissues based on a surgically controlled study of radiolabeled antibody distribution. Ten patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis received intraperitoneal injections of the murine monoclonal antibody B72.3 radiolabeled with 131I. Biodistribution studies were performed using nuclear medicine methods until laparotomy at 4-14 days after injection. Surgical biopsies of normal tissues and tumor were obtained. The marrow was predicted to be the critical organ, with maximum tolerated dose (200 rad (2 Gy) to marrow) expected at about 200 mCi (7.4 GBq). In patients with large intraperitoneal tumor deposits, the tumor itself is an important source tissue for radiation exposure to normal tissues. Local hot-spots for tumor-absorbed dose were observed, with maximum tumor-absorbed dose calculated at 11,000 rad (11 Gy) per 100 mCi (3.7 GBq) administered intraperitoneal; however, tumor rad dose varied considerably. This may pose serious problems for curative therapy, especially in patients with large tumor burdens.

  3. Absorption, distribution and excretion of the colour fraction of Caramel Colour IV in the rat.

    PubMed

    Selim, S; Chappel, C I; Schoenig, G P

    1992-05-01

    Caramel Colour IV prepared from [U-14C]glucose was ultrafiltered in order to isolate the high molecular weight colour fraction (HMCF). The colour fraction that was non-permeable to a 10,000-Da porosity membrane, contained 84% of the colour, 22% of the solids and 24% of the radioactivity of the [14C]Caramel Colour IV. The absorption, distribution and excretion of [14C]HMCF were evaluated in male rats after administration of single or multiple oral doses of the material at a dosage level of 2.5 g/kg body weight. Rats on the multiple oral dosage regimen were given unlabelled HMCF in their drinking water for 13 days before the administration of a bolus dose of [14C]HMCF on day 14. On both dosage regimens, the predominant route of excretion was by way of the faeces. Less than 3% of the administered radioactivity was excreted in the urine and only a negligible amount was found in the expired air. More than 99% of the administered radioactivity was excreted within 96 hr. The principal tissues in which radioactivity was found were the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, kidney and tissues of the gastro-intestinal tract. No major differences were observed in the absorption, distribution or excretion patterns between the single and multiple oral dose regimens.

  4. Dosing and Safety Implications for Oncologists When Administering Everolimus to Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway are common abnormalities in breast cancer and are associated with the development of resistance to endocrine- and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2-targeted therapies. Because of the significant improvement in progression-free survival for everolimus plus exemestane compared with exemestane plus placebo, everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, was approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), HER-negative, advanced breast cancer whose disease had progressed while receiving letrozole or anastrozole. To provide optimal prevention and management strategies, it is crucial that clinicians are aware of the adverse events (AEs) associated with mTOR inhibition. Understanding the appropriate dose modifications will help reduce toxicity and improve drug tolerance, thus achieving the optimal benefit from everolimus. Analyses of data from the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus 2 trial have shown that, despite a greater frequency of AEs in the everolimus plus exemestane treatment arm, the AEs were effectively managed with temporary dose reductions or interruptions. In some cases, the full dose of everolimus could be resumed. Despite a lower mean dose and duration of exposure in patients aged ≥ 70 versus < 70 years, everolimus plus exemestane was similarly efficacious, suggesting that appropriate dose reductions for toxicity will not adversely impact efficacy. Appropriate modification of the everolimus dose and dose delay according to the severity of AEs, with resumption of the optimal dose of everolimus when toxicity has improved, will positively affect patient outcomes in HR+ advanced breast cancer.

  5. Excretion of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin in rats is primarily by biliary excretion and P-gp-mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Holger; Runge, Frank; Held, Heinz-Dieter

    2012-04-11

    Linagliptin is a selective, competitive dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, recently approved in the USA, Japan and Europe for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has non-linear pharmacokinetics and, unlike other DPP-4 inhibitors, a largely non-renal excretion route. It was hypothesised that P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated intestinal transport could influence linagliptin bioavailability, and might contribute to its elimination. Two studies evaluated the role of P-gp-mediated transport in the bioavailability and intestinal secretion of linagliptin in rats. In the bioavailability study, male Wistar rats received single oral doses of linagliptin, 1 or 15 mg/kg, plus either the P-gp inhibitor, zosuquidar trihydrochloride, or vehicle. For the intestinal secretion study, rats underwent bile duct cannulation, and urine, faeces, and bile were collected. At the end of the study, gut content was sampled. Inhibition of intestinal P-gp increased the bioavailability of orally administered linagliptin, indicating that this transport system plays a role in limiting the uptake of linagliptin from the intestine. This effect was dependent on linagliptin dose, and could play a role in its non-linear pharmacokinetics after oral dosing. Systemically available linagliptin was mainly excreted unchanged via bile (49% of i.v. dose), but some (12%) was also excreted directly into the gut independently of biliary excretion. Thus, direct excretion of linagliptin into the gut may be an alternative excretion route in the presence of liver and renal impairment. The primarily non-renal route of excretion is likely to be of benefit to patients with type 2 diabetes, who have a high prevalence of renal insufficiency.

  6. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species.

  7. Excretion kinetics of 13C-urea breath test: influences of endogenous CO2 production and dose recovery on the diagnostic accuracy of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; Maity, Abhijit; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Daschakraborty, Sunil Baran; Ghosh, Shibendu; Pradhan, Manik

    2014-09-01

    We report for the first time the excretion kinetics of the percentage dose of (13)C recovered/h ((13)C-PDR %/h) and cumulative PDR, i.e. c-PDR (%) to accomplish the highest diagnostic accuracy of the (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection without any risk of diagnostic errors using an optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) method. An optimal diagnostic cut-off point for the presence of H. pylori infection was determined to be c-PDR (%) = 1.47 % at 60 min, using the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis to overcome the "grey zone" containing false-positive and false-negative results of the (13)C-UBT. The present (13)C-UBT exhibited 100 % diagnostic sensitivity (true-positive rate) and 100 % specificity (true-negative rate) with an accuracy of 100 % compared with invasive endoscopy and biopsy tests. Our c-PDR (%) methodology also manifested both diagnostic positive and negative predictive values of 100 %, demonstrating excellent diagnostic accuracy. We also observed that the effect of endogenous CO2 production related to basal metabolic rates in individuals was statistically insignificant (p = 0.78) on the diagnostic accuracy. However, the presence of H. pylori infection was indicated by the profound effect of urea hydrolysis rate (UHR). Our findings suggest that the current c-PDR (%) is a valid and sufficiently robust novel approach for an accurate, specific, fast and noninvasive diagnosis of H. pylori infection, which could routinely be used for large-scale screening purposes and diagnostic assessment, i.e. for early detection and follow-up of patients.

  8. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A; Miller, Wilson H; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L John

    2009-02-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at -30 degrees C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function.

  9. Mercury excretion and intravenous ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dirks, M J; Davis, D R; Cheraskin, E; Jackson, J A

    1994-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that intravenous ascorbic acid increases urinary excretion of mercury in subjects with low mercury levels from dental amalgam, food, and other sources. From 89 adult volunteers we selected 28 subjects with the highest mercury excretions (2 to 14 micrograms/24 h). We administered intravenous infusions of 500 ml lactated Ringer's solution with and without addition of 750 mg of ascorbic acid/kg body weight, up to 60 g ascorbic acid. Average mercury excretion during the 24 h after infusion of ascorbic acid was 4.0 +/- 0.5 micrograms (mean +/- SEM), which was not significantly more than after infusion of Ringer's solution alone (3.7 +/- 0.5 micrograms). Lead excretion was similarly unaffected. If ascorbic acid administered intravenously benefits some persons with suspected adverse reactions to mercury, the benefit in subjects similar to ours appears unrelated to short-term enhanced excretion of mercury or lead.

  10. Phase I dose-escalation study of the thioxanthone SR271425 administered intravenously once every 3 weeks in patients with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; High, Francine; Juniewicz, Paul; Shackleton, Gareth; Li, Jing; Boerner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study was performed to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT), the recommended phase II dose and the pharmacokinetic profile for SR271425, given over 1 h every 3 weeks. The initial starting dose of SR271425 was 17 mg/m2. Patient selection was based on common phase I criteria as well as additional cardiac criteria. Thirty-eight patients were accrued to 16 dose levels from 17 to 1,320 mg/m2. Patient characteristics included 24 males and 14 females ages 35–78 with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 (ten patients), 1 (27) and 2 (1). Tumor types were typical for a phase I study. The maximum administered dose was 1,320 mg/m2 with two DLTs, both QTc grade 3 prolongation. No drug related hematological toxicity was noted. Grade 1 toxicities included rash, flushing, pruritus, weight loss, diarrhea, hypertension and fatigue. Grade 2 toxicities included yellow discoloration of the skin, nausea and vomiting. QTc prolongation and hyperbilirubinemia were the only grade 3 toxicities noted. No confirmed tumor response was observed; however, two patients had prolonged stable disease. Both Cend and area under the plasma concentration– time curve increased in a dose related manner. Plasma drug concentrations declined in a biphasic manner with a mean terminal elimination half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 h (±1.3). There was no change in clearance or volume of distribution over the dose range studied. Due to cardiac toxicity occurring with both the parent compound, SR233377, as well as this analog, this series of agents was abandoned from further clinical development. PMID:18449472

  11. Tissue concentration of heparin, not administered dose, correlates with the biological response of injured arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lovich, Mark A.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    1999-01-01

    Drug activity is often studied in well controlled and characterized cellular environments in vitro. However, the biology of cells in culture is only a part of the tissue behavior in vivo. Quantitative studies of the dose response to drugs in vivo have been limited by the inability to reliably determine or predict the concentrations achieved in tissues. We developed a method to study the dose response of injured arteries to exogenous heparin in vivo by providing steady and predictable arterial levels of drug. Controlled-release devices were fabricated to direct heparin uniformly and at a steady rate to the adventitial surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. We predicted the distribution of heparin throughout the arterial wall by using computational simulations of intravascular drug binding and transport, and we correlated these concentrations with the biologic response of the tissues. This allowed the estimation of the arterial concentration of heparin required to maximally inhibit intimal hyperplasia after injury in vivo, 0.3 mg/ml. This estimation of the required concentration of drug seen by a specific tissue is independent of the route of administration and holds for all forms of drug release. In this way we may now be able to evaluate the potential of widely disparate forms of drug release and to finally create some rigorous criteria by which to guide the development of particular delivery strategies for local diseases. PMID:10500138

  12. Tissue dosimetry, metabolism and excretion of pentavalent and trivalent monomethylated arsenic in mice after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael F.; Devesa, Vicenta; Adair, Blakely M.; Styblo, Miroslav; Kenyon, Elaina M.; Thomas, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) can result from their formation as metabolites of inorganic arsenic and by the use of the sodium salts of MMA(V) as herbicides. This study compared the disposition of MMA(V) and MMA(III) in adult female B6C3F1 mice. Mice were gavaged po with MMA(V), either unlabeled or labeled with 14C at two dose levels (0.4 or 40 mg As/kg). Other mice were dosed po with unlabeled MMA(III) at one dose level (0.4 mg As/kg). Mice were housed in metabolism cages for collection of excreta and sacrificed serially over 24 h for collection of tissues. MMA(V)-derived radioactivity was rapidly absorbed, distributed and excreted. By 8 h post-exposure, 80% of both doses of MMA(V) were eliminated in urine and feces. Absorption of MMA(V) was dose dependent; that is, there was less than a 100-fold difference between the two dose levels in the area under the curves for the concentration-time profiles of arsenic in blood and major organs. In addition, urinary excretion of MMA(V)-derived radioactivity in the low dose group was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than in the high dose group. Conversely, fecal excretion of MMA(V)-derived radioactivity was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in the high dose group than in the low dose group. Speciation of arsenic by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry in urine and tissues of mice administered MMA(V) or MMA(III) found that methylation of MMA(V) was limited while the methylation of MMA(III) was extensive. Less than 10% of the dose excreted in urine of MMA(V)-treated mice was in the form of methylated products, whereas it was greater than 90% for MMA(III)-treated mice. In MMA(V)-treated mice, 25% or less of the tissue arsenic was in the form of dimethylarsenic, whereas in MMA(III)-treated mice, 75% or more of the tissue arsenic was in the form of dimethylarsenic. Based on urinary analysis, administered dose of MMA(V) did not affect the level of its metabolites

  13. A dose-response study of orally administered clonidine as premedication in the elderly: evaluating hemodynamic safety.

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Patroni, O; Goudas, L C; Bosas, O; Kassaras, A; Gartaganis, S

    1993-12-01

    Clonidine premedication in a dose of 5 micrograms/kg may be particularly well suited for elderly patients. To pursue this approach, sedation, intraocular pressure (IOP), and the hemodynamic profile of two doses of oral clonidine premedication were compared in 60 elderly patients, aged 65-82 yr, who underwent elective ophthalmic surgery under local anesthesia. Group 1 (n = 20) received placebo, Group 2 (n = 20) 150 micrograms of clonidine (2-2.5 micrograms/kg), and Group 3 (n = 20) 300 micrograms of clonidine (4-4.5 micrograms/kg) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Decreases in mean arterial blood pressure were more pronounced and occurred earlier after 300 micrograms of clonidine (31.4 +/- 12.1%, P < 0.001) as compared to 150 micrograms of clonidine (18.1 +/- 10.9%, P < 0.001). Throughout the study, six patients (30%) in Group 3 (300 micrograms clonidine-treated group), but no patient in Groups 1 or 2, were treated at least once for hypotension (P < 0.05). Heart rate decreased significantly 18.5 +/- 8.1% (P < 0.001) only after 300 micrograms of clonidine. Clonidine 150 micrograms and 300 micrograms decreased IOP 32.1 +/- 14.3% (P < 0.001) and 47.8 +/- 17.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. After 150 micrograms of clonidine patients were significantly more sedated as compared to those given placebo (P < 0.01) but significantly less sedated than after 300 micrograms of clonidine (P < 0.01), where sedation persisted more than 6 h postoperatively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or combined, on the dose and quality of anaesthetic induction with alfaxalone in goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T Brighton; Zeiler, Gareth E; Dzikiti, Loveness N; Garcia, Eva R

    2014-08-19

    Goats are rarely anaesthetised; consequently, scant information is available on the efficacy of anaesthetic drugs in this species. Alfaxalone is a relatively new anaesthetic agent, of which the efficacy in goats has not yet been studied. In this study, the sedative and alfaxalone sparing effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or concomitantly, in goats were assessed. Eight clinically healthy goats, four does and four wethers, were enlisted in a randomised crossover manner to receive intramuscular sedative treatments consisting of saline 0.05 mL/kg, or midazolam 0.30 mg/kg, or butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg, or a combination of midazolam 0.30 mg/kg with butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg before intravenous induction of general anaesthesia with alfaxalone. Following induction, the goats were immediately intubated and the quality of anaesthesia and basic physiological cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were assessed until the goats had recovered from anaesthesia. The degree of sedation, quality of induction and recovery were scored. When compared with saline (3.00 mg/kg), midazolam,administered alone or with butorphanol, caused a statistically significant increased level of sedation and a reduction in the amount of alfaxalone required for induction (2.00 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg, respectively). Butorphanol alone (2.30 mg/kg) did not cause significant changes in level of sedation or alfaxalone-induction dose. During induction and recovery, the goats were calm following all treatments, including the control group. Cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were maintained within clinically acceptable limits. The present study showed that midazolam, administered alone or combined with butorphanol, produces a degree of sedation that significantly reduces the dose of alfaxalone required for induction of general anaesthesia in goats, without causing any major adverse cardiorespiratory effects.

  15. Quantification of the bla(CMY-2) in feces from beef feedlot cattle administered three different doses of ceftiofur in a longitudinal controlled field trial.

    PubMed

    Alali, W Q; Scott, H M; Norby, B; Gebreyes, W; Loneragan, G H

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this longitudinal controlled trial was to quantitatively compare carriage of a gene encoding for ceftiofur-resistance (bla(CMY-2)), standardized to a reference gene (16SrRNA), among total community DNA extracted from fecal samples collected from cattle treated with three different dose regimens of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) versus those untreated (controls). Sixty-one steers were assigned to three treatment regimens and housed in six pens. In each pen, five steers were treated and five were controls (one of the pens had six controls). CCFA administration was as follows: two-thirds dose treatment (4.4 mg/kg, on day 0), single-dose treatment (6.6 mg/kg, on day 0), and three-dose treatment (6.6 mg/kg, on days 0, 6, and 13). Fecal samples were collected on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 18, 21, and 28. The gene copy numbers/gram of feces for bla(CMY-2) and 16SrRNA were determined in total community DNA samples using quantitative real-time PCR. The relationships between the quantities of standardized bla(CMY-2), nonstandardized bla(CMY-2), and nonstandardized 16SrRNA, and the explanatory variables (treatment, time, and treatment x time) were assessed using repeated measures mixed models. There were significant differences in each of the three models with respect to each explanatory variable. Overall, while steers administered three doses and two-thirds dose of CCFA had significantly higher quantities of nonstandardized bla(CMY-2) than controls, the standardized values were lower. The administration of CCFA in feedlot cattle may provide selection pressure favoring higher levels of bla(CMY-2) carriage, but this may also lead to concurrent reductions in the total bacterial population (as reflected by lowered 16SrRNA) during the treatment period.

  16. Intravenous and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of a single-daily dose of disodium-fosfomycin in cattle, administered for 3 days.

    PubMed

    Sumano, L H; Ocampo, C L; Gutierrez, O L

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of fosfomycin in cattle were determined after administration of buffered disodium fosfomycin either intravenously (i.v.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Calculated concentrations at time zero and maximum serum concentrations were 34.42 and 10.18 mug/mL, respectively. The variables determined, the elimination half-life of the drug remained unchanged during the 3 days ( = 1.33 +/- 0.3 h for the i.v. route and = 2.17 +/- 0.4 h for the i.m. route). Apparent volumes of distribution suggest moderated distribution out of the central compartment (V(darea) = 673 mL +/- 27 mL/kg and V(dss) = 483 +/- 11 mL/kg). Bioavailability after i.m. administration was 74.52%. Considering fosfomycin as a time-dependent antibacterial drug, plasma concentration vs. time profiles obtained in this study, suggest that clinically effective plasma concentrations of fosfomycin could be obtained for up to 8 h following i.v. administration and approximately 10 h after i.m. injection of 20 mg/kg, for susceptible bacteria. In addition to residue studies in milk and edible tissues, a series of clinical assessments, using fosfomycin at 20 mg/kg b.i.d. or t.i.d. are warranted before this antibacterial drug should be considered for use in cattle.

  17. Tissue distribution of a plasmid DNA encoding Hsp65 gene is dependent on the dose administered through intramuscular delivery

    PubMed Central

    Coelho-Castelo, AAM; Trombone, AP; Rosada, RS; Santos, RR; Bonato, VLD; Sartori, A; Silva, CL

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess a new strategy of DNA vaccine for a more complete understanding of its action in immune response, it is important to determine the in vivo biodistribution fate and antigen expression. In previous studies, our group focused on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of a plasmid DNA encoding the Mycobacterium leprae 65-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp65) and achieved an efficient immune response induction as well as protection against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge. In the present study, we examined in vivo tissue distribution of naked DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, the Hsp65 message, genome integration and methylation status of plasmid DNA. The DNA-Hsp65 was detectable in several tissue types, indicating that DNA-Hsp65 disseminates widely throughout the body. The biodistribution was dose-dependent. In contrast, RT-PCR detected the Hsp65 message for at least 15 days in muscle or liver tissue from immunized mice. We also analyzed the methylation status and integration of the injected plasmid DNA into the host cellular genome. The bacterial methylation pattern persisted for at least 6 months, indicating that the plasmid DNA-Hsp65 does not replicate in mammalian tissue, and Southern blot analysis showed that plasmid DNA was not integrated. These results have important implications for the use of DNA-Hsp65 vaccine in a clinical setting and open new perspectives for DNA vaccines and new considerations about the inoculation site and delivery system. PMID:16445866

  18. SU-E-T-750: Three Dimensional in Silico Study of Brachytherapy Application with In-Situ Dose-Painting Administered Via Gold-Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, N; Cifter, G; Ngwa, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy Application with in-situ Dose-painting Administered via Gold-Nanoparticle Eluters (BANDAGE) has been proposed as a new therapeutic strategy for radiation boosting of high-risk prostate tumor subvolume while minimizing dose to neighboring organs-at-risk. In a previous study the one-dimensional dose-painting with gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers was investigated. The current study investigates BANDAGE in three-dimensions. Methods: To simulate GNPs transport in prostrate tumors, a three dimensional, cylindrically symmetric transport model was generated using a finite element method (FEM). A mathematical model of Gold nanoparticle (GNPs) transport provides a useful strategy to optimize potential treatment planning for BANDAGE. Here, treatment of tumors with a radius of 2.5 cm was simulated in 3-D. This simulation phase considered one gold based cylindrical spacer (GBS of size 5mm × 0.8 mm) introduced at the center of the spherical tumor with initial concentration of 100 mg/g or 508 mol/m3 of GNP. Finite element mesh is used to stimulate the GNP transport. Gold concentrations within the tumor were obtained using a 3-D FEM solution implemented by COMSOL. Results: The analysis shows the spread of the GNPs through-out the tumor with the increase of concentration towards the periphery with time. The analysis also shows the concentration profiles and corresponding dose enhancement factors (dose boost factor) as a function of GNP size. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the use of computational modeling and optimal parameter estimation to predict local GNPs from central implant as a function of x, y and z axis . Such a study provides a useful reference for ongoing translational studies for the BANDAGE approach.

  19. Neoadjuvant Sequential Docetaxel Followed by High‐Dose Epirubicin in Combination With Cyclophosphamide Administered Concurrently With Trastuzumab. The DECT Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuti, Laura; Barba, Maddalena; Giannarelli, Diana; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Marchetti, Paolo; Anzà, Michele; Maugeri‐Saccà, Marcello; Natoli, Clara; Di Filippo, Simona; Catenaro, Teresa; Tomao, Federica; Amodio, Antonella; Carpano, Silvia; Perracchio, Letizia; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Anna; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    To report the results of the DECT trial, a phase II study of locally advanced or operable HER2‐positive breast cancer (BC) treated with taxanes and concurrent anthracyclines and trastuzumab. Eligible patients (stage IIA‐IIIB HER2‐positive BC, 18–75 years, normal organ functions, ECOG ≤1, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥55%) received four cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel, 100 mg/m2 intravenously, plus trastuzumab 6 mg/kg (loading dose 8 mg/kg) every 3 weeks, followed by four 3‐weekly cycles of epirubicin 120 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m2, plus trastuzumab. Primary objective was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, defined as ypT0/is ypN0 at definitive surgery. We enrolled 45 consecutive patients. All but six patients (13.3%) completed chemotherapy and all underwent surgery. pCR was observed in 28 patients (62.2%) overall and in 6 (66.7%) from the inflammatory subgroup. The classification and regression tree analysis showed a 100% pCR rate in patients with BMI ≥25 and with hormone negative disease. The median follow up was 46 months (8–78). Four‐year recurrence‐free survival was 74.7% (95%CI, 58.2–91.2). Seven patients (15.6%) recurred and one died. Treatment was well tolerated, with limiting toxicity being neutropenia. No clinical cardiotoxicity was observed. Six patients (13.4%) showed a transient LVEF decrease (<10%). In one patient we observed a ≥10% asymptomatic LVEF decrease persisting after surgery. Notwithstanding their limited applicability due to the current guidelines, our findings support the efficacy of the regimen of interest in the neoadjuvant setting along with a fairly acceptable toxicity profile, including cardiotoxicity. Results on BMI may invite further assessment in future studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2541–2547, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187274

  20. Safety of a second dose of varicella vaccine administered at 4 to 6 years of age in healthy children in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Diego; Monti, Andrea; Armoni, Judith; Stamboulian, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Varicela Biken [Live varicella Biken vaccine (strain Oka)] is an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of varicella infection. Although the recommended schedule in all age groups (children, adolescents and adults) is a single dose, physicians in some countries follow the 2007 recommendation of the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) which recommends “implementation of a routine 2-dose varicella vaccination program for children, with the first dose administered at age 12–15 months and the second dose at age 4–6 years.”1 Therefore, cases can arise when two doses of Varicela Biken are given even though the ACIP guidelines are a response to the US epidemiological situation and for US licensed products based on the Oka/Merck and the Oka-RIT strains (Varicela Biken is not registered in US). The aim of this study is to ascertain the safety of a second dose of Varicela Biken in children who have been previously vaccinated with the same vaccine. In this study, children, 4–6 years of age who had been previously vaccinated with Varicela Biken, received a single 0.5 mL dose of live attenuated varicella virus vaccine containing at least 1,000 Plaque Forming Units (PFU) attenuated live Varicella-zoster virus (Oka strain). Participants were monitored for 30 minutes after vaccination. Predefined injection site and systemic reactions were solicited during the subsequent seven days. Unsolicited injection site reactions and unsolicited systemic events were collected throughout the study. Any serious adverse events occurring throughout the study were reported to the sponsor's pharmacovigilance department. One hundred and twenty two children were recruited and all provided safety data. There were no immediate adverse events or injection site reactions. Forty three percent of participants reported injection site reactions and 22.1% reported systemic reactions on solicitation during the seven days after vaccination. During the 30 day monitoring period

  1. Open-Label, Randomized, 6-Way Crossover, Single-Dose Study to Determine the Pharmacokinetics of Batefenterol (GSK961081) and Fluticasone Furoate When Administered Alone or in Combination.

    PubMed

    Ambery, Claire; Riddell, Kylie; Daley-Yates, Peter

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of inhaled batefenterol (BAT) and fluticasone furoate (FF) given alone or in combination via ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler (DPI-E), and BAT monotherapy via DISKUS® DPI (DPI-D). In this open-label, 6-way crossover study, 48 healthy subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 treatment sequences, comprising 6 single-dose treatment regimens: (1) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-D; (2) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-E without a lactose-filled second strip; (3) BAT 1200 μg via DPI-E with a lactose-filled second strip; (4) BAT/FF 1200/300 μg via DPI-E; (5) FF 300 μg via DPI-E with a lactose-filled second strip; and (6) BAT/FF 900/300 μg via DPI-E. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed using noncompartmental methods. Plasma BAT area under the curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) were similar for all treatments containing BAT 1200 μg (geometric least-squares means [GLSM] ratio, 0.90-1.06). Plasma FF AUC and Cmax were reduced following BAT/FF 1200/300 μg and 900/300 μg versus FF 300 μg monotherapy (GLSM ratio, 0.62-0.77). BAT 1200 μg administered via DPI-E, alone or in combination with FF, resulted in similar systemic exposure versus BAT administered by DPI-D. FF exposure was reduced when administered in combination with BAT compared with FF alone.

  2. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  3. The effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle 3.5 days after ovulation on luteal function, morphology, and follicular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Arango, J; García-Roselló, E; García-Muñoz, A; Valldecabres-Torres, X; Martínez-Ros, P; González-Bulnes, A

    2011-12-01

    A single treatment with PGF2α is assumed to have no luteolytic effect on cows with corpora lutea < 5 days old. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle on the morphology and function of the early CL. The study followed a crossover design with a treatment cycle in which 50 mg of dinoprost were administered 3.5 days postovulation and a control untreated cycle. Ultrasound examination and blood samples were performed during the two consecutive cycles. Corpus luteum (CL) diameter, progesterone concentration, and follicular dynamics characteristics were compared between control and treated cycles. Two of nine cows (22%) developed full luteolysis. The remaining seven cows (78%) had partial luteolysis with a decrease (P < 0.05) in progesterone concentration and CL diameter for two and 12 days post-treatment, respectively. The interovulatory interval of treated cycles (19.7 ± 2.4 days) was not different (P > 0.05) from that of controls (23.8 ± 0.9 days). The transient reduction in progesterone of cows with partial luteolysis had no effect on the proportion of cows with two or three follicular waves, follicle growth rate, or preovulatory diameter (P > 0.05). Two cows developed ovarian cystic degeneration during the PGF2α-induced cycle. In conclusion, the treatment of cows with a high dose of PGF2α 3.5 days postovulation induced some degree of luteolysis in all treated cows. This resulted in partial luteolysis in 78% of treated animals and in full luteolysis in the remaining 22%.

  4. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-10-01

    Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab')2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition.

  5. An improved Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) is well tolerated and highly immunogenic when administered to rabbits in escalating doses using various immunization routes

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Cuberos, Lilian; Horn, Thomas L.; Shearer, Jeffry D.; Matthews, Stephen J.; House, Robert V.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2008-01-01

    Tularemia is a severe disease for which there is no licensed vaccine. An attenuated F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) was protective when administered to humans but safety concerns precluded its licensure and use in large scale immunization. An improved F. tularensis LVS preparation was produced under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) guidelines for evaluation in clinical trials. Preclinical safety, tolerability and immunogenicity were investigated in rabbits that received LVS in escalating doses (1x105 to 1x109 CFU) by the intradermal, subcutaneous or percutaneous (scarification) route. This improved LVS formulation was well tolerated at all doses; no death or adverse clinical signs were observed and necropsies showed no signs of pathology. No live organisms were detected in liver or spleen. Transient local reactogenicity was observed after scarification injection. Erythema and edema developed after intradermal injection in the highest dose cohorts. High levels of F. tularensis-specific IgM, IgG and IgA developed early after immunization, in a dose-dependent fashion. Scarification elicited higher levels of IgA. Antibodies elicited by LVS also recognized F. tularensis Schu-S4 antigens and there was a significant correlation between antibody titers measured against both LVS and Schu-S4. The ELISA titers also correlated closely with those measured by microagglutination. This is the first report describing comprehensive toxicological and immunological studies of F. tularensis LVS in rabbits. This animal model, which closely resembles human disease, proved adequate to assess safety and immunogenicity of F. tularensis vaccine candidates. This new LVS vaccine preparation is being evaluated in human clinical studies. PMID:18308432

  6. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab′)2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition. PMID:27380003

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of two doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine or one dose of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine, both administered concomitantly with routine immunization to 12- to 18-month-old children

    PubMed Central

    Noya, Francisco; McCormack, Deirdre; Reynolds, Donna L; Neame, Dion; Oster, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the immunogenicity and safety of a two-dose series of a quadrivalent meningococcal (serogroups A, C, Y and W) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACYW-D) administered to toddlers. METHODS: Children were randomly assigned (1:1) at study entry to receive MenACYW-D at 12 and 18 months of age (group 1; n=61) or meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MCC) at 12 months of age (group 2; n=62). All received routine childhood immunizations. A, C, Y and W antibody titres were measured in group 1 before and one month after the 18-month MenACYW-D vaccination and were measured in group 2 at one and seven months post-MCC vaccination. Antibodies elicited by diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed combined with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine coadministered at the 18-month vaccination were measured one month later. Safety data were collected. RESULTS: At 19 months of age, ≥96% in group 1 achieved protective titres for the four meningococcal serogroups after dose 2; 67% in group 2 exhibited protective titres against serogroup C 28 days after MCC vaccination at 12 months of age, declining to 27% seven months later. DTaP-IPV-Hib elicited high antibody concentrations/titres in groups 1 and 2, consistent with historical values. The safety profiles after each dose generated no unexpected safety signals; no serious adverse events were related to vaccination. DISCUSSION: A two-dose series of MenACYW-D given concomitantly with a DTaP-IPV-Hib booster dose at 18 months of age demonstrated a good immunogenicity and safety profile. A two-dose series of MenACYW-D can be used as an alternative to one dose of MCC and provides protection against additional serogroups (NCT ID: NCT01359449). PMID:25285126

  8. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Katherine A; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H; Patisaul, Heather B

    2013-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000μg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, non-invasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat.

  9. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Katherine A.; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, noninvasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50 mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat. PMID:23500335

  10. D-glucaric acid excretion in critical care patients--comparison with 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion and serum gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and relation to multiple drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeyer, G; Roots, I; Lestau, P; Klaiber, H R; Dennhardt, R

    1986-01-01

    The incidence of increased drug metabolism activity as a consequence of multiple drug therapy at a surgical intensive care ward has been studied non-invasively by determinations of daily urinary D-glucaric acid (GA) excretion rates. Among 165 randomly selected patients, GA excretion was stimulated in 76 cases (= 46%). Exploratory data analysis showed that increases in GA excretion are primarily due to administration of barbiturates (pentobarbitone, Nembutal), miconazole (Daktar) and, to a lesser extent, neuroleptics. Surprisingly, the large number of simultaneously administered additional drugs failed to increase GA excretion. Urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol (6 beta-OHF) and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid (17-OHCS) excretion rates were correlated in 34 patients with GA excretion; patients not receiving known enzyme inducers showed low GA values but high 6 beta-OHF and 17-OHCS values, however, with a ratio of 6 beta-OHF/17-OHCS in the normal range. Patients receiving high dose pentobarbitone treatment failed to exhibit significantly increased 6 beta-OHF and 17-OHCS or 6 beta-OHF/17-OHCS values. Miconazole treatment resulted in a significantly increased ratio of 6 beta-OHF/17-OHCS. gamma-Glutamyltranspeptidase activity in serum showed no correlation with GA excretion (n = 91). PMID:2868749

  11. Clinical study of urinary excretion of Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ibuka, K.; Hashizume, T.; Noguchi, A.; Kojima, J.; Sasakuma, F.; Ishigami, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Ga-67 urinary excretion was examined in 59 patients. The 72-hour urinary excretion rate ranged from 4.3 to 67.8% of the injected dose. Within the first 24 hours, 60.9% of the 72-hour urinary excretion was excreted. There was no significant difference in the Ga-67 urinary excretion rate between males and females, nor between the Ga-67 positive and negative cases. A significant negative correlation was found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and the unsaturated iron binding capacity. Notably, four patients with hyperferremia, which was considered secondary to leukemia and/or chemotherapy or liver cirrhosis, excreted more than 46.8% of Ga-67 within 72 hours. A significant negative correlation was also found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and age. Urinary excretion of Ga-67 may be related to the glomerular filtration rate, which decreases with age.

  12. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  13. Pharmacokinetics and effects of demographic factors on blood 25(OH)D3 levels after a single orally administered high dose of vitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-zhan; Li, Mian; Duan, Xiao-hua; Jia, Jing-ying; Li, Jing-quan; Chu, Rui-ai; Yu, Chen; Han, Jun-hua; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the biological consequences and demographic factors that might affect the pharmacokinetics of vitamin D3 after a single high dose intervention in a young Chinese population with vitamin D insufficiency status. Methods: A total of 28 young subjects (25 to 35 years old) with vitamin D insufficiency status [serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/mL] was recruited in Shanghai, China. The subjects were orally administered a single high dose of vitamin D3 (300 000 IU). Baseline characteristics and blood samples were collected at d 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28, 56, 84 and 112 after the intervention. The blood biomarker levels were determined with standardized methods. Results: The intervention markedly increased the blood 25(OH)D3 levels within the first five days (mean Tmax=5.1±2.1 d) and sustained an optimal circulating level of 25(OH)D3 (≥30 ng/mL) for 56 d. After the intervention, body weight and baseline 25(OH)D3 levels were significantly correlated with circulating 25(OH)D3 levels. No adverse events and no consistently significant changes in serum calcium, creatinine, glucose, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D binding protein, or the urinary calcium/reatinine ratio were observed. However, there was a significant increase in phosphorus after the vitamin D3 intervention. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were decreased at the end of the trial. Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics of vitamin D after intervention were influenced by baseline 25(OH)D3 levels and the body weight of the subjects. The results suggest that a single high oral vitamin D3 intervention is safe and efficient for improving the vitamin D status of young Chinese people with vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:27569392

  14. Urinary trimethylselenonium excretion by the rat: effect of level and source of selenium-75

    SciTech Connect

    Nahapetian, A.T.; Janghorbani, M.; Young, V.R.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore in rats the urinary metabolites of selenium (Se), by using (/sup 75/Se)selenomethionine, (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine, and (/sup 75/Se)selenite, and to assess the effects of low and high levels of Se intake on trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) excretion in urine. Male adult rats were adapted for 6 weeks to a commercial rat laboratory stock diet (0.25 ppm Se). They were then starved for 24 hours and given an oral dose of either low (16 micrograms Se/kg body weight) or high (1500 micrograms Se/kg body weight) Se as the test Se compounds. Appearance of radioactivity in TMSe and non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine was monitored for 48 hours. About 40% of the /sup 75/Se dose was excreted in urine. TMSe was the major urinary Se metabolite at high, and a minor urinary Se metabolite at low dose levels of Se and for all three Se test compounds. At least 80% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 26-42% of the orally administered /sup 75/Se were excreted as non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine under the latter condition. It is hypothesized that at a requirement intake of Se either a trace or no TMSe is excreted in urine, and it becomes a major excretory metabolite of Se when the dietary trace mineral intake exceeds a requirement level, probably serving as a means of detoxification.

  15. Safety and preliminary efficacy data of a novel Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) peptide inhibitor administered intralesionally at four dose levels in patients with cervical malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is now considered the second leading cause of death among women worldwide, and its incidence has reached alarming levels, especially in developing countries. Similarly, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), the precursor stage for cervical cancer, represents a growing health problem among younger women as the HSIL management regimes that have been developed are not fully effective. From the etiological point of view, the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role for developing cervical malignancies, and viral DNA has been detected in 99.7% of cervical tumors at the later stages. CIGB-300 is a novel cyclic synthetic peptide that induces apoptosis in malignant cells and elicits antitumor activity in cancer animal models. CIGB-300 impairs the Casein Kinase (CK2) phosphorylation, by targeting the substrate's phosphoaceptor domain. Based on the perspectives of CIGB-300 to treat cancer, this "first-in-human" study investigated its safety and tolerability in patients with cervical malignancies. Methods Thirty-one women with colposcopically and histologically diagnosed microinvasive or pre-invasive cervical cancer were enrolled in a dose escalating study. CIGB-300 was administered sequentially at 14, 70, 245 and 490 mg by intralesional injections during 5 consecutive days to groups of 7 – 10 patients. Toxicity was monitored daily until fifteen days after the end of treatment, when patients underwent conization. Digital colposcopy, histology, and HPV status were also evaluated. Results No maximum-tolerated dose or dose-limiting toxicity was achieved. The most frequent local events were pain, bleeding, hematoma and erythema at the injection site. The systemic adverse events were rash, facial edema, itching, hot flashes, and localized cramps. 75% of the patients experienced a significant lesion reduction at colposcopy and 19% exhibited full histological regression. HPV DNA was negative in 48

  16. Determination of designer doping agent--2-ethylamino-1-phenylbutane--in dietary supplements and excretion study following single oral supplement dose.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Jarek, Anna; Chajewska, Katarzyna; Turek-Lepa, Ewa; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2015-11-10

    The quantitative analysis of a new designer doping agent, 2-ethylamino-1-phenylbutane (EAPB) and its metabolite, 2-amino-1-phenylbutane (APB) in urine samples, and the determination of EAPB in dietary supplement samples, have been presented. The main purpose of the present study was to develop simple and reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (GC-MS) for excretion study following a single oral administration of dietary supplements containing EAPB. Three analytical methods for the determination of EAPB in urine and supplement samples, and APB in urine samples using the GC-MS system, have been validated. The method of the determination of EAPB in supplement samples was applied to analyze seventeen dietary supplements, CRAZE and DETONATE. Two other methods were used to determine the urinary excretion profile of EAPB and APB in the case of three healthy volunteers and, on further investigation, it was applied to the anti-doping control in sport. Quantification was obtained on the basis of the ions at m/z 86, 58 and 169, monitored for EAPB, APB and diphenylamine (used as an internal standard), respectively. The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.3μg/g for EAPB in the case of supplement analysis, 2.9 and 8.8ng/mL for EAPB in the case of urine analysis, and 3.2 and 9.7ng/mL for APB. The other validation parameters as linearity, precision and trueness have been also investigated with the acceptable results. The extraction yield of all presented methods was above 69%. EAPB was detected in fourteen analyzed supplements (not included EAPB in their labels) and its content varied between 1.8 and 16.1mg/g. Following oral administration of three supplements with EAPB to one male and two female volunteers, the parent compound of EAPB and its metabolite were monitored and the excretion parameters as the maximum concentration of the analyte in urine (2.2-4.2μg/mL for EAPB; 1.1-5.1μg/mL for APB) and the time for the maximum height of the excretion

  17. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular tumors was investigated with histological, histochemical, and morphometrical methods in male Sprague-Dawley rats continuously administered N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) or N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM) in the drinking water at low doses (0.5 mg DEN/100 ml; 1 mg NNM/100 ml). Groups of control, DEN-, and NNM-treated rats were investigated at 5-week intervals. Similar results were obtained in DEN- and NNM-treated rats. Two types of areas composed of basophilic or glycogenotic hepatocytes were observed preceding the appearance of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas. Besides their cytologic differences, the basophilic and glycogenotic areas induced displayed distinct histochemical features. Both types of areas were detected simultaneously and increased in parallel with time to a similar incidence, but basophilic areas reached larger sizes than the glycogenotic ones. Furthermore, each type of area, which clustered around and along efferent veins, was differently linked to tumorigenesis. Basophilic areas frequently developed into basophilic adenomas and trabecular carcinomas through a characteristic sequence. Early basophilic areas consisted of hepatocytes with lamellar cytoplasmic hyperbasophilia and exhibited the normal laminar liver structure. With time, an increasing number of basophilic areas also contained hepatocytes with powdered diffuse hyperbasophilia, which frequently were arranged in thick trabeculae, showed abundant mitotic figures, and invaded efferent veins. Neither such signs of malignancy nor conversion into basophilic areas or tumors could be established for areas of clear and acidophilic glycogenotic hepatocytes. However, a few small glycogenotic adenomas probably developed from glycogenotic areas. Our data thus underline the central role of basophilic areas for hepatocarcinogenesis. Moreover, taking into account the data from other experiments, it seems likely that although glycogenotic areas may be associated with the

  18. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 excretion in sheep by oral lactoferrin administration.

    PubMed

    Yekta, M Atef; Cox, E; Goddeeris, B M; Vanrompay, D

    2011-06-02

    Ruminants are an important reservoir of Escherichia coli O157:H7, therefore reducing E. coli O157:H7 excretion by these animals could play a key role in reducing human infections. The present study investigates the potential of bovine lactoferrin, a natural antimicrobial-immunomodulatory protein of milk, to prevent colonization and excretion of E. coli O157:H7 in sheep. The effect of two different doses of lactoferrin (1.5 g or 0.15 g per 12h) was evaluated on colonization of sheep intestine and faecal excretion of the NCTC12900 strain. Hereto, lactoferrin was orally administered to sheep during 30 consecutive days and sheep were experimentally infected with E. coli O157:H7 on the second day of the lactoferrin administration. Interestingly, both lactoferrin dosages significantly reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 in faeces as well as the duration of faecal excretion. The high dose group showed a significantly higher antibody response against EspA and EspB, two structural proteins of the bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS), than the colonization control group. The results suggest that oral lactoferrin administration could be used to prevent persistent colonization of sheep with E. coli O157:H7.

  19. Pharmacokinetic modeling and prediction of plasma pyrrole-imidazole polyamide concentration in rats using simultaneous urinary and biliary excretion data.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Aoyama, Takahiko; Yokoe, Tsubasa; Fukasawa, Akiko; Fukuda, Noboru; Ueno, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki

    2009-05-01

    The use of urinary and/or biliary excretion data was considered as an alternative approach if the bioanalytical method lacked the appropriate sensitivity to adequately characterize the serum or plasma concentration-time profile. This approach is used for the analysis of plasma concentration-time profile under the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of various analytical instruments. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the plasma concentration-time profiles under LLOQ of HPLC using urinary and biliary excretion data. As model compounds, pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides 1035 (MW, 1035.12) and 1666 (MW, 1665.78) were used. The cumulative urinary excretions of Py-Im polyamides 1035 and 1666 were 72.4+/-11.6 and 4.8+/-0.5% of the administered dose, respectively. The cumulative biliary excretion of Py-Im polyamide 1035 was 4.3+/-0.4% of the administered dose, and Py-Im polyamide 1666 was not detected. The plasma concentration-time profiles of Py-Im polyamide 1035 were adequately described using linear and non-linear output compartments. The developed PK model could be used to describe the plasma concentration profiles using the linear output compartment interpreted as the urine compartment and the non-linear output compartment interpreted as the bile compartment. This PK model will be able to provide a more accurate prediction of the plasma concentration profiles under LLOQ.

  20. Biotransformation, excretion kinetics, and tissue distribution of an N-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazolylphenyl sulfonamide herbicide in rats.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, M F; Brown, A; Budevska, B O; Lam, Z; Payne, W G

    2001-08-01

    TY029, an N-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazolylphenyl sulfonamide herbicide, controls economically important weeds through inhibition of protoporphyrinogen oxygenase. Due to the potential for exposure to this compound in food and animal feed items, a rat metabolism study was required to define the biotransformation of this compound. Animals were exposed to single 50- and 2-mg/kg doses of TY029 [hydantoin-5-(14)C] by oral gavage. About 90% of the administered dose was excreted within 96 h after oral administration. Excretion plateaued after 48 h, and the cumulative sum of urinary or fecal excretion after 48 h was less than 5% of the orally administered dose. TY029 yielded seven major metabolites. While some metabolites were formed by epimerization around chiral centers, others were generated through hydrolytic bond cleavage and hydroxylations and subsequent oxidation of hydroxyl groups to carboxylic acids. One metabolite, about 6.1% of the dose, was observed only in the urine from low-dose female rats. This metabolite was characterized as a glutamate conjugate of an extensively oxidized analog of TY029. With the exception of the glutamate conjugate, the same metabolites were observed in the excreta of all dose groups. However, the relative ratios of the metabolites were different between various dose groups.

  1. Species differences in biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Bevan, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    Biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was investigated in rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs following intratracheal administration. (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P, in amounts of approximately 150 ng or 350 ..mu..g, was instilled into lungs and amounts of radioactivity excreted in bile were monitored for six hrs following administration. Differences in biliary excretion of (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P and/or metabolites among species were observed at low doses but not at high doses. Six hours after instillation of a low dose of B(a)P, 70, 54, and 62% of the dose was excreted in bile of rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs, respectively. Upon administration of the higher dose of B(a)P, approximately 50% of the dose was excreted in bile in six hrs by all species. Thus, rats and guinea pigs exhibit differences in biliary excretion of low and high doses of B(a)P whereas hamsters do not. Profiles of phase II metabolites in rats and hamsters were similar at both low and high doses, with the majority of metabolites being glucuronides and thioether conjugates. However, differences in relative amounts of these conjugates were observed between the two doses, with a shift towards a greater proportion of glucuronides at the higher dose. Metabolites in bile from guinea pigs were primarily thioether conjugates, which accounted for 88% of metabolites at the low dose and 95% at the high dose.

  2. Disposition of human drug preparations in the horse. I. Rectally administered indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Delbeke, F T; Debackere, M; Vynckier, L

    1991-06-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method to measure urinary indomethacin levels is described. In 0.5 ml urine, 1 micrograms/ml of indomethacin could be detected. Alkaline hydrolysis of urine resulted in the decomposition of indomethacin. When two suppositories of Indocid corresponding to 200 mg indomethacin were administered rectally to four horses the drug was rapidly absorbed and remained detectable in urine from 1 to 12 h. The excretion rate peaked after 2-3 h while the maximal concentration ranged from 18.5 to 80.6 micrograms/ml. Only 8 to 16% of the indomethacin dose was eliminated in urine after 12 h. A fraction of the dose was excreted as the glucuronide conjugate.

  3. Simplified structure of a new model to describe urinary excretion of plutonium after systemic, liver or pulmonary contamination of rats associated with Ca-DTPA treatments.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P; Sérandour, A L; Grémy, O; Phan, G; Tsapis, N; Abram, M C; Renault, D; Fattal, E; Benech, H; Deverre, J R; Poncy, J L

    2009-06-01

    This study validates, by targeted experiments, several modeling hypotheses for interpretation of urinary excretion of plutonium after Ca-DTPA treatments. Different formulations and doses of Ca-DTPA were administered to rats before or after systemic, liver or lung contamination with various chemical forms of plutonium. The biokinetics of plutonium was also characterized after i.v. injection of Pu-DTPA. Once formed, Pu-DTPA complexes are stable in most biological environments. Pu-DTPA present in circulating fluids is rapidly excreted in the urine, but 2-3% is retained, mainly in soft tissues, and is then excreted slowly in the urine after transfer to blood. Potentially, all intracellular monoatomic forms of plutonium could be decorporated after DTPA internalization involving slow urinary excretion of Pu-DTPA with half-lives varying from 2.5 to 6 days as a function of tissue retention. The ratio of fast to slow urinary excretion of Pu-DTPA depends on both plutonium contamination and Ca-DTPA treatment. Fast urinary excretion of Pu-DTPA corresponds to extracellular decorporation that occurs beyond a threshold of the free DTPA concentration in circulating fluids. Slow excretion corresponds mostly to intracellular decorporation and depends on the amount of intracellular DTPA. From these results, the structure of a simplified model is proposed for interpretation of data obtained with Ca-DTPA treatments after systemic, wound or pulmonary contamination by plutonium.

  4. Urinary trimethylselenonium excretion by the rat: effect of level and source of /sup 75/Se

    SciTech Connect

    Nahapetian, A.T.; Janghorbani, M.; Young, V.R.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore in rats the urinary metabolites of selenium (Se), by using (/sup 75/Se)selenomethionine, (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine, and (/sup 75/Se)selenite, and to assess the effects of low and high levels of Se intake on trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) excretion in urine. Male adult rats were adapted for 6 weeks to a commercial rat laboratory stock diet (0.25 ppm Se). They were then starved for 24 hours and given an oral dose of either low (16 micrograms Se/kg body weight) or high (1500 micrograms Se/kg body weight) Se as the test Se compounds. Appearance of radioactivity in TMSe and non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine was monitored for 48 hours. About 40% of the /sup 75/Se dose was excreted in urine. TMSe was the major urinary Se metabolite (57-69% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 16-25% of oral /sup 75/Se dose) at high, and a minor urinary Se metabolite (10% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 3-4% of oral /sup 75/Se dose) at low dose levels of Se and for all three Se test compounds. At least 80% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 26-42% of the orally administered /sup 75/Se were excreted as non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine under the latter condition. It is hypothesized that at a requirement intake of Se either a trace or no TMSe is excreted in urine, and it becomes a major excretory metabolite of Se when the dietary trace mineral intake exceeds a requirement level, probably serving as a means of detoxification.

  5. The effect of phenobarbital on the metabolism and excretion of thyroxine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, R.M.; Levin, A.A.; Posch, R.; Downing, J.C.

    1989-06-15

    The effect of phenobarbital on thyroid function and the metabolism and biliary excretion of thyroxine in rats was determined. Phenobarbital, administered for 2 weeks at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day, resulted in an increase in hepatic and thyroid gland weights, decreased circulating levels of T4, T3 and rT3, and increased TSH levels in male and female rats. After 3 months of treatment liver and thyroid weights were still increased; however, hormone values were not as markedly affected indicating that the rats had partially compensated for the effect on thyroid function. In thyroidectomized rats the plasma clearance of thyroxine was increased with phenobarbital. In bile duct cannulated phenobarbital-treated male rats the hepatic uptake at 4 hr was markedly increased. Bile flow was increased and the 4-hr cumulative biliary excretion of administered radioactivity was increased by 42%. Most of the increase in the excretion (76%) was accounted for by an increase in the excretion of thyroxine-glucuronide in phenobarbital-treated rats. Hepatic thyroxine-glucuronyltransferase activity in phenobarbital-treated rats expressed as picomoles per milligram of protein was increased by 40%; enzyme activity per gram of liver was increased by about twofold which, coupled with increased hepatic weight, resulted in about a threefold increase in total hepatic thyroxine-glucuronyltransferase activity in phenobarbital-treated rats as compared to that of controls. Qualitatively similar effects on metabolism, excretion, and enzyme induction were noted in female rats; however, the magnitude of increase was less than that observed in male rats. It is concluded that the effect of phenobarbital on thyroid function in rats is primarily a result of its effects on the hepatic disposition of thyroid hormone.

  6. Phase I study of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor onalespib (AT13387) administered on a daily for 2 consecutive days per week dosing schedule in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; Speranza, Giovanna; Chang, Lun-Ching; Polley, Eric C; Bishop, Rachel; Zhu, Weimin; Trepel, Jane B; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Kinders, Robert J; Phillips, Larry; Collins, Jerry; Lyons, John; Jeong, Woondong; Antony, Ramya; Chen, Alice P; Neckers, Len; Doroshow, James H; Kummar, Shivaani

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of heat shock 90 (Hsp90) molecular chaperones allows targeting of multiple proteins involved in tumorigenesis. We investigated the safety, recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of onalespib (AT13387), a potent synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, administered on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 of 28 day cycles (QDx2/week) in a phase I trial. This study followed an accelerated titration design with a starting dose of 20 mg/m(2)/dose and a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation design for dose level 4 (120 mg/m(2)/dose) and above. Additional patients were enrolled at the RP2D with mandatory paired tumor biopsies to assess modulation of 210 client proteins using reverse phase protein array analysis. Thirty-one patients were treated; RP2D was established at 160 mg/m(2)/dose on the QDx2/week schedule. Common toxicities were gastrointestinal, hepatic, and hematologic. Pharmacokinetic profile was linear and plasma levels increased proportionally with dose (T½ ~8 h). No responses were observed; eight patients had stable disease for > 2 cycles with one patient remaining on study for 6 cycles. Target engagement was demonstrated by transcriptional upregulation of Hsp70 and Hsp27 in PBMCs. Statistically significant modulation of client proteins was not achieved in the 9 paired tumor biopsies evaluated; however, hierarchical clustering revealed two subgroups of patients with differential patterns of protein expression. Further combination studies are needed in order to target prospective driver oncoproteins.

  7. Estimation of benchmark dose as the threshold levels of urinary cadmium, based on excretion of total protein, {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin, and N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase in cadmium nonpolluted regions in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Etsuko . E-mail: ekoba@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Suwazono, Yasushi; Uetani, Mirei; Inaba, Takeya; Oishi, Mitsuhiro; Kido, Teruhiko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nogawa, Koji

    2006-07-15

    Previously, we investigated the association between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and indicators of renal dysfunction, including total protein, {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta} {sub 2}-MG), and N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase (NAG). In 2778 inhabitants {>=}50 years of age (1114 men, 1664 women) in three different Cd nonpolluted areas in Japan, we showed that a dose-response relationship existed between renal effects and Cd exposure in the general environment without any known Cd pollution. However, we could not estimate the threshold levels of urinary Cd at that time. In the present study, we estimated the threshold levels of urinary Cd as the benchmark dose low (BMDL) using the benchmark dose (BMD) approach. Urinary Cd excretion was divided into 10 categories, and an abnormality rate was calculated for each. Cut-off values for urinary substances were defined as corresponding to the 84% and 95% upper limit values of the target population who have not smoked. Then we calculated the BMD and BMDL using a log-logistic model. The values of BMD and BMDL for all urinary substances could be calculated. The BMDL for the 84% cut-off value of {beta} {sub 2}-MG, setting an abnormal value at 5%, was 2.4 {mu}g/g creatinine (cr) in men and 3.3 {mu}g/g cr in women. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the threshold level of urinary Cd could be estimated in people living in the general environment without any known Cd-pollution in Japan, and the value was inferred to be almost the same as that in Belgium, Sweden, and China.

  8. Predicting when biliary excretion of parent drug is a major route of elimination in humans.

    PubMed

    Hosey, Chelsea M; Broccatelli, Fabio; Benet, Leslie Z

    2014-09-01

    Biliary excretion is an important route of elimination for many drugs, yet measuring the extent of biliary elimination is difficult, invasive, and variable. Biliary elimination has been quantified for few drugs with a limited number of subjects, who are often diseased patients. An accurate prediction of which drugs or new molecular entities are significantly eliminated in the bile may predict potential drug-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) characterizes significant routes of drug elimination, identifies potential transporter effects, and is useful in understanding drug-drug interactions. Class 1 and 2 drugs are primarily eliminated in humans via metabolism and will not exhibit significant biliary excretion of parent compound. In contrast, class 3 and 4 drugs are primarily excreted unchanged in the urine or bile. Here, we characterize the significant elimination route of 105 orally administered class 3 and 4 drugs. We introduce and validate a novel model, predicting significant biliary elimination using a simple classification scheme. The model is accurate for 83% of 30 drugs collected after model development. The model corroborates the observation that biliarily eliminated drugs have high molecular weights, while demonstrating the necessity of considering route of administration and extent of metabolism when predicting biliary excretion. Interestingly, a predictor of potential metabolism significantly improves predictions of major elimination routes of poorly metabolized drugs. This model successfully predicts the major elimination route for poorly permeable/poorly metabolized drugs and may be applied prior to human dosing.

  9. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response.

  10. Influence of different degrees of reduced renal mass on the renal and hepatic disposition of administered cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K.

    1997-06-27

    The present study was designed to evaluate, in rats, the effect of varying degrees of reduced renal mass on the disposition of administered cadmium. As part of this evaluation, the intrarenal, hepatic, and hematological disposition of cadmium and the urinary and fecal excretion of cadmium were studied and characterized in control, uninephrectomized (NPX), and 75% nephrectomized (75% NPX) rats 1 d, 2 d, and 7 d after the intravenous injection of a nonnephrotoxic 8.9 {mu}mol/kg dose of cadmium chloride. Renal accumulation of cadmium was reduced significantly in the 75% NPX rats, but not in the NPX rats, between d 2 and 7 after the injection of cadmium. This diminution in cadmium accumulation was most likely due to diminished glomerular filtration rate and renal clearance of cadmium induced by 75% nephrectomy. Despite reduced glomerular filtration rate, the cumulative urinary excretion of cadmium in the 75% NPX rats was significantly greater than that in either the NPX rats or the control rats. However, that very little of the administered dose of cadmium was excreted in the urine by any of the three groups of rats. Interestingly, the content of cadmium in the liver was significantly greater in 75% NPX rats than in NPX or control rats between d 1 and 7 after the injection of cadmium. Moreover, the 75% NPX rats excreted significantly less cadmium in the feces over the 7 d of study than did the other 2 groups of rats, indicating that 75% nephrectomy causes a significant alteration in one or more of the mechanisms involved in the fecal excretion of cadmium. in summary, the findings from the present study indicate that the renal and hepatic handling of administered cadmium in rats changes significantly when renal mass is reduced by 75%. Further studies are needed to better characterize the effects of reductions of renal mass, which impair renal function significantly, on both the disposition and toxicity of cadmium in renal and hepatic tissues. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Delayed methotrexate excretion in infants and young children with primary central nervous system tumors and postoperative fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Karen D.; Panetta, John C.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Patay, Zoltan; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Broniscer, Alberto; Robinson, Giles; Boop, Frederick A.; Klimo, Paul; Ward, Deborah; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) has been used to treat children with central nervous system tumors. Accumulation of MTX within pleural, peritoneal, or cardiac effusions has led to delayed excretion and increased risk of systemic toxicity. This retrospective study analyzed the association of intracranial post-resection fluid collections with MTX plasma disposition in infants and young children with brain tumors. Methods Brain MRI findings were analyzed for postoperative intracranial fluid collections in 75 pediatric patients treated with HD-MTX and for whom serial MTX plasma concentrations ([MTX]) were collected. Delayed plasma excretion was defined as [MTX] ≥1μM at 42 hours (h). Leucovorin was administered at 42 h and then every 6 h until [MTX] <0.1μM. Population and individual MTX pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Results Fifty-eight patients had intracranial fluid collections present. Population average (inter-individual variation) MTX clearance was 96.0 ml/min/m2 (41.1 CV%) and increased with age. Of the patients with intracranial fluid collections, 24 had delayed excretion; only 2 of the 17 without fluid collections (p<0.04) had delayed excretion. Eleven patients had grade 3 or 4 toxicities attributed to HD-MTX. No significant difference was observed in intracranial fluid collection, total leucovorin dosing, or hydration fluids between those with and without toxicity. Conclusions Although an intracranial fluid collection is associated with delayed MTX excretion, HD-MTX can be safely administered with monitoring of infants and young children with intracranial fluid collections. Infants younger than one year may need additional monitoring to avoid toxicity. PMID:25342291

  12. Fecal steroid excretion is increased in rats by oral administration of gymnemic acids contained in Gymnema sylvestre leaves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Tsumura, Y; Tonogai, Y; Shibata, T

    1999-06-01

    Gymnemic acids are the saponins with a triterpenoid structure contained in Gymnema sylvestre leaves and have the hypoglycemic effects. In spite of the cholesterol-binding properties of saponins, the effect of gymnemic acids on cholesterol metabolism has not been elucidated to date. We investigated the effects of gymnemic acids on fecal steroid excretion in rats. Three kinds of extracts from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, extract (GSE), acid precipitate (GSA) and column fractionate (GSF), of which the gymnemagenin (an aglycone of gymnemic acids) concentrations are 58.87, 161.6, and 363.3 mg/g respectively, were used for the experiments. These were administered to rats orally at the dose of 0.05-1.0 g/kg for 22 d. Rats were given free access to water and nonpurified diet without cholesterol, and the differences in fecal excretion of steroids and gymnemic acids were investigated. Although there were no significant effects of GSE, GSA and GSF decreased body weight gain and food intakes in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). GSF (1.0 g/kg) significantly increased fecal excretion of neutral steroids and bile acids in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05), especially those of cholesterol and cholic acid (CA)-derived bile acids. The increases in fecal steroid excretion of cholesterol, total neutral steroids, total bile acids and CA-related bile acids were acute and significantly correlated with fecal gymnemagenin levels (r2 = 0.2316-0.9861, P < 0. 05). These results demonstrated for the first time that a high dose of gymnemic acids increases fecal cholesterol and CA-derived bile acid excretion. Further studies are needed to clarify the effect of gymnemic acids on cholesterol metabolism.

  13. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  14. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  15. The Effects of Probenecid and Thiazides and Their Combination on the Urinary Excretion of Electrolytes and on Acid-base Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, D. A.; Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The effects of commonly used therapeutic doses of hydrochlorothiazide and probenecid, given singly and in combination, on the urinary excretion of monovalent and divalent ions and on acid-base equilibrium were studied in four patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. Probenecid had no effect on the urinary excretion of monovalent ions but resulted in a sustained increase in the urinary excretion of calcium, magnesium and citrate and a temporary increase in the urinary excretion of ammonium, in addition to its well-known effects on uric acid metabolism. A temporary fall in serum phosphorus levels was also observed. Probenecid also modified the response to hydrochlorothiazide in that the urinary excretion of calcium, magnesium and citrate was greater during combined therapy than when hydrochlorothiazide was administered alone. Probenecid prevented or abolished the increase in serum uric acid levels associated with the use of thiazide but did not modify the effects of hydrochlorothiazide on the urinary excretion of sodium, chloride, potassiu, phosphorus, ammonium, titratable acid and bicarbonate. PMID:5469617

  16. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm(3) (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted.

  17. Synthesis and dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity evaluation of intravenously administered polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Balan; Sathish, Shanmugam; Balakumar, Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are being used in medical imaging, drug delivery, cancer therapy, and so on. However, there is a direct need to identify any nanotoxicity associated with these nanoparticles. However uncommon, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major health concern that challenges pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory agencies alike. In this study we have synthesized and evaluated the dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity of polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PUSPIOs). To assess the hepatotoxicity of intravenously injected PUSPIOs, alterations in basic clinical parameters, hematological parameters, hemolysis assay, serum levels of liver marker enzymes, serum and liver lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, enzymatic antioxidant levels, and finally histology of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain, and heart tissues were studied in control and experimental Wistar rat groups over a 30-day period. The results of our study showed a significant increase in the aspartate transaminase (AST) enzyme activity at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week. Besides, alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) enzyme activity showed a slender increase when compared with control experimental groups. A significant increase in the serum and liver LPO levels at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week was also observed. Histological analyses of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart tissue samples showed no obvious uncharacteristic changes. In conclusion, PUSPIOs were found to posses excellent biocompatibility and Wistar rats showed much better drug tolerance to the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. per week than the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. twice a week for the period of 30 days.

  18. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm3 for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm3 (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  19. Effect of low doses of Aspergillus niger phytase on growth performance, bone strength, and nutrient absorption and excretion by growing and finishing swine fed corn-soybean meal diets deficient in available phosphorus and calcium.

    PubMed

    Veum, T L; Ellersieck, M R

    2008-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of low doses of Aspergillus niger (AN) phytase for growing and finishing pigs fed corn-soybean meal (SBM) diets with narrow Ca:P ratios that were about 0.9 g/kg deficient in available P and Ca. Experiment 1 utilized 120 pigs with an early finisher period from 51.5 +/- 0.2 to 89.7 +/- 0.9 kg of BW and a late finisher period that ended at 122.5 +/- 2.0 kg of BW. During each period, treatments were the low-P diets with 0, 150, 300, or 450 units (U) of AN phytase added/kg of diet, and a positive control (PC) diet. There were linear increases (P < or = 0.001) in bone strength and ash weight, the absorption of P (g/d and %) and Ca (%), and overall ADG (P = 0.01) with increasing concentration of AN phytase. Pigs fed the diets with 150, 300, or 450 U of AN phytase/kg did not differ from pigs fed the PC diet in growth performance overall, and pigs fed the diets with 300 or 450 U of AN phytase did not differ in P and Ca absorption (g/d) or bone ash weight from pigs fed the PC diet. However, only pigs fed the diet with 450 U of AN phytase/kg had bone strength similar to that of pigs fed the PC diet. Experiment 2 utilized 120 pigs in a grower phase from 25.3 +/- 0.1 to 57.8 +/- 0.8 kg of BW and a finisher phase that ended at 107.6 +/- 1.0 kg of BW. Treatments were the low-P diet with AN phytase added at 300, 500, or 700 U/kg of grower diet, and 150, 250, or 350 U/kg of finisher diet, respectively, resulting in treatments AN300/150, AN500/250, and AN700/350. Growth performance and the absorption (g/d) of P and Ca for the grower and finisher phases were not different for pigs fed the diets containing AN phytase and pigs fed the PC diets. However, pigs fed the PC diets excreted more fecal P (g/d, P < or = 0.01) during the grower and more P and Ca (g/d, P < 0.001) during the finisher phases than the pigs fed the diets with phytase. There were linear increases (P < or = 0.05) in bone strength and bone ash weight with

  20. The co-solvent Cremophor EL limits absorption of orally administered paclitaxel in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malingré, M M; Schellens, J H; Van Tellingen, O; Ouwehand, M; Bardelmeijer, H A; Rosing, H; Koopman, F J; Schot, M E; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Beijnen, J H

    2001-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the co-solvents Cremophor EL and polysorbate 80 on the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel. 6 patients received in a randomized setting, one week apart oral paclitaxel 60 mg m(-2) dissolved in polysorbate 80 or Cremophor EL. For 3 patients the amount of Cremophor EL was 5 ml m(-2), for the other three 15 ml m(-2). Prior to paclitaxel administration patients received 15 mg kg(-1) oral cyclosporin A to enhance the oral absorption of the drug. Paclitaxel formulated in polysorbate 80 resulted in a significant increase in the maximal concentration (C(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of paclitaxel in comparison with the Cremophor EL formulations (P = 0.046 for both parameters). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel C(max) and AUC values were 0.10 +/- 0.06 microM and 1.29 +/- 0.99 microM h(-1), respectively, whereas these values were 0.31 +/- 0.06 microM and 2.61 +/- 1.54 microM h(-1), respectively, when formulated in polysorbate 80. Faecal data revealed a decrease in excretion of unchanged paclitaxel for the polysorbate 80 formulation compared to the Cremophor EL formulations. The amount of paclitaxel excreted in faeces was significantly correlated with the amount of Cremophor EL excreted in faeces (P = 0.019). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel excretion in faeces was 38.8 +/- 13.0% of the administered dose, whereas this value was 18.3 +/-15.5% for the polysorbate 80 formulation. The results show that the co-solvent Cremophor EL is an important factor limiting the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel from the intestinal lumen. They highlight the need for designing a better drug formulation in order to increase the usefulness of the oral route of paclitaxel

  1. Two doses of parenterally administered split influenza virus vaccine elicited high serum IgG concentrations which effectively limited viral shedding upon challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Hovden, A-O; Cox, R J; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2005-10-01

    We have previously found that whole influenza virus vaccine induced a more rapid and stronger humoral response, particularly after the first dose of vaccine, than split virus vaccine in mice. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of whole and split influenza virus vaccines in mice using a nonlethal upper respiratory tract challenge model. We have also investigated the immunological correlates associated with no or very little viral shedding after viral challenge. Vaccination resulted in reduced viral shedding and shortened the duration of infection by at least 2 days. After one dose of vaccine, whole virus vaccine generally resulted in less viral shedding than split virus vaccine. In contrast, two doses of split virus vaccine, particularly the highest vaccine strengths of 15 and 30 microg HA, most effectively limited viral replication and these mice had high concentrations of prechallenge influenza-specific serum IgG. The vaccine formulation influenced the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, and this IgG subclass profile was maintained upon challenge to some extent, although it did not influence the level of viral shedding. The concentration of postvaccination serum IgG showed an inverse relationship with the level of viral shedding after viral challenge. Therefore, serum IgG is an important factor in limiting viral replication in the upper respiratory tract upon challenge of an antigenically similar virus.

  2. Enhancement of radiopharmaceutical excretion by chemical interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Sacker, D.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The goal was to find methods of decreasing the radiation dose after radionuclide studies, by giving a compound that will increase the rate of excretion of the radionuclide. Sprague - 1 Dawley rats were given Tc-99m pertechnetate, Ga-67 citrate or Tl-201 chloride intravenously followed at intervals of 1 to 24 hours by one of the following compounds: desferroxamine (DFO), 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol (BAL), triethylene tetraamine hexaacetic acid (TETHA), stannous tartarate, bleomycin (BLEO), 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), DTPA+SnCl.2H/sub 2/O, dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), and ferric-cyanoferrate (IT)(Prussian blue, PB). All the agents except PB are chelators. Some of these agents enhance excretion through the urinary tract (DFO), while most are excreted through the bile. PB was shown to increase Cs excrection through the G.I. tract. (ACR)

  3. Excretion of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Saito, Takeshi; Fortner, Neil; Abraham, Tsadik; Gustafson, Richard A.; Smith, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Sweat testing is a noninvasive technique for monitoring drug exposure over a 7-day period in treatment, criminal justice, and employment settings. We evaluated Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) excretion in 11 daily cannabis users after cessation of drug use. PharmChek® sweat patches worn for 7 days were analyzed for THC by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the method was 0.4 ng THC/patch. Sweat patches worn the first week of continuously monitored abstinence had THC above the United States Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration’s proposed cutoff concentration for federal workplace testing of 1 ng THC/patch. Mean ± S.E.M. THC concentrations were 3.85 ± 0.86 ng THC/patch. Eight of 11 subjects had negative patches the second week and one produced THC positive patches for four weeks of monitored abstinence. We also tested daily and weekly sweat patches from 7 subjects who were administered oral doses of up to 14.8 mg THC/day for five consecutive days. In this oral THC administration study, no daily or weekly patches had THC above the LOQ; concurrent plasma THC concentrations were all less than 6.1 μg/L. In conclusion, using proposed federal cutoff concentrations, most daily cannabis users will have a positive sweat patch in the first week after ceasing drug use and a negative patch after subsequent weeks, although patches may remain positive for four weeks or more. Oral ingestion of up to 14.8 mg THC daily does not produce a THC positive sweat patch test. PMID:17481836

  4. The effect of lithium salts on the urinary excretion of α-oxoglutarate in man

    PubMed Central

    Bond, P. A.; Jenner, F. A.; Lee, C. R.; Lenton, Elizabeth; Pollitt, R. J.; Sampson, Gwyneth A.

    1972-01-01

    1. Lithium ions in therapeutic doses cause an increase in the renal excretion of α-oxoglutarate and glutaric acid. 2. The excretion is probably due to reduced renal tubular reabsorption. 3. Neither citrate, lactate nor pyruvate excretion rises. PMID:5084816

  5. Influence of renal insufficiency on the pharmacokinetics of cicletanine and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and prostanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, N; Geoffroy, J; Pozet, N; Cuisinaud, G; Benzoni, D; Zech, P Y; Sassard, J

    1988-01-01

    1. The kinetics of a single oral dose (300 mg) of cicletanine a new antihypertensive drug with diuretic properties, and its effects on the urinary excretion of electrolytes and of the major stable metabolites of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were studied in patients with normal renal function (n = 6), mild (n = 9) and severe (n = 10) renal insufficiency. 2. In normotensive subjects with normal renal function, cicletanine was rapidly and regularly absorbed, its apparent elimination half-life established around 7 h, and both its renal clearance (0.4 ml min-1) and its cumulative renal excretion (0.85% of the administered dose), were low. Mild renal insufficiency did not significantly alter these parameters, while severe renal impairment reduced the renal clearance and the cumulative urinary excretion of cicletanine and increased its apparent elimination half-life (31 h). However the area under the plasma curve was not changed due to reduced plasma concentrations in these patients. 3. Cicletanine induced a rapid and marked (four fold as a mean) increase in the urinary excretion of water, sodium and potassium which lasted for 6 to 10 h, in subjects with normal renal function. Renal insufficiency did not alter the slope of the calculated plasma concentration-effects curves but reduced the maximum effect observed for water, sodium and potassium. 4. A single oral dose of cicletanine did not change the urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 in the three groups of patients studied, the basal values of which being found to be closely related to the creatinine clearance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358898

  6. Comparison of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin administered at various dosing regimens to hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia: pharmacodynamic target attainment study using North American surveillance data for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Noreddin, Ayman M; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2005-08-01

    This work aimed at determining the target attainment potential of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin in specific age-related patient populations such as elderly (> or =65 years) versus younger (<65 years) hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Previously described population pharmacokinetic models of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin administration in patients with serious CAP were utilised to simulate gatifloxacin and levofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic simulations and susceptibility data for Streptococcus pneumoniae from the ongoing national surveillance study, Canadian Respiratory Organism Susceptibility Study (CROSS), were then used to produce pharmacodynamic indices of free-drug area under the curve over 24h relative to the minimum inhibitory concentration (free-drug AUC(0-24)/MIC(all)). Monte Carlo simulations were then used to analyse target attainment both of gatifloxacin and levofloxacin to achieve free-drug AUC(0-24)/MIC(all)> or =30 against S. pneumoniae in patients with CAP. Dosing regimens for gatifloxacin were 400 mg once daily (qd) administered to younger patients (<65 years) and gatifloxacin 200 mg qd to elderly patients (> or =65 years). Dosing regimens for levofloxacin were simulated as 500 mg, 750 mg and 1000 mg qd administered to elderly patients as well as younger patients. Monte Carlo simulations using gatifloxacin 400mg against S. pneumoniae yielded probabilities of achieving free-drug AUC(0-24)/MIC(all) of 30 of 96.6% for all patients, 92.3% for younger patients and 97.7% for elderly patients. When administered to elderly patients, a reduced dose of gatifloxacin 200mg qd could achieve a target attainment potential of 91.4%. Monte Carlo simulation using levofloxacin 500 mg qd yielded probabilities of achieving free-drug AUC(0-24)/MIC(all) of 30 of 92.3% for all patients, 95.7% for elderly patients compared with 72.7% for younger patients. Using levofloxacin 750 mg and 1000 mg qd had probabilities of achieving free

  7. Efficacy and safety of ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate administered in a hydrofluoroalkane metered-dose inhaler for the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Amal; Bhargava, Salil; Singh, Virendra; Talwar, Deepak; Whig, Jagdeep; Rebello, Juliet; Purandare, Shrinivas; Gogtay, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has contributed to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer resulting in serious health concerns. Ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate CFC-pressurized metered-dose inhalers (IB/SAL-CFC pMDI) have been in widespread use for many years without any apparent ill consequences. This combination has now been reformulated using the hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant. This study sought to establish the clinical noninferiority of a new HFA-containing IB/SAL pMDI to the conventional IB/SAL-CFC pMDI in subjects with mild/moderate COPD. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study in two consecutive periods: a 14-day run-in period followed by a 85-day treatment period. Eligible mild-to-moderate stable COPD subjects aged 40−75 years were enrolled into the study and entered the run-in period during which subjects withdrew all the bronchodilators, except for salbutamol as rescue medication. Subjects were randomized to 85 days treatment with either IB/SAL-HFA or IB/SAL-CFC, 20 μg qid. Results Of the 290 randomized patients, 249 completed the study. The primary efficacy variable was the change in forced expiratory volume in one second from predose to 60 minutes after dosing on day 85. At the end of the treatment period, the adjusted mean change in forced expiratory volume in one second at 60 minutes was 123 mL in the IB/SAL-HFA pMDI group and 115 mL in the IB/SAL-CFC pMDI group. Because the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference (−62 mL) was well within the noninferiority margin (−100 mL), the HFA formulation was deemed clinically noninferior to the CFC formulation. This finding was supported by secondary efficacy assessments. Both formulations of IB/SAL were well tolerated during the prolonged multiple dosing. Conclusion It is concluded that IB/SAL-HFA pMDI provides effective bronchodilation of similar degree to that achieved with IB/SAL-CFC p

  8. Lack of significant effect of bilastine administered at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses and concomitantly with ketoconazole on ventricular repolarization: results of a thorough QT study (TQTS) with QT-concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyl, Benoît; Kabbaj, Meriam; Azzam, Sara; Sologuren, Ander; Valiente, Román; Reinbolt, Elizabeth; Roupe, Kathryn; Blanco, Nathalie; Wheeler, William

    2012-06-01

    The effect of bilastine on cardiac repolarization was studied in 30 healthy participants during a multiple-dose, triple-dummy, crossover, thorough QT study that included 5 arms: placebo, active control (400 mg moxifloxacin), bilastine at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses (20 mg and 100 mg once daily, respectively), and bilastine 20 mg administered with ketoconazole 400 mg. Time-matched, triplicate electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded with 13 time points extracted predose and 16 extracted over 72 hours post day 4 dosing. Four QT/RR corrections were implemented: QTcB; QTcF; a linear individual correction (QTcNi), the primary correction; and a nonlinear one (QTcNnl). Moxifloxacin was associated with a significant increase in QTcNi at all time points between 1 and 12 hours, inclusively. Bilastine administration at 20 mg and 100 mg had no clinically significant impact on QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 5.02 ms; upper confidence limit [UCL] of the 1-sided, 95% confidence interval, 7.87 ms). Concomitant administration of ketoconazole and bilastine 20 mg induced a clinically relevant increase in QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 9.3 ms; UCL, 12.16 ms). This result was most likely related to the cardiac effect of ketoconazole because for all time points, bilastine plasma concentrations were lower than those observed following the supratherapeutic dose.

  9. Virus excretion in smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, J. K.; Mitra, A. C.; Mukherjee, M. K.; De, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Throat swabs of 34 of 328 family contacts of 52 smallpox cases, examined 4-8 days after the onset of the disease in the family, were positive for variola virus. The log titre of virus per swab ranged from 2 to 3.95. A higher proportion of unvaccinated than of vaccinated contacts excreted the virus. Only 4 of the virus-positive contacts developed clinical smallpox; this occurred 5-7 days after their swabs were examined. Excretion of virus in the throats of these contacts, a few of whom were in the incubation period of the disease, suggests the possibility that they could have spread the infection. This possibility, if kept in mind, may help in tracing the source of infection or in determining the incubation period in a few instances when difficulty is experienced. PMID:4359679

  10. Developmental toxicity of clarified slurry oil, syntower bottoms, and distillate aromatic extract administered as a single oral dose to pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Clarified slurry oil (CSO), syntower bottoms (STB), and distillate aromatic extract (DAE) are refinery streams produced by processing crude oil. Available data indicate that some refinery streams are developmentally toxic by the dermal route of exposure. However, there is no conclusive evidence for their being teratogenic. The present studies were designed to further explore the suspected teratogenic potency of refinery streams while at the same time limiting embryolethality. In general, evidence of maternal toxicity (i.e., decreased body weight gain, decreased thymus weight) was observed at doses greater than or equal to 500 mg/kg. For each refinery stream tested, the incidence of resorption was greatest on GD 11. A common pattern of fetal malformations was observed for all of the refinery streams tested and included cleft palate, diaphragmatic hernia, and paw and tail defects. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations were greatest on GD 11 and 12 for fetuses exposed to CSO; on GD 13 and 14, the incidence of malformation was comparable for CSO- and STB-exposed fetuses. The incidence of visceral anomalies was greatest on GD 11-13 for fetuses exposed to CSO and STB; on Gestation D 14, the incidence was comparable for each of the refinery streams tested. In general, the ability to produce adverse effects on development was greatest for CSO and least for DAE. Effects produced by STB were comparable to or less severe than those observed for CSO. 24 refs., 11 tabs.

  11. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Brivanib in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Eric; Fischer, Bruce S.; Gong, Jiachang; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Gan, Jinping; Pursley, Janice; Patricia, Daniel; Williams, Daphne; Ganapathi, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, mass balance, metabolism, routes and extent of elimination, and safety of a single oral dose of 14C-labeled brivanib alaninate and the safety and tolerability of brivanib after multiple doses in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. This was a two-part, single-center, open-label, single oral-dose (part A) followed by multiple-dose (part B) study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. In part A, patients received a single dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate and in part B patients received 800 mg of nonradiolabeled brivanib alaninate every day. Four patients (two white, two black: two with non–small-cell lung cancer, one with ovarian cancer, and one with renal cell carcinoma) were treated in both parts. The median time to reach the maximal plasma concentration of brivanib was 1 h, geometric mean maximal plasma concentration was 6146 ng/ml, mean terminal half-life was 13.8 h, and geometric mean apparent oral clearance was 14.7 l/h. After a single oral dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate, 12.2 and 81.5% of administered radioactivity was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. Brivanib alaninate was completely converted to the active moiety, brivanib, and the predominant route of elimination was fecal. Renal excretion of unchanged brivanib was minimal. Brivanib was well tolerated; fatigue was the most frequent adverse event occurring in all patients and the most frequent treatment-related adverse event in three (75%). The best clinical response in one patient was stable disease; the other three had progressive disease. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized after a single 800-mg oral dose; the majority of drug-related radioactivity was excreted in feces. PMID:20671097

  12. Urinary excretion of N-nitroso compounds in rats fed sodium nitrite and/or hot dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Anwar, Muhammad M; Zahid, Muhammad; Shostrom, Valerie; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2014-10-20

    Nitrite-treated meat is a reported risk factor for colon cancer. Mice that ingested sodium nitrite (NaNO2) or hot dogs (a nitrite-treated product) showed increased fecal excretion of apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC). Here, we investigated for the first time whether rats excrete increased amounts of ANC in their urine after they are fed NaNO2 and/or hot dogs. Rats were treated for 7 days with NaNO2 in drinking water or were fed hot dogs. Their 24 h urine samples were analyzed for ANC by thermal energy analysis on days 1-4 after nitrite or hot dog treatment was stopped. For two rats fed 480 mg NaNO2/L drinking water, mean urinary ANC excretion on days 1-4 was 30, 5.2, 2.5, and 0.8 nmol/day, respectively. For two to eight rats/dose given varied NaNO2 doses, mean urinary ANC output on day 1 increased from 0.9 (for no nitrite) to 37 (for 1000 mg NaNO2/L drinking water) nmol ANC/day. Urine samples of four rats fed 40-60% hot dogs contained 12-13 nmol ANC on day 1. Linear regression analysis showed highly significant correlations between urinary ANC excretion on day 1 after stopping treatment and varied (a) NaNO2 level in drinking water for rats fed semipurified or commercials diet and (b) hot dog levels in the diet. Some correlations remained significant up to 4 days after nitrite treatment was stopped. Urinary output of ANC precursors (compounds that yield ANC after mild nitrosation) for rats fed semipurified or commercial diet was 11-17 or 23-48 μmol/day, respectively. Nitrosothiols and iron nitrosyls were not detected in urinary ANC and ANCP. Excretion of urinary ANC was about 60% of fecal ANC excretion for 1 to 2 days after NaNO2 was fed. Administered NaNO2 was not excreted unchanged in rat urine. We conclude that urinary ANC excretion in humans could usefully be surveyed to indicate exposure to N-nitroso compounds.

  13. Bioavailability, tissue distribution, and excretion characteristics of the novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitor tolsultazolamide in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-da; Shi, Yong-ping; Yin, Jing; Pan, Zhi-yuan; Cui, Wen-yu; Zhang, Yan-fang; Wang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Tolsultazolamide, a novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, is designed for the prophylaxis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion characteristics of tolsultazolamide and the sex difference in pharmacokinetics in rats. Methods: For pharmacokinetic study, rats were intravenously injected tolsultazolamide at 1 and 2 mg/kg or orally administered tolsultazolamide at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg) in a pharmacokinetic study. The concentrations of tolsultazolamide in plasma were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography, with a liquid–liquid extraction. For tissue distribution study, tolsultazolamide (80 mg/kg) was orally administered to overnight fasted rats (six per group and three per sex). Samples were collected from the brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, muscle, kidney, stomach, fat, intestines, pancreas and sexual gland. For excretion study, tolsultazolamide (40 mg/kg) was orally administered to 6 rats (three per sex). The urine, feces, and bile samples were collected at 24, 48, and 72 h. Results: After its intravenous administration, tolsultazolamide was rapidly eliminated from the plasma, with T1/2 of about 60–90 min. The AUC0–t and the initial concentration (C0) values were proportional to the intravenous doses. After its oral administration, tolsultazolamide showed dose-independent pharmacokinetic characteristics, with Tmax and T1/2 of approximately 2 h and 5–7 h, respectively, and good oral absolute bioavailability of about 60%. Tolsultazolamide was distributed widely in various tissues. The highest tolsultazolamide levels were detected in the stomach, intestine, spleen, lung, and kidney. Total excretion of unchanged tolsultazolamide in the urine, feces, and bile was less than 2%. The Cmax and AUC of tolsultazolamide were significantly higher in female rats than those in male rats. Clearance and volume of distribution were greater in male rats than

  14. Relative bioavailability of single doses of prolonged-release tacrolimus administered as a suspension, orally or via a nasogastric tube, compared with intact capsules: a phase 1 study in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Undre, Nasrullah; Dickinson, James

    2017-01-01

    Objective Tacrolimus, an immunosuppressant widely used in solid organ transplantation, is available as a prolonged-release capsule for once-daily oral administration. In the immediate postsurgical period, if patients cannot take intact capsules orally, tacrolimus therapy is often initiated as a suspension of the capsule contents, delivered orally or via a nasogastric tube. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension versus intact capsules in healthy participants. Design A phase 1, open-label, single-dose, cross-over study. Setting A single clinical research unit. Participants In total, 20 male participants, 18–55 years old, entered and completed the study. Interventions All participants received nasogastric administration of tacrolimus 10 mg suspension in treatment period 1, with randomisation to oral administration of suspension or intact capsules in periods 2 and 3. Blood concentration–time profile over 144 hours was used to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary end point: relative bioavailability of prolonged-release intact capsule versus oral or nasogastric administration of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension (area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity post-tacrolimus dose (AUC0–∞); AUC measured until the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–tz); maximum observed concentration (Cmax); time to Cmax (Tmax)). Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. Results Relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension administered orally was similar to intact capsules, with a ratio of least-square means for AUC0–tz and AUC0–∞ of 1.05 (90% CI 0.96 to 1.14). Bioavailability was lower with suspension administered via a nasogastric tube versus intact capsules (17%; ratio 0.83; CI 0.76 to 0.92). Cmax was higher for oral and nasogastric suspension (30% and 28%, respectively), and median Tmax was shorter

  15. Systemic lanthanum is excreted in the bile of rats.

    PubMed

    Damment, Stephen J P; Pennick, Michael

    2007-06-15

    Lanthanum carbonate is a non-calcium-based oral phosphate binder for the control of hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease Stage 5. As part of its pre-clinical safety evaluation, studies were conducted in rats to determine the extent of absorption and routes of excretion. Following oral gavage of a single 1500 mg/kg dose, the peak plasma lanthanum concentration was 1.04+/-0.31 ng/mL, 8 h post-dose. Lanthanum was almost completely bound to plasma proteins (>99.7%). Within 24h of administration of a single oral dose, 97.8+/-2.84% of the lanthanum was recovered in the faeces of rats. Comparing plasma exposure after oral and intravenous administration of lanthanum yielded an absolute oral bioavailability of 0.0007%. Following intravenous administration of lanthanum chloride (0.3 mg/kg), 74.1+/-5.82% of the dose (96.9+/-0.50% of recovered lanthanum) was excreted in faeces in 42 days, and in bile-duct cannulated rats, 10.0+/-2.46% of the dose (85.6+/-2.97% of recovered lanthanum) was excreted in bile in 5 days. Renal excretion was negligible, with <2% of the intravenous dose recovered in urine. These studies demonstrate that lanthanum undergoes extremely low intestinal absorption and that absorbed drug is predominantly excreted in the bile.

  16. The excretion of pethidine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    ASATOOR, A M; LONDON, D R; MILNE, M D; SIMENHOFF, M L

    1963-04-01

    The excretion of pethidine and its metabolite norpethidine is increased in acid urine and decreased in alkaline urine. Excretion of these two bases is the main route of removal of pethidine from the body if the urine is highly acid. If the urine is alkaline, excretion of the hydrolysis products meperidinic and normeperidinic acids, both as free acids and as conjugates, is the more important means of elimination of the drug. Acidification of the urine with ammonium chloride is indicated in the therapy of cases of pethidine poisoning in patients with reduced metabolic breakdown of the drug by the microsomal enzyme systems within liver cells. Reversed-phase chromatography of the dinitrophenyl derivative of norpethidine may prove to be of forensic importance in the diagnosis of pethidine poisoning or of pethidine addiction. Norpethidine can be detected in the urine by this method for at least 3 days after the last dose of pethidine. Analytical sensitivity is increased by acidification of the urine which produces a temporary rise of the excretion rate.

  17. Relationships between biomarkers of exposure and toxicokinetics in Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice administered single doses of acrylamide and glycidamide and multiple doses of acrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Tareke, Eden; Twaddle, Nathan C.; McDaniel, L. Patrice; Churchwell, Mona I.; Young, John F.; Doerge, Daniel R. . E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov

    2006-11-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells and carcinogenic in rodents. AA is also formed in many commonly consumed starchy foods during cooking. Our previous toxicokinetic investigations of AA and its important genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide (GA), in rodents showed that AA is highly bioavailable from oral routes of administration, is widely distributed to tissues and that the dietary route, in particular, favors metabolism to GA. Measurements of DNA adducts in many tissues supported the hypothesis that AA is carcinogenic in rodent bioassays through metabolism to GA. The current investigation describes the development and validation of methodology for measuring hemoglobin (Hb) adducts with AA and GA in the same rodents previously used for toxicokinetic and DNA adduct measurements. The goal was to investigate possible relationships between these circulating biomarkers of exposure and serum toxicokinetic parameters for AA and GA and tissue GA-DNA adducts in rodents from both single and repeated dosing with AA. Significant correlations were observed between GA-Hb and liver GA-DNA adducts for either single or multiple dosing regimens with AA. Using available GA-Hb adduct data, empirical and allometric relationships permitted estimation of liver DNA adducts in humans in the range of 0.06-0.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides. This approach may prove useful in extrapolating human cancer risks from findings in rodent bioassays.

  18. Homeostatic control of manganese excretion in the neonatal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ballatori, N.; Miles, E.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and suckling animals showed that immature animals have a greatly diminished capacity to excrete manganese and therefore were considered to be unable to regulate tissue manganese concentrations. In contrast, the present studies indicate that suckling rats have the capacity to excrete excess manganese at rates nearly comparable to those of adults. Eight- to 10-day-old rats given a tracer dose of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ (essentially carrier free), either via gavage or by intraperitoneal injection showed little elimination of the /sup 54/Mn until the 18-19th day of life, when there was an abrupt increase in the rate of the metal's excretion. However, when manganese was given in doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg, the young animals excreted from 30-70% of the dose in only 4 days, at which time a new rate of excretion was achieved. This enhanced rate of excretion remained constant until the 18-19th day of life, when it was again accelerated. Biliary excretion of manganese, the primary route for the elimination of the metal, was only 30-60% lower in 14-day-old rats compared with adults at doses ranging from tracer to 10 mg /sup 54/Mn/kg. For both the 14-day-old and adult rats, an apparent biliary transport maximum was reached at a dose of 10 mg Mn/kg. These studies indicate that the excretory pathways for manganese are well developed in the neonatal rat. The avid retention of tracer quantities of manganese by the neonate may be a consequence of the scarcity of this essential trace metal in its diet.

  19. Radioactive iodide (131 I-) excretion profiles in response to potassium iodide (KI) and ammonium perchlorate (NH4ClO4) prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Curtis; Dallas, Cham; Rollor, Edward; White, Catherine; Blount, Benjamin; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    Radioactive iodide ((131)I-) protection studies have focused primarily on the thyroid gland and disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. The objective of the current study was to establish (131)I- urinary excretion profiles for saline, and the thyroid protectants, potassium iodide (KI) and ammonium perchlorate over a 75 hour time-course. Rats were administered (131)I- and 3 hours later dosed with either saline, 30 mg/kg of NH(4)ClO(4) or 30 mg/kg of KI. Urinalysis of the first 36 hours of the time-course revealed that NH(4)ClO(4) treated animals excreted significantly more (131)I- compared with KI and saline treatments. A second study followed the same protocol, but thyroxine (T(4)) was administered daily over a 3 day period. During the first 6-12 hour after (131)I- dosing, rats administered NH(4)ClO(4) excreted significantly more (131)I- than the other treatment groups. T(4) treatment resulted in increased retention of radioiodide in the thyroid gland 75 hour after (131)I- administration. We speculate that the T(4) treatment related reduction in serum TSH caused a decrease synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones resulting in greater residual radioiodide in the thyroid gland. Our findings suggest that ammonium perchlorate treatment accelerates the elimination rate of radioiodide within the first 24 to 36 hours and thus may be more effective at reducing harmful exposure to (131)I- compared to KI treatment for repeated dosing situations. Repeated dosing studies are needed to compare the effectiveness of these treatments to reduce the radioactive iodide burden of the thyroid gland.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and excretion of (14)C-lenvatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dubbelman, Anne-Charlotte; Rosing, Hilde; Nijenhuis, Cynthia; Huitema, Alwin D R; Mergui-Roelvink, Marja; Gupta, Anubha; Verbel, David; Thompson, Gary; Shumaker, Robert; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-02-01

    Lenvatinib is an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity. To get more insight into the disposition of lenvatinib, a mass balance study was performed in patients with advanced solid tumors. A single oral 24 mg (100 μCi) dose of (14)C-lenvatinib was administered to six patients, followed by collection of blood, plasma, urine and feces for 7 to 10 days. The collected material was analyzed for total radioactivity, unchanged lenvatinib and selected metabolites. The safety and antitumor effect of a daily oral dose of 24 mg non-labeled lenvatinib were assessed in the extension phase of the study. Peak plasma concentrations of lenvatinib and total radioactivity were reached 1.6 and 1.4 h after administration, respectively, and their terminal phase half-lifes were 34.5 and 17.8 h, respectively. Unchanged lenvatinib systemic exposure accounted for 60 % of the total radioactivity in plasma. Peak concentrations of the analyzed metabolite were over 700-fold lower than the peak plasma concentration of lenvatinib. Ten days after the initial dose, the geometric mean (± CV) recovery of administered dose was 89 % ±10 %, with 64 % ±11 % recovered in feces and 25 % ±18 % in urine. Unchanged lenvatinib in urine and feces accounted for 2.5 % ±68 % of the administered dose, indicating a major role of metabolism in the elimination of lenvatinib. In conclusion, lenvatinib is rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized, with subsequent excretion in urine and, more predominantly, in feces. Additionally, lenvatinib showed acceptable safety and preliminary antitumor activity.

  1. Tissue accumulation and urinary excretion of Cr in chromium picolinate (CrPic)-supplemented lambs.

    PubMed

    Dallago, Bruno Stéfano Lima; Lima, Bárbara Alcântara Ferreira; Braz, Shélida Vasconcelos; Mustafa, Vanessa da Silva; McManus, Concepta; Paim, Tiago do Prado; Campeche, Aline; Gomes, Edgard Franco; Louvandini, Helder

    2016-05-01

    Chromium (Cr) concentrations in liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lymph node, skeletal muscle, bone, testis and urine of lambs were measured to trace the biodistribution and bioaccumulation of Cr after oral supplementation with chromium picolinate (CrPic). Twenty-four Santa Inês lambs were treated with four different concentrations of CrPic: placebo, 0.250, 0.375 and 0.500 mg of CrPic/animal/day for 84 days. The basal diet consisted of Panicum maximum cv Massai hay and concentrate. Cr concentrations were measured by ICP-MS measuring (52)Cr as collected mass. There was a positive linear relationship between dose administered and the accumulation of Cr in the heart, lungs and testis. Urinary excretion of Cr occurred in a time and dose-dependent manner, so the longer or more dietary Cr provided, the greater excretion of the element. As some non-carcass components (such as lungs or heart) are added to bone and visceral meal to feed animals, there is a risk of bioaccumulation and biomagnification due to Cr offered as CrPic in the diet.

  2. Molecular mechanism of 1,1-dichloroethylene toxicity: excreted metabolites reveal different pathways of reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Reichert, D; Werner, H W; Metzler, M; Henschler, D

    1979-07-11

    The excretion and biotransformation of [14C] 1,1-dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride, VDC) after administration of a single oral dose has been investigated in female rats. Seventy-two hours after a dose of 0.5, 5.0, and 50.0 mg/kg, 1.26, 9.70, 16.47%, respectively, are exhaled as unchanged VDC, and 13.64, 11.35, 6.13% as 14CO2. The main pathway of elimination is through renal excretion with 43.55, 53.88, 42.11% of the administered radioactivity. Through the biliary system, 15.74, 14.54, 7.65% of the activity are eliminated. The isolation of the main metabolites of VDC from 24 h urine is accomplished through the combined application of solvent extraction, ion exchange chromatography and thin layer chromatography. Then gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are used for their identification. Three metabolites have been identified: thiodiglycolic acid, N-acetyl-S-(2-carboxymethyl)cysteine and methyl-thio-acetylaminoethanol. In addition, three smaller unidentified radioactive peaks have been found. Thiodiglycolic acid is the main metabolite in VDC metabolism. The simultaneous formation of an ethanolamine- and a cysteine-conjugation product points to different reaction pathways of the postulated intermediate reactive epoxide; ethanolamine probably originates from membrane lipids, which react with VDC-epoxide and/or its derivatives. This pathway could explain, in part, the parenchyma damaging effect of VDC.

  3. Radioactive excretion in human milk following administration of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pittard, W.B.; Merkatz, R.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1982-08-01

    Albumin-tagged sodium pertechnetate (technetium) is routinely used in nuclear medicine for scanning procedures of the lung. The rate of excretion of this radionuclide into breast milk and the resultant potential radiation hazard to the nursing infant have received little attention. Therefore the milk from a nursing mother who required a lung scan because of suspected pulmonary emboli using an intravenous injection of 4 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated human serum albumin was monitored. Albumin tagging severely limited the entrance of technetium into her milk and the radioactivity of the milk returned to base line by 24 hours. A total of 2.02 muCi of technetium was measured in the 24-hour milk collection after technetium injection and 94% of this amount was excreted by 15.5 hours. This amount of technetium administered orally to a newborn would deliver a total body radiation dose of .3 mrad. Therefore, an infant would receive trivial doses of radiation if breast-feeding were resumed 15.5 hours after administration of the radionuclide to the mother and nursing can clearly be resumed safely 24 hours after injection.

  4. Absorption, metabolism and excretion of cobimetinib, an oral MEK inhibitor, in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryan H; Ma, Shuguang; Yue, Qin; Kim-Kang, Heasook; Yi, Yijun; Ly, Justin; Boggs, Jason W; Fettes, Alec; McClory, Andrew; Deng, Yuzhong; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Choo, Edna F

    2017-01-01

    1. The absorption, metabolism and excretion of cobimetinib, an allosteric inhibitor of MEK1/2, was characterized in mass balance studies following single oral administration of radiolabeled ((14)C) cobimetinib to Sprague-Dawley rats (30 mg/kg) and Beagle dogs (5 mg/kg). 2. The oral dose of cobimetinib was well absorbed (81% and 71% in rats and dogs, respectively). The maximal plasma concentrations for cobimetinib and total radioactivity were reached at 2-3 h post-dose. Drug-derived radioactivity was fully recovered (∼90% of the administered dose) with the majority eliminated in feces via biliary excretion (78% of the dose for rats and 65% for dogs). The recoveries were nearly complete after the first 48 h following dosing. 3. The metabolic profiles indicated extensive metabolism of cobimetinib prior to its elimination. For rats, the predominant metabolic pathway was hydroxylation at the aromatic core. Lower exposures for cobimetinib and total radioactivity were observed in male rats compared with female rats, which was consistent to in vitro higher clearance of cobimetinib for male rats. For dogs, sequential oxidative reactions occurred at the aliphatic portion of the molecule. Though rat metabolism was well-predicted in vitro with liver microsomes, dog metabolism was not. 4. Rats and dogs were exposed to the two major human circulating Phase II metabolites, which provided relevant metabolite safety assessment. In general, the extensive sequential oxidative metabolism in dogs, and not the aromatic hydroxylation in rats, was more indicative of the metabolism of cobimetinib in humans.

  5. Metabolism and excretion of 2-ethoxyethanol in the adult male rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, K L; Plotnick, H B; Richards, D E; Weigel, W W

    1984-01-01

    The routes of 14C excretion following the administration of a single oral 230 mg/kg body weight dose of 2-ethoxyethanol [ethanol-1,2-14C] or 2-ethoxyethanol [ethoxy-1-14C] to male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. Elimination of the 14C by the urinary route accounted for 76 to 80% of the dose within 96 hr. The main pathway of biotransformation is oxidation to the corresponding acid, with some subsequent conjugation of the acid metabolite with glycine. The major metabolites, ethoxyacetic acid and N-ethoxy-acetyl glycine, representing 73 to 76% of the administered dose, were eliminated in the urine. The major difference in the metabolic profiles of the two radiochemicals was in the rate and amount of 14CO2 expired via the lung. Of the administered 14C, 11.7% of the ethoxy-labeled and 4.6% of the ethanol-labeled compounds were eliminated as CO2. The biological half-time was 9.9 +/- 1.5 hr for the ethoxy-labeled compound and 12.5 +/- 1.9 hr for the ethanol label. After administration of the ethanol-labeled compound, the only radiolabeled component found in the rat testes was identified as ethoxyacetic acid. Results of this study suggest that the reported testicular effects in the rat may be a result of tissue levels of ethoxyacetic acid. PMID:6437805

  6. Hepatobiliary excretion of berberine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pi-Lo; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2004-04-01

    Berberine is a bioactive herbal ingredient isolated from the roots and bark of Berberis aristata or Coptis chinensis. To investigate the detailed pharmacokinetics of berberine and its mechanisms of hepatobiliary excretion, an in vivo microdialysis coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed. In the control group, rats received berberine alone; in the drug-treated group, 10 min before berberine administration, the rats were injected with cyclosporin A (CsA), a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor; quinidine, both organic cation transport (OCT) and P-gp inhibitors; SKF-525A (proadifen), a cytochrome P450 inhibitor; and probenecid to inhibit the glucuronidation. The results indicate that berberine displays a linear pharmacokinetic phenomenon in the dosage range from 10 to 20 mg kg(-1), since a proportional increase in the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine was observed in this dosage range. Moreover, berberine was processed through hepatobiliary excretion against a concentration gradient based on the bile-to-blood distribution ratio (AUC(bile)/AUC(blood)); the active berberine efflux might be affected by P-gp and OCT since coadministration of berberine and CsA or quinidine at the same dosage of 10 mg kg(-1) significantly decreased the berberine amount in bile. In addition, berberine was metabolized in the liver with phase I demethylation and phase II glucuronidation, as identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Also, the phase I metabolism of berberine was partially reduced by SKF-525A treatment, but the phase II glucuronidation of berberine was not obviously affected by probenecid under the present study design.

  7. Clinical bioequivalence of a dose of clopidogrel Leti Cravid tablets 75 mg versus clopidogrel Sanofi Plavix tablets 75 mg administered on a daily dose for 7 days on healthy volunteers: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Aixa; Octavio, José; González, María Y; Contreras, Jesús; Méndez, Gisela; Portillo, Milagros; Valero, Zuleima

    2010-01-01

    Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention procedures, as in patients with coronary disease, should receive treatment indefinitely with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. New brands of clopidogrel have been developed at lower costs, for helping to avoid premature suspension of antiplatelet therapy, as Cravid Leti Laboratories clopidogrel. Its effectiveness and safety must be compared with Plavix international standard. A prospective, comparative, cross-over, and randomized study was conducted in healthy volunteers. Each group received 1 tablet of Clopidogrel Leti or Clopidogrel Sanofi, 75 mg in a single dose daily for 7 days, followed by 7-day washout period before administration of second treatment. Platelet aggregation was measured at the start of each period and at 7 days of treatment through optical aggregometry, using an optical aggregometer 490-2D Chrono-Log, with a self-calibration system working with platelet-rich plasma with readings 0%-100% of light transmission. An important decrease of platelet aggregation was observed in both groups at 7 days of treatment of more than 50%, independent of adenosine diphosphate reactive (Helena and Chrono-Log) used for aggregation (P < 0.05). The relationship between the mean and 90% confidence interval ratio obtained with the 2 different adenosine diphosphate brands were between 80% and 125%, therefore, it can be considered that both brands are bioequivalent and perfectly exchangeable.

  8. Effects of polybrominated biphenyls on the excretion of steroids.

    PubMed

    Willett, L B; Schanbacher, F L; Moorhead, P D

    1983-05-01

    When polybrominated biphenyls (fireMaster BP-6, PBB) are ingested by cattle, they have been shown to alter hepatic enzyme systems, and produce renal lesions with chronic high exposure. These changes provide mechanisms for alteration of the metabolism and clearance of steroid hormones that might then affect reproductive function. This study was conducted to examine the effects of PBB on the excretion of radiolabel from injected estradiol-17 beta and progesterone. Toxicity was induced by dosing two Holstein cows with 25 g of fireMaster BP-6/d for 39 or 50 d. Single iv injections of 35 microCi [4-14C] progesterone and 400 microCi [2,4,6,7-3H] estradiol-17 beta were given on d -5, 10, 30 and 38 or 48 relative to dosing. Last injections were given when animals were terminally toxic. Clinical signs and necropsy findings confirmed the typical toxic syndrome and renal lesions. Excretion of 14C was primarily in feces, while 3H appeared in both urine and feces. As toxicosis developed, the excretion of steroids in feces was delayed as anorexia reduced mass and rate of passage of feces. This had little effect on the amount of steroid excreted and the rate of urinary excretion was affected only minimally. Recovery of both radiolabels declined 10 to 20% by d 30 of dosing as excretion rate was reduced from pre-PBB dosing. Excretion declined sharply when animals were moribund. Despite developing toxicosis, both animals continued to have estrous cycles with normal periodicity.

  9. The quantitative relationship of urinary peptide hydroxyproline excretion to collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Phillip H.; Klein, LeRoy

    1969-01-01

    To determine the quantitative relationship of urinary hydroxyproline peptide excretion to collagen breakdown, known quantities of radioactive hydroxyproline peptides were administered to unlabeled animals and excertion of radioactivity in respiratory carbon dioxide, urine, and feces was measured. The major routes of excretion of collagen peptide metabolites were respiratory carbon dioxide (75%) and urine, as hydroxyproline-containing peptides (25%). Since the predominant urine hydroxyproline peptide linkage is proly-hydroxyproline, L-prolyl-L-hydroxyproline-3H was administered to unlabeled animals. Greater than 80% of the administered dipeptide was excreted in urine, suggesting that this peptide linkage is not hydrolyzed to a significant extent in vivo. These data suggest that urinary hydroxyproline excretion is a “fairly” sensitive indicator of collagen breakdown and can be used at the clinical level to quantitate changes in collagen breakdown. PMID:5765022

  10. Antagonism by idazoxan at low dose but not high dose, of the natriuretic action of moxonidine.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, D. R.; Penner, S. B.; Smyth, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Recent studies concerning the imidazoline receptor have utilized idazoxan as a specific imidazoline receptor antagonist. The aim of the present study was to describe the in vivo effects of various doses of idazoxan on renal function, in the presence and absence of moxonidine, an I1 imidazoline receptor agonist. 2. In anaesthetized, unilaterally nephrectomized (7 to 10 days) Sprague Dawley rats, an intrarenal infusion of moxonidine (3 nmol kg-1 min-1) increased urine flow rate, sodium excretion and osmolar clearance without altering free water clearance. Pretreatment with intravenous idazoxan at 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg-1 produced a dose-related decrease in the renal actions of moxonidine. However, a higher dose of idazoxan (1 mg kg-1) was not as effective as the 0.3 mg kg-1 dose in blocking the effects of moxonidine. 3. In a separate series of experiments, the direct renal actions of idazoxan alone were investigated. Idazoxan at 0.3 mg kg-1 failed to alter urine flow rate and sodium excretion. However, idazoxan at 1 mg kg-1 produced a significant increase in urine flow rate and sodium excretion in association with an increase in osmolar clearance. 4. These results do not prove but are consistent with low doses of idazoxan antagonizing the sites stimulated by moxonidine (renal imidazoline receptors). However, at higher doses, idazoxan may function as a partial agonist and/or interact with other receptors to increase urine flow rate, independent of imidazoline receptor blockade. These studies underscore the importance of the dose of idazoxan administered when this antagonist is used as a tool to investigate imidazoline receptors. PMID:8825339

  11. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  12. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate Extended-Release Multiple Layer Beads Administered as Intact Capsule or Sprinkles Versus Methylphenidate Immediate-Release Tablets (Ritalin®) in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Nathan S.; Kupper, Robert J.; Chang, Wei-Wei; Greenhill, Laurence; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Connor, Daniel F.; Wigal, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative bioavailability and safety of a multilayer extended-release bead methylphenidate (MPH) hydrochloride 80 mg (MPH-MLR) capsule or sprinkles (37% immediate-release [IR]) versus MPH hydrochloride IR(Ritalin®) tablets, and to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model simulating MPH concentration-time data for different MPH-MLR dosage strengths. Methods: This was a single-center, randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study conducted in 26 fasted healthy adults (mean weight±standard deviation, 70.4±11.7 kg) assigned to single-dose oral MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule or sprinkles with applesauce, or Ritalin IR 25 mg (1×5 mg and 1×20 mg tablet) administered at 0, 4, and 8 hours. Results: MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule and sprinkles were bioequivalent; ratios for maximum concentration (Cmax), area under plasma drug concentration versus time curve (AUC)0-t, and AUC0-inf were 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.3–112.4), 0.99 (95% CI, 95.3–102.8), and 0.99 (95% CI, 95.4–103.0), respectively. MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles produced highly comparable, biphasic profiles of plasma MPH concentrations characterized by rapid initial peak, followed by moderate decline until 5 hours postdose, and gradual increase until 7 hours postdose, culminating in an attenuated second peak. Based on 90% CIs, total systemic exposure to MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule/sprinkles was similar to that for Ritalin IR 25 mg three times daily, but marked differences in Cmax values indicated that MPH-MLR regimens were not bioequivalent to Ritalin. MPH Cmax and total systemic exposure over the first 4 hours postdose with MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles was markedly higher than that associated with the first dose of Ritalin. All study drugs were safe and well tolerated. The PK modeling in adults suggested that differences in MPH pharmacokinetics between MPH-MLR and Ritalin are the result of dosage form design attributes and the associated

  13. Sustained immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a two-dose schedule in adolescent girls: Five-year clinical data and modeling predictions from a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Behre, Ulrich; Schulze, Karin; Hillemanns, Peter; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized, partially-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00541970), the licensed formulation of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (20 μg each of HPV-16/18 antigens) was found highly immunogenic up to 4 y after first vaccination, whether administered as a 2-dose (2D) schedule in girls 9–14 y or 3-dose (3D) schedule in women 15–25 y. This end-of-study analysis extends immunogenicity and safety data until Month (M) 60, and presents antibody persistence predictions estimated by piecewise and modified power law models. Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 y) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (N = 240 ) or 3D at M0,1,6 (N = 239). Here, results are reported for girls 9–14 y (2D) and women 15–25 y (3D). Seropositivity rates, geometric mean titers (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and geometric mean titer ratios (GMRs; 3D/2D; post-hoc exploratory analysis) were calculated. All subjects seronegative pre-vaccination in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort were seropositive for anti-HPV-16 and −18 at M60. Antibody responses elicited by the 2D and 3D schedules were comparable at M60, with GMRs close to 1 (anti-HPV-16: 1.13 [95% confidence interval: 0.82–1.54]; anti-HPV-18: 1.06 [0.74–1.51]). Statistical modeling predicted that in 95% of subjects, antibodies induced by 2D and 3D schedules could persist above natural infection levels for ≥ 21 y post-vaccination. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In conclusion, a 2D M0,6 schedule of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine was immunogenic for up to 5 y in 9–14 y-old girls. Statistical modeling predicted that 2D-induced antibodies could persist for longer than 20 y. PMID:26176261

  14. The characteristic long-term upregulation of hippocampal NF-κB complex in PTSD-like behavioral stress response is normalized by high-dose corticosterone and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate administered immediately after exposure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Zohar, Joseph; Kaplan, Zeev

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor for genes involved in cell survival, differentiation, inflammation, and growth. This study examined the role of NF-κB pathway in stress-induced PTSD-like behavioral response patterns in rats. Immunohistochemical technique was used to detect the expression of the NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits, I-κBα, p38, and phospho-p38 in the hippocampal subregions at 7 days after exposure to predator scent stress. Expression of p65 nuclear translocation was quantified by western blot as the level of NF-κB activation. The effects of intraperitoneally administered corticosterone or a selective NF-κB inhibitor (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)) at 1 h post exposure on behavioral tests (elevated plus-maze and acoustic startle response) were evaluated 7 days later. Hippocampal expressions of those genes were subsequently evaluated. All data were analyzed in relation to individual behavior patterns. Extreme behavioral responder animals displayed significant upregulation of p50 and p65 with concomitant downregulation of I-κBα, p38, and phospho-p38 levels in hippocampal structures compared with minimal behavioral responders and controls. Immediate post-exposure treatment with high-dose corticosterone and PDTC significantly reduced prevalence rates of extreme responders and normalized the expression of those genes. Stress-induced upregulation of NF-κB complex in the hippocampus may contribute to the imbalance between what are normally precisely orchestrated and highly coordinated physiological and behavioral processes, thus associating it with stress-related disorders.

  15. Fecal and urinary excretion of six iodothyronines in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.J. III; Sapin, V.

    1987-11-01

    Fecal and urinary excretion rates of six iodothyronines were assessed in the rat maintained under normal steady state physiological conditions, to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of control of normal thyroid hormone economy and metabolism. Groups of young adult male rats were injected with trace doses of T4, T3, rT3, 3,3'-diiodothyronine (T2), 3',5'-T2, or 3'-monoiodothyronine, each labeled with /sup 125/I, and feces and urine were collected separately for up to 10 days. Pooled fecal pellets were homogenized in saline, extracted in ethanol, evaporated under vacuum, and reconstituted in NaOH. Fecal extracts and urine were chromatographed on Sephadex G25 columns under conditions providing quantitative separations of components of interest. A new technique was also developed, based on a model of the in vitro extraction and measurement process, to correct chromatographic results for possible variable recoveries and possible artifactious degradation of radioactively labeled components. No iodothyronines or their conjugates were excreted in urine; all radioactivity was in the form of iodide. In feces, about 30% of the (/sup 125/I)T3 injected was excreted as T3; and 24% of the (/sup 125/I)T4 injected was excreted as T4, plus 4% as T3. Together, these results imply that about 24% of endogenous T4 production is excreted as T4 and 76% is irreversibly metabolized; and for T3, about 30% of endogenous T3 production is excreted as T3 and 70% is degraded. For the nonhormonal iodothyronines, about 6% of injected monoiodothyronine, 3% of injected 3',5'-T2, 2% of injected 3,3'-T2, and less than 1% of injected rT3 were excreted in feces as such, indicating that these substances are nearly completely deiodinated in vivo. Very little (1-7%) iodide was excreted as such in feces, which also were devoid of measurable conjugates.

  16. Detection of fenspiride and identification of in vivo metabolites in horse body fluids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: administration, biotransformation and urinary excretion after a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Dumasia, M C; Houghton, E; Hyde, W; Greulich, D; Nelson, T; Peterson, Jackie

    2002-02-05

    Studies related to the in vivo biotransforrmation and urinary excretion of fenspiride hydrochloride in the horse are described. After oral administration, the drug is metabolised by both phase I functionalisation and phase II conjugation pathways. Following enzymatic deconjugation, fenspiride and its phase I metabolites were isolated from post-administration biofluids using bonded co-polymeric mixed mode solid-phase extraction cartridges to isolate the basic compounds. Following trimethylsilylation (TMS), the parent drug and metabolites were identified by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fenspiride (A) and seven metabolites (B-->G) arising from oxidation on both the aromatic and heterocyclic substructures were detected in urine. The positive ion electron ionisation mass spectra of the TMS derivatives of fenspiride and its metabolites provided useful information on its metabolism. Positive ion methane chemical ionisation-GC-MS of the derivatives provided both derivatised molecular mass and structural information. Unchanged fenspiride can be detected in post-administration plasma and urine samples for up to 24 h. Maximum urinary levels of 100-200 ng ml(-1) were observed between 3 and 5 h after administration. After enzymatic deconjugation, the major phenolic metabolite (G) can be detected in urine for up to 72 h. This metabolite is the analyte of choice in the GC-MS screening of post-race equine urine samples for detection of fenspiride use. However, a distinct difference was observed in the urinary excretion of this metabolite between the thoroughbred horses used in UK study and the quarterbred and standardbred horses used for the USA administrations.

  17. Excretion and biotransformation of carboxymethyl-cysteine in rat, dog, monkey and man.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, L B; Teng, L; Kinzie, J M; Pitts, J E; Pinchbeck, F M; Bruce, R B

    1978-10-01

    1. Following an oral dose of S-carboxymethyl [35S]cysteine monkey (rhesus and African green), rat, dog, and man excreted 77,88,95, and 100% respectively of the 35S radioactivity in urine and 7.0, 2.5, 0.7, and 0.3% in faeces during a 3 to 4 day period. 2. The principal drug-related components excreted were unchanged carboxymethylcysteine, dicarboxymethyl sulphide and inorganic sulphate. 3. Rat, dog, and man excreted primarily dicarboxymethyl sulphide and unchanged carboxymethylcysteine and no inorganic sulphate (rat, 7%). 4. Monkey excreted largely inorganic sulphate, moderate amounts of dicarboxymethyl sulphide and a trace of unchanged drug.

  18. Urinary excretion profiles for total morphine, free morphine, and 6-acetylmorphine following smoked and intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Shimomura, E T; Summers, J; Paul, B D; Jenkins, A J; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    2001-10-01

    Heroin is one of the major target drugs in workplace drug-testing programs because of its history of abuse, liability, and continued negative social impact. This study was a comprehensive examination of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, detection times, opiate immunoassay performance, and urine excretion profiles following single doses of heroin administered to human subjects via smoking and intravenous routes. Studies of the first four components of this investigation were previously published. This article describes the urine excretion profiles. Total morphine (Tmor), free morphine (Fmor), and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 920 urine samples collected from 11 male human subjects following single doses of heroin. Eight received intravenous doses of 3, 6, and 12 mg heroin HCI and four smoked 3.5-, 5.2-, 7-, 10.5-, or 13.9-mg doses of heroin (base). In addition, 183 urine-based blind quality-control samples were added to the study set to assess assay performance. Creatinine was also measured in each sample by a colorimetric technique. The parameters studied were not significantly dependent on route of administration. Excretion half-life mean +/- SD for Tmor was 3.11 +/- 0.30 h. Range (median) of peak urine concentrations, time to peak, time to last positive sample for low cutoff (300 ng/mL) and high cutoff (2000 ng/mL) for Tmor following lower doses (< or = 7 mg) were, respectively, 1392-9250 (3620) ng/mL, 1.2-6.2 (2.3) h, 7.4-31.9 (7.4) h, and 0-10.1 (4.3) h. Following higher doses (> 10 mg) they were 2065-29,030 (16,470) ng/mL, 2.3-9.3 (4.5) h, 10.7-53.5 (34.4) h, 2.3-22.3 (8.3) h. Fmor peaked in the same sample as Tmor. Range (median) of peak Fmor concentrations and time to last positive using a cutoff of 100 ng/mL for low and high doses were, respectively, 117-1160 (415) ng/mL, 1.2-10.1 (4.5) h and 150-2580 (1400) ng/mL, 2.3-29.1 (9.3) h. The range (median) of peak urine concentrations for 6-AM was 6

  19. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract.

  20. Influence of magnesium on the absorption and excretion of calcium and oxalate ions.

    PubMed

    Berg, W; Bothor, C; Pirlich, W; Janitzky, V

    1986-01-01

    In two test series additional oxalic acid excretion in urine was induced in healthy test persons by administering a spinach diet. This additional excretion could be markedly reduced by magnesium administration. Calcium and citrate excretions are largely unaffected by magnesium administration. Magnesium excretions, however, are clearly increased. The calcium oxalate crystallization rates in the 5-or 7-hour urines reveal a behavior parallel to that of the oxalic acid excretion profile. In the control urines, the crystal picture is characterized by numerous medium-sized whewellite crystals. In contrast, in the test series weddellite crystals are reduced in size and frequency after magnesium administration. New aspects of magnesium effects must be discussed; above all the possible absorption changes resulting from gastrointestinal diseases.

  1. Excretion of technetium 99m hexakismethoxyisobutylisonitrile in milk.

    PubMed

    Rubow, S M; Ellmann, A; le Roux, J; Klopper, J

    1991-01-01

    The amount of radioactivity excreted in breast milk following the administration of technetium 99m hexakismethoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) to a patient referred for cold spot myocardial scintigraphy was determined. During the first 24 h after administration, only 41.2 kBq 99mTc (0.0084% of the injected dose) was excreted in 448 ml milk with the highest concentration of 0.49 kBq/ml in the first sample. The images obtained show a high concentration of 99mTc-MIBI in the lactating breasts contrary to the very small percentage excreted in the milk. Comparison with various recommendations regarding nursing after administration of radiopharmaceuticals seems to indicate that the administration of 99mTc-MIBI does not necessitate an interruption of breast-feeding.

  2. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled 241Am

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Huckle, James E.; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Jay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [14C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared to a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of 241Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of 241Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  3. Distribution and excretion of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl, the major component of Firemaster BP-6.

    PubMed

    Matthews, H B; Kato, S; Morales, N M; Tuey, D B

    1977-10-01

    The intestinal absorption, distribution, and excretion of the major component of Firemaster BP-6,2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl, has been studied in the male rat. This polybrominated biphenyl was readily absorbed from the intestine, initially distributed throughout the body, and eventually stored primarily in the adipose tissue, was not subject to appreciable metabolism, and was excreted almost exclusively in the feces and at a very slow rate. Approximately 90% of an oral dose was absorbed from the intestine, and extrapolation of the rate of excretion to infinity indicates that less than 10% of the total dose would ever be excreted.

  4. Copiea - excretion rates of salamaders

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stoichiometry of excreta and excretion rates of a stream-dwelling plethodontid salamander in Cincinnati, OH, USAThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Milanovich , J., and M. Hopton. Stoichiometry of excreta in larval stream salamanders: implications regarding the ecological roles of salamanders. FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY. Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA, USA, 00, (2012).

  5. Pharmacokinetics of theophylline: a dose-range study.

    PubMed Central

    Rovei, V; Chanoine, F; Strolin Benedetti, M

    1982-01-01

    1 Pharmacokinetics of theophylline were investigated in a group of healthy adult volunteers (non smokers and on xanthine-free diet) following single oral administration of 125, 250, 375 and 500 mg doses as tablets (Theodel). 2 Absorption of theophylline was rapid and followed first-order kinetics. Plasma curves were fitted according to a one compartment open model. 3 There was a linear relationship (P less than 0.001) between plasma Cmax or AUCx values and the administered dose. The analysis of variance showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters of theophylline (t1/2 abs, tmax, t1/2 beta, CL, CLR, Vd and F) were not modified at any dose. 4 Absorption of the drug was complete since the recovery in urine of theophylline (13.7 to 16.8% of the dose) and its major metabolites, 1,3-dimethyluric acid (35 to 42%), 1-methyluric acid (21.3 to 26.7%) and 3-methylxanthine (11.5 to 13.7%), accounted for the administered dose. Some impairment of demethylation to 3-methylxanthine was observed in two subjects, however the percentage of theophylline and its major metabolites excreted in urine was constant for all the four doses. 5 On the basis of these results, after single oral administration, elimination of theophylline followed first-order kinetics in the range of doses investigated (1.62 to 10.42 mg/kg). PMID:7150456

  6. [Nitrogen metabolism in the large intestine of ruminants. 6. Metabolism of intracecally administered 14C and 15N urea in sheep with simultaneous intracecal doses of heat-damaged hay].

    PubMed

    Kijora, C; Bartelt, J; Bergner, H

    1989-11-01

    Two wethers (28 kg and 33 kg) were supplied with ileocaecal re-entrance cannulae and received a straw pellet ration rich in crude fibre (70.5% straw, 12% chopped sugar beet, 10% cereals, 2% urea, 3% NH4HCO3 and 2.5% of a mineral mixture). In a preliminary period 50% of the digesta flow was collected on 6 successive days for 18 h each. An amount of digesta sufficient for 24 h was apportioned for hourly application and stored at a temperature of -20 degrees C for the main trial. In the main trial the two animals received intracaecally the collected digesta with a supplement of ca. 6 g hay damaged by heat/kg LW(0.75) in hourly portions over 24 h (hay made up ca. 15 and 20% resp. of the DM amount). In addition, each digesta sample was supplemented with 14C and 15N labelled urea (19.7.10(6) Bq 14C urea and 364 mg 15N excess from 15N urea). About 9% of the applied 15N amount was microbially utilized; the utilization quota was thus lower than after the application of partly hydrolyzed straw meal (16% in a previous trial). The 14C activity from 14C urea was quickly eliminated in the form of CO2 in the respiratory gases (at the 18th hour after the end of the infusion 70% excreted as CO2). The half-lives for the urea resulting from the semi-logarithmic decrease of the atom-% 15N excess in the blood plasma were 7.9 and 7.7 resp. 23% and 34% resp. of the applied 15N excess were excreted in urine. The excretion of radioactive carbon in urine, however, was at 2.8% and 4.3% resp. of the applied amount very low 120 h after the beginning of the trial (96 h after the end of the infusion). On the whole one can conclude from this trial that hay damaged by heat has only a low stimulating effect on microbial activity in the large intestine.

  7. Effect of neomycin on the bioavailability of spironolactone: a single-dose study.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Coates, P E; Fisher, M M; Louman, F J

    1979-12-01

    The effect of oral neomycin sulfate on the bioavailability of oral spironolactone in humans was studied. A 100-mg spironolactone tablet was administered alone or with two 500-mg neomycin sulfate tablets to 12 healthy, fasting men in a randomized crossover fashion. Levels of canrenone (an active spironolactone metabolite) in plasma and urine samples collected for 32 and 48 hours after dosing, respectively, were measured fluorimetrically. Neomycin significantly decreased the peak plasma canrenone concentration, significantly increased the time to reach peak concentration of canrenone, and significantly decreased the urinary excretion of canrenone over the first four hours (p less than 0.05). There were no significant differences between treatment groups in elimination half-life, area under the plasma curves or 48-hour urinary excretion of canrenone. Single doses of neomycin appear to delay the rate but not reduce the extent of spironolactone absorption. Thus, neomycin may not interfere with the clinical efficacy of spironolactone.

  8. Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Routes of Excretion of [14C]-Labeled Arruva, a High-Potency Sweetener, Following Oral Administration to Beagle Dogs.

    PubMed

    Casterton, Phillip L; Crincoli, Christine M; Brathwaite, Witty A; Rihner, Marisa O; Nikiforov, Andrey I; Thomas, Jennifer A

    2014-05-01

    [(14)C]-Labeled arruva [sodium/potassium (2R,4R)-2-amino-4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-5-(3-indolyl) pentanoate] was administered as a single gavage dose (10 mg/kg bw) to male and female Beagle dogs and 1 bile duct-cannulated male. The mean peak arruva plasma concentration equivalent of 1.2 µg/g occurred at first sampling time point of 1 hour postdosing. The mean area under the concentration versus time curve from 0 hour postdosing to the last time point was approximately 20 µg·h/g and the mean terminal plasma elimination half-life ranged from 15 hours in females to 21 hours in males. Over 168 hours postdosing, 35% to 50% of the administered arruva was eliminated in the urine with 44% to 53% eliminated in feces; 1.3% of the administered dose was recovered in bile. Arruva and its derivatives were identified using tandem mass spectrometry, and the relative percentage of each substance was quantified via radio high-performance liquid chromatography. Over a 168-hour collection period, combined urine and feces extract data from the 6 noncannulated dogs showed that approximately 91% of the dose was excreted as unchanged parent arruva (41% in urine and 50% in feces). In the cannulated male, 95.3% was excreted as unchanged parent arruva; 50.2% in urine, 43.9% in feces, and 1.3% in bile. Lactone and lactam derivatives of arruva and 1 unidentified substance were detected in urine only during the first 24 hours postdosing with the greatest amounts detected during the first 6 hours of collection; up to 1% of lactone or lactam derivatives were detected in bile samples. Plasma pharmacokinetics data indicated rapid absorption of arruva with the majority of radioactivity located in the feces collected in the first 48 hours.

  9. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Dey, H.M.; Siebyl, I.B.

    1994-05-01

    SPECT imaging of the brain with I-123 iomazenil has shown avid uptake of the radioligand in a distribution consistent with benzodiazepine receptor binding. It was desirable to radiolabel this compound with a positron emitting radionuclide so that quantitation of the receptor density could be assessed with PET imaging. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil were calculated prior to obtaining Institutional Review Board approval of this procedure. A previously published multicompartmental model was used as the biological model for estimating residence times associated with the C-11 labeled iomazenil. According to this model, 85-90% is excreted in the urine and 10-15% in the feces. A dynamic, voiding urinary bladder model was utilized for activity excreted renally and the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract kinetic model was used for activity excreted via the hepatobiliary system. Absorbed doses from C-11 (I-123) iomazenil to the urinary bladder were calculated to be 0.099 mGy/MBq (0.19 mGy/MBq) for a 4.8 hour bladder voiding interval. Shortening the bladder voiding interval to 2.0 hours had little effect on the bladder wall dose (0.095 mGy/MBq). However, a 30-minute void interval was estimated to lower the bladder wall dose substantially (0.045 mGy/MBq). Absorbed dose to the kidney was higher for C-11 iomazenil (0.054 vs 0.031 mGy/MBq) than for I-123 iomazenil due to rapid, early renal excretion of this very short-lived positron emitter. Doses to the gastrointestinal tract were estimated to be 4- to 20-fold lower for C-11 iomazenil compared to I-123 iomazenil. Overall, labeling iomazenil with C-11 rather than I-123 greatly reduces the radiation dose, per unit administered, to all organs except the kidneys.

  10. Influence of DTPA Treatment on Internal Dose Estimates.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Peleau, Bernadette; Correze, Philippe; Bohand, Sandra; Franck, Didier

    2016-06-01

    In case of internal contamination with plutonium materials, a treatment with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be administered in order to reduce plutonium body burden and consequently avoid some radiation dose. DTPA intravenous injections or inhalation can start almost immediately after intake, in parallel with urinary and fecal bioassay sampling for dosimetric follow-up. However, urine and feces excretion will be significantly enhanced by the DTPA treatment. As internal dose is calculated from bioassay results, the DTPA effect on excretion has to be taken into account. A common method to correct bioassay data is to divide it by a factor representing the excretion enhancement under DTPA treatment by intravenous injection. Its value may be based on a nominal reference or observed after a break in the treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of this factor on internal dose by comparing the dose estimated using default or upper and lower values of the enhancement factor for 11 contamination cases. The observed upper and lower values of the enhancement factor were 18.7 and 63.0 for plutonium and 24.9 and 28.8 for americium. For americium, a default factor of 25 is proposed. This work demonstrates that the use of a default DTPA enhancement factor allows the determination of the magnitude of the contamination because dose estimated could vary by a factor of 2 depending on the value of the individual DTPA enhancement factor. In case of significant intake, an individual enhancement factor should be determined to obtain a more reliable dose assessment.

  11. Urinary zinc excretion in infancy.

    PubMed

    Sievers, E; Oldigs, H D; Dörner, K; Schaub, J

    1990-03-01

    In view of the conflicting data on urinary Zn excretion in infancy we investigated the possible influence of contamination, collecting methods, nutrition (human milk versus formula) and longitudinal changes during the first 16 weeks of life. Methodical investigation showed that special attention is necessary to avoid contamination due to the use of Zn-containing baby creams in the genital region. The sampling device for collection should include the smallest area of skin possible and the use of Zn-containing baby creams has to be avoided both during the collection and at least 24 hours prior to urine collection. Previous fractional urine sampling of the collecting method to be evaluated proves that erroneously high values are not obtained at the beginning of collection. Midstream urinary samples reduce the possibility of contamination. Increased urinary excretion was shown in pre-term infants under theophylline or coffeine medication. The median daily urinary Zn excretion in healthy breast-fed term infants declined significantly from 0.063 (0.027-0.111) mg per kg body weight at the age of 2 weeks to 0.018 (0.004-0.059) mg per kg body weight at the age of 16 weeks. Comparable values for formula-fed term infants were 0.029 (0.025-0.063) mg per kg body weight initially and 0.025 (0.007-0.059) mg per kg body weight at the end of the study. These values can be used as reference values for the urinary Zn excretion of healthy infants.

  12. Cholesterol excretion and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    Populations consuming diets high in fat and cholesterol exhibit a greater incidence of colon cancer than those consuming less fat and cholesterol. Lowering elevated serum cholesterol levels experimentally or clinically is associated with increased large-bowel tumorigenesis. Thus, cholesterol lost to the gut, either dietary or endogenously synthesized, appears to have a role in large-bowel cancer. Whether the effect(s) is mediated by increases in fecal bile acid excretion or some other mechanism is not clear.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole in normal humans after single- and multiple-dose intravenous infusions.

    PubMed Central

    Lakings, D B; Friis, J M; Brown, R J; Allen, H R

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole (free acid equivalents of cefpimizole sodium), a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, were determined after single- and multiple-dose 20-min intravenous infusions of 1, 2, and 4 g. The kinetics of single-dose administration of cefpimizole correspond to a two-compartment model with an average apparent volume of distribution of 20.0 +/- 3.5 liters, a distribution rate constant of 2.24 +/- 1.00 h-1, and a terminal rate constant of 0.358 +/- 0.036 h-1 (half-life, 1.9 h). The total body clearance was 118.6 +/- 20.2 ml/min. The primary route of elimination for cefpimizole was the renal route, with approximately 80% of the administered dose excreted as the parent compound. The elimination rate constant, as calculated from urinary excretion data, was 0.339 +/- 0.043 h-1, which is in close agreement with the terminal rate constant for plasma. Renal clearance of cefpimizole was 96.2 +/- 17.3 ml/min. Dose proportionality over the three dose levels was obtained from area under the plasma curve and cumulative urinary excretion data. The results of the multiple-dose study indicated that no apparent change in the distribution or elimination kinetics of cefpimizole occurred after the administration of 1-, 2-, and 4-g doses for 7 days, three times a day. The kinetics from the multiple-dose study were in close agreement with those from the single-dose study. No accumulation of cefpimizole occurred, and nondetectable levels was observed 24 h after administration of the last dose. Peaks that could be attributed to metabolites of cefpimizole were not observed during high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of either plasma or urine specimens. PMID:6524897

  14. LC-MS/MS determination and urinary excretion study of seven alkaloids in healthy Chinese volunteers after oral administration of Shuanghua Baihe tablets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Minlu; Liu, Ruijuan; Wu, Yao; Gu, Pan; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Yujie; Ma, Pengcheng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-25

    An LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of magnoflorine, berberrubine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, epiberberine, palmatine and berberine in human urine. The sample preparation procedure involved the four-fold dilution of the urine samples with acetonitrile/water (1:3, v/v). The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Hedera ODS-2 column under gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min with acetonitrile and water containing 0.5% formic acid as the mobile phase. The mass detection was performed in the positive mode. Calibration curves of the seven alkaloids showed good linearity (correlation coefficients>0.9973) over their concentration ranges. To meet the requirements of urinary excretion study for each alkaloid in human, the lower limit of quantification was set at different values from 0.05063 ng/mL to 2.034 ng/mL for the seven alkaloids, respectively. The intra- and inter-batch precision and accuracy were all within ± 15%. No matrix effect was observed for the analytes. The validated method was applied to the excretion study for the seven alkaloids in healthy Chinese volunteers after oral administration of Shuanghua Baihe tablets. The average 72 h cumulative urinary excretion of magnoflorine, berberrubine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, epiberberine, palmatine and berberine accounted for 1.81%, 0.27%, 0.29%, 0.046%, 0.027%, 0.010% and 0.021% of the respective administered dose.

  15. Excretion and metabolism of milnacipran in humans after oral administration of milnacipran hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanying; Chin, Christina; Wangsa, Julie; Ho, John

    2012-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics, excretion, and metabolism of milnacipran were evaluated after oral administration of a 100-mg dose of [¹⁴C]milnacipran hydrochloride to healthy male subjects. The peak plasma concentration of unchanged milnacipran (∼240 ng/ml) was attained at 3.5 h and was lower than the peak plasma concentration of radioactivity (∼679 ng Eq of milnacipran/ml) observed at 4.3 h, indicating substantial metabolism of milnacipran upon oral administration. Milnacipran has two chiral centers and is a racemic mixture of cis isomers: d-milnacipran (1S, 2R) and l-milnacipran (1R, 2S). After oral administration, the radioactivity of almost the entire dose was excreted rapidly in urine (approximately 93% of the dose). Approximately 55% of the dose was excreted in urine as unchanged milnacipran, which contained a slightly higher proportion of d-milnacipran (∼31% of the dose). In addition to the excretion of milnacipran carbamoyl O-glucuronide metabolite in urine (∼19% of the dose), predominantly as the l-milnacipran carbamoyl O-glucuronide metabolite (∼17% of the dose), approximately 8% of the dose was excreted in urine as the N-desethyl milnacipran metabolite. No additional metabolites of significant quantity were excreted in urine. Similar plasma concentrations of milnacipran and the l-milnacipran carbamoyl O-glucuronide metabolite were observed after dosing, and the maximum plasma concentration of l-milnacipran carbamoyl O-glucuronide metabolite at 4 h after dosing was 234 ng Eq of milnacipran/ml. Lower plasma concentrations (<25 ng Eq of milnacipran/ml) of N-desethyl milnacipran and d-milnacipran carbamoyl O-glucuronide metabolites were observed.

  16. Differences in serological responses and excretion patterns of volunteers challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with and without the colonization factor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Satterwhite, T K; Evans, D J; DuPont, H L

    1978-01-01

    Double-blind studies were performed to compare the virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with and without the fimbriate colonization factor antigen (CFA), using young healthy adults (mean age, 23 years) as volunteers. In the first study one group of volunteers ingested 1 X 10(6) E. coli H-10407, the CFA-positive strain, and another group ingested 1 X 10(6) E. coli H-10407-P, the CFA-negative spontaneous derivative of strain H-10407. The second study was similar except that the test strains were administered at a dose of 1 X 10(8) viable cells. Three parameters of infection were monitored: (i) diarrhea and associated symptoms; (ii) excretion pattern of test strains; and (iii) humoral antibody response to CFA, somatic antigen, and heat-labile enterotoxin. Significant signs of illness occurred only in six of seven volunteers who ingested E. coli H-10407 at a dose of 1 X 10(8). At both doses, E. coli H-10407-P appeared in the stool on day 1 postchallenge and disappeared by day 4. In contrast, strain H-10407 was persistently excreted from the first to the last day of the study. Also, only those volunteers in the H-10407 challenge groups (12 of 13 analyzed) responded with a fourfold antibody titer rise to CFA, somatic antigen, and/or heat-labile enterotoxin. No reversion of H-10407-P to H-10407 was detected. PMID:346488

  17. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-01-01

    The reported investigation provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. L-histidine (His) was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol GSH and Cys chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of a chelator. The intravenous GSH or Cys were most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. Oral administration of ReadiSorb reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted.

  18. Caffeine in sport. Urinary excretion of caffeine in healthy volunteers after intake of common caffeine-containing beverages.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, P J; Müller, F R; Müller, F O

    1988-08-20

    The presence of a concentration of caffeine greater than or equal to 15 micrograms/ml in urine of athletes participating in competitive sport is a disqualifying factor. A study was conducted to establish how much caffeine needs to be ingested--in the form of coffee, tea or Coca-Cola--to approach or exceed this limit. Nine healthy volunteers participated in a randomised cross-over study and received caffeine in the form of these beverages, ingested within 15 minutes, in doses ranging from 1.52 mg/kg to 17.53 mg/kg. The latter dose is equivalent to nearly 8 cups of ordinary percolated coffee. The maximum caffeine concentration in urine recorded was 14 micrograms/ml, 3 hours after ingestion. A significant correlation was found between the caffeine dose and the maximum urinary concentration. The mean recovery of caffeine in urine was between 0.74% and 0.91% of the administered dose. The nature of the beverage did not appear to influence the degree of caffeine excretion. It is concluded that if a concentration of 15 micrograms caffeine/ml urine is recorded, it can safely be accepted that the athlete purposely ingested large amounts of the substance, in whatever form.

  19. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides.

  20. Renal electrolyte excretion and renin release during calcium and parathormone infusions in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, W S; Roddis, S A; Unwin, R J

    1986-01-01

    Following a random block experimental design in each case, three repeated measurement studies were carried out in three different groups of conscious rabbits, to investigate the renal effects of increasing doses of intravenous calcium chloride (CaCl2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH). In the first study, each rabbit received either CaCl2 (0.15, 0.3, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1) or vehicle alone (control) for 160 min. In the second study, rabbits were given either PTH (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1), CaCl2 (1.0 mg kg-1 min-1), PTH plus CaCl2 (0.15 microgram kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 mg kg-1 min-1, respectively) or vehicle alone; PTH was infused for just over 60 min. In the third study, a much smaller dose (0.05 mg kg-1 min-1) of CaCl2 was infused for 100 min. CaCl2 infusion produced a striking fall in fractional excretion of sodium of at least 50% (P less than 0.01), but this was not dose related, being almost maximal at the smaller doses infused. Although this effect was evident in the absence of any changes in total plasma calcium concentration at the lower doses of CaCl2, renal calcium excretion was increased between 2- and 20-fold (P less than 0.01) at all doses infused. Fractional excretion of chloride doubled at the two higher doses of CaCl2 (P less than 0.01), but potassium excretion was unchanged. There were no consistent alterations in mean arterial blood pressure, effective renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate or plasma renin activity (PRA); total plasma calcium concentration was consistently elevated only during infusion of the high dose by just under 1 mmol l-1. PTH infusion had no measured effect on fractional excretion of sodium or renal calcium excretion, but doubled fractional potassium excretion (P less than 0.05). Heart rate and PRA increased (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.05, respectively), the latter by 50%, but systemic pressure and renal haemodynamics were not significantly affected. By contrast, PTH infused with CaCl2 produced a 4-fold rise

  1. Tissue distribution, metabolism and excretion of 3, 3′-dichloro-4′-sulfooxy-biphenyl in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; He, Xianran; Teesch, Lynn M.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with lower numbers of chlorine atoms exhibit a greater susceptibility to metabolism than their higher-chlorinated counterparts. Following initial hydroxylation of these lower chlorinated PCBs, metabolic sulfation to form PCB sulfates is increasingly recognized as an important component of their toxicology. Since procedures for the quantitative analysis of PCB sulfates in tissue samples have not been previously available, we have now developed an efficient, LC-ESI-MS/MS based, protocol for the quantitative analysis of 4-PCB 11 sulfate in biological samples. This procedure was used to determine the distribution of 4-PCB 11 sulfate in liver, kidney, lung, and brain, as well as its excretion profile, following its intravenous administration to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Following initial uptake of 4-PCB 11 sulfate, its concentration in these tissues and serum declined within the first hour following injection. Although biliary secretion was detected, analysis of 24 hour collections of urine and feces revealed recovery of less than 4% of the administered 4-PCB 11 sulfate. High-resolution LC-MS analysis of bile, urine, and feces showed metabolic products derived from 4-PCB 11 sulfate. Thus, 4-PCB 11 sulfate at this dose was not directly excreted in the urine, but was, instead, re-distributed to tissues and/or subjected to further metabolism. PMID:26046945

  2. Detection of doping with rhGH: excretion study with WADA-approved kits.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Xinmiao; He, Chunji; Zhang, Lisi; Xu, Youxuan; Xie, Minhao; Yan, Yi; Su, Hao; Wu, Moutian

    2011-01-01

    The detection of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) doping using the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) approved kits is reported in this research. Twenty-five young male students were selected and divided randomly into two groups with six belonging to the placebo and nineteen to the administration group. Thirteen volunteers in one group were administered with a Chinese preparation of rhGH while six volunteers included in the other group were given rhGH made in Switzerland. Both preparations were administered at a dose of 0.1 IU/kg body weight, one injection per day for 14 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected using WADA guidelines and all blood samples were analyzed with WADA-approved Kits 1 and 2. The time window for detection of rhGH doping using WADA-approved kits and criteria are discussed. Based on the comparison of the data obtained from this excretion study and from our routine (Chinese population as reference), consideration of the recent WADA criteria for rhGH AAF (Analytical Adverse Findings) is reported statistically. A comparison of data obtained from the two sample groups administered with pharmaceutical preparations, one Chinese rhGH (GenHeal®, S19990019, 1.6 mg (4 IU), Shanghai, China) obtained from prokaryotic cells and the other (Saizen®, S20080036, 1.33 mg (4 IU), Laboratoires Serone S.A., Switzerland) from eukaryotic cells is reported and did not show any significant difference for the detection of doping with rhGH.

  3. Effect of sodium taurolithocholate on bile flow and bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Norman B.; Emerman, Sidney

    1968-01-01

    Sodium taurolithocholate and sodium taurocholenate were infused intravenously into rats and hamsters. Each bile acid salt was given alone or in combination with varying amounts of a primary bile salt, either sodium taurocholate or sodium taurochenodeoxycholate. Bile flow, total bile acid salt excretion, and the excretion of sodium taurolithocholate were quantitatively determined. In addition, mannitol excretion in bile was determined at various flow rates. Sodium taurolithocholate was found to be rapidly excreted in bile in concentrations greater than its aqueous solubility. When the endogenous excretion rate of bile salt or the infusion of primary bile salt was less than the molar amount of administered sodium taurolithocholate, cholestasis always occurred. Increasing molar amounts of primary bile salt prevented cholestasis and enhanced the excretion rate of sodium taurolithocholate. Infusion of sodium taurocholenate, a nonhemolytic bile salt, caused an effect on bile flow and bile acid salt excretion qualitatively similar to sodium taurolithocholate. The induction of cholestasis can be attributed to the physical properties of these poorly water soluble bile salts. The reduction in bile flow could not be shown to be related to water reabsorption from the biliary tree since there was no increase in mannitol concentration in bile during cholestasis. Reduction in bile flow may be related to obstruction of segments of the biliary tree by precipitates of sodium taurolithocholate and possibly to a decrease in water entry into the biliary tree during infusion of this bile acid salt. PMID:5645847

  4. Biliary excretion in dogs: evidence for a molecular weight threshold.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinning; Gandhi, Yash A; Morris, Marilyn E

    2010-04-16

    Molecular weight (MW) is known as an important factor of biliary excretion in rats, guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the biliary excretion and MW of drugs in dogs. Data on the percentage of dose excreted into bile as parent drug (PD(b)) in dogs were collected from the literature for 134 compounds. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was utilized to determine whether a MW threshold exists for PD(b). A MW threshold of 375-400 Da was established for anions in dogs, which is similar with the cutoff value observed in rats (400 Da) but lower than the one in humans (475 Da). No MW threshold was found for cations or cations/neutral compounds. A molecular volume threshold of 300A(3) was also determined for anions in dogs, which corresponds to a MW of 394 Da. In conclusion, our analysis suggested the presence of a MW cutoff for anions in dogs, which may be related with the molecular size of a compound. This represents the first report of the influence of MW or molecular volume as a determinant of biliary excretion for a structurally diverse set of compounds in dogs.

  5. Cross-fostering study of methyl mercury retention, demethylation and excretion in the neonatal hamster.

    PubMed

    Nordenhäll, K; Dock, L; Vahter, M

    1998-03-01

    The cross-fostering technique was used in order to compare methyl mercury (MeHg) metabolism in hamsters following prenatal (in utero) and neonatal (lactational) exposure. Pregnant Syrian golden hamsters were administered radiolabeled MeHg on day 12 of gestation. The offspring was nursed by foster mothers unexposed to MeHg, while the pups from the unexposed animals were nursed by the MeHg-administered animals. Under these conditions, each pup in the litter received a dose of MeHg in utero corresponding to 0.9% of the maternal dose. The average amount of mercury found in the pups exposed via milk corresponded to 4.5% of the total body burden of the foster dam at the onset of lactation. This was about half the amount received by the pups exposed in utero. The total body burden of mercury, and the amount of mercury in the liver, brain and kidney of the pups exposed in utero began to decrease at seven days of age. The rate of decrease differed among the tissues and was lowest in the kidney. The amount of mercury in pups exposed via milk reached a peak level when the pups were 10-15 days old. The total body burden of mercury showed a slow decrease while the liver, brain and kidney levels decreased rapidly. In both groups of animals, up to 80% of the total body burden of mercury was found in the pelt. These data show that milk may be a significant exposure route for mercury and that neonatal hamsters are unable to demethylate MeHg and excrete mercury in urine and faeces.

  6. D-penicillamine does not increase urinary bismuth excretion in patients treated with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate.

    PubMed

    Nwokolo, C U; Pounder, R E

    1990-10-01

    Twenty-four urinary bismuth excretion was measured in five patients who had been treated with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate, before and after single 1 g oral dose of D-penicillamine. Before dosing with D-penicillamine, the median 24 h urinary bismuth output was 55 micrograms 24 h-1 (range 17-156 micrograms 24 h-1) and following dosing with D-penicillamine the median 24 h urinary bismuth output was 53 micrograms 24 h-1 (range 12-156 micrograms 24 h-1). D-penicillamine does not facilitate the urinary excretion of bismuth, hence it is unsuitable for use as an oral chelator in patients with bismuth intoxication.

  7. Salt excretion in Suaeda fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Nehla; Ammari, Manel; Mssedi, Dorsaf; Benzerti, Maali; Snoussi, Sana; Abdelly, C

    2010-09-01

    Suaeda fruticosa is a perennial "includer" halophyte devoid of glands or trichomes with a strong ability of accumulating and sequestrating Na(+) and Cl(-). We were interested in determining whether leaf cuticle salt excretion could be involved as a further mechanism in salt response of this species after long-term treatment with high salinity levels. Seedlings had been treated for three months with seawater (SW) diluted with tap water (0, 25, 50 and 75% SW). Leaf scanning electron microscopy revealed a convex adaxial side sculpture and a higher accumulation of saline crystals at the lamina margin, with a large variability on repartition and size between treatments. No salt gland or salt bladder was found. Threedimensional wax decorations were the only structures found on leaf surface. Washing the leaf surface with water indicated that sodium and chloride predominated in excreted salts, and that potassium was poorly represented. Optimal growth of whole plant was recorded at 25% SW, correlating with maximum Na(+) and Cl(-) absolute secretion rate. The leaves of plants treated with SW retained more water than those of plants treated with tap water due to lower solute potential, especially at 25% SW. Analysis of compatible solute, such as proline, total soluble carbohydrates and glycinebetaine disclosed strong relationship between glycinebetaine and osmotic potential (r = 0.92) suggesting that tissue hydration was partly maintained by glycinebetaine accumulation. Thus in S. fruticosa , increased solute accumulation associated with water retention, and steady intracellular ion homeostasis confirms the "includer" strategy of salt tolerance previously demonstrated. However, salt excretion at leaf surface also participated in conferring to this species a capacity in high salinity tolerance.

  8. Cocaine and metabolite excretion in saliva under stimulated and nonstimulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Hillsgrove, M; Weinhold, L; Gorelick, D A; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1993-10-01

    The accessibility of saliva for rapid, noninvasive sampling makes it an attractive biological fluid for detecting drug use. However, little is known about salivary excretion patterns of the major cocaine metabolites, benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME). Additionally, there is a general lack of information on the effects of salivary collection conditions on cocaine excretion in saliva. This study documents the profile of cocaine and metabolites in human saliva under stimulated and nonstimulated saliva flow conditions. Saliva samples were obtained periodically from six healthy volunteers who were administered three, equally spaced, single intravenous doses of 25 mg of cocaine during a 6-h test session. On different days, whole saliva was obtained either under nonstimulated or stimulated (sour candy) conditions. The samples were analyzed for cocaine and metabolites by GC/MS. Cocaine, BE, and EME were detected and quantitated in the saliva of all subjects. Cocaine was the predominant analyte identified in all samples. Nonstimulated saliva contained substantially more drug than stimulated samples. The ratio of the area under the curve (AUC) of cocaine in nonstimulated saliva to that of stimulated saliva was variable and ranged from 3.0 to 9.5. The AUC ratios of BE and EME were similar to those observed for cocaine. The lowering of cocaine concentration in saliva in the stimulated flow condition was likely due to an increase in saliva pH associated with increased saliva flow rate; it is known that an increase in saliva pH retards cocaine partitioning into this biological fluid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Plasma pharmacokinetics and urinary excretion of hexamethylene bisacetamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Egorin, M J; Zuhowski, E G; Cohen, A S; Geelhaar, L A; Callery, P S; Van Echo, D A

    1987-11-15

    In order to further understand the clinical toxicities of hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) and to allow appropriate in vitro studies, we developed a suitable gas chromatographic assay and quantified plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of four metabolites which we had previously identified in urine of patients receiving 5-day HMBA infusions at 4.8-43.2 g/m2/day. 6-Acetamidohexanoic acid (AcHA) was the major plasma metabolite and reached steady state concentration (Css) by 24 h. AcHA Css increased from 0.12 +/- 0.02 (SD) mM at 4.8 g/m2/day to 0.72 mM at 43.2 g/m2/day. The Css AcHA:Css HMBA ratio decreased with increasing HMBA dosage. At dosages below 24 g/m2/day plasma Css of N-acetyl-1,6-diaminohexane (NADAH), the initial metabolite of HMBA, were below the limit of detection of our assay. With HMBA infusions of 24, 33.6, and 43.2 g/m2/day, Css of NADAH were 0.16 +/- 0.05, 0.14 +/- 0.06, and 0.19 +/- 0.04 mM, respectively. Css NADAH:Css HMBA ratios at 24, 33.6, and 43.2 g/m2/day were 0.18 +/- 0.06, 0.08 +/- 0.02, and 0.31 +/- 0.05, respectively. Plasma Css of 1,6-diaminohexane and 6-aminohexanoic acid were below the limit of detection of our assay. Each patient's urinary excretion of NADAH, AcHA, and 1,6-diaminohexane was consistent from day to day. The fraction of dose excreted in urine as AcHA was not affected by HMBA dosage and accounted for 12.7 +/- 3.9% of the daily dose. The percentage of daily HMBA dose accounted for by excretion of NADAH decreased with increasing HMBA dosage (10.8 +/- 6.0% at 4.8 g/m2/day to 4.2 +/- 1.2% at 33.6 g/m2/day). Urinary excretion of 1,6-diaminohexane always accounted for less than 3% of the daily dose. Our results indicate that: (a) plasma concentrations of AcHA alone cannot explain the degree of acidosis observed with toxic doses of HMBA; (b) NADAH is present in plasma at concentrations that we have found to cause differentiation in vitro; and (c) the probable rate-limiting step in HMBA metabolism is the initial

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity.

  11. African swine fever virus excretion patterns in persistently infected animals: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Weesendorp, E; Elbers, A R W; Bouma, A; Quak, S; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2012-12-07

    The continuing circulation of African swine fever (ASF) in Russia and in the Trans-Caucasian countries has led to increased efforts in characterizing the epidemiology of ASF. For a better insight in epidemiology, quantitative data on virus excretion is required. Until now, excretion data has mainly focused on the initial stages of the disease. In our study we have studied ASF virus (ASFV) excretion dynamics in persistently infected animals. For this purpose, virus excretion through different routes was quantified over 70 days after infection. Three virus isolates of moderate virulence were used: the Brazil'78, the Malta'78 (a low and a high inoculation dose) and the Netherlands'86 isolate. For each isolate or dose, 10 animals were used. All (Brazil'78 group), or three animals per group were inoculated and the other animals served as contact animals. It was shown that dose (Malta'78 low or high) or infection route (inoculated or naturally infected) did not influence the ASFV excretion (p>0.05). Nasal, ocular and vaginal excretions showed the lowest ASFV titres. Virus was consistently present in the oropharyngeal swabs, showing two peaks, for up to 70 days. Virus was occasionally present in the faeces, occasionally with very high titres. Viral DNA persisted in blood for up to 70 days. The results presented in this study show that a high proportion of persistently infected animals shed virus into the environment for at least 70 days, representing a possible risk for transmission and that should be considered in future epidemiological analysis of ASF.

  12. Relative bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate to the lung following inhalation, using urinary excretion

    PubMed Central

    Aswania, O A; Corlett, S A; Chrystyn, H

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine if a urinary excretion method, previously described for salbutamol, could also indicate the relative bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate to the lung following inhalation from a metered dose inhaler. Method Inhaled (INH), inhaled+oral charcoal (INHC), oral (ORAL) and oral+oral charcoal (ORALC) 20 mg doses of sodium cromoglycate were given via a randomised cross-over design to 11 healthy volunteers trained on how to use a metered dose inhaler. Urine samples were collected at 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and up to 24 h post dosing and the sodium cromoglycate urinary concentration was measured using a high performance liquid chromatographic method. Results No sodium cromoglycate was detected in the urine up to 24 h following ORALC dosing. A mean (s.d.) of 3.6 (4.3) μg, 10.4 (10.9) μg and 83.7 (71.1) μg of the ORAL dose was excreted, in the urine, during the 0.5, 1.0 and 24 h post dose collection periods, respectively. Following INH dosing, the renal excretion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) with 32.9 (14.5) μg, 61.2 (28.3) μg and 305.6 (82.3) μg excreted, respectively. The SCG excreted at 0.5, 1.0 and 24 h collection periods following INHC dosing were 26.3 (8.4) μg, 49.3 (18.1) μg and 184.9 (98.4) μg, respectively. There was no significant difference between the excretion rate of sodium cromoglycate following INHC when compared with INH dosing in the first 0.5 and 1.0 h. Conclusions The urinary excretion of sodium cromoglycate in the first 0.5 h post inhalation can be used to compare the relative lung deposition of two inhaled products or of the same product using different inhalation techniques. This represents the relative bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate to the lung following inhalation. Similar 24 h urinary excretion of sodium cromoglycate can be use to compare the total dose delivered to the body from two different inhalation products/inhalation methods. This represents the relative bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate to the body

  13. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  14. Disposition, Metabolism, and Excretion of [14C]Doripenem after a Single 500-Milligram Intravenous Infusion in Healthy Men▿

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Iolanda; Mannens, Geert; Janssen, Cor; Vermeir, Marc; Cuyckens, Filip; Desai-Krieger, Daksha; Vaccaro, Nicole; Kao, L. Mark; Devineni, Damayanthi; Redman, Rebecca; Turner, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    In this open-label, single-center study, eight healthy men each received a single 500-mg dose of [14C]doripenem, containing 50 μCi of [14C]doripenem, administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion. The concentrations of unchanged doripenem and its primary metabolite (doripenem-M-1) resulting from β-lactam ring opening were measured in plasma and urine by a validated liquid chromatography method coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry assay. Total radioactivity was measured in blood, plasma, urine, and feces by liquid scintillation counting. Further metabolite profiling was conducted on urine samples using liquid chromatography coupled to radiochemical detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Unchanged doripenem and doripenem-M-1 accounted for means of 80.7% and 12.7% of the area under the plasma total-radioactivity-versus-time curve (area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity) and exhibited elimination half-lives of 1.1 and 2.5 h, respectively. Total clearance of doripenem was 16 liters/h, and renal clearance was 12.5 liters/h. At 7 days after the single dose, 95.3% of total doripenem-related radioactivity was recovered in urine and 0.72% in feces. A total mean of 97.2% of the administered dose was excreted in the urine as unchanged doripenem (78.7% ± 5.7%) and doripenem-M-1 (18.5% ± 2.6%). Most of the urinary recovery occurred within 4 h of dosing. Three additional minor metabolites were identified in urine: the glycine and taurine conjugates of doripenem-M-1 and oxidized doripenem-M-1. These results show that doripenem is predominantly eliminated in urine as unchanged drug, with only a fraction metabolized to doripenem-M-1 and other minor metabolites. PMID:18644951

  15. Trichloroethylene-induced formic aciduria: effect of dose, sex and strain of rat.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Noreen; Evans, Andrew R; Lock, Edward A

    2013-02-08

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) has been reported to increase the excretion of formic acid in the urine of male Fischer 344 (F-344) rats following large oral doses. We have examined the dose-response relationship for formic aciduria in male and female Fischer 344 rats, the effect of some known metabolites of TCE and examined the response in male Wistar rats to help understand its relevance to renal toxicity. We report that doses of TCE as low as 8 mg/kg for 3 days to both male and female F344 rats produced formic aciduria. The formic aciduria was time-dependent being more marked after 3 doses compared to one dose in male F344 rats and to a lesser extent in female F344 rats. TCE administration to male Wistar rats produced less formic aciduria than in male F344 rats, indicating a strain difference in response. As TCE is primarily metabolised by cytochrome P450 2E1, Wistar rats were administered inducers of cytochrome P450 2E1 followed by TCE, this increased formic acid excretion to a concentration similar to that observed in male F344 rats, indicating a role for P450. Administration of the major metabolites of TCE, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid to male F344 rats also produced a marked and sustained formic aciduria, while the metabolite of TCE formed via glutathione conjugation had no effect on formic acid excretion. The mechanism whereby this response occurs is currently not understood, but the formic acid excreted is not a metabolite of TCE, but appears to be due to interference with the metabolic utilisation of formate by a down stream metabolite of TCE. Over the three days of the studies no histopathological evidence of kidney toxicity was observed in F344 rats given TCE, indicating that the perturbation of formate metabolism does not lead to acute renal injury.

  16. Urinary excretion of morphine and biosynthetic precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Lamshöft, Marc; Orth, Robert G.; Dräger, Birgit; Kutchan, Toni M.; Zenk, Meinhart H.; Spiteller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It has been firmly established that humans excrete a small but steady amount of the isoquinoline alkaloid morphine in their urine. It is unclear whether it is of dietary or endogenous origin. There is no doubt that a simple isoquinoline alkaloid, tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), is found in human and rodent brain as well as in human urine. This suggests a potential biogenetic relationship between both alkaloids. Unlabeled THP or [1,3,4-D3]-THP was injected intraperitoneally into mice and the urine was analyzed. This potential precursor was extensively metabolized (96%). Among the metabolites found was the phenol-coupled product salutaridine, the known morphine precursor in the opium poppy plant. Synthetic [7D]-salutaridinol, the biosynthetic reduction product of salutaridine, injected intraperitoneally into live animals led to the formation of [7D]-thebaine, which was excreted in urine. [N-CD3]-thebaine was also administered and yielded [N-CD3]-morphine and the congeners [N-CD3]-codeine and [N-CD3]-oripavine in urine. These results show for the first time that live animals have the biosynthetic capability to convert a normal constituent of rodents, THP, to morphine. Morphine and its precursors are normally not found in tissues or organs, presumably due to metabolic breakdown. Hence, only that portion of the isoquinoline alkaloids excreted in urine unmetabolized can be detected. Analysis of urine by high resolution-mass spectrometry proved to be a powerful method for tracking endogenous morphine and its biosynthetic precursors. PMID:20421505

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl congeners that increase the glucuronidation and biliary excretion of thyroxine are distinct from the congeners that enhance the serum disappearance of thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Martin, L A; Wilson, D T; Reuhl, K R; Gallo, M A; Klaassen, C D

    2012-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners differentially reduce serum thyroxine (T(4)) in rats, but little is known about their ability to affect biliary excretion of T(4). Thus, male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1242 (32 mg/kg per day), PCB-95, PCB-99, PCB-118 (16 mg/kg per day), PCB-126 (40 μg/kg per day), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (3.9 μg/kg per day), or corn oil for 7 days. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, [(125)I]T(4) was administered intravenously, and blood, bile, and urine samples were collected for quantifying [(125)I]T(4) and in bile [(125)I]T(4) metabolites. Serum T(4) concentrations were reduced by all treatments, but dramatic reductions occurred in response to Aroclor-1254, PCB-99 [phenobarbital (PB)-type congener], and PCB-118 (mixed-type congener). None of the treatments increased urinary excretion of [(125)I]T(4). Aroclor-1254, PCB-118, TCDD, and PCB-126 (TCDD-type congener) increased biliary excretion of T(4)-glucuronide by 850, 756, 710, and 573%, respectively, corresponding to marked induction of hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward T(4). PCB-95 and PCB-99 did not induce UGT activity; therefore, the increased biliary excretion of T(4)-glucuronide was related to the affinity of congeners for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. The disappearance of [(125)I]T(4) from serum was rapid (within 15-min) and was increased by Aroclor-1254, PCB-99 and PCB-118. Thus, reductions in serum T(4) in response to PCBs did not always correspond with UGT activity toward T(4) or with increased biliary excretion of T(4)-glucuronide. The rapid disappearance of [(125)I]T(4) from the serum of rats treated with PB-like PCBs suggests that increased tissue uptake of T(4) is an additional mechanism by which PCBs may reduce serum T(4).

  18. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6-35 months and 3-17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158.

  19. Moderate alcohol consumption and urinary excretion of magnesium and calcium.

    PubMed

    Rylander, R; Mégevand, Y; Lasserre, B; Amstutz, W; Granbom, S

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnesium (Mg) status of male subjects consuming moderate amounts of alcohol (n = 14) in comparison with that of a group of non-consumers of alcohol (n = 10). Plasma ionized Mg levels and total erythrocyte Mg content were determined as well as the excretion of Mg in urine before and after an oral loading test. Intake of Mg via food and water was estimated using a one-week dietary records. The results showed a significantly higher, alcohol dose-related excretion of Mg and Ca (calcium) in the urine after the oral Mg load among consumers of alcohol. Although the study is based on a small number of subjects with differences in smoking habits, it is suggested that alcohol consumption even in moderate amounts could contribute to Mg deficiency.

  20. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Setien, A.; Loza-Rubio, E.; Salas-Rojas, M.; Brisseau, N.; Cliquet, F.; Pastoret, P. P.; Rojas-Dotor, S.; Tesoro, E.; Kretschmer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  1. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setien, A; Loza-Rubio, E; Salas-Rojas, M; Brisseau, N; Cliquet, F; Pastoret, P P; Rojas-Dotor, S; Tesoro, E; Kretschmer, R

    2005-06-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion.

  2. Impact of dose on the bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angélique; Williamson, Gary; Crozier, Alan

    2014-08-01

    Single servings of coffee beverage containing low (412 μmol), medium (635 μmol) and high (795 μmol) amounts of chlorogenic acids were administered to eleven healthy volunteers in a double-blind randomised controlled trial. Analysis of plasma and urine collected for 24 h revealed the presence of 12 metabolites in plasma and 16 metabolites in urine, principally in the form of sulphates, and to a lesser extent glucuronides of caffeic, ferulic, dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids, as well as intact feruloylquinic and caffeoylquinic acids, and sulphated caffeoylquinic acid lactones. Median values of peak plasma concentrations after increasing doses of chlorogenic acids were 1088, 1526 and 1352 nM. In urine the median amounts of metabolites excreted after 24 h following consumption of the three coffees were 101, 160 and 125 μmol, accounting for 24%, 25% and 16% of the doses ingested. Peak plasma concentration and urinary excretion values showed trends towards a reduced bioavailability of chlorogenic acids associated with the highest dose ingested, when expressed as percentages of intake. Potential biomarkers of coffee intake were identified as feruloylquinic acids and sulphated caffeoylquinic acid lactones in plasma and urine with positive moderate to strong coefficients of determination for peak plasma concentrations (0.60-0.81) and amounts excreted in urine (0.36-0.73) (P < 0.05).

  3. Dietary isoflavone absorption, excretion, and metabolism in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Whitehouse-Tedd, Katherine M; Cave, Nicholas J; Ugarte, Claudia E; Waldron, Lucy A; Prasain, Jeevan K; Arabshahi, Alireza; Barnes, Stephen; Thomas, David G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary isoflavones, capable of influencing reproductive parameters in domestic cats (Felis catus), have been detected in commercial diets fed to captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). However, the absorptive and metabolic capacity of cheetahs towards isoflavones has not yet been studied. Experiments were designed to describe the plasma concentration-time curve, metabolite profile, and urinary and fecal excretion of genistein and daidzein in cheetahs following consumption of isoflavones. Four adult cheetahs were administered a single oral bolus of genistein and daidzein, and five juvenile cheetahs consuming a milk replacer formula found to contain isoflavones were also included. Urine was collected from all animals, and blood and feces were also collected from adult cheetahs following isoflavone exposure. Samples were analyzed for isoflavone metabolite concentration by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-multiple reaction ion monitoring mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. Sulfate conjugates were the primary metabolites detected of both genistein and daidzein (60-80% of total isoflavones present) in the plasma and urine of cheetahs. A smaller proportion of daidzein was detected as conjugates in the urine of juvenile cheetahs, compared to adult cheetahs. Other metabolites included unconjugated genistein and daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, and dihydrodaidzein, but not equol. Only 33% of the ingested genistein dose, and 9% of daidzein, was detected in plasma from adult cheetahs. However, of the ingested dose, 67% of genistein and 45% of daidzein were detected in the feces of adults. This study revealed that cheetahs appear efficient in their conjugation of absorbed dietary isoflavones and only a small fraction of ingested dose is absorbed. However, the capacity of the cheetah to conjugate genistein and daidzein with sulfate moieties appears lower than reported in the domestic cat. This may confer greater opportunity for biologic

  4. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  5. Theoretically required urinary flow during high-dose methotrexate infusion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Tanaka, J; Fujimoto, T

    1984-01-01

    The renal excretion of methotrexate (MTX) and its major metabolite 7-hydroxymethotrexate (7-OH-MTX) was analysed in 12 children with malignancies during 52 courses of high-dose methotrexate (H-D-MTX) infusion at dosages ranging from 0.7 to 8.4 g/m2. The peak concentrations of both MTX and 7-OH-MTX exceeded the aqueous solubilities of these compounds at low pH (less than or equal to 6.0). The cumulative MTX excretion in urine was 75%-98% of the administered amount of MTX, and the cumulative 7-OH-MTX excretion in the urine was 3%-15%. The theoretically required urinary flow (TRUF) was estimated as the minimum urine volume needed for complete resolution of MTX and its metabolites in urine. TRUF during MTX infusion from 0 to 6 h and from 6 to 12 h was correlated with the dosage of MTX, and these values were 0.1-1.8 ml/min/m2 at pH 7.0, 0.5-11.1 ml/min/m2 at pH 6.0, and 1.9-42.2 ml/min/m2 at pH 5.0 with dosages of 0.7 to 8.4 g/m2. The value of the theoretically required urinary flow is important to ensure adequate hydration and the optimum alkalinization schedule for massive MTX infusion.

  6. Exploration of diuretic potential and electrolyte excretion of Tephrosia purpurea (Fabaceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, D; Narayana, T V; Vidyasagar; Mazumder, Upal Kanti; Gupta, Malaya

    2012-03-01

    Tephrosia purpurea (Fabaceae) is a well-known traditional plant with diuretic effect but no scientific work published till date to support the claimed ethnomedical use. Therefore, the present study appraised the diuretic potential of methanol extract of Tephrosia purpurea (METP) in male wistar rats. The powdered plant material was extracted with methanol by hot extraction. The animals were divided into five groups for diuretic activity. The first group served as saline control (0.9%% saline solution, 25 ml/kg, body weight (b.w)), the second group received osmotic diuretic, urea (1 g/kg b.w), the third group received high-ceiling diuretic, furosemide (5 mg/kg b.w), and the other two groups were administered various concentrations of METP (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg b.w) orally to hydrated rats and their urine volume was measured at 5th and 24th hr after drug administration, while animals were deprived of food and water. After collection of urine, the parameters such as urine output, diuretic activity, electrolyte excretion of Na(++), K(++), Ca(2++), and Cl(-), and pH were analyzed. METP at various dose levels exhibited significant diuretic activity as evidenced by increased urine volume, electrolyte concentration, and alkaline pH in comparison to control group of animals. The present study provides a quantitative basis for explaining the folkloric use of Tephrosia purpurea as a diuretic agent in Indian traditional system of medicine.

  7. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, L. J.

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  8. Excretion of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine in human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbona, F A; Onyeji, C O; Bolaji, O O; Torimiro, S E

    1987-01-01

    The excretion of chloroquine and the major metabolite, desethylchloroquine, in breast milk was investigated in eleven lactating mothers following a single oral dose of chloroquine (600 mg base). The average milk to plasma concentration ratio at the 24th hour was 6.6 +/- 2.4 for chloroquine and 1.5 +/- 0.6 for desethylchloroquine in five of the volunteers. In five other volunteers the elimination half-life of chloroquine in milk was 8.8 +/- 4.7 days which was longer than that in saliva (3.9 +/- 1.0 days) from the same volunteers. The maximum daily dose of the drug that the infant can receive from breastfeeding was about 0.7% of the maternal start dose of the drug in malaria chemotherapy. It is, therefore, suggested that it is safe for mothers to breastfeed their infants when undergoing treatment for malaria with chloroquine. PMID:3580253

  9. Excretion of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine in human milk.

    PubMed

    Ogunbona, F A; Onyeji, C O; Bolaji, O O; Torimiro, S E

    1987-04-01

    The excretion of chloroquine and the major metabolite, desethylchloroquine, in breast milk was investigated in eleven lactating mothers following a single oral dose of chloroquine (600 mg base). The average milk to plasma concentration ratio at the 24th hour was 6.6 +/- 2.4 for chloroquine and 1.5 +/- 0.6 for desethylchloroquine in five of the volunteers. In five other volunteers the elimination half-life of chloroquine in milk was 8.8 +/- 4.7 days which was longer than that in saliva (3.9 +/- 1.0 days) from the same volunteers. The maximum daily dose of the drug that the infant can receive from breastfeeding was about 0.7% of the maternal start dose of the drug in malaria chemotherapy. It is, therefore, suggested that it is safe for mothers to breastfeed their infants when undergoing treatment for malaria with chloroquine.

  10. [Effect of the chelator Zn-DTPA on the excretion of lead in lead intoxication mice detected with ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Lu, Kai-zhi; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Qiong; Zeng, Yu-liang; Yin, Hong-jun; He, Xuan-hui; Tian, Ying; Dong, Jun-Xing

    2014-11-01

    To study the lead excretion effect of the chelator Zn-DTPA on the lead intoxication mice, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to detect the lead content of biological samples. The acute lead intoxication mice model was established by injecting lead acetate intraperitoneally with the dose of 1 mg. Zn-DTPA was administered intraperitoneally to mice once daily for five consecutive days 4 h after intoxication. Control group, model group, combination of Zn-DTPA and Ca-DTPA group were evaluated at the same time. The urine was collected every day. The mice were sacrificed in batches in the 2rd, 4th, 6th day. Biological samples including urine, whole blood, femur and brain were prepared and nitrated. Lead concentration was detected by ICP-MS. The result showed that Zn-DTPA could increase lead content in urine markedly and reduce lead content in blood, femur and brain.

  11. The effect of ethanol on the urinary excretion and differential metabolism of folate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    In rats chronically fed ethanol and folate-containing diets for 12 weeks, urinary folate excretion was increased. However, no significant tissue depletion was noted unless rats were fed folate deficient diets. In rats fed folate-deficient diets urinary folate excretion was dramatically decreased at two weeks, when tissue folate stores were replete. After 16 weeks of diet treatment, the urinary excretion of an intraperitoneal dose of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was not altered in folate-deficient rats. Although acute ethanol administration (oral or intravenous) increased endogenous folate excretion that of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was not significantly altered, nor was the fractional excretion of {sup 3}H-label. To clarify this effect, the metabolism of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was studied. HPLC analysis of urine showed extensive metabolism of {sup 3}H-PteGlu to other folate substrates. Oral ethanol-treatment increased the fractional excretion of endogenous 5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu with no increase in urinary excretion or fractional excretion of other {sup 3}H-labeled derivatives. After infusion of tritium labeled 5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu, ethanol treatment increased the fractional excretion of endogenous and {sup 3}H-5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu, but not that of other folates. There was rapid uptake of {sup 3}H-label by the kidney with only 10% of the urinary {sup 3}H-label as {sup 3}H-5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu.

  12. Subchronic dispositional and toxicological effects of arsenate administered in drinking water to mice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, M F; Thompson, D J

    1996-10-11

    Exposure to the drinking water contaminant arsenate is a daily occurrence and there are concerns that this exposure may lead to cancer. Although the acute dispositional effects of arsenate have been studied in detail, there is minimal information on the disposition and toxicological effects of it after continuous exposure. The objective of this study was to examine in mice the effect of a 4-wk treatment with arsenate administered in drinking water. Female B6C3F1 mice (3/cage) were housed in metabolism cages and given water and food ad libitum. Two groups (A, B) of mice were treated (4 cages/treatment/group) with distilled water (control, C) or water containing 0.025 mg/L (L) or 2.5 mg/L (H) arsenate. Group A was sacrificed on d 28 and plasma and urine samples were taken for determination of clinical chemistry parameters. Liver and kidney tissue samples were taken for histopathological analysis. The reduced nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) content in several tissues was determined. Group B was gavaged with [73As]arsenate on d 28 and continued the arsenate drinking water exposure for 48 h. Excreta and tissues were collected and analyzed for 73As. Urine was further analyzed for arsenate and its metabolites. There were no effects on the mean daily amount of water and food consumed, whereas the mean daily urine volume excreted was significantly elevated by 10% in the H-treated animals compared to C and L. A dose-related hepatic vacuolar degeneration in the liver was observed, but no histological changes were evident in the kidney. Only clinical chemistry parameters in plasma were altered by the arsenate treatment. Glucose was significantly lower at the H dose compared to C and L, triglycerides were significantly greater in C than L and H, and creatinine was significantly greater in H than C. Hepatic NPSH content in the H animals was significantly lower than C and L animals, whereas no effects in lung and kidney were detected. The weights of liver, lung, and kidney, as well

  13. Radiation dosimetry from breast milk excretion of radioiodine and pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; Di Simone, R.N.; Keen, R.L.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements were made of the activity in samples of breast milk obtained from a patient with postpartum thyroiditis following administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide and subsequently (99mTc)pertechnetate 24 hr later. Both /sup 123/I and 99mTc were found to be excreted exponentially with an effective half-life of 5.8 hr and 2.8 hr, respectively. Less than 10% of the activity was incorporated into breast-milk protein. After administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide breast feeding should be discontinued for 24-36 hr to reduce the absorbed dose to the child's thyroid.

  14. Grape seed procyanidins administered at physiological doses to rats during pregnancy and lactation promote lipid oxidation and up-regulate AMPK in the muscle of male offspring in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Anna; del Bas, Josep Maria; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Arola, Lluís; Caimari, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether the administration of a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) during pregnancy and lactation, at doses extrapolated to human consumption, programs male offspring toward improved metabolism in adulthood. For this purpose, female rats were fed a normal-fat diet (NFD) and treated with either GSPE (25 mg kg(-1) of body weight/day) or vehicle during gestation and lactation. The metabolic programming effects of GSPE were evaluated in the male offspring fed NFD from 30 to 170 days of life. No changes were observed in body weight, adiposity, circulating lipid profile and insulin sensitivity between the offspring of dams treated with GSPE (STD-GSPE group) and their counterparts (STD-veh). However, the STD-GSPE offspring had lower circulating levels of C-reactive protein and lower respiratory quotient values, shifting whole-body energy catabolism from carbohydrate to fat oxidation. Furthermore, the STD-GSPE animals also exhibited increased levels of total and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and an over-expression of the mRNA levels of key genes related to fatty acid uptake (Fatp1 and CD36) and β-oxidation (pparα and had) in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that GSPE programs healthy male offspring towards a better circulating inflammatory profile and greater lipid utilisation in adulthood. The metabolic programming effects of GSPE that are related to the enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle seem to be mediated, at least in part, by AMPK. These findings could be of relevance in the prevention of pathologies associated to lifestyle and aging, such as obesity and insulin resistance.

  15. M-M-R(®)II manufactured using recombinant human albumin (rHA) and M-M-R(®)II manufactured using human serum albumin (HSA) exhibit similar safety and immunogenicity profiles when administered as a 2-dose regimen to healthy children.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Richard T; Reisinger, Keith S; Hartzel, Jonathan; Malacaman, Edgardo; Senders, Shelly D; Giacoletti, Katherine E D; Shaw, Eric; Kuter, Barbara J; Schödel, Florian; Musey, Luwy K

    2015-04-27

    Prior to 2006, M-M-R(®)II (measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine live) was manufactured using human serum albumin (HSA) and each dose of the vaccine contained a relatively small amount (≤0.3mg) of HSA. Because of specific regulatory requirements and limited suppliers of HSA acceptable for human use, there was a need to replace HSA with recombinant human albumin (rHA) to mitigate any potential risk to the availability of M-M-R(®)II. Two different formulations of M-M-R(®)II manufactured using either rHA or HSA were clinically evaluated for safety and immunogenicity when administered as a 2-dose regimen to healthy children 12-18 months and 3-4 years of age. Adverse events, including those indicative of a possible hypersensitivity reaction, were collected for 42 days after each dose. Antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella were measured before and approximately 6 weeks after dose 1. Antibodies to rHA were measured before and approximately 6 weeks after dose 1 and dose 2. Antibody seroconversion rates to measles, mumps, and rubella were 97.0%, 99.5%, and 99.7%, respectively, for recipients of M-M-R(®)II with rHA and 97.2%, 97.9%, and 99.6%, respectively, for recipients of M-M-R(®)II with HSA, and geometric mean titers to all 3 vaccine viral antigens were comparable between the 2 vaccination groups. The proportions of subjects who reported adverse events, including those suggestive of hypersensitivity reactions, after each dose of study vaccine were comparable between the 2 vaccination groups. No subject had detectable antibodies to rHA immediately prior to or following receipt of either the first or second dose of study vaccine. Given the comparable immunogenicity and safety profiles of both formulations, rHA is an acceptable replacement for HSA in the manufacture of M-M-R(®)II.

  16. Development of a kinetic model and calculation of radiation dose estimates for sodium iodide-{sup 131}I in athyroid individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.

    1997-07-01

    The treatment for some thyroid carcinomas involves surgically removing the thyroid gland and administering the radiopharmaceutical Sodium iodide-{sup 131}I (NaI). A diagnostic dose of NaI is given to the patient to determine if remnant tissue from the gland remains or larger doses are administered in order to treat the malignant tissue. Past research regarding NaI uptake and retention in euthyroid individuals (normal functioning thyroid) reveal that radioiodine concentrates mainly in the thyroid tissue and the remaining material is excreted from the body. The majority of radioiodine in athyroid (without thyroid) individuals is also eliminated from the body; however, there has been recent evidence of a long-term retention phase for individuals with no radioiodine concentrating tissue. The general purpose of this study was to develop a kinetic model and estimate the absorbed dose to athyroid individuals regarding the distribution and retention of NaI.

  17. Effects of water extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa, Linn (Malvaceae) 'Roselle' on excretion of a diclofenac formulation.

    PubMed

    Fakeye, T O; Adegoke, A O; Omoyeni, O C; Famakinde, A A

    2007-01-01

    The effect of beverages prepared from the dried calyx of the flowers of Hibiscus sabdariffa on the excretion of diclofenac was investigated using a controlled study in healthy human volunteers. A high pressure liquid chromatographic method was used to analyse the 8 h urine samples collected after the administration of diclofenac with 300 mL (equivalent to 8.18 mg anthocyanins) of the beverage administered daily for 3 days. An unpaired two-tailed t-test was used to analyse for significant difference observed in the amount of diclofenac excreted before and after administration of the beverage. There was a reduction in the amount of diclofenac excreted and the wide variability observed in the control with the water beverage of Hibiscus sabdariffa (p < 0.05). There is an increasing need to counsel patients against the use of plant beverages with drugs.

  18. Effects of SiC nanoparticles orally administered in a rat model: Biodistribution, toxicity and elemental composition changes in feces and organs

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, Omar; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Mejia, Jorge; Rolin, Stéphanie; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; and others

    2012-10-15

    Background: Silicon carbide (SiC) presents noteworthy properties as a material such as high hardness, thermal stability, and photoluminescent properties as a nanocrystal. However, there are very few studies in regard to the toxicological potential of SiC NPs. Objectives: To study the toxicity and biodistribution of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model after acute (24 h) and subacute (28 days) oral administrations. The acute doses were 0.5, 5, 50, 300 and 600 mg·kg{sup −1}, while the subacute doses were 0.5 and 50 mg·kg{sup −1}. Results: SiC biodistribution and elemental composition of feces and organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) have been studied by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). SiC and other elements in feces excretion increased by the end of the subacute assessment. SiC did not accumulate in organs but some elemental composition modifications were observed after the acute assessment. Histopathological sections from organs (stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys) indicate the absence of damage at all applied doses, in both assessments. A decrease in the concentration of urea in blood was found in the 50 mg·kg{sup −1} group from the subacute assessment. No alterations in the urine parameters (sodium, potassium, osmolarity) were found. Conclusion: This is the first study that assesses the toxicity, biodistribution, and composition changes in feces and organs of SiC nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model. SiC was excreted mostly in feces and low traces were retrieved in urine, indicating that SiC can cross the intestinal barrier. No sign of toxicity was however found after oral administration. -- Highlights: ► SiC nanoparticles were orally administered to rats in acute and subacute doses. ► SiC was found in low traces in urine. It is mostly excreted in feces within 5 days. ► SiC excretion rate, feces and organ elemental composition change with time. ► No morphological alteration were found on GI tract, liver, kidneys

  19. Urinary Excretion of Antidiuretic Hormone in Man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that urinary excretion of ADH can be detected readily and quantitated accurately. The ADH excretion in normal subjects is inhibited following the administration of a water load and stimulated following water deprivation. It appears that measurement of ADH excretion in man provides a means of quantitating alterations in neurohypophyseal ADH secretion. By determining not only the basal excretion of ADH but also the response to such physiological influences as water loading and dehydration, it becomes possible to study the dynamics of ADH release. Thus, the ability to extract ADH efficiently from urine combined with a sensitive and specific technique for determination of ADH concentration allows the exploration of regulatory systems for ADH control in the normal state as well as the etiological role of altered ADH secretion in clinical disorders of water balance.

  20. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  1. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin.

  2. [Hepatoduodenal circulation and excretion of the new GABA derivative citrocard].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Smirnova, L A; Riabukha, A F; Suchkov, E A; Lebedeva, S A

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic investigation of a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative cirtocard showed that, upon the intravenous introduction, the drug is determined in high concentrations in organs of elimination--the liver and kidneys. The tissue accessibility amounts to 1.341 for the liver and 4.053 for the kidneys and the separation factor is 1.041 for the liver and 4.486 for the kidneys. The study of drug excretion showed that cirtocard is determined in the urine for 48 h, its nephritic clearance being 0.047 L/h and extra-nephritic clearance, 0.33 L/h. For the unchanged substance, a large significance ofhepatoduodenal circulation is low probable, since no more than 1 - 2% of the introduced dose was isolated with bile over entire experiment. It is established that the removal of the unchanged substance does not exceed 10% of the introduced dose. There is high probability of hepatoduodenal circulation and excretion of the preparation in the form of metabolites.

  3. Clinical pharmacology of single- and multiple-ascending doses of ACT-178882, a new direct renin inhibitor, and its pharmacokinetic interaction with food and midazolam.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Jasper; Nicolas, Laurent; Binkert, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the tolerability, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of ACT-178882, a new direct renin inhibitor, as well as its interaction with food and midazolam. Healthy male subjects received either single (10-1000 mg) or multiple doses (30-600 mg) administered once daily for 14 days of ACT-178882, placebo, or 20 mg enalapril in the fasted state. Following a 2-week washout, the single dose of 30 mg ACT-178882 was also administered in the fed state. In the multiple-ascending-dose part, subjects were dosed with midazolam on days -2, 2, and 12 to investigate interactions with CYP3A4. Dizziness and headache were the most frequently reported adverse events. No clinically relevant changes occurred for body weight, vital signs, clinical laboratory variables, and ECG although both enalapril and ACT-178882 tended to decrease systolic blood pressure. Following single doses of ACT-178882, t1/2 and tmax varied from 18.7 to 24.7 h and from 3 to 5 h, respectively, and food had no significant effect. Steady-state conditions were achieved after 4-6 days of dosing and accumulation was minimal. ACT-178882 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional. ACT-178882 but not enalapril dose-dependently increased Cmax and area under the concentration-time curve of midazolam. Single and multiple doses of ACT-178882 dose-dependently increased active renin and decreased plasma renin activity, whereas enalapril increased both variables. No effects on urinary excretion of creatinine, potassium, and the 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio were observed, whereas sodium and aldosterone excretion was decreased by both ACT-178882 and enalapril. The current results with ACT-178882 warrant further clinical investigation of this renin inhibitor in hypertensive patients.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of triclopyr (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid) in the beagle dog and rhesus monkey: perspective on the reduced capacity of dogs to excrete this organic acid relative to the rat, monkey, and human.

    PubMed

    Timchalk, C; Nolan, R J

    1997-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of triclopyr (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid) were measured in the beagle dog and rhesus monkey and compared with the kinetics observed in rats and humans. In addition, studies were conducted in anesthetized dogs to better understand the mechanism by which [14C]triclopyr is eliminated in this species. Triclopyr was dissolved in distilled water, and administered as a single oral dose of 0.5, 5, or 20 mg/kg to three male dogs. A single male rhesus monkey was given an intravenous dose of 30 mg [14C]triclopyr/kg body wt on two occasions separated by 10 days. Anesthetized male dogs, were implanted with venous, arterial, and urethral catheters and given increasing amounts of triclopyr to produce plasma triclopyr levels ranging from 0.3 to 27 microg eq/mL. In the monkey, triclopyr was rapidly eliminated from the plasma (t1/2 = 6.3 hr) with >95% of the urinary 14C activity excreted within 24 hr postdosing. In the dog, orally administered triclopyr was rapidly and effectively absorbed at every dose level with virtually all of it excreted in the urine by 72 hr postdosing. However, the kinetics were slightly nonlinear, and the fraction of the dose excreted in the urine decreased with increasing dose. Several nonlinear processes may collectively contribute to the modest nonlinear pharmacokinetics in the dog. Plasma protein binding of triclopyr in the dog ranged from 94 to 99%, was nonlinear, and was an important determinant in the renal clearance of triclopyr. The nonlinear plasma protein binding indicates that glomerular filtration became disproportionately more important as plasma triclopyr concentration increased. There was good evidence for a high-affinity low-capacity active-secretory process that was saturated by low plasma triclopyr concentrations. As plasma triclopyr concentrations increased, tubular reabsorption begins to exceed secretion, resulting in decreased renal clearance. The volume of distribution, normalized for body weight

  5. COMPUTER ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION VERSUS TRADITIONALLY ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION, ECONOMICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOPSTEIN, FELIX F.; SEIDEL, ROBERT J.

    AN ATTEMPT IS MADE TO ASSESS THE ECONOMICS OF COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION (CAI) VERSUS TRADITIONALLY ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION (TAI) IN CONTROLLING THE STRUCTURE OF THE LEARNER'S STIMULUS ENVIRONMENT IN TEACHING AND TRAINING SITUATIONS. THERE IS A DISCUSSION OF THE NEED FOR A SOUND, OBJECTIVE ECONOMIC APPRAISAL OF THE VALUE TO SOCIETY OF…

  6. The pharmacology of chymotrypsin administered by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, L.; Martin, L. E.; Sheard, P.; Harrison, C.

    1960-01-01

    The ability of chymotrypsin to reach the limits of the bronchial tree has been studied in cats receiving the enzyme by inhalation as a very fine powder. For this purpose derivatives of chymotrypsin were used which had been labelled with a fluorescent molecule or with [131I]. Quantitative measurements of the absorption and distribution of inhaled chymotrypsin- [131I] revealed a rapid removal of radioactivity from the lungs over the first 24 hr. and corresponding excretion of labelled inorganic iodide in the urine. High levels of activity were not attained in the blood or thyroid. Subcutaneous administration of labelled enzyme led to more rapid accumulation of radioactivity in the blood and thyroid. Consideration of these and other results leads to the conclusion that, while some enzyme ascends the respiratory tract by ciliary movement of mucus, a substantial part is absorbed into the lungs and the [131I] subsequently detached from it. The changes in tidal air accompanying inhalation of labelled trypsin and chymotrypsin were followed in anaesthetized cats. Trypsin brings about a decrease in tidal air in distinctly lower doses than does chymotrypsin. Prior administration of mepyramine had an antagonistic effect, and it is suggested that the change in tidal air is essentially the result of bronchial spasm. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:13850540

  7. Excreting and non-excreting grasses exhibit different salt resistance strategies

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Muhammad; Gulzar, Salman; Ahmed, Muhammad Zaheer; Gul, Bilquees; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Khan, Muhammad Ajmal

    2014-01-01

    The combination of traits that makes a plant successful under saline conditions varies with the type of plant and its interaction with the environmental conditions. Knowledge about the contribution of these traits towards salt resistance in grasses has great potential for improving the salt resistance of conventional crops. We attempted to identify differential adaptive response patterns of salt-excreting versus non-excreting grasses. More specifically, we studied the growth, osmotic, ionic and nutrient (carbon/nitrogen) relations of two salt-excreting (Aeluropus lagopoides and Sporobolus tremulus) and two non-excreting (Paspalum paspalodes and Paspalidium geminatum) perennial C4 grasses under non-saline and saline (0, 200 and 400 mM NaCl) conditions. Growth and relative growth rate decreased under saline conditions in the order P. geminatum > S. tremulus = A. lagopoides > P. paspalodes. The root-to-shoot biomass allocation was unaffected in salt-excreting grasses, increased in P. paspalodes but decreased in P. geminatum. Salt-excreting grasses had a higher shoot/root Na+ ratio than non-excreting grasses. K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ homoeostasis remained undisturbed among test grasses possibly through improved ion selectivity with rising substrate salinity. Salt-excreting grasses increased leaf succulence, decreased ψs and xylem pressure potential, and accumulated proline and glycinebetaine with increasing salinity. Higher salt resistance of P. paspalodes could be attributed to lower Na+ uptake, higher nitrogen-use efficiency and higher water-use efficiency among the test species. However, P. geminatum was unable to cope with salt-induced physiological drought. More information is required to adequately document the differential strategies of salt resistance in salt-excreting and non-excreting grasses. PMID:24996428

  8. Pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin, a new macrolide, after single ascending oral doses.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S Y; Sennello, L T; Bunnell, S T; Varga, L L; Wilson, D S; Sonders, R C

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of single ascending doses of clarithromycin (6-0-methylerythromycin A) were assessed in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial with 39 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to receive single doses of either placebo or 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, or 1,200 mg of clarithromycin. Blood and urine collections were performed over the 24 h following administration of the test preparation. Biological specimens were analyzed for clarithromycin and 14(R)-hydroxyclarithromycin content by a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. The pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin appeared to be dose dependent, with terminal disposition half-life ranging from 2.3 to 6.0 h and mean +/- standard deviation area under the concentration-versus-time curve from time 0 to infinity for plasma ranging from 1.67 +/- 0.48 to 3.72 +/- 1.26 mg/liter.h per 100-mg dose over the 100- to 1,200-mg dose range. Similar dose dependency was noted in the pharmacokinetics of the 14(R)-hydroxy metabolite. Mean urinary excretion of clarithromycin and its 14(R)-hydroxy metabolite ranged from 11.5 to 17.5% and 5.3 to 8.8% of the administered dose, respectively. Urinary excretion data and plasma metabolite/parent compound concentration ratio data suggested that capacity-limited formation of the active metabolite may account, at least in part, for the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of clarithromycin. No substantive dose-related trend was observed for the renal clearance of either compound. There were no clinically significant drug-related alterations in laboratory and nonlaboratory safety parameters. In addition, there was no significant difference between placebo and clarithromycin recipients in the incidence or severity of adverse events. Clarithromycin appears to be safe and well tolerated. PMID:1489187

  9. A phase I study with MAG-camptothecin intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle in adult patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wachters, F M; Groen, H J M; Maring, J G; Gietema, J A; Porro, M; Dumez, H; de Vries, E G E; van Oosterom, A T

    2004-06-14

    In MAG-camptothecin (MAG-CPT), the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin is linked to a water-soluble polymer. Preclinical experiments showed enhanced antitumour efficacy and limited toxicity compared to camptothecin alone. Prior phase I trials guided the regimen used in this study. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, safety profile, and pharmacokinetics of weekly MAG-CPT. Patients with solid tumours received MAG-CPT intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles. At the starting dose level (80 mg x m(-2) week(-1)), no dose-limiting toxicities occurred during the first cycle (n=3). Subsequently, three patients were enrolled at the second dose level (120 mg x m(-2) week(-1)). Two of three patients at the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort developed haemorrhagic cystitis (grade 1/3 dysuria and grade 2/3 haematuria) during the second and third cycles. Next, the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort was enlarged to a total of six patients. One other patient at this dose level experienced grade 1 haematuria. At 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1), grade 1 bladder toxicity occurred in two of three patients. Dose escalation was stopped at 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Cumulative bladder toxicity was dose-limiting toxicity at 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Pharmacokinetics revealed highly variable urinary camptothecin excretion, associated with bladder toxicity. Due to cumulative bladder toxicity, weekly MAG-CPT is not a suitable regimen for treatment of patients with solid tumours.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, distribution, and excretion of carfilzomib in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfu; Wang, Zhengping; Fang, Ying; Jiang, Jing; Zhao, Frances; Wong, Hansen; Bennett, Mark K; Molineaux, Christopher J; Kirk, Christopher J

    2011-10-01

    Carfilzomib [(2S)-N-[(S)-1-[(S)-4-methyl-1-[(R)-2-methyloxiran-2-yl]-1-oxopentan-2-ylcarbamoyl]-2-phenylethyl]-2-[(S)-2-(2-morpholinoacetamido)-4-phenylbutanamido]-4-methylpentanamide, also known as PR-171] is a selective, irreversible proteasome inhibitor that has shown encouraging results in clinical trials in multiple myeloma. In this study, the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, distribution, and excretion of carfilzomib in Sprague-Dawley rats were characterized. After intravenous administration, the plasma concentration of carfilzomib declined rapidly in a biphasic manner. Carfilzomib displayed high plasma clearance [195-319 ml/(min · kg)], a short-terminal half-life (5-20 min), and rapid and wide tissue distribution in rats. The exposure to carfilzomib (C(max) and area under the curve) increased dose proportionally from 2 to 4 mg/kg but less than dose proportionally from 4 to 8 mg/kg. The high clearance was mediated predominantly by extrahepatic metabolism through peptidase cleavage and epoxide hydrolysis. Carfilzomib was excreted mainly as metabolites resulting from peptidase cleavage. Carfilzomib and its major metabolites in urine and bile accounted for approximately 26 and 31% of the total dose, respectively, for a total of 57% within 24 h postdose. Despite the high systemic clearance, potent proteasome inhibition was observed in blood and a variety of tissues. Together with rapid and irreversible target binding, the high clearance may provide an advantage in that "unnecessary" exposure to the drug is minimized and potential drug-related side effects may be reduced.

  11. Administering the Individualized Instruction Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, James, Jr.

    This book provides discussion and guidelines for administering an individualized instruction program; it is stated, however, that the book is not confined to individualized study units alone but brings in the creation of any educational instrument, a variety of which are illustrated in the appendixes. The following topics are considered in this…

  12. Excretion of bisphenol A into rat milk.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Ken; Watanabe, Toshi

    2010-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, is widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. This study analyzed the BPA concentration in rat milk, in order to assess the risk of BPA transfer to the offspring via milk. The rats ingested BPA by oral administration or by drinking the water in a polycarbonate bottle, and the milk samples were collected using an automated experimental milker. The BPA concentration in the samples of milk, drinking water, and food was analyzed by LC/MS. In the case of milk samples obtained from rats injected with BPA at 2, 4, 8, and 24 h prior to milking, the BPA concentrations were 0.462 +/- 0.182 ppm, 0.138 +/- 0.0185 ppm, 0.080 +/- 0.0197 ppm, and 0.0232 +/- 0.0051 ppm, respectively. Also, in the cases of the water sample left in polycarbonate bottle and the milk sample obtained from rats provided it as drinking water, the concentrations of BPA were 0.000332 +/- 0.00015 ppm and 0.0184 +/- 0.0050 ppm, respectively. The results indicate that the BPA administered to the dams was transferred to their milk, and that BPA concentration in milk was higher at the early period after the single bolus dose. Additionally, these results reveal that sequential elution of BPA from polycarbonate containers in a much diluted form would undergo bioaccumulation in dams and likely be transferred to pups via milk in a much concentrated form.

  13. Metabolism, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of S-allyl-L-cysteine in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji; Kodera, Yukihiro

    2015-05-01

    The metabolism, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC), an active key component of garlic supplements, were examined in rats and dogs. A single dose of SAC was administered orally or i.v. to rats (5 mg/kg) and dogs (2 mg/kg). SAC was well absorbed (bioavailability >90%) and its four metabolites-N-acetyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine (NAc-SAC), N-acetyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (NAc-SACS), S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (SACS), and l-γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine-were identified in the plasma and/or urine. Renal clearance values (<0.01 l/h/kg) of SAC indicated its extensive renal reabsorption, which contributed to the long elimination half-life of SAC, especially in dogs (12 hours). The metabolism of SAC to NAc-SAC, principal metabolite of SAC, was studied in vitro and in vivo. Liver and kidney S9 fractions of rats and dogs catalyzed both N-acetylation of SAC and deacetylation of NAc-SAC. After i.v. administration of NAc-SAC, SAC appeared in the plasma and its concentration declined in parallel with that of NAc-SAC. These results suggest that the rate and extent of the formation of NAc-SAC are determined by the N-acetylation and deacetylation activities of liver and kidney. Also, NAc-SACS was detected in the plasma after i.v. administration of either NAc-SAC or SACS, suggesting that NAc-SACS could be formed via both N-acetylation of SACS and S-oxidation of NAc-SAC. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of SAC in rats and dogs is characterized by its high oral bioavailability, N-acetylation and S-oxidation metabolism, and extensive renal reabsorption, indicating the critical roles of liver and kidney in the elimination of SAC.

  14. Impact of water-induced diuresis on excretion profiles of ethanol, urinary creatinine, and urinary osmolality.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, P; Jones, A W

    1999-01-01

    This article reports the impact of diuresis on urinary excretion of ethanol in seven healthy volunteers who drank 1000 mL of export beer (44 g ethanol) in 30 min and, 120 min later, ingested 500 or 1000 mL of water within 5 min. Urine was voided before drinking started and every 30-60 min for 360 min after the start of drinking. The concentration of ethanol in urine (UAC) was determined by headspace gas chromatography, the creatinine content was determined by Jaffe's method, and osmolality was measured by freezing point depression. Maximum diuresis coincided with the peak UAC and was reached 60-90 min after the end of drinking. The urinary creatinine and osmolality dropped appreciably after drinking beer, and the lowest values coincided with peak diuresis. Creatinine was < 0.2 g/L in 22% of urine specimens, and osmolality was < 200 mOsm/kg in 31% of specimens. Production of urine decreased as UAC entered the postabsorptive phase but increased again after the subjects drank water 120 min after alcohol consumption. The amount of ethanol recovered in urine was 681 mg (standard deviation [SD] 203 mg) corresponding to 1.5% (SD 0.46%) of the dose administered. The concentrations of ethanol in successive voids during the postabsorptive phase were not influenced after subjects drank 500 or 1000 mL of water although diuresis increased and urinary creatinine and osmolality decreased. Measuring UAC provides a reliable way to monitor recent drinking, and unlike the analysis of illicit drugs in urine, the concentrations of ethanol are not influenced by diuresis.

  15. PLasma half-life and urinary excretion of cyclophosphamide in children.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E; Priest, J; Doeden, D; Mirocha, C J; Pathre, S; Krivit, W

    1980-01-01

    The plasma half-life and urinary excretion of cyclophosphamide were determined in 13 children who had various malignancies and/or who were being prepared for bone marrow transplantation. Disappearance from the plasma following iv infusion over a 1-2 hour period was first-order. Urinary excretion was maximal during the first 8 hours after administration and was essentially complete in 24 hours. The plasma half-life in children not receiving known inducers of hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxygenase activity or cyclophosphamide in the 3-week period prior to each determination ranged from 145 to 390 minutes. These values are lower than those ordinarily found in adult patients. The fraction of the total dose excreted in the urine as the parent compound ranged from 4% to 27%. Repeated administration of cyclophosphamide at approximately 30-60 day intervals did not appear to alter its plasma half-life but did appear to increase its urinary excretion. Daily administration of cyclophosphamide (approximately 50 mg/kg/day x 2 or 4) significantly decreased its plasma half-life and urinary excretion suggesting that it may reversibly induce its own metabolism.

  16. Excretion of berberine and its metabolites in oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing-Yi; Feng, Ru; Tan, Xiang-Shan; Ma, Chao; Shou, Jia-Wen; Fu, Jie; Huang, Min; He, Chi-Yu; Chen, Shuo-Nan; Zhao, Zhen-Xiong; He, Wen-Yi; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2013-11-01

    Berberine (BBR) has been confirmed to show extensive bioactivities for the treatments of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia in clinic. However, there are few pharmacokinetic studies to elucidate the excretions of BBR and its metabolites. Our research studied the excretions of BBR and its metabolites in rats after oral administration (200 mg/kg). Metabolites in bile, urine, and feces were detected by liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry; meanwhile, a validated liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for their quantifications. Sixteen metabolites, including 10 Phase I and six Phase II metabolites were identified and clarified after dosing in vivo. Total recovered rate of BBR was 22.83% (19.07% of prototype and 3.76% of its metabolites) with 9.2 × 10(-6) % in bile (24 h), 0.0939% in urine (48 h), and 22.74% in feces (48 h), respectively. 83% of BBR was excreted as thalifendine (M1) from bile, whereas thalifendine (M1) and berberrubine (M2) were the major metabolites occupying 78% of urine excretion. Most of BBR and its metabolites were found in feces containing 84% of prototype. In summary, we provided excretion profiles of BBR and its metabolites after oral administration in rats in vivo.

  17. Chemical synthesis of deuterated folate monoglutamate and in vivo assessment of urinary excretion of deuterated folates in man

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, J.F. III; Toth, J.P.

    1988-04-01

    The synthesis and in vivo application of stable-isotopically labeled folic acid was investigated to devise methods suitable for studies of folate metabolism in human subjects. Glutamate-labeled tetradeutero-pteroylglutamic acid (d4-folic acid) was prepared by mixed anhydride coupling of N10-trifluoroacetylpteroic acid and dimethyl L-(3,3,4,4-2H4)glutamic acid, saponification in sodium deuteroxide, and chromatographic purification. Retention of the isotopic label was verified by proton NMR and mass spectrometry of the para-aminobenzoylglutamic acid product of C9-N10 bond cleavage. A method was devised for determination of of isotopic enrichment of urinary d4-folates derived from orally administered d4-folic acid using affinity chromatographic purification, chemical cleavage of the C9-N10 bond, HPLC isolation of the p-(2H4)aminobenzoylglutamate product, followed by negative-ion chemical-ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Data concerning the urinary excretion of d4-folates derived from an oral dose of d4-folic acid in an adult human are presented.

  18. Effects of polyvinyl alcohol administered in the diet to rats on fertility, early embryonic development, growth and development.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, D E; Kelly, C M; DeMerlis, C C; Schoneker, D R; Borzelleca, J F

    2003-05-01

    PVA was administered in the diet to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (26/sex/group) at doses of 0, 2000, 3500 and 5000 mg/kg/day for two generations. The study design assessed gonadal function, estrous cycle, mating behavior, conception, gestation, parturition, lactation, weaning, and growth and development of F(1) and F(2) offspring. Parental rats were treated for 70 days prior to mating, throughout mating, gestation and lactation until sacrifice. Clinical observations, body weights and feed consumption were recorded routinely. Dietary concentrations were adjusted for each sex on a weekly basis except during gestation and lactation, to provide the intended mg/kg/day PVA levels. Pups were weighed routinely and weaned at 21 days of age prior to selection for the next generation. Unformed stool was noted predominately at the 3500 and 5000 mg/kg/day levels in P(0) and F(1) parental animals. This finding was attributed to the high levels of PVA being fed and subsequently excreted in the stool. Slight decreases in the mean body weights of P(0) males were noted at 2000 and 5000 mg/kg/day. Feed consumption was elevated at the 3500 and 5000 mg/kg/day doses in both generations but not during either lactation period. These increases generally were observed in a dose-related manner (g/kg/day), as a result of the large amount of PVA being consumed to maintain the caloric intake necessary for normal growth. There were no effects of PVA on P(0), F(1) male or female reproductive performance or pup survival, growth, organ weights, and macroscopic or microscopic observations at doses of 2000, 3500 and 5000 mg/kg/day. Therefore the no-observed-effect level (NOAEL) is 5000 mg/kg/day for both parental and offspring in this reproductive study.

  19. Urate excretion by the cat kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y K; Jung, D K; Jung, J S; Lee, S H

    1992-08-01

    1. The renal handling of urate by the cat kidney was investigated during continuous infusion of urate. 2. Fractional urate excretion (FE(UA)) in cats was 0.57 +/- 0.04, indicating net reabsorption of urate. In contrast, FE(UA) in rabbits was 1.76 +/- 0.08, reflecting net secretion of urate. 3. Fractional PAH excretion (FE(PAH)) was 3.94 +/- 0.26 in cats and 4.12 +/- 0.76 in rabbits, showing net secretion in both species. 4. FE(UA) in cats was dependent on urine flow, but was independent of plasma urate concentration. 5. The urate excretion in cats was enhanced by probenecid, but was insensitive to PAH and PZA. 6. The PAH excretion in cats was reduced by probenecid, but was unaltered by urate and PZA. 7. These results indicate that urate is handled in the cat kidney by a unique transport system which is distinct from that for organic anions.

  20. Tissue uptake, distribution and excretion of brevetoxin-3 after oral and intratracheal exposure in the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta and the diamondback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin.

    PubMed

    Cocilova, Courtney C; Flewelling, Leanne J; Bossart, Gregory D; Granholm, April A; Milton, Sarah L

    2017-03-07

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur nearly annually off the west coast of Florida and can impact both humans and wildlife, resulting in morbidity and increased mortality of marine animals including sea turtles. The key organism in Florida red tides is the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis that produces a suite of potent neurotoxins referred to as the brevetoxins (PbTx). Despite recent mortality events and rehabilitation efforts, still little is known about how the toxin directly impacts sea turtles, as they are not amenable to experimentation and what is known about toxin levels and distribution comes primarily from post-mortem data. In this study, we utilized the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta and the diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin as model organisms to determine the distribution, clearance, and routes of excretion of the most common form of the toxin, brevetoxin-3, in turtles. Turtles were administered toxin via esophageal tube to mimic ingestion (33.48μg/kg PbTx-3, 3×/week for two weeks for a total of 7 doses) or by intratracheal instillation (10.53μg/kg, 3×/week for four weeks for a total of 12 doses) to mimic inhalation. Both oral and intratracheal administration of the toxin produced a suite of behavioral responses symptomatic of brevetoxicosis. The toxin distributed to all organ systems within 1h of administration but was rapidly cleared out over 24-48h, corresponding to a decline in clinical symptoms. Excretion appears to be primarily through conjugation to bile salts. Histopathological study revealed that the frequency of lesions varied within experimental groups with some turtles having no significant lesions at all, while similar lesions were found in a low number of control turtles suggesting another common factor(s) could be responsible. The overall goal of this research is better understand the impacts of brevetoxin on turtles in order to develop better treatment protocols for sea turtles exposed to HABs.

  1. Distribution, elimination, and renal effects of single oral doses of europium in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Keiko; Usuda, Kan; Nakayama, Shin; Sugiura, Yumiko; Kitamura, Yasuhiro; Kurita, Akihiro; Tsuda, Yuko; Kimura, Motoshi; Kono, Koichi

    2011-11-01

    Single doses of europium (III) chloride hexahydrate were orally administered to several groups of rats. Cumulative urine samples were taken at 0-24 h, and blood samples were drawn after 24-h administration. The europium concentration was determined in these samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The volume, creatinine, ß-2-microglobulin, and N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase were measured in the urine samples to evaluate possible europium-induced renal effects. The blood samples showed low europium distribution, with an average of 77.5 μg/L for all groups. Although the urinary concentration and excretion showed dose-dependent increases, the percentage of europium excreted showed a dose-dependent decrease, with an average of 0.31% in all groups. The administration of europium resulted in a significant decrease of creatinine and a significant increase of urinary volume, N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase, and ß-2-microglobulin. Rare earth elements, including europium, are believed to form colloidal conjugates that deposit in the reticuloendothelial system and glomeruli. This specific reaction may contribute to low europium bioavailability and renal function disturbances. Despite low bioavailability, the high performance of the analytical method for determination of europium makes the blood and urine sampling suitable tools for monitoring of exposure to this element. The results presented in this study will be of great importance in future studies on the health impacts of rare earth elements.

  2. Comparative Metabolism Studies of Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Diastereomers in Male Rats Following a Single Oral Dose.

    PubMed

    Hakk, Heldur

    2016-01-05

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively accounting for 42% of dose for α-HBCD, 59% for ß-HBCD, and 53% for γ-HBCD. Urine was also an important route of HBCD excretion, accounting for 13% of dose for α-HBCD, 30% for ß-HBCD, and 21% for γ-HBCD. Total metabolism of HBCD diastereomers followed the rank order ß > γ > α, and was >65% of that administered. The metabolites formed were distinct in male rats: α-HBCD did not debrominate or stereoisomerize, but formed two hydroxylated metabolites; ß- and γ-HBCD were both extensively metabolized via pathways of stereoisomerization, oxidation, dehydrogenation, reductive debromination, and ring opening. ß-HBCD was biotransformed to two mercapturic acid pathway metabolites. The metabolites of ß- and γ-HBCD were largely distinct, and could possibly be used as markers of exposure. These isomer-specific data suggest that α-HBCD would be the most dominant HBCD diastereomer in biological tissues because it was metabolized to the lowest degree and also accumulated from the stereoisomerization of the β- and γ- diastereomers.

  3. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in rats dosed orally or intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    El Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The disposition of (/sup 14/C)-labeled 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) in male Fischer-344 rats dosed orally (49 or 0.5 mg/kg) or intravenously (0.5 mg/kg) was determined. Absorption of the oral dose was evident, since, in 72 h, most of the radioactivity administered by either route appeared in the urine. Smaller amounts appeared in the feces. In 4 h, 12% of the radioactivity from an intravenous dose of 0.5 mg/kg was excreted in the bile of rats with biliary cannulas. For rats dosed intravenously, the half-life for disappearance of unchanged MBI from plasma was 125 min. In contrast, the terminal half-life for loss of radioactivity from blood was 83 h. The concentration of total radioactivity was higher in liver and kidney tissue than in blood. One of the major urinary metabolites was identified as benzimidazole, and a minor component was tentatively identified as unchanged MBI. Neither of these could be detected in bile. 8 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  4. Preventing and Managing Toxicities of High-Dose Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Howard, Scott C; McCormick, John; Pui, Ching-Hon; Buddington, Randall K; Harvey, R Donald

    2016-12-01

    : High-dose methotrexate (HDMTX), defined as a dose higher than 500 mg/m(2), is used to treat a range of adult and childhood cancers. Although HDMTX is safely administered to most patients, it can cause significant toxicity, including acute kidney injury (AKI) in 2%-12% of patients. Nephrotoxicity results from crystallization of methotrexate in the renal tubular lumen, leading to tubular toxicity. AKI and other toxicities of high-dose methotrexate can lead to significant morbidity, treatment delays, and diminished renal function. Risk factors for methotrexate-associated toxicity include a history of renal dysfunction, volume depletion, acidic urine, and drug interactions. Renal toxicity leads to impaired methotrexate clearance and prolonged exposure to toxic concentrations, which further worsen renal function and exacerbate nonrenal adverse events, including myelosuppression, mucositis, dermatologic toxicity, and hepatotoxicity. Serum creatinine, urine output, and serum methotrexate concentration are monitored to assess renal clearance, with concurrent hydration, urinary alkalinization, and leucovorin rescue to prevent and mitigate AKI and subsequent toxicity. When delayed methotrexate excretion or AKI occurs despite preventive strategies, increased hydration, high-dose leucovorin, and glucarpidase are usually sufficient to allow renal recovery without the need for dialysis. Prompt recognition and effective treatment of AKI and associated toxicities mitigate further toxicity, facilitate renal recovery, and permit patients to receive other chemotherapy or resume HDMTX therapy when additional courses are indicated.

  5. Combined laboratory and epidemiological study of the effect of load on the excretion of Beta aminoisobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, W.R.; Fischbein, A.; Sharma, O.K.S.

    1987-01-01

    Beta Aminoisobutyric Acid (BAIB) is the end product of the catabolism of thymine. BAIB is actively secreted and is a common component of human urine. Since lead has not been reported to degrade DNA we were surprised to find elevated amounts of BAIB in the urine of workers who had lead poisoning. To further study this phenomenon a group of 26 males engaged in demolition work which exposed them to lead was compared to a control group of 40 male hospital workers with regard to BAIB excretion. The exposed workers excreted an average of 19.26 nmoles of BAIB per ..mu..mole creatinine. The value for the control group was 6.02. In order to determine the effect of lead on BAIB excretion under controlled conditions, the authors exposed marmosets to different doses of lead and monitored the lead poisoning via the blood level of zinc protoporphyrin. They found a strong correlation between exposure to lead and excretion of BAIB.

  6. [Amoxicillin and its excretion into bronchial secretion (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weingärtner, L; Richter, I; Patsch, R; Thiemann, H H; Brömme, W; Baum, W; Vorwald, U

    1977-02-01

    Various dates on amoxicillin (resorption, distribution, elimination, tissue passage, urinary excretion) are presented. The bacterial spectrum is more fully discussed. Amoxicillin is compared with ampicillin. Dosage and therapeutical results are presented. Within repeated bronchoscopic examinations necessary on account of bronchopulmonary affections determination of germs were done in 88 children. At the same time examination of ampicillin levels in bronchial secretions were performed after amoxicillin therapy with different high doses (3 x 125 mg to 3 x 750 mg) for 7 days. It could be shown that good antibiotic levels could be found in secretion specimens above all obtained 2 to 4 hours after the last amoxicillin administration. They could be found too, if there did not exist any purulent secretion or stronger inflammation. There are relations between the amount of dosage, the level in secretion as well as the influence on germs.

  7. The involvement of multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 in the distribution and excretion of berberine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling; Xue, Yaru; Zhang, Cuifeng; Wang, Le; Lin, Yunfei; Pan, Guoyu

    2017-03-16

    1. Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline alkaloid, has demonstrated multiple clinical pharmacological actions. As a substrate of multiple transporters in the liver, BBR is rarely excreted into the bile but can be found in the urine. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) in the transport of BBR in the liver and kidney. 2. Using human MATE1 (hMATE1)-transfected HEK293 cells, BBR was shown to be a substrate of hMATE1 (Km = 4.28 ± 2.18 μM). In primary rat hepatocytes, pH-dependent uptake and efflux studies suggested that the transport of BBR was driven by the exchange of H(+) and involved Mate1. In rats, we found that pyrimethamine (PYR), an inhibitor of Mate1, increased hepatic and renal distribution of BBR and decreased systematic excretion of BBR. 3. These findings indicated that BBR is a substrate of MATE1 and that hepatic and renal Mate1 promote excretion of BBR into bile and urine, respectively. In conclusion, Mate1 plays a key role in the distribution and excretion of BBR, and we speculate that drug-drug interactions (DDIs) caused by MATE1 may occur between BBR and other co-administered drugs.

  8. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  9. Lanthanum carbonate reduces urine phosphorus excretion: evidence of high-capacity phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Pennick, Michael; Poole, Lynne; Dennis, Kerry; Smyth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of phosphate binders can be assessed by evaluating urinary phosphorus excretion in healthy volunteers, which indicates the ability of the phosphate binder to reduce gastrointestinal phosphate absorption. Healthy volunteers were enrolled into one of five separate randomized trials; four were open label and one double blind. Following a screening period of ≤28 days, participants received differing tablets containing lanthanum carbonate [LC, 3000 mg/day of elemental lanthanum (in one study other doses were also used)]. Participants received a standardized phosphate diet and remained in the relevant study center throughout the duration of each treatment period. The end point in all studies was the reduction in urinary phosphorus excretion. Reductions in mean 24-h urinary phosphorus excretion in volunteers receiving a lanthanum dose of 3000 mg/day were between 236 and 468 mg/day over the five separate studies. These data in healthy volunteers can be used to estimate the amount of reduction of dietary phosphate absorption by LC. The reduction in 24-h urinary phosphorus excretion per tablet was compared with published data on other phosphate binders. Although there are limitations, evidence suggests that LC is a very effective phosphate binder in terms of binding per tablet.

  10. Comparison of total costs of administering calcium polycarbophil and psyllium mucilloid in an institutional setting.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, R; Cimino, J A; Cooperman, J M; Kugel, R

    1990-01-01

    The total cost of administering calcium polycarbophil per unit dose (two tablets) was compared with that of administering psyllium mucilloid (one packet dissolved in 8 oz of water) in 20 elderly nursing-home residents. Times for printing labels, checking and initialing labels, gathering materials needed, and preparing and administering the medications were recorded during at least 50 observations in each treatment group. Total cost included nurses' and pharmacists' time, materials, and medications. Calcium polycarbophil doses were prepared and administered more quickly (mean, 49.5 sec) than psyllium mucilloid (105.3 sec). The mean cost of preparing and administering a unit dose was 28.2 for calcium polycarbophil tablets and 59.9 for psyllium mucilloid. The results suggest that the use of calcium polycarbophil tablets would save time and money in institutions in which laxatives are frequently administered.

  11. Urinary beta-aminoisobutyric acid excretion in thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fessas, Ph.; Koniavitis, A.; Zeis, P. M.

    1969-01-01

    The quantity of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB) excreted in the urine of patients with an intact spleen suffering from thalassaemia major appears to be proportional to the number of the circulating normoblasts and inversely proportional to the haemoglobin level. After splenectomy only minute amounts of BAIB are excreted. Transfusion constantly, but temporarily, reduces urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid. Other anaemic but non-thalassaemic patients may excrete low levels. Images PMID:5776546

  12. Urinary beta-aminoisobutyric acid excretion in thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Fessas, P; Koniavitis, A; Zeis, P M

    1969-03-01

    The quantity of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB) excreted in the urine of patients with an intact spleen suffering from thalassaemia major appears to be proportional to the number of the circulating normoblasts and inversely proportional to the haemoglobin level. After splenectomy only minute amounts of BAIB are excreted. Transfusion constantly, but temporarily, reduces urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid. Other anaemic but non-thalassaemic patients may excrete low levels.

  13. Single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of HX-1171, a novel antioxidant, in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Han; Choi, Hee Youn; Lee, Shi Hyang; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Miki, Tokutaro; Kang, Jong-Koo; Han, Kyoung-Goo; Bae, Kyun-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Background HX-1171 (1-O-hexyl-2,3,5-trimethylhydroquinone) is a promising antioxidant with therapeutic potential for hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of HX-1171 in healthy volunteers. Methods A randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study was conducted in 83 subjects. In the single ascending dose study, 20, 40, 80, 160, 300, 600, 1,200, 1,500 or 2,000 mg of HX-1171 was administered to 67 subjects. In the multiple ascending dose study, 500 or 1,000 mg was administered to 16 subjects for 14 days. The plasma and urine concentrations of HX-1171 were determined by using a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by non-compartmental analysis. Tolerability was assessed based on physical examinations, vital signs, clinical laboratory tests, and electrocardiograms. Results Adverse events reported in the study were all mild in intensity and resolved without any sequelae. HX-1171 was rapidly and minimally absorbed with a median time at maximal concentration of 0.63–1.50 hours and slowly eliminated with a terminal half-life of 21.12–40.96 hours. Accumulation index ranged from 2.0 to 2.2 after repeated dosing for 14 days. For both the single and multiple doses administrations, urinary concentrations indicated that less than 0.01% of the HX-1171 administered was excreted in urine. Conclusion HX-1171 was well tolerated and minimally absorbed in healthy volunteers. The pharmacokinetic profile of HX-1171 was consistent with once-a-day dosing. PMID:25848210

  14. NTP Technical report on the toxicity studies of ortho-, meta-, and para- Nitrotoluenes (CAS Nos. 88-72-2, 99-08-1, 99-99-0) Administered in Dosed Feed to F344/N Rats And B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, J

    1992-11-01

    Nitrotoluenes are high production volume chemicals used in the synthesis of agricultural and rubber chemicals and in various dyes. Because of differences in the metabolism of the 3 isomers and their capability to bind to DNA, comparative toxicity studies of o-, m-, or p-nitrotoluene were conducted in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice. Animals were evaluated for histopathology, clinical pathology, and toxicity to the reproductive system. The nitrotoluenes were also studied in several in vitro and in vivo assays for genetic toxicity. In 14-day studies, o-nitrotoluene, m-nitrotoluene, or p-nitrotoluene was administered in the feed to male and female rats and mice at concentrations ranging from 388 to 20000 ppm (5 animals/chemical/species/sex/dose). There were no effects on survival or clinical signs of toxicity in these studies, although animals at the higher doses showed decreases in body weight gains relative to controls. In the 13-week studies, o-, m-, or p-nitrotoluene was given to male and female rats and mice (10 animals/chemical/species/ sex/dose) in the feed at concentrations between 625 and 10000 ppm. The estimated daily doses based on measures of feed consumption were 40 to 900 mg nitrotoluene/kg body weight/day for rats and 100 to 2000 mg/kg/day for mice and were similar for each of the 3 isomers when compared for each dietary level/sex/species. There were no effects on survival in any of the studies, and clinical signs of toxicity were limited to decreases in feed consumption. Decreased body weight gains occurred in dosed rats and mice in all studies at the higher dose levels and were most pronounced in rats receiving o-nitrotoluene. In rats, histopathologic analyses after 13 weeks of dosing showed toxicity to kidney, spleen, and testis in animals receiving any of the 3 isomers, and toxicity to the liver and mesothelium in male rats given o-nitrotoluene. Kidney toxicity observed in male rats was characterized by the presence of hyaline droplets in tubular

  15. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics and safety following administration of escalating doses once daily to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dvorchik, Barry H; Brazier, David; DeBruin, Michael F; Arbeit, Robert D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the pharmacokinetics and safety of escalating, once-daily doses of daptomycin, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic active against gram-positive pathogens, including those resistant to methicillin and vancomycin. This phase 1, multiple-dose, double-blind study involved 24 healthy subjects in three dose cohorts (4, 6, and 8 mg/kg of body weight) who were randomized to receive daptomycin or the control at a 3:1 ratio and administered the study medication by a 30-min intravenous infusion every 24 h for 7 to 14 days. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics was assessed by blood and urine sampling. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by monitoring adverse events (AEs) and laboratory parameters. Daptomycin pharmacokinetics was linear through 6 mg/kg, with a slight ( approximately 20%) nonlinearity in the area under the curve and trough concentration at the highest dose studied (8 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameters measured on the median day of the study period, (day 7) were half-life ( approximately 9 h), volume of distribution ( approximately 0.1 liters/kg), systemic clearance ( approximately 8.2 ml/h/kg), and percentage of the drug excreted intact in urine from 0 to 24 h ( approximately 54%). Daptomycin protein binding (mean amount bound, 91.7%) was independent of the drug concentration. No gender effect was observed. All subjects who received daptomycin completed the study. The frequencies and distributions of treatment-emergent AEs were similar for the subjects who received daptomycin and the control subjects. There were no serious AEs and no pattern of dose-related events. The pharmacokinetics of once-daily administration of daptomycin was linear through 6 mg/kg. For all three doses, plasma daptomycin concentrations were consistent and predictable throughout the dosing interval. Daptomycin was well tolerated when it was administered once daily at a dose as high as 8 mg/kg for 14 days.

  16. [Secret excretion from the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Balakina, G B; Markov, A G

    2000-02-01

    Histological studies revealed that the mammary gland nipple have smooth muscle fibres along the nipple channel. These fibres infiltrate the connective tissue parallel to the skin. The ring muscles are not obvious. Delays in the milk excretion in mice may be due to specifics of allocation and functioning of the nipple smooth muscles. To obtain milk, a mechanical action upon the nipple and a synchronised release of oxitocin into the blood are necessary.

  17. Breath hydrogen excretion in infants with colic.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; McVeagh, P; Fleet, G H; Petocz, P; Brand, J C

    1989-05-01

    Breath hydrogen excretion as an index of incomplete lactose absorption was measured in 118 healthy infants who were either breast fed or given a formula feed containing lactose, some of whom had colic. Infants with colic (n = 65) were selected on the basis of the mother's report of a history of inconsolable crying lasting several hours each day. Infants in the control group (n = 53) were not reported to cry excessively by their mothers. Breath samples were collected using a face mask sampling device preprandially, and 90 and 150 minutes after the start of a feed. Normalised breath hydrogen concentrations were higher in the group with colic than in the control group at each time point. The median maximum breath hydrogen concentration in the colic group was 29 ppm, and in the control group 11 ppm. The percentage of infants with incomplete lactose absorption (breath hydrogen concentration more than 20 ppm) in the colic group was 62% compared with 32% in the control group. The clinical importance of the observed association between increased breath hydrogen excretion and infantile colic remains to be determined. Increased breath hydrogen excretion indicative of incomplete lactose absorption may be either a cause or an effect of colic in infants.

  18. Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, A A; Williams, P N; Deacon, C M; Norton, G J; Hossain, M; Louhing, D; Marwa, E; Lawgalwi, Y; Taggart, M; Cascio, C; Haris, P

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis.

  19. Excretion pattern of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyls in ovine milk and faeces

    SciTech Connect

    Vrecl, Milka . E-mail: milka.vrecl@vf.uni-lj.si; Ursic, Matjaz; Pogacnik, Azra; Zupancic-Kralj, Lucija; Jan, Janja

    2005-04-15

    This study employed the gas chromatography with electron capture detection to determine residual levels and excretion patterns of two pairs of structurally diverse polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (IUPAC Nos. 54, 80, 155, and 169) administered to lactating sheep by intramuscular injection. PCB levels and excretion patterns in blood, milk, and faeces were time-dependent and differed from the composition of PCB congeners administered. Lactational transfer substantially exceeded the faecal transfer. Between days 3 and 7, the amount of PCB congeners 54 and 169 excreted in milk was around 50- and 800-fold higher than the amount of these two congeners excreted via faeces. During the same period, the relative contribution of co-planar PCB congeners (80 and 169) in PCB pattern decreased in blood and increased in milk and faeces compared with non-planar PCBs (54 and 155). On day 3, the ratio PCB 169 to 54 was 7-fold higher in milk than in faeces. PCB congeners with log K{sub ow} values under 6.5 reached peaks of their excretion in milk within the first three days after administration, while the super-lipophilic PCB 169 congener with log K{sub ow} value of over 7 has not reached the plateau until day 10, but afterwards, its level remained relatively high throughout the observation period. During the 57-day follow-up period, the excretion of PCB 80, 155, and 169 in milk was 4.5-, 14-, and 46-fold greater compared with PCB 54. Differences in levels and patterns were explained with some physico-chemical properties of individual PCB congeners, such as lipophilicity, planarity, metabolic stability, sorption/diffusion properties.

  20. [Effect of electroacupuncture on the urine flow, sodium excretion and potassium excretion in the conscious dog].

    PubMed

    Lin, M Z; Wei, Z Y

    1989-01-01

    Unanesthetized dogs with chronic ureteral and gastric fistulae were infused with 0.8% NaCl solution into the stomach at a constant rate for maintaining a state of saline loading. In these animals, there was a steady renal excretion of water, sodium and potassium. However, after a 20-minute unilateral electroacupuncture of the points corresponding to "Sanyinjao" and "Zhaohai" in human leg as described in Traditional Chinese Medicine caused a marked increase in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion, but had no significant effect on urinary potassium excretion. In another group of normal unanesthetized dogs (without saline loading), the effect of electroacupuncture mentioned above no longer appeared. Owing to the facts that electroacupuncture merely increased the water and sodium excretion of kidneys in saline-loading unanesthetized dogs, and had no effect in normal unanesthetized dogs, it is concluded that the effects of electroacupuncture on the urine flow and sodium excretion in saline-loading unanesthetized dogs is an action of normalization by acupuncture.

  1. Stereoselectivity in bioaccumulation and excretion of epoxiconazole by mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) larvae.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaotian; Liu, Chen; Li, Yaobin; Gao, Yongxin; Wang, Huili; Li, Jianzhong; Guo, Baoyuan

    2014-09-01

    Stereoselectivity in bioaccumulation and excretion of stereoisomers of epoxiconazole by mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) larvae through dietary exposure was investigated. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method that use a ChiralcelOD-3R[cellulosetris-Tris-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl-carbamate)] chromatography column was applied to carry out chiral separation of the stereoisomers. Wheat bran was spiked with racemic epoxiconazole at two dose levels of 20mg/kg and 2mg/kg (dry weight) to feed T. molitor larvae. The results showed that both the doses of epoxiconazole were taken up by Tenebrio molitor larvae rapidly at the initial stages. There was a significant trend of stereoselective bioaccumulation in the larvae with a preferential accumulation of (-)-epoxiconazole in the 20mg/kg dose. The stereoselectivity in bioaccumulation in the 2mg/kg dosage was not obvious compared to the 20mg/kg group. Results of excretion indicated an active excretion is an important pathway for the larvae to eliminate epoxiconazole which was a passive transport process with non stereoselectivity. The faster elimination might be the reason for the low accumulation of epoxiconazole, as measured by bioaccumulation factor (BAF).

  2. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  3. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  4. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenous sulbactam in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schaad, U B; Guenin, K; Straehl, P

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered sulbactam were studied in 17 pediatric patients two to 14 years of age. Single doses of 12.5 or 25 mg/kg were infused over 3 min, and in previously healthy children, mean peak plasma concentrations 5 min after dosing were 71 and 163 micrograms/ml, respectively. Noncompartmental and compartmental calculations resulted in similar pharmacokinetic parameters. Linear pharmacokinetics were found in the concentration range studied. The mean terminal-phase half-life was 1.75 hr, the mean total plasma clearance was 180 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean apparent volume of distribution was 340 ml/kg. Approximately 70%-80% of an intravenous dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. In children with cystic fibrosis, both total plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution were significantly increased. The data support the intravenous administration of 12.5-25 mg of sulbactam/kg every 6 to 8 hr for assessing the adequacy of this drug as an adjunct to beta-lactam therapy for various bacterial infections in children.

  5. Metabolism of linoleamides. I. Absorption, excretion and metabolism of N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)linoleamide in rat and man.

    PubMed

    Hirohashi, A; Nagata, A; Miyawaki, H; Nakatani, H; Toki, K

    1976-06-01

    1. In urine of rats dosed with N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)linoleamide (MBLA), three dicarboxylic acid monoamides, N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)succinic acid monoamide, N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)glutaric acid monoamide and N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)adipic acid monoamide, were identified. Conjugated alpha-methylbenzylamine, hippuric acid and conjugates of the dicarboxylic acid monoamides were also found in the urine. N-(alpha-Methylbenzyl)succinic acid monoamide was the main metabolite in rats. 2. Biliary excretion of radioactivity was studied in rats, cannulated for collection of bile and duodenal infusion, after oral administration of N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)[1-14C]linoleamide. With constant duodenal infusion of bile, about 7% of the dose was excreted in the bile, while excretion of radioactivity was negligible without bile infusion. 3. The g.l.c. analysis of human urine after oral administration of MBLA revealed that two dicarboxylic acid monoamides were present and N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)succinic acid monoamide was the main metabolite. 4. MBLA was excreted unchanged in the faeces of men who received MBLA to the extent of about 53% dose in 3 days. 5. MBLA was not detected (less than 1 mug/ml) in the serum of a volunteer who had been taking an oral daily dose of 1500 mg of MBLA for 3 months.

  6. Excretion of caffeine and its primary degradation products into bile.

    PubMed

    Holstege, A; Kurz, M; Weinbeck, M; Gerok, W

    1993-01-01

    Caffeine, widely consumed in beverages, is known to alter several biliary parameters that can affect gallstone pathogenesis. To address the question whether methylxanthines can act on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells, we measured caffeine and its primary demethylation products in human bile. Eight patients had an external biliary drainage due to bile duct or gallbladder disease. Two of the patients suffered from histologically confirmed liver cirrhosis. The levels of caffeine, paraxanthine, theobromine, and theophylline were monitored over 10 h in plasma and bile before and after a prior oral dose of caffeine (5 mg/kg b. wt.). Methylxanthines were enriched by an organic extraction procedure and separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Time-concentration curves in bile paralleled the time-course of methylxanthine levels in blood plasma. Accordingly, values in bile and blood plasma were highly correlated for each methylxanthine measured. Within 1 h after the oral test dose, peak levels of caffeine were obtained in both fluids. Biliary concentrations were either almost equal (caffeine) or lower (dimethylxanthines) than their respective values in blood plasma. The results of our study indicate that minor amounts of caffeine and its primary degradation products are excreted via the bile allowing local interference with epithelial cell metabolism of bile ducts and gallbladder.

  7. Effects of Acetazolamide on the Unrinary Excretion of Cyclic AMP and on the Activity of Renal Adenyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Hector J.; Walls, John; Yates, Jesse; Klahr, Saulo

    1974-01-01

    Acetazolamide, an inhibitor of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, increased the urinary excretion of cyclic AMP in normal and parathyroidectomized rats. The increase was greater in rats with intact parathyroid glands than in parathyroidectomized rats. This rise in the urinary excretion of cyclic AMP was not due to an increase in urine flow or a change in urine pH. Furosemide caused an increase in urine flow, but did not affect the excretion of cyclic AMP or phosphate. Alkalinization of the urine with bicarbonate did not increase the urinary excretion of phosphate or cyclic AMP. Acetazolamide increased the productionof cyclic AMP by rat renal cortical slices in vitro. This effect was dose-dependent. Acetazolamide also stimulated the activity of renal cortical adenyl cyclase in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The pattern of urinary excretion of cyclic AMP and phosphate after administration of acetazolamide was similar to that observed in rats given parathyroid hormone. It is suggested that acetazolamide stimulates the renal production of cyclic AMP by activating adenyl cyclase and that this may be the mechanism by which this inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase produces phosphaturia. PMID:4357608

  8. Cytostatic drugs are without significant effect on digitoxin plasma level and renal excretion.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Wilke, J; Rietbrock, N

    1982-11-01

    In three patients with malignant lymphoma who received 0.5 mg digitoxin before and 24 hr after combination therapy with cyclophosphamide, Oncovin, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) or cyclophosphamide, Oncovin, and prednisone (COP), plasma glycoside concentrations and renal excretion were measured 0 to 168 hr after digitoxin and the areas under plasma concentration-time curves *(AUCs) were calculated. In 10 patients receiving 0.1 mg digitoxin, daily plasma glycoside concentration and daily renal excretion were measured before and after COPP, COP, or cyclophosphamide, Oncovin, cytosine-arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) treatment schemes. In contrast to previous reports on digoxin, cytostatic drug therapy does not lead to a reduction in steady-state digitoxin plasma levels and daily renal excretion. During cytostatic therapy attainment of peak digitoxin level was delayed after a single dose, showing that the rate of digitoxin absorption was reduced, but that the AUCs and renal excretion of digitoxin (parameters of the extent of digitoxin absorption) were not diminished. Since the absorption rate is not clinically relevant in patients on long-term glycoside therapy, our results indicate that digitoxin is preferable to digoxin in such patients.

  9. Comparison of the urinary excretion of quercetin glycosides from red onion and aglycone from dietary supplements in healthy subjects: a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanlu; Williamson, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Some intervention studies have shown that quercetin supplementation can regulate certain biomarkers, but it is not clear how the doses given relate to dietary quercetin (e.g. from onion). We conducted a two-period, two-sequence crossover study to compare the bioavailability of quercetin when administered in the form of a fresh red onion meal (naturally glycosylated quercetin) or dietary supplement (aglycone quercetin) under fasting conditions. Six healthy, non-smoking, adult males with BMI 22.7 ± 4.0 kg m(-2) and age 35.3 ± 12.3 y were grouped to take the two study meals in random order. In each of the 2 study periods, one serving of onion soup (made from 100 g fresh red onion, providing 156.3 ± 3.4 μmol (47 mg) quercetin) or a single dose of a quercetin dihydrate tablet (1800 ± 150 μmol (544 mg) of quercetin) were administered following 3 d washout. Urine samples were collected up to 24 h, and after enzyme deconjugation, quercetin was quantified by LC-MS. The 24 h urinary excretion of quercetin (1.69 ± 0.79 μmol) from red onion in soup was not significantly different to that (1.17 ± 0.44 μmol) for the quercetin supplement tablet (P = 0.065, paired t-test). This means that, in practice, 166 mg of quercetin supplement would be comparable to about 10 mg of quercetin aglycone equivalents from onion. These data allow intervention studies on quercetin giving either food or supplements to be more effectively compared.

  10. Absorption, Metabolism, and Excretion by Freely Moving Rats of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and Related Polyphenols from Olive Fruits (Olea europaea)

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Shunsuke; Komada, Haruna; Yonekura, Lina; Sato, Akihiko; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Tamura, Hirotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Absorption, metabolism, and excretion of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, oleuropein, and hydroxytyrosol isolated from olive fruits were newly evaluated after oral and intravenous administration in freely moving rats cannulated in the portal vein, jugular vein, and bile duct. Orally administered 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, an important bioactive compound in olive pomace, was readily absorbed and metabolized to hydroxytyrosol, homovanillic acid, and homovanillyl alcohol, as shown by dose-normalized 4 h area under the curve (AUC0→4 h/Dose) values of 27.7, 4.5, and 4.2 μM·min·kg/μmol, respectively, in portal plasma after oral administration. The parent compound 3,4-DHPEA-EDA was not observed in the portal plasma, urine, and bile after oral and intravenous administration. Additionally, hydroxytyrosol, homovanillic acid, and homovanillyl alcohol in the portal plasma after oral administration of hydroxytyrosol showed 51.1, 22.8, and 7.1 μM·min·kg/μmol AUC0→4 h/Dose, respectively. When oleuropein, a polar glucoside, was injected orally, oleuropein in the portal plasma showed 0.9 μM·min·kg/μmol AUC0→4 h/Dose. However, homovanillic acid was detected from oleuropein in only a small amount in the portal plasma. Moreover, the bioavailability of hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein for 4 hours was 13.1% and 0.5%, respectively. Because the amount of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA in olive fruits is about 2-3 times greater than that of hydroxytyrosol, the metabolites of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA will influence biological activities. PMID:26904279

  11. Dose esclation in radioimmunotherapy based on projected whole body dose

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Kaminski, M.S.; Regan, D.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of approaches have been utilized in conducting phase I radioimmunotherapy dose-escalation trials. Escalation of dose has been based on graded increases in administered mCi; mCi/kg; or mCi/m2. It is also possible to escalate dose based on tracer-projected marrow, blood or whole body radiation dose. We describe our results in performing a dose-escalation trial in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma based on escalating administered whole-body radiation dose. The mCi dose administered was based on a patient-individualized tracer projected whole-body dose. 25 patients were entered on the study. RIT with 131 I anti-B-1 was administered to 19 patients. The administered dose was prescribed based on the projected whole body dose, determined from patient-individualized tracer studies performed prior to RIT. Whole body dose estimates were based on the assumption that the patient was an ellipsoid, with 131 antibody kinetics determined using a whole-body probe device acquiring daily conjugate views of 1 minute duration/view. Dose escalation levels proceeded with 10 cGy increments from 25 cGy whole-body and continues, now at 75 cGy. The correlation among potential methods of dose escalation and toxicity was assessed. Whole body radiation dose by probe was strongly correlated with the blood radiation dose determined from sequential blood sampling during tracer studies (r=.87). Blood radiation dose was very weakly correlated with mCi dose (r=.4) and mCi/kg (r=.45). Whole body radiation dose appeared less well-correlated with injected dose in mCi (r=.6), or mCi/kg (r=.64). Toxicity has been infrequent in these patients, but appears related to increasing whole body dose. Non-invasive determination of whole-body radiation dose by gamma probe represents a non-invasive method of estimating blood radiation dose, and thus of estimating bone marrow radiation dose.

  12. Multiple ascending dose study with the new renin inhibitor VTP-27999: nephrocentric consequences of too much renin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Balcarek, Joanna; Sevá Pessôa, Bruno; Bryson, Catherine; Azizi, Michel; Ménard, Joël; Garrelds, Ingrid M; McGeehan, Gerard; Reeves, Richard A; Griffith, Sue G; Danser, A H Jan; Gregg, Richard

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile of the new renin inhibitor VTP-27999 in salt-depleted healthy volunteers, administered once daily (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg) for 10 days, versus placebo and 300 mg aliskiren. VTP-27999 was well tolerated with no significant safety issues. It was rapidly absorbed, attaining maximum plasma concentrations at 1 to 4 hours after dosing, with a terminal half-life of 24 to 30 hours. Plasma renin activity remained suppressed during the 24-hour dosing interval at all doses. VTP-27999 administration resulted in a dose-dependent induction of renin, increasing the concentration of plasma renin maximally 350-fold. This induction was greater than with aliskiren, indicating greater intrarenal renin inhibition. VTP-27999 decreased plasma angiotensin II and aldosterone. At 24 hours and later time points after dosing on day 10 in the 600-mg group, angiotensin II and aldosterone levels were increased, and plasma renin activity was also increased at 48 and 72 hours, compared with baseline. VTP-27999 decreased urinary aldosterone excretion versus placebo on day 1. On day 10, urinary aldosterone excretion was higher in the 300- and 600-mg VTP-27999 dose groups compared with baseline. VTP-27999 decreased blood pressure to the same degree as aliskiren. In conclusion, excessive intrarenal renin inhibition, obtained at VTP-27999 doses of 300 mg and higher, is accompanied by plasma renin rises, that after stopping drug intake, exceed the capacity of extrarenal VTP-27999 to block fully the enzymatic reaction. This results in significant rises of angiotensin II and aldosterone. Therefore, renin inhibition has an upper limit.

  13. Relative lung and systemic bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate inhaled products using urinary drug excretion post inhalation.

    PubMed

    Aswania, Osama; Chrystyn, Henry

    2002-05-01

    The relative lung and systemic bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate following inhalation by different methods have been determined using a urinary excretion pharmacokinetic method. On three separate randomised study days, 7 days apart, subjects inhaled (i) 4x5 mg from an Intal metered dose inhaler (MDI), (ii) 4x5 mg from an MDI attached to a large volume spacer (MDI+SP) and (iii) 20 mg from an Intal Spinhaler (DPI). Urine samples were provided at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 24 h post dose. The mean (S.D.) amount of sodium cromoglycate excreted in the urine during the first 30 min post inhalation was 38.1 (27.5), 222.3 (120.3) and 133.1 (92.2) microg following MDI, MDI+SP and DPI, respectively. The mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of these amounts excreted in the urine over the first 30 min for MDI+SP vs. MDI, DPI vs. MDI and MDI+SP vs. DPI was 801.0 (358.0, 1244; p<0.002)%, 457.0 (244.0, 670.0; p<0.02)% and 262.4 (110.2, 414.5)%, respectively. Similarly for the 24 h cumulative amount of sodium cromoglycate excreted over the 24 h post inhalation the ratios were 375.4 (232.9, 517.9; p<0.005)%, 287.5 (183.4, 391.6; p<0.02)% and 211.4 (88.3, 334.5)%, respectively. The results highlight better lung deposition of sodium cromoglycate from a metered dose inhaler attached to a large volume spacer.

  14. Excretion of trazodone in breast milk.

    PubMed Central

    Verbeeck, R K; Ross, S G; McKenna, E A

    1986-01-01

    The excretion of breast milk was studied in six lactating women following the oral administration of a single trazodone tablet (50 mg). The milk/plasma ratio of trazodone based on area under the plasma and milk curves was small: 0.142 +/- 0.045 (mean +/- s.d.). Assuming that the babies would drink 500 ml 12 h-1, they would be exposed to less than 0.005 mg kg-1 as compared to 0.77 mg kg-1 for the mothers. It is concluded that exposure of babies to trazodone via breast milk is very small. PMID:3768252

  15. Factors influencing cadmium mobilization by diethyldithiocarbamate: chelator dose, cadmium burden, and sex. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Atkins, L.M.; Walker, E.M. Jr.; Smith, A.B.

    1983-03-01

    A study was made of the effects of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) on organ distribution and excretion of cadmium (Cd) as influenced by DDTC dose, Cd burden, and sex of mice. One hundred to 250 mg per kg of DDTC did not promote mobilization of hepatic Cd, but it was effective at 500 mg per kg. All doses tested were significantly effective in mobilizing renal and splenic Cd, and the response was dose-dependent, as was the increase in brain levels of Cd. Cadmium mobilization by DDTC following Cd loads over a three-fold range appeared to be first order in nature; i.e., a given regimen of DDTC treatment promoted mobilization of a virtually constant percentage of the Cd administered, rather than a constant amount of Cd. The response to DDTC was markedly sex-dependent, being more effective in females than males. In organs of control Cd-loaded mice one sex-related difference was noted; spleens of females retained a considerably greater percentage of administered Cd than those of males.

  16. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4... AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of State's Bureau of Human Resources, Office of Recruitment is responsible for administering the Thomas...

  17. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  18. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  19. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  20. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  1. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  2. Metabolism of doxylamine succinate in Fischer 344 rats. Part I: Distribution and excretion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H C; Gosnell, A B; Holder, C L; Siitonen, P H; Rowland, K L; Cmarik, J L

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with male and female rats (12 per group) dosed by gavage with 2 or 20 mg (based on the free amine) doxylamine succinate containing about 10 microCi 14C-doxylamine succinate to determine distribution and excretion of the activity as a function of dose and sex with time. Urine and feces were collected at intervals up to 72 hr. Most of the dose (approximately equal to 70%) was eliminated in the first 24 hr after dosing and 95 to 100% of the dose was recovered during the 72-hr course of the experiments with both sexes and dose levels. Less than 1% of the total dose remained in the rats at the end of the test period. The urinary route of elimination was more predominant than the fecal route in both sexes given the 20-mg dose. The fecal route predominates in low-dose males whereas there is no significant difference between urinary and fecal routes of elimination in low-dose females. Preliminary characterization of urinary metabolite form using extraction techniques shows 99% of the metabolites to be in the polar conjugated form.

  3. Nitrogen metabolism and excretion during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Chew, S F

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, up-to-date information on nitrogen metabolism and excretion in various aestivators is presented. Although aestivation involves long-term fasting and corporal torpor, adaptive responses with regard to excretory nitrogen metabolism exhibited by aestivators during aestivation differ from those exhibited by nonaestivators undergoing fasting or immobilization. Special efforts were made to address current issues pertaining to excretory nitrogen metabolism and related phenomena in aestivators. Adaptations exhibited by aestivators were discussed in relation to the induction, maintenance, and arousal phases of aestivation. For the induction phase, we included topics like urea as an internal induction signal for aestivation, alteration in the permeability of the skin to ammonia, and changes in rate of ammonia production and urea synthesis. For the maintenance phase, the emphasis was on protein synthesis and degradation, ammonia production, and urea synthesis and accumulation. For the arousal phase, the focus was on rehydration, urea excretion, and phenomena related to feeding. Adaptations exhibited by aestivators specifically to each of these three phases of aestivation are essential to the understanding of the overall aestivation process, but, at present, only limited information is available on excretory nitrogen metabolism in animals during the induction or arousal phases of aestivation. Therefore, future efforts should be made to identify adaptive responses particular to each of the three phases of aestivation in various aestivators.

  4. Urinary oxalate excretion in urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, T.; Belzer, T.; Blau, N.; Hoppe, B.; Sidhu, H.; Leumann, E.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate urinary oxalate excretion in children with urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis and to classify hyperoxaluria (HyOx).
METHODS—A total of 106 patients were screened. In those in whom the oxalate: creatinine ratio was increased, 24 hour urinary oxalate excretion was measured. Liver biopsy and/or genomic analysis was performed if primary hyperoxaluria (PH) was suspected. Stool specimens were examined for Oxalobacter formigenes in HyOx not related to PH type 1 or 2 (PH1, PH2) and in controls.
RESULTS—A total of 21 patients screened had HyOx (>0.5 mmol/24 h per 1.73 m2); they were classified into five groups. Eleven had PH (PH1 in nine and neither PH1 nor PH2 in two). Six had secondary HyOx: two enteric and four dietary. Four could not be classified. Seven patients had concomitant hypercalciuria. Only one of 12 patients was colonised with O formigenes compared to six of 13controls.
CONCLUSIONS—HyOx is an important risk factor for urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis in children, and can coexist with hypercalciuria. A novel type of PH is proposed. Absence of O formigenes may contribute to HyOx not related to PH1.

 PMID:10735843

  5. Chromatographic detection of 7-methyladenine in urine of rats administered N-methylnitrosourea: a potential marker for monitoring exposure to methylating carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Mandel, H G; Straw, J A; Farmer, P B; Martin, J

    1989-04-01

    Relatively simple and rapid analytical procedures involving two sequential HPLC separations were developed for the isolation of methylated purines in the urine of rats administered radiolabeled methylating carcinogens. Following a dose of [3H]N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), 7-methyl-adenine (m7Gua) was detected by chromatography as a urinary methylpurine in addition to the expected 7-methylguanine (m7Gua) and 3-methyladenine (m3Ade). When methyl-labeled methionine was given to rats concurrently with MNU, urinary m7Gua was labeled, but no radioactivity was recovered in either of the two methyladenine fractions. The profile of urinary methylated purines following a dose of dimethyl sulfate to the rat was similar. Small amounts of 1-methyladenine (m1Ade) and 3-methylguanine (m3Gua) were also detected in the urine. The excretion of m7Ade derived from the methyl group of the carcinogen rather than from the normal precursor for methylation, implies that this adduct, like m3Ade, may serve as an indicator in urine for exposure to methylating carcinogens.

  6. Observation of changes in urinary excretion of thorium in humans following ingestion of a therapeutic soil.

    PubMed

    Höllriegl, V; Greiter, M; Giussani, A; Gerstmann, U; Michalke, B; Roth, P; Oeh, U

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the changes in urinary thorium excretion by humans following ingestion of a therapeutic soil, which contains about 10 ppm of thorium. This well-known healing earth in Germany has been considered as an alternative medicine for diarrhoea and gastric hyper-acidity. Six adult volunteers ingested this therapeutic soil in varying quantities for 1-15 days at levels approximating those described in the package insert of the medicine (10-60 g of soil per day). The subjects ingested about 0.1-0.6 mg of thorium daily, which is 100-600 times higher than the normal daily intake of about 1 microg thorium in Germany. All 24-h urine samples collected from the subjects during pre-ingestion, ingestion and post-ingestion periods of the soil were analyzed for (232)Th using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The measured excretion values varied in a wide range. Apparently, the high thorium amounts administered did not increase the (232)Th excretion in urine as expected, suggesting that this soil ingestion will not result in a considerably higher and harmful uptake of thorium into the human body.

  7. Renal excretion profiles of psilocin following oral administration of psilocybin: a controlled study in man.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Felix; Bourquin, Daniel; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2002-09-05

    In a clinical study eight volunteers received psilocybin (PY) in psychoactive oral doses of 212+/-25 microg/kg body weight. To investigate the elimination kinetics of psilocin (PI), the first metabolite of PY, urine was collected for 24 h and PI concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with column switching and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Sample workup included protection of the unstable PI with ascorbic acid, freeze-drying, and extraction with methanol. Peak PI concentrations up to 870 microg/l were measured in urine samples from the 2-4 h collection interval. The PI excretion rate in this period was 55.5+/-33.8 microg/h. The limit of quantitation (10 microg/L) was usually reached 24 h after drug administration. Within 24 h, 3.4+/-0.9% of the applied dose of PY was excreted as free PI. Addition of beta-glucuronidase to urine samples and incubation for 5 h at 40 degrees C led to twofold higher PI concentrations, although 18+/-7% of the amount of unconjugated PI was decomposed during incubation. We conclude that in humans PI is partially excreted as PI-O-glucuronide and that enzymatic hydrolysis extends the time of detectability for PI in urine samples.

  8. Effects of cytostatic drugs on plasma level and renal excretion of beta-acetyldigoxin.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Zilly, W; Wilke, J

    1981-10-01

    Mucosal defects decrease digoxin absorption in patients with malabsorption syndromes. Since the intestinal mucosa can be damaged by cytostatic drugs, we investigated their effects on digoxin plasma levels and urinary digoxin excretion. In six patients with malignant lymphoma who received 0.8 mg beta-acetyldigoxin before and 24 hr after treatment with a combination of cyclophosphamide, oncovin, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) or cyclophosphamide, oncovin, and prednisone (COP), plasma digoxin concentrations were measured 0 to 8 hr after the dose and areas under the plasma concentration-time curves were calculated. In 15 patients on 0.3 mg of beta-acetyldigoxin daily, plasma glycoside concentrations and renal excretion were measured daily before and after COPP, COP, cyclophosphamide, oncovin, cytosine-arabinosine, and prednisone (COAP), or adriamycin, bleomycin, and prednisone (ABP) treatment schemes. The diminished steady-state glycoside plasma concentrations and daily renal glycoside excretion during the 24 to 168 hr after the cytostatic drug established reversible impairment of digoxin absorption. The delayed time to peak after a single dose of digoxin during cytostatic drug therapy shows that extent and rate of digoxin absorption are reduced. To maintain adequate control of digoxin therapy in patients treated with cytostatic drugs, plasma levels should be monitored.

  9. Sex-related differences in urinary excretion of egualen sodium in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Suzaka, H; Miyazaki, H

    2000-01-01

    Egualen sodium (sodium 3-ethyl-7-isopropyl-1-azulenesulfonate 1/3 hydrate) is a new antiulcer drug. There has been no difference observed in absorption between male and female rats, the relative amount of metabolites in male plasma has been higher than that in females, and the excretion ratios of metabolites in males have been significantly higher than those in females. However, the plasma concentration profile of total radioactivity in males has been higher than that in females. To clarify this discrepancy, the renal clearances and plasma concentrations of the unchanged drug and its metabolites were determined. The renal clearance of the unchanged drug in males was 21 times lower than that in females, and the urinary excretions in males and females were 2.1 and 39.5% of dose, respectively. This indicates that the major factor in the sex-related difference observed in the plasma concentration of total radioactivity is due to the difference in the renal clearance of the unchanged drug between the sexes. The results of treatments with probenecid in normal and gonadectomized rats revealed that egualen sodium was mainly excreted into urine by secretion through the renal tubule. Furthermore, the results of treatments with testosterone in rats revealed that the excretion of egualen sodium was highly affected by androgens. These facts indicated that the sex-related difference observed in the plasma concentration of total radioactivity can be attributed to the inhibition of renal tubular secretion of the unchanged drug by androgens. This is the first example of sex-related differences in both metabolism and excretion.

  10. Zea mays L. extracts modify glomerular function and potassium urinary excretion in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, D V O; Xavier, H S; Batista, J E M; de Castro-Chaves, C

    2005-05-01

    Diuretic and uricosuric properties have traditionally been attributed to corn silk, stigma/style of Zea mays L. Although the diuretic effect was confirmed, studies of the plant's effects on renal function or solute excretion were lacking. Thus, we studied the effects of corn silk aqueous extract on the urinary excretion of water, Na+, K+, and uric acid. Glomerular and proximal tubular function and Na+ tubular handling were also studied. Conscious, unrestrained adult male rats were housed in individual metabolic cages (IMC) with continuous urine collection for 5 and 3 h, following two protocols. The effects of 25, 50, 200, 350, and 500 mg/kg body wt. corn silk extract on urine volume plus Na+ and K+ excretions were studied in water-loaded conscious rats (2.5 ml/100 g body wt.) in the IMC for 5 h (Protocol 1). Kaliuresis was observed with doses of 350 (100.42 +/- 22.32-120.28 +/- 19.70 microEq/5 h/100 g body wt.; n = 13) and 500 mg/kg body wt. (94.97+/- 29.30-134.32 +/- 39.98 microEq/5h/100 g body wt.; n = 12; p<0.01), and the latter dose resulted in diuresis as well (1.98 +/- 0.44-2.41 +/- 0.41 ml/5 h/100 g body wt.; n = 12; p<0.05). The effects of a 500 mg/kg body wt. dose of corn silk extract on urine volume, Na+, K+ and uric acid excretions, and glomerular and proximal tubular function, were measured respectively by creatinine (Cler) and Li+ (ClLi) clearances and Na+ tubular handling, in water-loaded rats (5 ml/100 g body wt.) in the IMC for 3 h (Protocol 2). Clcr (294.6 +/- 73.2, n = 12, to 241.7 +/- 48.0 microl/ min/100 g body wt.; n = 13; p<0.05) and the Na+ filtered load (41.9 +/- 10.3, n = 12, to 34.3 +/- .8, n = 13, p<0.05) decreased and ClLi and Na+ excretion were unchanged, while K+ excretion (0.1044 +/- 0.0458, n=12, to 0.2289 +/- 0.0583 microEq/min/100 body wt.; n = 13; p<0.001) increased. For Na+ tubular handling, the fractional proximal tubular reabsorption (91.5 +/- 3.5, n = 12, to 87.5 +/- 3.4%; n = 13; p<0.01) decreased, and both fractional distal

  11. Comparison of the absorption, excretion, and metabolism of suxibuzone and phenylbutazone in humans.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Y; Shindo, T; Mitani, N; Ishida, N; Oono, F; Kageyama, T

    1982-05-01

    The absorption, excretion, and metabolism of a single oral dose of suxibuzone, a new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, in healthy male volunteers were compared with those of phenylbutazone. After oral administration of either suxibuzone or phenylbutazone, phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone, and gamma-hydroxyphenylbutazone were found in the plasma; phenylbutazone was the main metabolite of suxibuzone and phenylbutazone. In the urine, p-gamma-dihydroxyphenylbutazone and several glucuronide conjugates also were found. Spectrometric and/or enzymatic analysis showed that these glucuronide conjugates were suxibuzone glucuronide, 4-hydroxymethylphenylbutazone glucuronide, 4-hydroxymethyloxyphenbutazone glucuronide, oxyphenbutazone glucuronide, and phenylbutazone glucuronides (two types: O-glucuronide and C-4-glucuroxide) after suxibuzone administration, and oxyphenbutazone glucuronide and phenylbutazone glucuronide after phenylbutazone administration. The conjugates specific to suxibuzone administration, suxibuzone glucuronide, 4-hydroxymethylphenylbutazone glucuronide, and 4-hydroxymethyloxyphenbutazone glucuronide, were excreted in the first 6 hr urine. These findings and the pharmacokinetics of these metabolites in the plasma and urine show that suxibuzone is a prodrug of phenylbutazone.

  12. Plasma disposition, milk excretion and parasitological efficacy of mebendazole in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae.

    PubMed

    Gokbulut, Cengiz; Aksit, Dilek; Santoro, Mario; Roncoroni, Cristina; Mariani, Ugo; Buono, Francesco; Rufrano, Domenico; Fagiolo, Antonio; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Mebendazole (MBZ) has been licensed for use in horses and donkeys, however there are no data available in the literature regarding its pharmacokinetic disposition and efficacy in donkeys. This study was designed to determine the plasma disposition, milk excretion and anthelmintic efficacy of MBZ in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae. The animals were allocated to three groups, each of six donkeys. One group was untreated control (C-group) and the others were treated using a paste formulation of MBZ administered per os at the manufacturer's recommended horse dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight (MBZ 1) and at the double horse dosage 20 mg/kg body weight (MBZ 2). Blood and milk samples were collected at various times between 1h and 120 h post treatment and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. Individual FECs (Faecal Egg Counts) were performed on each animal before the treatment (day-3) and weekly from day 7 until day 56 post treatment using a modified McMaster technique. The plasma concentrations and systemic exposure of MBZ in donkeys were relatively lower compared with the other methylcarbamate benzimidazoles. Dose-dependent plasma dispositions of MBZ were observed at the increased dosage (10 mg/kg vs 20 mg/kg) in donkeys. MBZ was not detected in any milk samples at a dosage of 10 mg/kg. However, the parent drug reached 0.01 μg/ml peak milk concentration at 10.66 h and AUCmilk/AUCplasma value was 0.18 ± 0.02 at a dosage of 20 mg/kg bodyweight. This study indicated that per os administration of MBZ has a minimal disposition rate into the milk and may be used in lactating donkeys with zero milk-withdrawal period. The results of FECRT for both MBZ dosages were efficient (>95% efficacy) until day 28. This trial demonstrates that MBZ oral paste at horse dosage (10 mg/kg B.W.) was effective and safety for the treatment of Cyathostominae in donkeys. Therefore, similar dosage regimens of MBZ could be used for horses and

  13. Duration of cisplatin excretion in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Hays, Karen E; Ryu, Rachel J; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Reed, Eddie; McManus, Terry; Rybeck, Blanche; Petros, William P; Hebert, Mary F

    2013-11-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapy agent, is commonly used in treating cancers that may affect women of childbearing age, including cervical cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, and pediatric tumors in adolescents. The authors found that platinum was undetectable in breast milk at 66 hours and beyond following a 70-mg dose of intravenous cisplatin. Relative infant dose of platinum was calculated to be between 0.29% and 0.40% of the maternal dose corrected for body weight. This case demonstrates minimal exposure to platinum via breast milk, following a single 70-mg intravenous dose of cisplatin.

  14. Response of urinary purine derivatives excretion to different levels of ruminal glucose infusion in heifers.

    PubMed

    Dickhoefer, Uta; Ahnert, Sandra; Schoof, Hartwig; Moritz, Niels; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the response of urinary purine derivatives (PD) excretion to increasing levels of intraruminal glucose infusion to evaluate how well this indicator reflects induced changes in microbial crude protein flow. Four rumen-cannulated heifers (482 ± 25 kg body weight) were fed at maintenance energy level with a basal diet (on fresh matter basis) of 4 kg/d hay, 1.5 kg/d concentrate and 60 g/d minerals in two equal meals. The trial comprised a control period (Control I) without glucose infusion followed by four consecutive periods in which all animals received 125 g, 250 g, 500 g or 1000 g/d of glucose, respectively. For this, daily dosages of glucose and urea (90 g/d during all periods) were divided into three portions that were dissolved in water and directly administered into the rumen during morning and afternoon feedings and once during noon. After the highest glucose dosage, a second control period was carried out (Control II). Urinary PD excretion increased with glucose infusion of 125 g/d (71.4 mmol/d) and 1000 g/d (74.2 mmol/d) over the level at Control I (53.9 mmol/d (standard error of the mean (SEM) 3.4; p = 0.012). After withdrawing glucose infusion, PD excretion (79.0 mmol/d) did not return to Control I level (p = 0.001). In contrast, faecal nitrogen (N) excretions linearly increased with incremental glucose infusion (p < 0.001) from 33.9 g/d at Control I to 39.7 g/d (SEM 0.5) at 1000 g/d of glucose and were similar in Control I and II (p = 0.086). The contradicting responses in the excretions of faecal N and urinary PD to increasing glucose infusions highlight the limited accuracy of the PD excretion as a non-invasive indicator when incremental dosages of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates are supplied.

  15. Biotransformation of acrolein in rat: excretion of mercapturic acids after inhalation and intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Linhart, I; Frantík, E; Vodicková, L; Vosmanská, M; Smejkal, J; Mitera, J

    1996-01-01

    Biotransformation of acrolein (ACR) was studied in vivo in the rat following inhalation and ip administration. The major and minor urinary metabolites were 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (HPMA) and 2-carboxyethylmercapturic acid (CEMA), respectively. Male Wistar rats were exposed to ACR, 23, 42, 77 and 126 mg/m3, for 1 hr. The sum of mercapturic acids HPMA and CEMA excreted within 24 hr after the exposure amounted to 0.87 +/- 0.12, 1.34 +/- 0.5, 2.81 +/- 1.15, and 7.13 +/- 1.56 mumol/kg, i.e., 10.9 +/- 1.5, 13.3 +/- 5.0, 16.7 +/- 6.9, and 21.5 +/- 4.8% of the estimated absorbed dose, respectively. The dose estimate was based on reported values of minute respiratory volume and respiratory tract retention and was corrected for the ACR-induced changes in minute respiratory volume. In the relevant dose range (8.9 to 35.7 mumol/kg) the portion of mercapturic acids excreted was nearly constant for ip exposed rats. The sum of HPMA and CEMA amounted to 29.1 +/- 6.5% of the dose. These results indicate that the deficiency in rat lung metabolism of ACR to acrylic acid previously observed is not compensated by the other detoxication pathway in vivo, mercapturic acid formation. The health hazard arising from inhalation of ACR is likely to be higher than that from other routes of exposure.

  16. Biliary excretion of cadmium in rat. III. Effects of chelating agents and change in intracellular thiol content on billiary transport and tissue distribution of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of changes in sulfur-containing intracellular ligands on biliary excretion of cadmium were studied in rats. Injection of zinc or copper salts 24 h before intravenous injection of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ (1 mg/kg Cd) decreased biliary excretion of Cd. Pretreatment with cysteine (25 mg/kg) had a similar effect. Depletion of intracellular thiol by injection of diethylmaleate had little effect. The effect of chelating agents on the pharmacokinetics of Cd depended on time of administration of the agents after exposure to Cd. When chelating agents were administered 1/2 h after Cd injection (before the synthesis of metallothionein), the thiol-containing agents (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol (BAL), DL-penicillamine, N-acetylpenicillamine, and dithioerythritol increased the biliary excretion of Cd, while the carboxyl-containing ones (EDTA and nitrilotriacetate) increased the urinary excretion of Cd. BAL was the most effective chelating agent, but there was also an increase in the renal concentration of Cd. However, when these chelating agents were administered 24 h after Cd injection (after the synthesis of metallothionein), only BAL increased the biliary excretion of Cd. Renal and hepatic Cd concentrations decreased concurrently after BAL treatment.

  17. Lorry drivers' work stress evaluated by catecholamines excreted in urine.

    PubMed Central

    van der Beek, A J; Meijman, T F; Frings-Dresen, M H; Kuiper, J I; Kuiper, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate lorry drivers' work stress by measurement of adrenaline and noradrenaline excreted in the urine, and to find out which factors in their working situation are related to the excretion rates of these catecholamines. METHODS--The urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline of 32 lorry drivers, who also had loading and unloading activities to perform, was studied for one working day and one rest day. Each driver was asked to provide six urine samples on both days. RESULTS--For all samples, except the first (overnight) sample, the excretion rates of both catecholamines on the working day were higher than those on the rest day. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were carried out to find out which factors in the drivers' working situation were related to the excretion rate of the working day. The excretion rate of adrenaline on the rest day, age, and psychosomatic complaints were positively related to the excretion rate on the working day (all P < 0.05). Body mass index and physical workload during loading and unloading were positively related to noradrenaline excretion rate (both P < 0.01). Psychosocial job strain did not significantly contribute to the proportion of variance explained in the excretion rates of both catecholamines. CONCLUSIONS--The excretion rates of adrenaline and, especially, noradrenaline on the working day were higher than those found in earlier studies among professional drivers and insufficient recovery took place after the work was ended. The only association between excretion rate on the working day and work stressors was found for noradrenaline and physical workload. The drivers' sympathoadrenal medullary reactivity to everyday work demands shows the characteristics of sustained activation. PMID:7670621

  18. A mass balance study to evaluate the biotransformation and excretion of [14C]-triamcinolone acetonide following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Argenti, D; Jensen, B K; Hensel, R; Bordeaux, K; Schleimer, R; Bickel, C; Heald, D

    2000-07-01

    The principle objective of this study was to characterize the absorption, metabolism, and disposition of orally administered [14C]-triamcinolone acetonide. Six healthy male subjects each received a single 100 microCi (approximately 800 micrograms) oral dose of [14C]-triamcinolone acetonide. Plasma, urine, and fecal samples were collected at selected times and analyzed for triamcinolone acetonide and [14C]-derived radioactivity. Plasma protein binding of triamcinolone acetonide was also determined. Metabolite profiling and identification were carried out in plasma and excreta. Principle metabolites were assessed for activity with in vitro anti-inflammatory models. [14C]-triamcinolone acetonide was found to be systemically absorbed following oral administration. The presystemic metabolism and clearance of triamcinolone acetonide were extensive, with only a small fraction of the total plasma radioactivity being made up of triamcinolone acetonide. Little to no parent compound was detected in the plasma 24 hours after administration. Most of the urinary and fecally [14C]-derived radioactivity was also excreted within 24 and 72 hours postdose, respectively. Mean plasma protein binding of triamcinolone acetonide was constant, predictable, and a relatively low 68% over a 24-fold range of plasma concentrations. Three principle metabolites of triamcinolone acetonide were profiled in plasma, urine, and feces. These metabolites were identified as 6 beta-hydroxy triamcinolone, 21-carboxylic acid triamcinolone acetonide, and 6 beta-hydroxy-21-oic triamcinolone acetonide. All three metabolites failed to show any concentration-dependent effects in anti-inflammatory models evaluating IL-5-sustained eosinophil viability and IgE-induced basophil histamine release.

  19. Plasma pharmacokinetics, tissue disposition, excretion and metabolism of vinleucinol in mice as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    van Tellingen, O; Sonneveldt, A L; Beijnen, J H; Nooijen, W J; Kettenes-van den Bosch, J J; Versluis, C; Bult, A

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics of the experimental semisynthetic vinca alkaloid vinleucinol (VileE; O4-deacetyl-3-de(methoxycarbonyl)-3-[[[1-ethoxycarbonyl-2- methylbutyl]amino]carbonyl]-vincaleukoblastine). The study was performed in male FVB mice receiving 10.5 mg/kg VileE i.v. or p.o. Plasma, urine, faeces and tissue samples were analysed by a selective method based on ion-exchange normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and liquid-liquid extraction for sample clean-up. Apart from the parent drug, two other metabolic compounds were detected. One of these metabolites is vinleucinol acid (VileA; O4-deacetyl-3-de(methoxycarbonyl)-3-[[[1-carboxyl-2- methylbutyl]amino]carbonyl]-vincaleukoblastine), which possesses no cytotoxic activity. The structure proposed for the second metabolite (VileX) was based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy data. Metabolization of VileE to VileX must occur in the amino acid moiety of the molecule, with a (beta- or gamma-) lactone ring being formed after oxidation of the (beta- or gamma) carbon of the amino acid. VileX is a major metabolite, which is excreted in faeces and urine after i.v. administration and accounting for up to 23% of the administered dose. The activity of VileX against cultured L1210 cells is four times that of the parent drug VileE and comparable with that of vinblastine (VBL). At 48 h after administration of VileE, the concentration of VileX exceeds that of the parent drug in many tissues. These findings indicate that the metabolite VileX may be at least largely responsible for the activity observed against xenografts in mice after administration of the parent drug, VileE.

  20. 14C-NaVP and 14C-PEV repeated dose study in rat. Pharmacokinetic study in rats after repeated oral administrations of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt and 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, M; Acerbi, D; Canali, S; Giachetti, C; Poli, G; Ventura, P; Zanolo, G

    1998-01-01

    The absorption, excretion and tissue distribution of radioactivity after repeated oral equimolar doses of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt (NaVP) or 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester (PEV) was investigated in male rats treated once a day for 14 consecutive days. The 14th day plasma time-course of radioactivity after PEV administrations was characterised by a slow absorption rate with a delayed peak (tmax 2 h, Cmax 7.52 +/- 1.35 microg eq./ml), followed by a plateau lasting up to 8 h. After NaVP treatment, the main peak of radioactivity was observed 0.5 h after administration (Cmax 8.30 +/- 1.26 microg eq./ml) followed by a secondary peak due to biliary enterohepatic recycling. Starting from 4 h onwards, radioactivity levels after PEV treatment were higher than those after NaVP (AUCtau = 113.3 h.microg eq./ml after PEV vs 71.9 h.microg eq./ml after NaVP), but concentrations declined with similar terminal half-lives (52.8 h for PEV and 49.7 h for NaVP). Radioactivity recovered (0-432 h interval) in urine accounted for 79.3% (PEV) and 56.1% (NaVP) while, in faeces accounted for 9.1% (PEV) and 26.1% (NaVP) of total administered dose (14 days). The difference is attributable to a higher excretion of radioactivity in the bile for NaVP. The missing fraction in the total radioactivity balance is probably excreted in expired air, as observed in single dose studies. Radioactivity excreted in bile (0-8 h interval of the last 14th day) accounted for 5.1% (NaVP) and 0.23% (PEV) of the total administered dose (14 days). A possible explanation of this difference may be a different metabolism pattern for the two compounds. The negligible biliary excretion observed after PEV administration is probably due to an inhibition of the glucuronation of valproic acid (or other metabolites) caused by the pivalic acid. Due to the presence of the enterohepatic recycle, the radioactivity levels in intestine, 0.5 and 2 h after administration, were higher after NaVP administration

  1. Persistence of urinary excretion products of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Haglund, R.; White, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Persistence of DNA-adducts has been observed in a variety of experimental circumstances and has been suggested as one potential mechanism for explaining the long-term delay before expression of proliferative disease. In this concept, a stable DNA-adduct, which is a remnant of a prior exposure in a nondividing cell, would not express the genotoxic effect until the cells were stimulated to divide, and thus explain the long-term delay in expression of cancer. An alternative view of the observation of persistent DNA-adducts, described in this communication, is the continuing replenishment of DNA adducts by formation and turnover of these adducts from exposure to a constant supply of the ultimate carcinogenic species derived from a prior exposure. It is of interest to note that virtually all experiments where ''persistent'' adducts have been observed have been high dose exposures. During the course of experiments designed to develop improved methods for detection of DNA adducts and related derivatives derived from polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), we observed that there was a continuous excretion of urinary derivatives of the injected benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) beyond the initial burst of detoxification. This report describes the time dependent distribution of those derivatives in blood, urine, feces, and at the site of injection. 11 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Excretion of N-mononitrosopiperazine after low level exposure to piperazine in air: effects of dietary nitrate and ascorbate

    SciTech Connect

    Bellander, T.; Osterdahl, B.G.; Hagmar, L.

    1988-04-01

    The secondary amine piperazine may be nitrosated in vivo, following oral intake or occupational exposure by inhalation. The suspected carcinogen N-mononitrosopiperazine could be formed in the human stomach, and in part excreted in the urine. In this study, 0.4 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine, determined by gas chromatography-Thermal Energy Analysis, was observed in the urine in one of four volunteers, at an experimental exposure by inhalation of 0.3 mg piperazine/m3. The intake of spinach and beetroot caused an increased nitrosation of piperazine, and up to 1.7 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine was excreted in the urine in the four individuals. This excretion indicates that about 5% of the absorbed piperazine dose was converted to N-mononitrosopiperazine. With the same nitrate-rich diet, but with the addition of citrus fruits and fresh vegetables, the highest excretion was 0.6 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine. The excretion was significantly correlated with the ratio between the maximum level of nitrite in saliva and the ascorbate level in plasma. There was also a significant interindividual variation. N,N'-Dinitrosopiperazine was not found in any sample of urine.

  3. Effect of dietary supplementation of essential oils mixture on performance, eggshell quality, hatchability, and mineral excretion in quail breeders.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Osman; Yıldız, Alp Önder

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of six different levels (0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg) of phytogenic feed additive containing a mixture essential oils from thyme, black cumin, fennel, anise and rosemary on performance, eggshell quality, reproductive traits, and mineral excretion in quail breeders. In this trial, a total of 60 male and 120 female quails, 91 days old, were randomly distributed in six experimental groups. During the 60-day experiment period, birds were fed with six treatment diets. Performances, eggshell qualities, hatchability, and mineral excretion data were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results showed that the different dietary levels of essential oil mixture had no significant effect on performance parameters, damaged eggs, eggshell weight, fertility, hatchability of fertile eggs, hatchability of set eggs, and lead and boron excretion. On the other hand, 50 mg/kg supplementation of essential oil mixture (EOM) significantly improved egg-breaking strength and eggshell thickness, and ash, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and cadmium excretion was significantly depressed in quail breeders supplemented with the two higher doses (400 or 600 mg/kg) of EOM. These results concluded that supplementing diets with EOM improved egg-breaking strength and decreased excretion of minerals in breeder quails.

  4. The ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongqing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Qin; Qian, Lei; Xu, Jiajia; Lu, Ming; Hu, Xihan; Zhu, Ming; Chang, Catherine C Y; Song, Baoliang; Chang, Tayuan; Xiong, Ying; Li, Boliang

    2016-11-01

    Acyl-coenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver of healthy human. Our previous studies have shown that in monocytic cells the low-level expression of human ACAT2 gene with specific CpG-hypomethylated promoter is regulated by the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In this study, we further report that the ACAT2 gene expression is attributable to the C/EBPs in the human leukocytes and correlated with the excretion of fluorescent lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed NBD22-steryl esters. Moreover, this lipoprotein excretion can be inhibited by the ACAT2 isoform-selective inhibitor pyripyropene A (PPPA) in a dose-dependent manner, and employed to determine the half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of PPPA. Significantly, it is found that the differentiation-inducing factor all-trans retinoic acid, but not the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α, enhances this ACAT2-dependent lipoprotein excretion. These data demonstrate that the ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters (CE/SE), and suggest that the excretion of lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed CS/SE may avoid cytotoxicity through decreasing the excess intracellular cholesterols/sterols (especially various oxysterols), which is essential for the action of the human leukocytes.

  5. Safety of florfenicol administered in feed to tilapia (Oreochromis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Schleis, Susan M.; Tuomari, Darrell; Endris, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of Aquaflor® (50% w/w florfenicol [FFC]) incorporated in feed then administered to tilapia for 20 days (2x the recommended duration) at 0, 15, 45, or 75 mg/kg body weight/day (0, 1, 3, or 5x the recommended dose of 15 mg FFC/kg BW/d) was investigated. Mortality, behavioral change, feed consumption, body size, and gross and microscopic lesions were determined. Estimated delivered doses were >96.9% of target. Three unscheduled mortalities occurred but were considered incidental since FFC-related findings were not identified. Feed consumption was only affected during the last 10 dosing days when the 45 and 75 mg/kg groups consumed only 62.5% and 55.3% of the feed offered, respectively. There were significant, dose-dependent reductions in body size in the FFC-dose groups relative to the controls. Treatment-related histopathological findings included increased severity of lamellar epithelial hyperplasia, increased incidence of lamellar adhesions, decreased incidence of lamellar telangiectasis in the gills, increased glycogen-type and lipid-type hepatocellular vacuolation in the liver, decreased lymphocytes, increased blast cells, and increased individual cell necrosis in the anterior kidney, and tubular epithelial degeneration and mineralization in the posterior kidney. These changes are likely to be of minimal clinical relevance, given the lack of mortality or morbidity observed. This study has shown that FFC, when administered in feed to tilapia at the recommended dose (15 mg FFC/kg BW/day) for 10 days would be well tolerated.

  6. The effect of stress level, amino acid formula, and nitrogen dose on nitrogen retention in traumatic and septic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Cerra, F; Blackburn, G; Hirsch, J; Mullen, K; Luther, W

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-seven patients were entered into a randomized, prospective, double-blind, six-center study to evaluate the effect of amino acid loading and a formula that was branched chain enriched (50%) on nitrogen retention in metabolic stress. The patients had varying levels of metabolic stress (0-3) after major surgery, polytrauma, or surgical sepsis. The study was isocaloric and isonitrogenous and lasted for 7 days. The patients received either a standard amino acid formula (SAA) (Travasol) or a 50% branched chain enriched formula that was equimolar, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (MAA) (Travasol + Branchamin concentrate) at a dose of 1.0-2.0 g/kg/day in a fixed ratio with 114 glucose calories per gram of nitrogen administered. The nitrogen retention was proportionate to the nitrogen (and, therefore, caloric) load in both groups. The MAA group, however, had better nitrogen retention, reached nitrogen equilibrium at a lower dose of amino acids, and had less urinary nitrogen excretion per gram of nitrogen administered. Since the groups were isonitrogenous and the calorie to nitrogen ratios were fixed, it appears that nitrogen equilibrium in surgical stress is proportionate to the amino acid load over a range of 0.05-0.4 g/kg/day of nitrogen; and that MAA are more efficient at inducing nitrogen retention and a reduction in urea excretion. These effects on nitrogen retention were more significant at level 2 stress or greater. At these higher stress levels, a dose of 2 +/- 0.2 g/kg/day of MAA seemed most efficient in promoting nitrogen retention. PMID:3548612

  7. The effect of stress level, amino acid formula, and nitrogen dose on nitrogen retention in traumatic and septic stress.

    PubMed

    Cerra, F; Blackburn, G; Hirsch, J; Mullen, K; Luther, W

    1987-03-01

    Eighty-seven patients were entered into a randomized, prospective, double-blind, six-center study to evaluate the effect of amino acid loading and a formula that was branched chain enriched (50%) on nitrogen retention in metabolic stress. The patients had varying levels of metabolic stress (0-3) after major surgery, polytrauma, or surgical sepsis. The study was isocaloric and isonitrogenous and lasted for 7 days. The patients received either a standard amino acid formula (SAA) (Travasol) or a 50% branched chain enriched formula that was equimolar, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (MAA) (Travasol + Branchamin concentrate) at a dose of 1.0-2.0 g/kg/day in a fixed ratio with 114 glucose calories per gram of nitrogen administered. The nitrogen retention was proportionate to the nitrogen (and, therefore, caloric) load in both groups. The MAA group, however, had better nitrogen retention, reached nitrogen equilibrium at a lower dose of amino acids, and had less urinary nitrogen excretion per gram of nitrogen administered. Since the groups were isonitrogenous and the calorie to nitrogen ratios were fixed, it appears that nitrogen equilibrium in surgical stress is proportionate to the amino acid load over a range of 0.05-0.4 g/kg/day of nitrogen; and that MAA are more efficient at inducing nitrogen retention and a reduction in urea excretion. These effects on nitrogen retention were more significant at level 2 stress or greater. At these higher stress levels, a dose of 2 +/- 0.2 g/kg/day of MAA seemed most efficient in promoting nitrogen retention.

  8. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Jerzy K.

    1971-01-01

    Piotrowski, J. K. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 172-178. Evaluation of exposure to phenol: absorption of phenol vapour in the lungs and through the skin and excretion of phenol in urine. Volunteers were exposed to phenol vapour (5 to 25 mg/m3) by inhalation and through the skin, respectively, and the excretion of phenol in urine was examined. The retention of vapour in the lungs decreased from about 80 to 70% in the course of exposure. The absorption of vapour through the whole of the skin was approximately proportional to the concentration of vapour used, the absorption rate being somewhat lower than in the lungs. Almost 100% of the phenol was excreted in the urine within one day. The rate of excretion of phenol in the urine may be used as an exposure test which permits the absorbed dose to be estimated with a precision of about ±2 mg. PMID:5572685

  9. Comparison of the antiproteinuric effects of the calcium channel blockers benidipine and amlodipine administered in combination with angiotensin receptor blockers to hypertensive patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Maruyama, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2009-04-01

    Benidipine, an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker, dilates both efferent and afferent arterioles and reduces glomerular pressure. Thus, it may exert renoprotective effects. We conducted an open-labeled, randomized trial to compare the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect and antiproteinuric effect of benidipine with those of amlodipine in hypertensive patients with moderate-to-advanced-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) (stages 3-5). These patients were already being administered the current maximum recommended doses of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Patients with BP >or=140/90 mm Hg, despite treatment with the maximum recommended dose of ARBs, were randomly assigned to two groups. The patients received either of the following treatment regimens: 4 mg day(-1) of benidipine, which was increased up to a dose of 16 mg day(-1) (B group; n=24), and 2.5 mg day(-1) of amlodipine, which was increased up to a dose of 10 mg day(-1) amlodipine (A group; n=23). After 6 months of treatment, a significant and comparable reduction in the systolic and diastolic BP was seen in both groups. The decrease in the urinary protein to creatinine ratio in the B group was significantly lower than that in the A group. Benidipine exerted antiproteinuric effect to a greater extent than did amlodipine, even in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We conclude that the addition of benidipine, rather than amlodipine, ameliorates urinary protein excretion in hypertensive patients with CKD who are already being administered ARBs. Therefore, we propose a combination therapy with benidipine and ARBs, even for patients with moderate-to-advanced-stage CKD.

  10. An internal radiation dosimetry computer program, IDAC 2.0, for estimation of patient doses from radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Johansson, L; Minarik, D; Mattsson, S; Leide-Svegborn, S

    2014-12-01

    The internal dosimetry computer program internal dose assessment by computer (IDAC) for calculations of absorbed doses to organs and tissues as well as effective doses to patients from examinations with radiopharmaceuticals has been developed. The new version, IDAC2.0, incorporates the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)/ICRU computational adult male and female voxel phantoms and decay data from the ICRP publication 107. Instead of only 25 source and target regions, calculation can now be made with 63 source regions to 73 target regions. The major advantage of having the new phantom is that the calculations of the effective doses can be made with the latest tissue weighting factors of ICRP publication 103. IDAC2.0 uses the ICRP human alimentary tract (HAT) model for orally administrated activity and for excretion through the gastrointestinal tract and effective doses have been recalculated for radiopharmaceuticals that are orally administered. The results of the program are consistent with published data using the same specific absorption fractions and also compared with published data from the same computational phantoms but with segmentation of organs leading to another set of specific absorption fractions. The effective dose is recalculated for all the 34 radiopharmaceuticals that are administered orally and has been published by the ICRP. Using the new HAT model, new tissue weighting factors and the new adult computational voxel phantoms lead to an average effective dose of half of its earlier estimated value. The reduction mainly depends on electron transport simulations to walled organs and the transition from the stylised phantom with unrealistic interorgan distances to more realistic voxel phantoms.

  11. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of cefetamet pivoxil (Ro 15-8075) with ascending oral doses in normal healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Y K; Kneer, J; Dubach, U C; Stoeckel, K

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefetamet pivoxil during administration of ascending oral doses were studied in 16 male normal healthy volunteers (age, 24.5 +/- 2.1 years; weight, 73.5 +/- 8.5 kg). The subjects were randomly assigned to four oral treatments of 500, 1,000, 1,500, and 2,000 mg of cefetamet pivoxil according to a four-by-four Latin square design. After an overnight fast, the drug was administered 10 min after a standard breakfast. It was found that both the rate and extent of prodrug absorption, measured as cefetamet adsorption, were reduced with increasing doses. The time to maximum concentration of cefetamet in serum was delayed from 4.00 +/- 0.81 to 4.88 +/- 0.96 h (P less than 0.05) when the dose of cefetamet pivoxil was increased from 500 to 2,000 mg. The dose-normalized values of area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for cefetamet and fraction of dose excreted as cefetamet were reduced by averages of 10.3 and 12.5%, respectively, over the dose range studied (P less than 0.05). The changes in rate and extent of prodrug absorption are thought to be the main factors contributing to the nonlinear relationship between maximum concentration in serum and dose. The change in absorption characteristics of cefetamet pivoxil with dose is, however, expected to have few clinical consequences because the magnitudes of these changes are comparable with their respective intragroup variations. PMID:2764545

  13. The fate of dienochlor administered orally and dermally to rats.

    PubMed

    Quistad, G B; Mulholland, K M; Skinner, W S

    1986-09-15

    Within four days of receiving a single oral dose (1 mg/kg) of [U-ring-14C]dienochlor [bis(pentachloro-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)] female rats excreted 2 and 88% of the applied 14C in urine and feces, respectively. Metabolites could not be identified and the preponderance of the fecal radioactivity consisted of unextractable 14C-labeled residues. Within 1 day virtually all of the dienochlor had been degraded by rats, with only traces of parent dienochlor in excreta and tissues. After four days only 2% of the applied dose remained in tissues (mainly kidney, liver, and gastrointestinal tract). Pharmacokinetic studies with blood plasma and bile showed dienochlor (and/or its metabolites) to be poorly absorbed. Rats were exposed dermally for 24 hr to [14C]dienochlor formulated as Pentac WP miticide both as an aqueous suspension and as an undiluted wettable powder. Half of the dose adhered to the skin and the other half was found in gauze patches used to protect the treated skin. After a 24-hr exposure over 60% of the radiolabel that adhered to skin was removed by washing with an aqueous soap solution and 86% of this rinsing solution was unmetabolized dienochlor. The dienochlor and its metabolites were transported inefficiently from the application site; only 1% of the applied dose was detected in urine plus feces and less than or equal to 0.2% in tissues. With application rates that simulate field exposure by humans, the actual residue of dienochlor and metabolites in skin (i.e., not removable by washing) is about thirteen times higher following exposure to dienochlor as undiluted wettable powder than as an aqueous suspension.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of bismuth and ranitidine following multiple doses of ranitidine bismuth citrate

    PubMed Central

    KOCH, K M; KERR, B M; GOODING, A E; DAVIS, I M

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of bismuth and ranitidine derived from oral doses of ranitidine bismuth citrate 800 mg given twice daily for 28 days were examined in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in 27 healthy subjects. Bismuth accumulation in plasma reflected its multicompartmental disposition, achieving the majority of predicted steady state within 14–28 days. Bismuth absorption from ranitidine bismuth citrate is limited (<0.5% of the dose), and bismuth elimination is predominantly renal secretion. Peak plasma concentrations did not exceed 19 ng ml−1, remaining well below those associated with bismuth toxicity. Bismuth was measurable at low concentrations in plasma and urine for up to 5 months after the last dose. Plasma bismuth concentration-time data and urinary excretion data were best described by separate multicompartmental models, with terminal half-lives averaging 21 days and 45 days, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of ranitidine derived from ranitidine bismuth citrate were similar to those of ranitidine administered alone. Ranitidine did not appreciably accumulate in plasma. Ranitidine bismuth citrate was well-tolerated during 28 days of repeated dosing. PMID:8864319

  15. Cortisol-mediated synchronization of circadian rhythm in urinary potassium excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Schmelzer, W. S.; Kass, D. A.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Conscious chair-acclimatized squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) studied with lights on (600 lx) from 0800 to 2000 hr daily (LD 12:12) display a prominent circadian rhythm in renal potassium excretion. The characteristics of this rhythm were reproduced in adrenalectomized monkeys by infusing 5 mg cortisol and 0.001 mg aldosterone, or 5 mg cortisol alone, between 0800 and 0900 kr daily. When the timing of cortisol administration (with or without aldosterone) was phase-delayed by 8 hr, the urinary potassium rhythm resynchronized by 80% of the cortisol phase shift, but only after a transient response lasting 3-4 days. With the same daily dose of adrenal steroids given as a continuous infusion throughout each 24 hr, urinary potassium excretion showed free-running oscillations no longer synchronized to the light-dark cycle. These results indicate that the circadian rhythm of plasma cortisol concentration acts as an internal mediator in the circadian timing system, synchronizing a potentially autonomous oscillation in renal potassium excretion to environmental time cues and to other circadian rhythms within the animal.

  16. Oral intake of ranitidine increases urinary excretion of N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Mitch, William A

    2016-06-01

    The H2-receptor antagonist, ranitidine, is among the most widely used pharmaceuticals to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcers. While previous studies have demonstrated that amines can form N-nitrosamines when exposed to nitrite at stomach-relevant pH, N-nitrosamine formation from ranitidine, an amine-based pharmaceutical, has not been demonstrated under these conditions. In this work, we confirmed the production of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a potent carcinogen, by nitrosation of ranitidine under stomach-relevant pH conditions in vitro We also evaluated the urinary NDMA excretion attributable to ingestion of clinically used ranitidine doses. Urine samples collected from five female and five male, healthy adult volunteers over 24-h periods before and after consumption of 150mg ranitidine were analyzed for residual ranitidine, ranitidine metabolites, NDMA, total N-nitrosamines and dimethylamine. Following ranitidine intake, the urinary NDMA excreted over 24h increased 400-folds from 110 to 47 600ng, while total N-nitrosamines increased 5-folds. NDMA excretion rates after ranitidine intake equaled or exceeded those observed previously in patients with schistosomiasis, a disease wherein N-nitrosamines are implicated as the etiological agents for bladder cancer. Due to metabolism within the body, urinary NDMA measurements represent a lower-bound estimate of systemic NDMA exposure. Our results suggest a need to evaluate the risks attributable to NDMA associated with chronic consumption of ranitidine, and to identify alternative treatments that minimize exposure to N-nitrosamines.

  17. Extracellular carbonic anhydrase in the dogfish, Squalus acanthias: a role in CO2 excretion.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K M; Perry, S F; Bernier, N J; Henry, R P; Wood, C M

    2001-01-01

    In Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias), plasma CO(2) reactions have access to plasma carbonic anhydrase (CA) and gill membrane-associated CA. The objectives of this study were to characterise the gill membrane-bound CA and investigate whether extracellular CA contributes significantly to CO(2) excretion in dogfish. A subcellular fraction containing membrane-associated CA activity was isolated from dogfish gills and incubated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. This treatment caused significant release of CA activity from its membrane association, a result consistent with identification of the dogfish gill membrane-bound CA as a type IV isozyme. Inhibition constants (K(i)) against acetazolamide and benzolamide were 4.2 and 3.5 nmol L(-1), respectively. Use of a low dose (1.3 mg kg(-1) or 13 micromol L(-1)) of benzolamide to selectively inhibit extracellular CA in vivo caused a significant 30%-60% reduction in the arterial-venous total CO(2) concentration difference, a significant increase in Pco(2) and an acidosis, without affecting blood flow or ventilation. No effect of benzolamide on any measure of CO(2) excretion was detected in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These results indicate that extracellular CA contributes substantially to CO(2) excretion in the dogfish, an elasmobranch, and confirm that CA is not available to plasma CO(2) reactions in rainbow trout, a teleost.

  18. Turnover and urinary excretion of free and acetylated MS-222 rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Schoettger, R.A.; Willford, W.A.

    1968-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) anesthetized in 100 mg/liter of M.S. 222 at 12 C excreted the drug in free and acetylated forms via the urine during a 24-hr recovery period in freshwater. Of the M.S. 222 excreted, 77-96% was acetylated. Blood levels of free drug in anesthetized trout approximated 75% of the anesthetic concentration, but the amount of acetylated M.S. 222 was relatively insignificant. The blood and urine were cleared of the two fractions of M.S. 222 in 8 and 24 hr respectively. Low levels of aromatic amines of natural origin occurred in blood and urine and were subtracted from measurements of M.S. 222. Intraperitoneal injections of 10-100 mg/kg of M.S. 222 did not induce anesthesia; however, the 24-hr pattern of drug excretion was similar to that observed after anesthesia by immersion. Only 15-21 % of the injected dose was found in the urine, suggesting a second route of drug elimination.

  19. Balanced propofol sedation administered by nonanesthesiologists: The first Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    Repici, Alessandro; Pagano, Nico; Hassan, Cesare; Carlino, Alessandra; Rando, Giacomo; Strangio, Giuseppe; Romeo, Fabio; Zullo, Angelo; Ferrara, Elisa; Vitetta, Eva; Ferreira, Daniel de Paula Pessoa; Danese, Silvio; Arosio, Massimo; Malesci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a balanced approach using midazolam in combination with propofol, administered by non-anesthesiologists, in a large series of diagnostic colonoscopies. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy were sedated with a single dose of midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) and low-dose propofol (starter bolus of 0.5 mg/kg and repeated boluses of 10 to 20 mg). Induction time and deepest level of sedation, adverse and serious adverse events, as well as recovery times, were prospectively assessed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were also collected. RESULTS: Overall, 1593 eligible patients were included. The median dose of propofol administered was 70 mg (range: 40-120 mg), and the median dose of midazolam was 2.3 mg (range: 2-4 mg). Median induction time of sedation was 3 min (range: 1-4 min), and median recovery time was 23 min (range: 10-40 min). A moderate level of sedation was achieved in 1561 (98%) patients, whilst a deep sedation occurred in 32 (2%) cases. Transient oxygen desaturation requiring further oxygen supplementation occurred in 8 (0.46%; 95% CI: 0.2%-0.8%) patients. No serious adverse event was observed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were 93.5% and 23.4% (27.8% for male and 18.5% for female, subjects), respectively. CONCLUSION: A balanced sedation protocol provided a minimalization of the dose of propofol needed to target a moderate sedation for colonoscopy, resulting in a high safety profile for non-anesthesiologist propofol sedation. PMID:21987624

  20. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  1. Renal excretion in channel catfish following injection of quinaldine sulphate or 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Hunn, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, injected intraperitoneally with 2-methyl-quinoline sulphate (QdSO4) or 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) eliminate most of the dose of these compounds by extra-renal routes. Patterns of renal excretion of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- (pEq kg-1 h-1) appeared to be associated with the 'stress' of the urine collection technique rather than with the elimination of either compound. Concentrations of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- (mEq/1) were determined in urine, plasma and gall bladder bile.

  2. Effects of substituted dithiocarbamates on distribution and excretion of inorganic mercury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Atkins, L.M.; Smith, A.B.; Jones, M.M.

    1985-02-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) and six of its N,N-disubstituted congeners were evaluated for their relative efficacies in mobilizing and promoting excretion of mercury (Hg/sup + +/) using mice which had been given /sup 203/Hg/sup + +/; D-penicillamine (PEN) was used as a positive control compound. While none was as effective as PEN when compared on a molar dose basis, significant activity as assessed by reduction of whole body /sup 203/Hg burden, was observed following treatment with three of the analogs. The order of effectiveness was PEN greater than N-methyl-N-dithiocarboxyglucamine (MDCG) greater than di(carboxymethyl)dithiocarbamate (DCDC) greater than di(hydroxyethyl)dithiocarbamate (DHDC).

  3. Human breast milk excretion of iodine-131 following diagnostic and therapeutic administration to a lactating patient with Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dydek, G.J.; Blue, P.W.

    1988-03-01

    Previous reports on the excretion of /sup 131/I into human breast milk have recommended discontinuance of breast feeding from 1 to 12 days following diagnostic tracer doses of /sup 131/I. Recent excretion models have calculated that breast feeding could safely resume 56 days following a 5 microCi (0.185 MBq) /sup 131/I maternal tracer dose. We studied a postpartum patient with Graves' disease following first an uptake dose of 8.6 microCi (0.317 MBq) and then for 38 days following a 9.6 mCi (355 MBq) therapy dose of Na/sup 131/I. We calculated from our data that although nursing could not be safely resumed for 46 days following the 8.6-microCi uptake dose, nursing could resume in this patient 8 days after a 100-nCi (3.7 KBq) dose. Extrapolating this data to impure /sup 123/I (p, 2n or p, 5n) we feel that standard 100-microCi (3.7 MBq) doses of either /sup 123/I preparation is not suitable if nursing is to be resumed.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of nefopam, a dual reuptake inhibitor in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Madhu; Banach, John; Ledvina, Aaron; Modi, Nishit B; Mittur, Aravind

    2016-11-01

    1. The disposition of nefopam, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was characterized in eight healthy male volunteers following a single oral dose of 75 mg [(14)C]-nefopam (100 μCi). Blood, urine, and feces were sampled for 168 h post-dose. 2. Mean (± SD) maximum blood and plasma radioactivity concentrations were 359 ± 34.2 and 638 ± 64.7 ngEq free base/g, respectively, at 2 h post-dose. Recovery of radioactive dose was complete (mean 92.6%); a mean of 79.3% and 13.4% of the dose was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. 3. Three main radioactive peaks were observed in plasma (metabolites M2 A-D, M61, and M63). Intact [(14)C]-nefopam was less than 5% of the total radioactivity in plasma. In urine, the major metabolites were M63, M2 A-D, and M51 which accounted for 22.9%, 9.8%, and 8.1% of the dose, respectively. An unknown entity, M55, was the major metabolite in feces (4.6% of dose). Excretion of unchanged [(14)C]-nefopam was minimal.

  5. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  6. Tissue biodistribution and blood clearance rates of intravenously administered carbon nanotube radiotracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi; Pantarotto, Davide; Lacerda, Lara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Klumpp, Cédric; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2006-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. Although all possible clinical applications will require compatibility of CNT with the biological milieu, their in vivo capabilities and limitations have not yet been explored. In this work, water-soluble, single-walled CNT (SWNT) have been functionalized with the chelating molecule diethylentriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) and labeled with indium (111In) for imaging purposes. Intravenous (i.v.) administration of these functionalized SWNT (f-SWNT) followed by radioactivity tracing using gamma scintigraphy indicated that f-SWNT are not retained in any of the reticuloendothelial system organs (liver or spleen) and are rapidly cleared from systemic blood circulation through the renal excretion route. The observed rapid blood clearance and half-life (3 h) of f-SWNT has major implications for all potential clinical uses of CNT. Moreover, urine excretion studies using both f-SWNT and functionalized multiwalled CNT followed by electron microscopy analysis of urine samples revealed that both types of nanotubes were excreted as intact nanotubes. This work describes the pharmacokinetic parameters of i.v. administered functionalized CNT relevant for various therapeutic and diagnostic applications. nanomedicine | blood circulation half-life | drug delivery | pharmacokinetics | nanotoxicology

  7. Chelation in metal intoxication X: influence of different polyaminocarboxylic acids and thiol chelators in the excretion and tissue distribution of /sup 54/Mn in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, S.K.; Khandelwal, S.

    1982-05-01

    The influence of some selected polyaminocarboxylic acids and thiol metal binding agents on the urinary and faecal excretions of /sup 54/Mn and on the tissue distribution of /sup 54/Mn in /sup 54/MnC1/sub 2/ administered rats was studied to find a suitable chelating drug for Mn poisoning. HEDTA, CDTA, DTPA and TTHA were highly successful in enhancing the excretion of /sup 54/Mn and reducing the tissue levels of /sup 54/Mn in rats. The thiol chelators viz. D L-penicillamine, N-acetyl D L-penicillamine and DMS could neither influence the excretion nor the tissue distribution of /sup 54/Mn suggesting poor affinity of the metal towards sulfhydryl groups.

  8. Absorption, Metabolism, Excretion, and the Contribution of Intestinal Metabolism to the Oral Disposition of [14C]Cobimetinib, a MEK Inhibitor, in Humans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryan H; Choo, Edna F; Ma, Shuguang; Wong, Susan; Halladay, Jason; Deng, Yuzhong; Rooney, Isabelle; Gates, Mary; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Dresser, Mark J; Musib, Luna

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of cobimetinib, a MEK inhibitor, were characterized in healthy male subjects (n = 6) following a single 20 mg (200 μCi) oral dose. Unchanged cobimetinib and M16 (glycine conjugate of hydrolyzed cobimetinib) were the major circulating species, accounting for 20.5% and 18.3% of the drug-related material in plasma up to 48 hours postdose, respectively. Other circulating metabolites were minor, accounting for less than 10% of drug-related material in plasma. The total recovery of the administered radioactivity was 94.3% (±1.6%, S.D.) with 76.5% (±2.3%) in feces and 17.8% (±2.5%) in urine. Metabolite profiling indicated that cobimetinib had been extensively metabolized with only 1.6% and 6.6% of the dose remaining as unchanged drug in urine and feces, respectively. In vitro phenotyping experiments indicated that CYP3A4 was predominantly responsible for metabolizing cobimetinib. From this study, we concluded that cobimetinib had been well absorbed (fraction absorbed, Fa = 0.88). Given this good absorption and the previously determined low hepatic clearance, the systemic exposures were lower than expected (bioavailability, F = 0.28). We hypothesized that intestinal metabolism had strongly attenuated the oral bioavailability of cobimetinib. Supporting this hypothesis, the fraction escaping gut wall elimination (Fg) was estimated to be 0.37 based on F and Fa from this study and the fraction escaping hepatic elimination (Fh) from the absolute bioavailability study (F = Fa × Fh × Fg). Physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling also showed that intestinal clearance had to be included to adequately describe the oral profile. These collective data suggested that cobimetinib was well absorbed following oral administration and extensively metabolized with intestinal first-pass metabolism contributing to its disposition.

  9. Biliary excretion of TT virus (TTV).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, N; Ikoma, J; Ishihara, T; Yasui-Kawamura, N; Fujita, N; Iwasa, M; Kaito, M; Watanabe, S; Adachi, Y

    2000-08-01

    A novel DNA virus (TT virus; TTV) was isolated from a patient with post-transfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology. If TTV replicates in the liver, TTV may appear in the bile. In the present study, to clarify whether fecal-oral infection occur via biliary excretion, the presence of TTV DNA was assessed in paired serum and bile samples collected from 28 patients with obstructive jaundice without parenchymal liver disease. TTV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using semi-nested primers, and quantified by Real Time Detection PCR (RTD-PCR). The nucleotide sequence of isolates TTV DNAs was also determined and the sequences were compared between serum and bile samples. Among 28 patients, 7 were positive for TTV DNA in both samples, and 3 and 2 were positive in serum and bile respectively. Of 7 patients positive for TTV DNA in both samples, the TTV DNA titer was higher in serum of 4 patients and in bile of 1 patient. Among 7 patients positive for TTV DNA in serum and bile, 6 had the same sequence in both samples. Multiple distinct types of TTV DNA clones were isolated from serum in 2 patients and from bile in 4 patients. In conclusion, TTV DNA is detected frequently in bile from patients with obstructive jaundice, suggesting a fecal-oral route of infection and high prevalence of asymptomatic TTV carriers. TTV DNA was detected only in serum from some patients, suggesting that replication of TTV may occur in other organs as well as in the liver.

  10. Gababuline induces delta-aminolevulinic acid excretion by cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.; Guikema, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Gabaculine (5-amino-1,3-cyclohexadienylcarboxylic acid) was examined as an inhibitor of Chl biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans. At 20 ..mu..M, it blocked the synthesis of both Chl and phycocyanin. Similar results were obtained using aminooxyacetic acid. Because gabaculine is well established as an inhibitor of aminotransferase activity, the authors expected it to cause an inhibition of ..delta..-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis. However, an excretion of ALA was observed instead. Concentrated cell cultures were incubated in the presence of gabaculine, and the spent media was examined for ALA excretion using modified Ehrlick's reagent. Gabaculine induced ALA excretion in normal cultures, and in those stressed by iron or phosphate deficiency. Nitrate deficiency depressed the extent of ALA excretion. These results suggest that, in cyanobacteria, gabaculine inhibits CHl biosynthesis at a site after ALA formation.

  11. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding.

  12. Renal sodium excretion in sons of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Turner, S T; Reilly, S L

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether renal excretion of sodium is impaired and whether tubular reabsorption of sodium is increased in normotensive white men with a familial predisposition to develop essential hypertension. We compared 11 normotensive sons of two hypertensive parents (SOHT) with 11 normotensive sons of two normotensive parents (SONT); renal sodium handling was assessed after 1 week of low-sodium diet (10 mmol/d) and after 1 week of high-sodium diet (200 mmol/d). The SOHT were on average 5.5 years older than the SONT (46.9 +/- 5.2 [SD] vs 41.4 +/- 4.1, P = .012). On the sixth day of each diet, mean urinary sodium excretion did not differ between the two groups (12.9 +/- 6.3 vs 12.7 +/- 6.7 mmol/d on low-sodium diet, P = .930; 197 +/- 25 vs 200 +/- 27 mmol/d on high-sodium diet, P = .817). On the seventh day of each diet, baseline means for filtered load of sodium, absolute excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of sodium (an index of total tubular sodium reabsorption), and fractional excretion of lithium (an inverse index of proximal tubular sodium reabsorption) also did not differ between the groups. To assess renal sodium handling under non-steady-state conditions, we infused 2 L normal saline intravenously over a 2-hour period. The means for absolute excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of sodium, and fractional excretion of lithium increased from baseline, but the increases did not differ in magnitude between the groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Excretion of (3H)prednisolone in clinically normal and experimentally infected bovine udders

    SciTech Connect

    Geleta, J.N.; Shimoda, W.; Mercer, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The excretion rate of (3H)prednisolone from clinically normal and experimentally infected udders of 10 lactating cows was studied. Each quarter of 6 cows was injected with a single dose of (3H)prednisolone mixed with non-radioactive prednisolone equivalent to 10 mg in 10 ml of peanut oil base. Each of the remaining 4 cows was given 40 mg of nonradioactive prednisolone and (3H)prednisolone in 60% ethanol IV. Control and postadministration samples of blood, milk, and urine were examined for radioactivity. The effects of (3H)prednisolone were evaluated in the same cows, first in clinically normal udders, then 2 weeks later in udders experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Absorption and elimination of prednisolone were the same before and after induced infection. Within 3 hours after intramammary injection, 95% of the labeled prednisolone was absorbed systemically, less than 5% of this dose was recovered in milk, and 29% was excreted in urine. After IV injection of (3H)prednisolone, less than 0.2% of the total radioactivity was recovered in milk and less than 46% was excreted in urine. Clinical mastitis induced by S agalactiae was moderate. Circulating blood leukocytes and somatic cells in the milk of normal cows remained essentially unchanged. The leukocyte response to induced infection was rapid in blood and milk. Large numbers of leukocytes were noticed in the milk and a severe leukopenia occurred. Prednisolone treatment did not alter the number of somatic cells in milk or reduce the inflammatory response of experimentally infected cows.

  14. Effect of urinary excretion on the bladder tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones in rats.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Makiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate which of blood or urine has the greater effect on bladder tissue concentrations of fluoroquinolones important for the treatment of urinary tract infections by measuring concentrations of fluoroquinolones in the vesical tissue (chemically and immunohistochemically) and intravesical space (chemically). Thirty-minute incubation of isolated rat bladders with fluoroquinolones showed only a 1.9-fold difference in transferability among norfloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and sparfloxacin. Intravesical instillation of norfloxacin and sparfloxacin in rats yielded similar vesical tissue distributions. Thus, there were no large differences in vesical tissue transfer among the four fluoroquinolones. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin (high urinary excretion-type) and sparfloxacin (low urinary excretion-type) at 1 h after a single oral dose (10 mg/kg) to rats were 15.4 and 1.3, respectively. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin after an intravenous injection (10 mg/kg) to ureter-catheterized and sham-operated rats were 1.36 and 57.8. Thus the bladder tissue distribution was significantly higher in the urine-exposed bladder. Immunohistochemical examination of the vesical tissue localization of norfloxacin in rats given a single intravenous dose revealed the presence of the drug-positive image in the cytoplasm of surface layer cells (both in umbrella and cover cells) of the bladder transitional epithelium. In conclusion, the results suggest that norfloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are excreted into urine and then transferred to the surface layer of the bladder transitional epithelium. Therefore, the urine levels have a greater effect on the vesicle tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones than the plasma levels in rats.

  15. Ammonia excretion in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Chan, Ainsely C; Meyer, Heiko; Döring, Carmen; Sourial, Mary; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2012-09-15

    In aquatic invertebrates, metabolic nitrogenous waste is excreted predominately as ammonia. Very little is known, however, of the underlying mechanisms of ammonia excretion, particularly in freshwater species. Our results indicate that in the non-parasitic freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, ammonia excretion depends on acidification of the apical unstirred layer of the body surface and consequent ammonia trapping. Buffering of the environment to a pH of 7 or higher decreased the excretion rate. Inhibitor experiments suggested further that the excretion mechanism involves the participation of the V-type H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase and possibly also the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. Alkalinization (pH 8.5, 2 days) of the environment led to a 1.9-fold increase in body ammonia levels and to a downregulation of V-ATPase (subunit A) and Rh-protein mRNA. Further, a 2 day exposure to non-lethal ammonia concentrations (1 mmol l(-1)) caused a doubling of body ammonia levels and led to an increase in Rh-protein and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α-subunit) mRNA expression levels. In situ hybridization studies indicated a strong mRNA expression of the Rh-protein in the epidermal epithelium. The ammonia excretion mechanism proposed for S. mediterranea reveals striking similarities to the current model suggested to function in the gills of freshwater fish.

  16. Active hydrogen excretion and sodium absorption through isolated frog skin.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, J; Garcia-Romeu, F

    1977-07-01

    The in vitro skin of Rana esculenta was studied in open-circuit conditions. It was shown that when the external face is bathed in a 2-meq solution of NaCl, sodium is absorbed at a significantly higher rate than chloride. The ionic balance is maintained by excretion of hydrogen. With a mucosal solution of 2 meq Na2SO4 the equation relating sodium absorption to proton excretion is JnH+ = (-25 +/- 7) - (0.73 +/- 0.04) JnNa+. The correlation between the two variables is highly significant. Hydrogen excretion obeys saturation kinetics in relation to the sodium concentration of the mucosal solution. Maximum excretion occurs at a sodium concentration of 4 meq. When the mucosal solution is a 115-meq solution of Na2SO4 the net flux of sodium is 2.3 times higher than that of hydrogen. The balance is maintained by absorption of SO42-. The effects of various substances on the Na+ext/H+int exchange were studied. With a mucosal solution of 2 meq Na2SO4 and short-circuit conditions it was shown that the hydrogen excretion is active and nearly the same as in open circuit, the short-circuit current is equal (to within 8%) to the sum of the sodium and hydrogen net fluxes, and the correlation between the movements of the two ions is low. A model relating the active proton excretion with the sodium transport mechanism is proposed.

  17. The route of liquids administered to calves by esophageal feeder.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, H W; Butler, D G; Newell, M

    1986-01-01

    An esophageal feeder and a rubber nasoesophageal tube were used to administer fluids to calves. Radio-opaque fluids were given and their destination determined by fluoroscopy and radiography. Fluids containing glucose and xylose were also given and plasma glucose and xylose concentrations measured. In at least 93% of calves, the radio-opaque fluids entered the reticulum, indicating that the reticular groove did not close. Oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, copper sulfate and guanidine HCl did not influence groove closure in calves that received fluids through an esophageal feeder. As administration of the fluids continued, overflow to the abomasum occurred after about 400 mL had been given. When 2.0 L of glucose and electrolyte solution was given by esophageal feeder, plasma glucose levels rose significantly (p less than 0.01), showing that absorption had occurred. Plasma xylose levels rose in seven out of eight calves 30 minutes after a second 2.0 L dose (containing xylose) had been administered. Thus, even though esophageal feeders do not cause reticular groove closure, they can be used to administer fluids for enteric absorption, provided large quantities are given. PMID:3742363

  18. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the

  19. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  20. Cerebral regulation of renal sodium excretion in sheep infused intravenously with hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Chodobski, A; McKinley, M J

    1989-01-01

    1. The natriuretic response to intravenous infusion of 2 M-NaCl was investigated in six conscious sheep. This hypertonic NaCl load resulted in relatively small, physiological (2-3 mmol l-1) increases in plasma Na+ concentration and was followed by a natriuresis with a maximum mean urinary sodium excretion 5 times higher than pre-infusion values. 2. Intravenous infusion of isotonic NaCl, delivering the same Na+ load as hypertonic NaCl infusion, did not induce natriuresis. This suggested, therefore, that with the hypertonic sodium load administered in the present study, the rise in plasma Na+ and/or tonicity rather than increase in blood volume is important in evoking the natriuretic response. 3. Intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduced CSF Na+ concentration, decreased plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels and caused a copious water diuresis. This was associated with excessive loss of water and large increases in plasma Na+ concentration and osmolality. 4. The natriuresis induced by intravenous hypertonic NaCl load could be blocked by lowering CSF Na+ concentration in situations where water diuresis was either prevented or reduced by intravenous infusion of AVP or by delayed intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ CSF, respectively. 5. The results of the present study provide further evidence that renal sodium excretion can be controlled by the central nervous system. PMID:2621619

  1. Alginate enhances excretion and reduces absorption of strontium and cesium in rats.

    PubMed

    Idota, Yoko; Harada, Hitomi; Tomono, Takumi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kobayashi, Shoko; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Miyajima, Chihiro; Kasahara, Fumiyoshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    Alginate (ALA), which is an intercellular polysaccharide associated with brown algae, is used as a food additive, a health food and a medicine. Here, we first examined the adsorption of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs) by ALA in vitro, and then evaluated the effects of ALA on absorption and excretion of Sr and Cs in rats, in order to evaluate its potential usefulness for minimizing radiation damage from materials released after a nuclear accident. Both Sr and Cs were concentration-dependently adsorbed by sodium alginate (ALA-Na) in vitro. In rats given diet containing either ALA-Na or calcium alginate (ALA-Ca) for two weeks, the plasma concentration of Sr gradually decreased compared with the controls (normal diet); however, in the case of Cs, the plasma concentration was decreased only in the ALA-Ca group, but not the ALA-Na group. Moreover, we examined the effect of preadministration of diet containing either ALA-Na or ALA-Ca on absorption of Sr and Cs administered orally as the chloride salts to rats. Absorption of both Sr and Cs was reduced in the ALA-Ca group, while absorption of only Sr was reduced in the ALA-Na group. Safety assessments indicated that ALA-Ca is safer than ALA-Na. These results indicate that ALA-Ca reduces absorption and promotes excretion of both Sr and Cs, while ALA-Na does so only for Sr.

  2. Accelerated urinary excretion of methylmercury following administration of its antidote N-acetylcysteine requires Mrp2/Abcc2, the apical multidrug resistance-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Madejczyk, Michael S; Aremu, David A; Simmons-Willis, Tracey A; Clarkson, Thomas W; Ballatori, Nazzareno

    2007-07-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is a sulfhydryl-containing compound that produces a dramatic acceleration of urinary methylmercury (MeHg) excretion in poisoned mice, but the molecular mechanism for this effect is poorly defined. MeHg readily binds to NAC to form the MeHg-NAC complex, and recent studies indicate that this complex is an excellent substrate for the basolateral organic anion transporter (Oat)-1, Oat1/Slc22a6, thus potentially explaining the uptake from blood into the renal tubular cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that intracellular MeHg is subsequently transported across the apical membrane of the cells into the tubular fluid as a MeHg-NAC complex using the multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (Mrp2/Abcc2). NAC markedly stimulated urinary [(14)C]MeHg excretion in wild-type Wistar rats, and a second dose of NAC was as effective as the first dose in stimulating MeHg excretion. In contrast with the normal Wistar rats, NAC was much less effective at stimulating urinary MeHg excretion in the Mrp2-deficient (TR-) Wistar rats. The TR- rats excreted only approximately 30% of the MeHg excreted by the wild-type animals. To directly test whether MeHg-NAC is a substrate for Mrp2, studies were carried out in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from livers of TR- and control Wistar rats. Transport of MeHg-NAC was lower in vesicles prepared from TR- rats, whereas transport of MeHg-cysteine was similar in control and TR- rats. These results indicate that Mrp2 is involved in urinary MeHg excretion after NAC administration and suggest that the transported molecule is most likely the MeHg-NAC complex.

  3. Urinary excretion of cyclic nucleotides, creatinine prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 from mice exposed to whole-body irradiation from an enhanced neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, L.K.; Rafferty, M.A.; Wolfe, W.W.; Egan, J.E.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Urine volume and excretion of cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and creatinine were evaluated as potential indicators of radiation damage in mice given 2-5 Gy to the whole body from an enhanced neutron field. In general, urinary cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, creatinine and urine volumes were positively correlated across time postexposure, for each radiation dose. TxB2 levels positively correlated with urine volume and cyclic AMP excretion only in animals given 2.0Gy. None of these parameters suggests their use as a prognostic indicator of the extent of radiation damage. Urinary excretion of PGE2 was negatively correlated with other urinary parameters. Biphasic increases in urinary PGE2 were also observed. The initial transient elevation 2-3 days postexposure was not correlated with the dose (2-5 Gy). The second elevation of PGE2 excretion occurred at 6-10 days. The magnitude of the latter increase suggests that urinary PGE2 excretion may be a useful indicator of whole-body or kidney exposure to neutron fields.

  4. Urinary excretion of chromium following ingestion of chromite-ore processing residues in humans: implications for biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Gargas, M L; Norton, R L; Harris, M A; Paustenbach, D J; Finley, B L

    1994-12-01

    Biomonitoring programs for urinary chromium (Cr) typically attempt to evaluate occupational exposure via the inhalation route. This study investigated whether Cr can be detected in the urine of people following the ingestion of soils that contain relatively high concentrations of chromium in chromite ore processing residue (COPR). To evaluate the reasonableness of using urinary monitoring to assess environmental exposure, six volunteers ingested 400 mg of soil/day (low-dose group), two others ingested 2.0 g of soil/day (high-dose group) for 3 consecutive days, and one person ingested a placebo on each of 3 days. The soil and COPR mixture contained concentrations of total chromium (Cr) and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] of 103 +/- 20 and 9.3 +/- 3.8 mg/kg, respectively. Therefore, the low-dose group ingested 41 micrograms Cr/day [including 3.7 micrograms Cr(VI)] and the high-dose group ingested 206 micrograms Cr/day [including 18.6 micrograms Cr(VI)] on each of 3 consecutive days. All urine samples were collected and analyzed individually for total Cr on the day prior to dosing, during the 3 days of dosing, and up to the first void 48 h after the last dose. No significant increases in urinary Cr excretion were found when background excretion data were compared with data following each of the 3 days of dosing or in daily mean urine concentrations of the high- vs the low-dose groups. It appears that Cr present in a soil and COPR mixture at Cr doses up to 200 micrograms/day is not sufficiently bioavailable for biomonitoring of urine to be informative.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Deckert, T.; Yokoyama, H.; Mathiesen, E.; Rønn, B.; Jensen, T.; Feldt-Rasmussen, B.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Jensen, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion precedes development of atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes independently of conventional atherogenic risk factors and of diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cohort study with 11 year follow up. SETTING: Diabetes centre in Denmark. SUBJECTS: 259 patients aged 19-51 with insulin dependent diabetes of 6-34 years' duration and without atherosclerotic vascular disease or diabetic nephropathy at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Baseline variables: urinary albumin excretion, blood pressure, smoking habits, and serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor. End point: atherosclerotic vascular disease assessed by death certificates, mailed questionnaires, and hospital records. RESULTS: Thirty patients developed atherosclerotic vascular disease during follow up of 2457 person year. Elevated urinary albumin excretion was significantly predictive of atherosclerotic vascular disease (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.18) per 5 mg increase in 24 hour urinary albumin excretion, P = 0.002). Predictive effect was independent of age; sex; blood pressure; smoking; serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor; level of haemoglobin A(lc); insulin dose, duration of diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy (hazard ratio 1.04 (1.01 to 1.08) per 5 mg increase PMID:8611873

  6. Silicon balance in human volunteers; a pilot study to establish the variance in silicon excretion versus intake

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests a role for silicon in optimal connective tissue health. Further proof of its importance/essentiality may be provided by studies involving imposed depletion followed by 29Si challenge to estimate metabolic balance. Prior to conducting these expensive studies, we first established the variance of estimating normal Si excretion versus intake using a single oral dose of typical dietary Si, orthosilicic acid. Methods Healthy volunteers were recruited from Loei Rajabhat University, separated into two matched groups (three males and three females/group) and maintained on a standardized diet for the three study days. One group ingested 500 ml water containing orthosilicic acid (28.9 mg Si) and the other group received 500 ml water alone, all on a fasted stomach. Blood samples and total urine and faeces were collected over the 48 h post-dose period and 24 h before-hand (baseline) and analysed for silicon by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Results Serum Si analysis confirmed the ready absorption of silicon from the orthosilicic acid solution. Mean total urinary and faecal Si excretions over the 24 h post-dose period accounted for 57 ± 9.5% and 39 ± 9.4% of the ingested dose, respectively. Thus in total 96.3 ± 5.8% of the ingested dose was recovered in faecal plus urinary excretions over the 24 h post-dose period. Conclusions We report that in healthy subjects (presumably in Si balance), the ingestion of a soluble dose of dietary Si results in the same quantity (within analytical error) being excreted within 24 h. It is currently not known if this all originated from the dose solution or if there was some exchange with the body Si pool but, given the low variance in these silicon balance data, isotopic studies are now merited. PMID:24405738

  7. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  8. [Trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE): a new route for cholesterol excretion].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Moreau, François; Cariou, Bertrand; Le May, Cédric

    2014-10-01

    The small intestine plays a crucial role in dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption, as well as its lymphatic secretion as chylomicrons (lipoprotein exogenous way). Recently, a new metabolic pathway called TICE (trans-intestinal excretion of cholesterol) that plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism has emerged. TICE is an inducible way, complementary to the hepatobiliary pathway, allowing the elimination of the plasma cholesterol directly into the intestine lumen through the enterocytes. This pathway is poorly characterized but several molecular actors of TICE have been recently identified. Although it is a matter of debate, two independent studies suggest that TICE is involved in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Thus, TICE is an innovative drug target to reduce -cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  10. Urinary calcium excretion in postmenopausal African American women

    PubMed Central

    Aloia, John F.; Shieh, Albert; Mikhail, Mageda; Islam, Shahidul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to develop a reference range for urine calcium excretion (both 24-hour and fasting) for African American women compared to White women. In addition, the variables that determine urine calcium excretion were identified. Material: Data were analyzed for baseline studies of healthy postmenopausal volunteers who participated in seven separate studies conducted at one site. Methods: Some studies included fasting urine Ca/Cr and others 24-hour urine calcium excretion. 24-hour urine calcium was considered with and without correction for urinary creatinine excretion. Calcium was measured initially by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and more recently by an automated method (ADVIA 2400 Chemistry System). Results: Participants were considered healthy based on history and physical and routine laboratory studies. Those screened who had a history of nephrolithiasis were excluded. A reference range for 24-hour urine calcium and fasting urine calcium/creatinine was developed. Reference intervals of 11 – 197 mg/24-hour urine calcium excretion and of 0.007 – 0.222 of fasting Ca/Cr were found for African American women compared to 21 – 221 mg/24 hours and 0.019 – 0.264 in White women, respectively. Urine creatinine excretion was higher in African Americans consistent with their higher muscle mass. Conclusion: Urine calcium excretion is lower in postmenopausal African American than White women. The reference range developed should be considered in the diagnosis of hypocalciuric states and may also be useful in the diagnosis of hypercalciuria. PMID:26226948

  11. Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Mills, Katherine T; Appel, Lawrence J; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Lee, Belinda T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Porter, Anna; Makos, Gail; Weir, Matthew R; Hamm, L Lee; Kusek, John W

    2016-04-01

    CKD is a major risk factor for ESRD, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Whether dietary sodium and potassium intake affect CKD progression remains unclear. We prospectively studied the association of urinary sodium and potassium excretion with CKD progression and all-cause mortality among 3939 patients with CKD in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion were measured using three 24-hour urine specimens, and CKD progression was defined as incident ESRD or halving of eGFR. During follow-up, 939 CKD progression events and 540 deaths occurred. Compared with the lowest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (<116.8 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (≥194.6 mmol/24 h) were 1.54 (1.23 to 1.92) for CKD progression, 1.45 (1.08 to 1.95) for all-cause mortality, and 1.43 (1.18 to 1.73) for the composite outcome of CKD progression and all-cause mortality after adjusting for multiple covariates, including baseline eGFR. Additionally, compared with the lowest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (<39.4 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios for the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (≥67.1 mmol/24 h) were 1.59 (1.25 to 2.03) for CKD progression, 0.98 (0.71 to 1.35) for all-cause mortality, and 1.42 (1.15 to 1.74) for the composite outcome. These data indicate that high urinary sodium and potassium excretion are associated with increased risk of CKD progression. Clinical trials are warranted to test the effect of sodium and potassium reduction on CKD progression.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of renally excreted drug dexpramipexole in subjects with impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Kerr, Doug; Marbury, Thomas; Ries, Daniel; Farwell, Wildon; Stecher, Scott; Dong, Yingwen; Wei, Dong; Rogge, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This phase I, open-label, single-dose study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of renally excreted drug dexpramipexole in subjects with normal and impaired renal function, i.e. mild, moderate, severe renal impairment, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis when matched by age and sex. Dexpramipexole area under the curves (AUCs), but not Cmax, were significantly increased with the severity of renal impairment after a single dose administration. The geometric mean ratio of dose-normalized AUC(0–72) was 1.4, 1.7, 2.7, and 4.5, respectively, in mild, moderate, severe renal impairment, and ESRD subjects when compared to healthy subjects. There was a strong association between renal function (eGFR) and dexpramipexole CLr. The slope (90% confidence interval(CI)) of eGFR and renal clearance (CLr) in the regression model was 3.1 (2.4, 3.7). Dexpramipexole elimination in ESRD subjects during both dialysis and non-dialysis (i.e., interval between dialysis) was insignificant. Single 75 mg and 150 mg doses of dexpramipexole were well tolerated, and the safety profile was comparable across renal function groups. Extensive drug accumulation may occur with repeated dosing in patients with significant renal impairment. It is recommended that dexpramipexole not to be given to patients with severe renal impairment or in those with ESRD. PMID:24965504

  13. [Plasma concentrations and renal excretion of vincamine after oral administration in man (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Siegers, C P; Iven, H; Strubelt, O

    1977-01-01

    Plasma concentrations and renal excretion of 14,15-dihydro-14beta-hydroxy-(3alpha,16alpha)-eburnamenine-14-carbonic acid methylester (vincamine, Vincapront) were studied in 5 healthy volunteers following the oral intake of 30 or 60 mg vincamine, respectively. After the higher dose (60 mg vincamine), the treatment was continued by the daily intake of 3 X 20 mg vincamine for 5 days. Plasma vincamine levels were determined in the morning prior to the ingestion of the first 20-mg dose and in the evening 2 h after the intake of the third 20-mg dose. Our results prove that vincamine is rapidly liberated and absorbed from the tablet formulation used, the maximum plasma levels being reached 90 min after ingestion and amounting to a mean value of 139 ng/ml after 30 mg and to a mean of 252 ng/ml after 60 mg of vincamine. There was a biphasic elimination of vincamine after both doses indicating a process of distribution influencing also the elimination phase. In the 24-h urine, unchanged vincamine amounted to 5.8% of the applied dose after 30 mg and to 7.3% after 60 mg vincamine. Vincamine did not accumulate during the daily intake of 60 mg for 6 days. Side-effects were not observed in any volunteer during the period of observation.

  14. Role of renal medullary adenosine in the control of blood flow and sodium excretion.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Nithipatikom, K; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-03-01

    This study determined the levels of adenosine in the renal medullary interstitium using microdialysis and fluorescence HPLC techniques and examined the role of endogenous adenosine in the control of medullary blood flow and sodium excretion by infusing the specific adenosine receptor antagonists or agonists into the renal medulla of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Renal cortical and medullary blood flows were measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Analysis of microdialyzed samples showed that the adenosine concentration in the renal medullary interstitial dialysate averaged 212 +/- 5.2 nM, which was significantly higher than 55.6 +/- 5.3 nM in the renal cortex (n = 9). Renal medullary interstitial infusion of a selective A1 antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 8), did not alter renal blood flows, but increased urine flow by 37% and sodium excretion by 42%. In contrast, renal medullary infusion of the selective A2 receptor blocker 3, 7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX; 150 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 9) decreased outer medullary blood flow (OMBF) by 28%, inner medullary blood flows (IMBF) by 21%, and sodium excretion by 35%. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of adenosine produced a dose-dependent increase in OMBF, IMBF, urine flow, and sodium excretion at doses from 3 to 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1 (n = 7). These effects of adenosine were markedly attenuated by the pretreatment of DMPX, but unaltered by DPCPX. Infusion of a selective A3 receptor agonist, N6-benzyl-5'-(N-ethylcarbonxamido)adenosine (300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 6) into the renal medulla had no effect on medullary blood flows or renal function. Glomerular filtration rate and arterial pressure were not changed by medullary infusion of any drugs. Our results indicate that endogenous medullary adenosine at physiological concentrations serves to dilate medullary vessels via A2 receptors, resulting in a natriuretic response that overrides the tubular A1 receptor

  15. Quantitative studies of human urinary excretion of uropontin.

    PubMed

    Min, W; Shiraga, H; Chalko, C; Goldfarb, S; Krishna, G G; Hoyer, J R

    1998-01-01

    Uropontin is the urinary form of osteopontin, an aspartic acid-rich phosphorylated glycoprotein. Uropontin has been previously shown to be a potent inhibitor of the nucleation, growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals and the binding of these crystals to renal epithelial cells. Quantitative data defining the excretion of this protein are necessary to determine its role in urinary stone formation. In the present studies, we determined uropontin excretion rates of normal humans. Urine samples were obtained under conditions of known dietary intake from young adult human volunteers with no history, radiographic or laboratory evidence of renal disease. Urinary concentrations of uropontin were measured by a sensitive ELISA employing an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum to uropontin. Thirteen normal subjects ingested a constant diet providing 1 gram of calcium, 1 gram of phosphorus, 150 mEq of sodium and 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body wt per day during an eight day study period. The relationship of urinary volume to uropontin excretion was assessed by varying fluid intake on the last four days of the study to change the mean urine volume/24 hr by > 500 ml. Urine collected in six hour aliquots for eight days was analyzed for uropontin by ELISA, and for calcium, and creatinine. Daily uropontin excretion of 13 individual subjects was 3805 +/- 1805 micrograms/24 hr (mean +/- 1 SD). The mean urinary levels (1.9 micrograms/ml) detected in the present study are sufficient for inhibition of crystallization; our previous studies have demonstrated that the nucleation, growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals and their binding to renal cells in vitro are inhibited by this concentration of purified uropontin. In contrast to the regular pattern of diurnal variation of calcium excretion seen in most subjects, uropontin excretion showed no regularity of diurnal variation and was not directly related to either calcium or creatinine excretion or changes in

  16. Changes in parasite transmission stage excretion after pheasant release.

    PubMed

    Villanúa, D; Acevedo, P; Höfle, U; Rodríguez, O; Gortázar, C

    2006-09-01

    The production of parasite transmission stages was investigated in the faeces of 77 farm-bred ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Coccidian oocysts (Eimeria sp.), and nematode eggs (Heterakis sp., and Capillaria-like eggs) were recovered before and after release but all birds were treated prior to release. Treatment with fenbendazole significantly reduced the abundance of transmission-stage excretion for all parasites, and reduced the prevalence in the case of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the excretion abundance for all parasites and in the prevalence of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. was found after release. Eggs of Ascaridia sp. were found only after releasing, suggesting infection ocurred in the wild. A negative relationship was found between the pheasant body condition and Heterakis excretion abundance and a higher abundance of Capillaria sp. eggs in female birds. No significant relationship was found between parasite excretion abundance and pheasant survival. Despite this, results suggest that an increase in the excretion of parasite transmission stages follows the release of captive pheasants into the wild. This can in part explain restocking failures, but also means that autochtonous free-living birds may become exposed to new and potentially harmful pathogens. To avoid these risks it is proposed that improved prophylactic measures should be taken.

  17. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-10-20

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal's ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the "stepwise peristaltic ureter" (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney.

  18. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal’s ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the “stepwise peristaltic ureter” (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  19. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies. (a... Department's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which provides commodities, assigns caseload, and...

  20. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies. (a... Department's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which provides commodities, assigns caseload, and...

  1. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies. (a... Department's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which provides commodities, assigns caseload, and...

  2. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies. (a... Department's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which provides commodities, assigns caseload, and...

  3. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies. (a... Department's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which provides commodities, assigns caseload, and...

  4. Teaching Students to Administer the WISC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Yost

    1977-01-01

    A college level psychology course is described in which students were trained by both traditional and experimental methods to administer individual intelligence tests. Comparative analysis of performance by each group indicates that student motivation and performance is not greatly influenced by teaching method and that videotape demonstrations…

  5. Changes in Medications Administered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Johnson, Shella; Roman, Jaclyn; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to determine if there have been changes in the type and number of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) medications administered in schools since the introduction of long-acting stimulants. A survey was sent to 1,000 school nurses randomly selected from the National Association…

  6. The biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 117m}Sn DTPA with special emphasis on active marrow absorbed doses

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, J.; Atkins, H.

    1999-01-01

    {sup 117m}Sn(4+) DTPA is a new radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of pain associated with metastatic bone cancer. Recently, the Phase 2 clinical trials involving 47 patients were completed. These patients received administered activities in the range 6.7--10.6 MBq/kg of body mass. Frequent collections of urine were acquired over the first several hours postadministration and daily cumulative collections were obtained for the next 4--10 days. Anterior/posterior gamma camera images were obtained frequently over the initial 10 days. Radiation dose estimates were calculated for 8 of these patients. Each patient`s biodistribution data were mathematically simulated using a multicompartmental model. The model consisted of the following compartments: central, bone, kidney, other tissues, and cumulative urine. The measured cumulative urine data were used as references for the cumulative urine excretion compartment. The total-body compartment (sum of the bone surfaces, central, kidney, and other tissues compartments) was reference to all activity not excreted in the urine.

  7. Studies on phenolic steriods in human subjects. XXI. renal metabolism, conjugation and excretion of four androgens: a comparison with estriol.

    PubMed

    Kirdani, R; Barua, N R; Sandberg, A A

    1977-06-01

    The present study was conducted in order to ascertain whether the human kidney can conjugate androgens to an extent similar to that of estriol (E3). Differently labeled androgens (testosterone, DHT and androstenedione) were injected simultaneously into a peripheral vein and the renal artery. The excretion of the radioactivity in the early urine collections served as an index of the ability of the kidney to conjugate and/or metabolize the various steroids administered. It was shown that the human kidney can conjugate testosterone to some extent as the 17-glucuronide of DHT, but to a much lesser degree that E3. Androstenedione was not conjugated by the kidney and the excretion DHT was paradoxically lower following its renal artery administration than following its peripheral injection. We interpret the latter to indicate that some kidney cells may contain receptors with very high affinity for DHT, thus leading to the lower excretion observed. The administration of androstenediol (into the renal artery) and E3 (peripherally) indicated that the diol was not conjugated as readily as E3. The results point to the ability of the kidney to conjugate testosterone to some extent; however, in no case was it able to conjugate an androgen with the same facility as it does E3.

  8. Practical applications of internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1994-06-01

    Accurate estimates of intake magnitude and internal dose are the goal for any assessment of an actual intake of radioactivity. When only one datum is available on which to base estimates, the choices for internal dose assessment become straight-forward: apply the appropriate retention or excretion function, calculate the intake, and calculate the dose. The difficulty comes when multiple data and different types of data become available. Then practical decisions must be made on how to interpret conflicting data, or how to adjust the assumptions and techniques underlying internal dose assessments to give results consistent with the data. This article describes nine types of adjustments which can be incorporated into calculations of intake and internal dose, and then offers several practical insights to dealing with some real-world internal dose puzzles.

  9. On the Interchangeability of Individually Administered and Group Administered Ability Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Baruch; Sela, Roni

    2003-01-01

    This research studied the interchangeability of individually administered and group administered cognitive tests. Seventy undergraduate students took the Hebrew version of the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised), and their IQs were measured. They also took the IPET (Israeli Psychometric Entrance Test) and their IPET scores were…

  10. Lowering urinary oxalate excretion to decrease calcium oxalate stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Assimos, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modifications should be considered as a first line approach in the treatment of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The amounts of oxalate and calcium consumed in the diet are significant factors in the development of the disease due to their impact on urinary oxalate excretion. There are a number of strategies that can be employed to reduce oxalate excretion. The consumption of oxalate-rich foods should be avoided and calcium intake adjusted to 1000–1200 mg/day. To encourage compliance it should be emphasized to patients that they be vigilant with this diet as a deviation in any meal or snack could potentially result in significant stone growth. The evidence underlying these two modifications is outlined and other strategies to reduce urinary oxalate excretion are reviewed. PMID:26614109

  11. Quantitation of phosphorus excretion in sheep by compartmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.M.; Boston, R.C.; Leaver, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    The control of phosphorus excretion in sheep has been examined by constructing a kinetic model that contains a mechanistic set of connections between blood and gastrointestinal tract. The model was developed using experimental data from chaff-fed sheep and gives an accurate description of the absorption and excretion of /sup 32/P phosphorus in feces and urine of the ruminating sheep. These results indicated the main control site for phosphorus excretion in the ruminating sheep was the gastrointestinal tract, whereas for the non-ruminating sheep fed the liquid diet, control was exerted by the kidney. A critical factor in the induction of adaptation of phosphorus reabsorption by the kidney was the reduction in salivation, and since this response occurred independently of marked changes in the delivery of phosphorus to the kidney, a humoral factor may be involved in this communication between salivary gland and kidney.

  12. Reduction in urinary prostaglandin excretion in the premenstrual syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, A; Modena, F; Calò, L; Cantaro, S; Avogadro, A; Nardo, G; Cerutti, R

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to study some factors involved in renal handling of salt and water in the premenstrual syndrome (PMS), in which salt and water retention is frequently observed. In 18 women with PMS and in 18 healthy women we studied the levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, aldosterone, prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha and kallikrein in urinary samples collected during the luteal phase. There was no difference between the two groups regarding sodium, aldosterone and kallikrein urinary excretion. In the PMS group there was a significant reduction in urinary excretion of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha with respect to the control group. At multivariate analysis sodium urinary excretion proved not to be the same as the model validated in healthy women. There may be different renal handling of water and electrolytes during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in women with PMS.

  13. Dynamics of renal electrolyte excretion in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Ripper, Maria; Tegtmeier, Ines; Humberg, Evelyn; Sterner, Christina; Reichold, Markus; Warth, Richard; Bandulik, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified mice represent important models for elucidating renal pathophysiology, but gene deletions frequently cause severe failure to thrive. In such cases, the analysis of the phenotype is often limited to the first weeks of life when renal excretory function undergoes dramatic physiological changes. Here, we investigated the postnatal dynamics of urinary ion excretion in mice. The profiles of urinary electrolyte excretion of mice were examined from birth until after weaning using an automated ion chromatography system. Postnatally, mice grew about 0.4 g/day, except during two phases with slower weight gain: (i) directly after birth during adaptation to extrauterine conditions (P0-P2) and (ii) during the weaning period (P15-P21), when nutrition changed from mother's milk to solid chow and water. During the first 3 days after birth, remarkable changes in urinary Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and phosphate concentrations occurred, whereas K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations hardly changed. From days 4-14 after birth, Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations remained relatively stable at low levels. Urinary concentrations of creatinine, NH4(+), phosphate, and sulfate constantly increased from birth until after weaning. Profiles of salt excretion in KCNJ10(-/-) mice exemplified the relevance of age-dependent analysis of urinary excretion. In conclusion, the most critical phases for analysis of renal ion excretion during the first weeks of life are directly after birth and during the weaning period. The age dependence of urinary excretion varies for the different ions. This should be taken into consideration when the renal phenotype of mice is investigated during the first weeks of life.

  14. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition for one week improves renal sodium and water excretion in cirrhotic rats with ascites.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P Y; Ohara, M; Gines, P; Xu, D L; St John, J; Niederberger, M; Schrier, R W

    1998-01-01

    Normalization of the increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) generation with low doses of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) corrects the hemodynamic abnormalities of cirrhotic rats with ascites. We have undertaken this study to investigate the effect of the normalization of vascular NO production, as estimated by aortic cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentration and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression in the aorta and mesenteric artery, on sodium and water excretion. Rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis and ascites were investigated using balance studies. The cirrhotic rats were separated into two groups, one receiving 0.5 mg/kg per day of L-NAME (CIR-NAME) during 7 d, whereas the other group (CIR) was administrated the same volume of vehicle. Two other groups of rats were used as controls, one group treated with L-NAME and another group receiving the same volume of vehicle. Sodium and water excretion was measured on days 0 and 7. On day 8, blood samples were collected for electrolyte and hormone measurements, and aorta and mesenteric arteries were harvested for cGMP determination and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoblotting. Aortic cGMP and eNOS protein expression in the aorta and mesenteric artery were increased in CIR as compared with CIR-NAME. Both cirrhotic groups had a similar decrease in sodium excretion on day 0 (0.7 versus 0.6 mmol per day, NS) and a positive sodium balance (+0.9 versus +1.2 mmol per day, NS). On day 7, CIR-NAME rats had an increase in sodium excretion as compared with the CIR rats (sodium excretion: 2.4 versus 0.7 mmol per day, P < 0.001) and a negative sodium balance (-0.5 versus +0.8 mmol per day, P < 0.001). The excretion of a water load was also increased after L-NAME administration (from 28+/-5% to 65+/-7, P < 0.05). Plasma renin activity, aldosterone and arginine vasopressin were also significantly decreased in the CIR-NAME, as compared with the CIR rats. The results thus indicate

  15. Biomarker detection of rhGH doping: an excretion study.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Zhou, Xinmiao; He, Chunji; Zhang, Lisi; Yang, Sheng; Xu, Youxuan; Xie, Minhao; Yan, Yi; Su, Hao; Wu, Moutian

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to validate the biomarker-based approach for the detection of doping with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in sport. The GH-2000 project proposed an indirect method for the detection of exogenously administered growth hormone (GH) based on the measurement of the GH-dependent markers: insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and Type III pro-collagen (P-III-P). These markers rise in a dose-dependent manner after GH application. In this study, the concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-BP3, and P-III-P in serum were determined to provide further incentives for the implementation of this detection assay in modern anti-doping programmes. This paper reports on an administration study of rhGH involving 25 Chinese male volunteers at a dose of 0.1 IU /kg/day for a continuous 14-day period. We observed that the serum IGF-I concentration increased rapidly in the rhGH treatment group and showed significantly higher levels compared to baseline between days 4 and day 16 after administration. Although the response of P-III-P to rhGH administration was delayed compared to the IGF-I axis, the P-III-P concentration remained increased for a longer period (from day 4 to day 28). Statistical analysis was carried out to establish a discriminant formula with Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) concluding that the biomarker methodology is valid and universally applicable.

  16. Nocturnal 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate excretion in female workers exposed to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J; Stevens, Richard G. ); Anderson, Larry E. ); Hansen, Norman H.; Kilpelainen, M; Kumlin, T; Laitinen, J T.; Sobell, Eugene; Wilson, Bary W. )

    2000-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether daytime occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (MFs) suppresses nocturnal melatonin production. Sixty female volunteers were recruited. Thirty-nine worked in a garment factory, and 21 office workers served as a reference group. Exposure assessment was based on the type of sewing machine used and MF measurements around each type of machine. Eye-level MF flux density was used to classify the operators to higher (> 1 microT) and lower (0.3-1 microT) exposure categories. A third group of factory workers had diverse MF exposures from other sources. The reference group had average exposure of about 0.15 microT. Urine samples were collected on Friday and Monday for three consecutive weeks. Melatonin production was assessed as urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) excretion. The ratio of Friday morning/Monday morning 6-OHMS was used to test the hypothesis that melatonin production is suppressed after 4 days of occupational MF exposure with significant recovery during the weekend. Possible chronic suppression of melatonin production was evaluated by studying exposure-related differences in the Friday values by multivariate regression analysis. The Monday/Friday ratios were close to 1.0, suggesting that there is no increase in melatonin production over the weekend. The average 6-OHMS excretion on Friday was lower among the factory workers than in the reference group, but no monotonous dose-response was observed. Multivariate regression analysis identified MF exposure, smoking, and age as significant explanatory variables associated with decreased 6-OHMS excretion.

  17. Stereoselective urinary MDMA (ecstasy) and metabolites excretion kinetics following controlled MDMA administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Schwaninger, Andrea E; Meyer, Markus R; Barnes, Allan J; Kolbrich-Spargo, Erin A; Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Huestis, Marilyn A; Maurer, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    The R- and S-enantiomers of racemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) exhibit different dose-concentration curves. In plasma, S-MDMA was eliminated at a higher rate, most likely due to stereoselective metabolism. Similar data were shown in various in vitro experiments. The aim of the present study was the in vivo investigation of stereoselective elimination of MDMA's phase I and phase II metabolites in human urine following controlled oral MDMA administration. Urine samples from 10 participants receiving 1.0 and 1.6 mg/kg MDMA separated by at least one week were analyzed blind by liquid chromatography-high resolution-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after chiral derivatization with S-heptafluorobutyrylprolyl chloride. R/S ratios at C(max) were comparable after low and high doses with ratios >1 for MDMA, free DHMA, and HMMA sulfate, and with ratios <1 for MDA, free HMMA, DHMA sulfate and HMMA glucuronide. In the five days after the high MDMA dose, a median of 21% of all evaluated compounds were excreted as R-stereoisomers and 17% as S-stereoisomers. Significantly greater MDMA, DHMA, and HMMA sulfate R-enantiomers and HMMA and HMMA glucuronide S-stereoisomers were excreted. No significant differences were observed for MDA and DHMA sulfate stereoisomers. Changes in R/S ratios could be observed over time for all analytes, with steady increases in the first 48 h. R/S ratios could help to roughly estimate time of MDMA ingestion and therefore, improve interpretation of MDMA and metabolite urinary concentrations in clinical and forensic toxicology.

  18. Increased urinary excretion of thioether in new rubber workers

    PubMed Central

    Kilpikari, I; Savolainen, H

    1982-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary excretion of thioether before starting work and in the early work period in a rubber factory was measured in urine samples collected after one, two to four, and five or more months of starting work. The study population consisted of 84 new workers. The urinary excretion of thioether decreased after one month's exposure and increased thereafter up to five months. Measurement of urinary thioethers in groups of new workers is therefore informative of exposure to alkylating agents only after several months from starting work. This effect may be mediated by the induction of the pertinent metabolic pathway. PMID:7138800

  19. [Microalbuminuria and urinary albumin excretion in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; González, Fernando; Acevedo, Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Microalbuminuria is a new tool in the management of patients with diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Microalbuminuria is an easily measured biomarker in a urine sample. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in first morning urine sample correlates with 24 hours urinary albumin excretion, but it is easier to obtain, and can identify hypertensive or diabetic patients with high risk for cardiovascular events. Therapeutic interventions such as renin angiotensin system blockade have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing urinary albumin excretion in clinical studies. It would be advisable to incorporate urinary albumin to creatinine ratio to the routine clinical monitoring of patients with cardiovascular risk, such as those with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  20. 40 CFR 63.216 - Who administers this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Information § 63.216 Who administers this subpart? (a) This subpart can be administered by us, the... authority to administer and enforce this subpart. You should contact your EPA Regional Office to find out...

  1. 40 CFR 63.216 - Who administers this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Information § 63.216 Who administers this subpart? (a) This subpart can be administered by us, the... authority to administer and enforce this subpart. You should contact your EPA Regional Office to find out...

  2. 40 CFR 63.5455 - Who administers this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 63.5455 Who administers this subpart? (a) This subpart can be administered by us, the United States... that agency has the primary authority to administer and enforce this subpart. You should contact your...

  3. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of gonyautoxins after an oral toxin dose in cats.

    PubMed

    Andrinolo, Darío; Iglesias, Verónica; García, Carlos; Lagos, Néstor

    2002-06-01

    Although the action of Gonyautoxins (GTXs) and Saxitoxin (STX) mechanisms is well known at the molecular level, there are still many unresolved questions associated with the intoxication syndrome in mammals. For example, how are these toxins absorbed in the digestive system? Where are they absorbed? What is the absorption rate? What is the maximal concentration in plasma (C(max)) and the time taken to reach this C(max) (T(max)) in the case of oral toxin administration? These questions are addressed in this paper, which describes an experimental design which allowed us to follow the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of GTX 2/3 epimers poisoning in vivo, when an oral dose of toxin was administered to an anaesthetized cat permanently coupled to an artificial ventilator. The GTX 2/3 epimers was orally administered with a dose of 70 microg/kg, then urine and blood samples were collected during a 5 h experimental period. The toxins were quantified using a post column derivatisation high performance liquid chromatography method. Procedure of extraction, clean up and detection of GTX 2/3 epimers are described. The arterial pressure of the cats was continuously monitored. The GTX 2/3 epimers oral dose was completely absorbed at intestinal level. This dose was sufficient to decrease arterial pressure and to produce death within the experimental time. However, with the intravenous (i.v.) administration of 2.5 microg/min kg of dobutamine, hemodynamic parameters were restored which allowed the animal to overcome the cardiovascular shock. The renal clearance of GTX 2/3 epimers measured in the cats was 4.6 ml/min kg, indicating that like STX, in cats with normal cardiovascular parameters and diuresis, the GTX 2/3 excretion mainly involves glomerular filtration. Oral doses of 35 microg/kg of GTX 2/3 epimers and plasma level of 36 ng/ml are lethal limits for cats. This is the first report that shows the effects of the GTX 2/3 epimers at different plasmatic levels and their

  4. Hepatically-metabolized and -excreted artificial oxygen carrier, hemoglobin vesicles, can be safely used under conditions of hepatic impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Miyasato, Mayumi; Ujihira, Hayato; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Sakai, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Eishun; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2010-11-01

    The hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier in which a concentrated Hb solution is encapsulated in lipid vesicles. Our previous studies demonstrated that HbV is metabolized by the mononuclear phagocyte system, and the lipid components are excreted from the liver. It is well-known that many hepatically-metabolized and -excreted drugs show altered pharmaceutics under conditions of liver impairment, which results in adverse effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administration of HbV causes toxicity in rats with carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhosis. Changes in plasma biochemical parameters, histological staining and the pharmacokinetic distribution of HbV were evaluated after an HbV injection of the above model rats at a putative clinical dose (1400 mgHb/kg). Plasma biochemical parameters were not significantly affected, except for a transient elevation of lipase, lipid components and bilirubin, which recovered within 14 days after an HbV infusion. Negligible morphological changes were observed in the kidney, liver, spleen, lung and heart. Hemosiderin, a marker of iron accumulation in organs, was observed in the liver and spleen up to 14 days after HbV treatment, but no evidence of oxidative stress in the plasma and liver were observed. HbV is mainly distributed in the liver and spleen, and the lipid components are excreted into feces within 7 days. In conclusion, even under conditions of hepatic cirrhosis, HbV and its components exhibit the favorable metabolic and excretion profile at the putative clinical dose. These findings provide further support for the safety and effectiveness of HbV in clinical settings.

  5. Administering social security: challenges yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, the Social Security Administration (SSA) celebrates the 75th anniversary of the passage of the Social Security Act. In those 75 years, SSA has been responsible for programs providing unemployment insurance, child welfare, and supervision of credit unions, among other duties. This article focuses on the administration of the Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program, although it also covers some of the other major programs SSA has been tasked with administering over the years-in particular, Medicare, Black Lung benefits, and Supplemental Security Income. The article depicts some of the challenges that have accompanied administering these programs and the steps that SSA has taken to meet those challenges. Whether implementing complex legislation in short timeframes or coping with natural disasters, SSA has found innovative ways to overcome problems and has evolved to meet society's changing needs.

  6. Orally Administered Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. G. Duncan Hitchens, Anthony Giletto, Allison Rice-Ficht, Sunitha...Aug 96) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Orally Administered Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines DAMD17-95-C-5099 6... microencapsulated vaccine against staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). The research is centered around using a known bioadhesive, vitelline protein B (vpB), to

  7. Toxicokinetics of acrylamide in rats and humans following single oral administration of low doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Eva Katharina; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The rodent carcinogen acrylamide (AA) is formed during preparation of starch-containing foods. AA is partly metabolized to the genotoxic epoxide glycidamide (GA). After metabolic processing, the mercapturic acids N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), rac-N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) and rac-N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-moyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) are excreted with urine. In humans, AAMA can be sulfoxidized to AAMA-sulfoxide. The aim of this study was to assess potential species-differences in AA-toxicokinetics in rats and humans after single oral administration of doses similar to the daily human dietary exposure. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 5/dose group) were administered 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA in deionized water via oral gavage. Human subjects (n = 3/gender) were orally administered 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA with drinking water. Urine samples were collected in intervals for 96 and 94 h, respectively. Urinary concentrations of {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recovered urinary metabolites accounted for 66.3% and 70.5% of the 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in rats and for 71.3% and 70.0% of the 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in humans. In rats, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA accounted for 33.6% and 38.8% of dose and 32.7% and 31.7% of dose was recovered as {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA; {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide was not detected in rat urine. In humans, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide accounted for 51.7% and 49.2%, 6.3% and 6.4% and 13.2% and 14.5% of the applied dose, respectively. The obtained results suggest that the extent of AA bioactivation to GA in humans is lower than in rodents.

  8. Drug interaction between sunitinib and cimetidine and contribution of the efflux transporter ATP-binding cassette C2 to biliary excretion of sunitinib in rats.

    PubMed

    Arakawa-Todo, Maki; Ueyama, Jun; Nomura, Hiroshi; Abe, Fumie; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Takaaki

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the H2 antagonist cimetidine on the pharmacokinetics of a multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor, sunitinib, in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and Eisai hyperbilirubinemic mutant rats (EHBR) lacking the efflux transporter, ATP-binding cassette C2 protein (ABCC2). Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of cimetidine (10 mg/kg) once a day for three days. On day 4, sunitinib (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 30 min after the final injection of cimetidine or saline to SD rats. Disappearance of sunitinib from plasma was significantly delayed by cimetidine. The pharmacokinetic parameter of sunitinib, systemic clearance (CLSYS), was significantly reduced and the half-life was significantly prolonged, with no change in the volume of distribution at steady-state (VSS). When the effect of cimetidine on the biliary excretion of sunitinib at steady-state condition was investigated in SD rats, cimetidine had no effect on some transporter-mediated biliary excretion of sunitinib. Furthermore, the contribution of ABCC2 to the biliary excretion of sunitinib was also examined in SD rats and EHBR. The biliary clearance of sunitinib was significantly lower in EHBR, but the biliary excretion rate of EHBR was not different from that of SD rats, and the contribution of biliary excretion to systemic elimination was small, suggesting that sunitinib is mainly eliminated by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4)-mediated metabolism and is not excreted into the bile via ABCC2. These findings indicate that co-administration of cimetidine alters the pharmacokinetics of sunitinib probably due to inhibition of CYP3A4, suggesting the possibility that cimetidine should be used carefully for patients with cancer being treated with sunitinib therapy.

  9. Absorption, distribution, and excretion of 8-methoxypsoralen in HRA/Skh mice

    SciTech Connect

    Muni, I.A.; Schneider, F.H.; Olsson, T.A. III; King, M.

    1984-12-01

    The tissue distribution and excretion of (/sup 3/H)8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a well-accepted therapeutic agent for the treatment of psoriasis, was studied in hairless HRA/Skh female mice. Mice were given single oral doses of 6 mg of (/sup 3/H)8-MOP or 5-(/sup 14/C)8-MOP/kg in corn oil. Radiochemical analyses of tissues and excreta were accomplished by liquid scintillation counting. The 8-MOP appeared to be rapidly absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract, where the tritium levels were highest, followed by skin, blood, and liver; levels were lowest in fat (adipose tissue). In female HRA/Skh mice which had not been irradiated with UVA (320-400 nm), 84% of the carbon-14 and 58% of the tritium were recovered in the urine and feces within 24 hours of oral administration of 5-(/sup 14/C)8-MOP or (/sup 3/H)8-MOP, respectively. Animals that were exposed to UVA and received (3H)8-MOP excreted approximately 12% less tritium in the urine and feces compared with the animals which received no UVA.

  10. Urinary excretion of copper, zinc and iron with and without D-penicillamine administration in relation to hepatic copper concentration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fieten, H; Hugen, S; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Hendriks, W H; Vernooij, J C M; Bode, P; Watson, A L; Leegwater, P A J; Rothuizen, J

    2013-08-01

    Hereditary copper-associated hepatitis in dogs resembles Wilson's disease, a copper storage disease in humans. Values for urinary copper excretion are well established in the diagnostic protocol of Wilson's disease, whereas in dogs these have not been evaluated. The objectives of this study were to characterize both basal and D-penicillamine induced urinary copper, zinc and iron excretion in dogs in relation to hepatic copper concentration. Beagles, Beagle-Bedlington terrier cross-breeds homozygous for the COMMD1 gene mutation that causes copper toxicosis, and Labrador retrievers with normal or increased hepatic copper concentrations were investigated. The hepatic copper phenotype was determined by histological evaluation of liver biopsies and measurement of the hepatic copper concentration by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Urinary excretion of copper, iron and zinc was measured via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry under basal conditions and after oral administration of a single dose (20mg/kg bodyweight) of the chelator D-penicillamine. There was a rapid increase in urinary excretion of copper and zinc, but not iron after D-penicillamine administration. This increase was not different between dogs with high or normal hepatic copper concentrations. D-penicillamine-induced urinary copper excretion and the copper/creatinine ratio did not correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in the dogs studied, although basal urinary copper/zinc ratios did correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in Labrador retrievers. The latter parameter may be useful in diagnostic and follow-up protocols for copper-associated hepatitis in Labrador retrievers.

  11. Phase II study of irinotecan (CPT-11) administered every 2 weeks as treatment for patients with colorectal cancer resistant to previous treatment with 5-fluorouracil-based therapies: comparison of two different dose schedules (250 and 200 mg/m2) according to toxicity prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Saigi, Eugeni; Salut, Antonieta; Campos, Juan Manuel; Losa, Ferran; Manzano, Hermini; Batiste-Alentorn, Eduard; Acusa, Angels; Vélez de Mendizabal, Edelmira; Guasch, Inmaculada; Antón, Isabel

    2004-10-01

    Our objective was to assess the antitumoral activity and toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) 60-min i.v. infusion every 2 weeks as second-line monotherapy of advanced colorectal cancer. Two doses were studied (250 and 200 mg/m) according to the risk of developing toxicity. Two groups of patients were studied: high-risk group (HR, 200 mg/m, n = 45; Karnofsky score 60-80% and/or the record of prior pelvic irradiation) and low-risk-group (LR, 250 mg/m, n = 51; Karnofsky score >80% and without prior pelvic irradiation). The mean number of cycles per patient was 7: 6.6 (HR group) and 8.3 (LR group). Median RDI was 0.96. The overall response rate was 8.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5-21.2%; HR group] and 15.7% (95% CI 7.0-28.5%; LR group), respectively. The LR group showed two complete responses and a higher percentage of stable disease (56.9 versus 33.3% in HR group). The median survival was 7.1 months (95% CI 5.2-8.9 months, HR group) and 11.7 months (95% CI 8.4-15.1 months, LR group). The median time to disease progression was 3.2 months (95% CI 1.0-5.4 months, HR group) and 5.3 months (95% CI 3.8-6.7 months, LR group). Both CPT-11 treatments were well tolerated. Grade 3/4 toxicity incidence was low, e.g. granulocytopenia (7% of patients in HR group and 9% in LR group) and delayed diarrhea (18% of patients in HR group and 14% in LR group). We conclude that the treatment of patients with the adjusted dose of CPT-11 according to prognostic factors for toxicity resulted in the improved toxicity profile, but showed poorer efficacy outcome. Therefore, the dose reduction in patients with low performance and treated with radiotherapy needs further investigation to provide some new insights on the benefit:risk ratio of such treatment.

  12. Evaluation of a low-dose progestagen as a contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, R; Hayashi, M; Kamouchi, Y; Yamanaka, K

    1971-01-01

    In order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a low-dose progestagen oral contraceptive, 46 women were administered 0.25 mg daily of a synthetic gestagen, R-2453 (17alpha-methyl delta 9-19 norprogesterone) for 1-12 months for a total of 189 cycles. The pill was found to be safe and completely effective with no pregnancies occurring in the study group. The length of the bleeding cycle was found to be prolonged under this treatment, to an average of 40 days . Bleeding duration and amount were generally the same as those before treatment, except in 3 cases where irregular bleeding prompted discontinuance of the pill use. Basal body temperature patterns were measured and found to be atypical biphasic in 17.3% of the cases, high temperature monophasic in 47.2%, and irregular in 34.6%. Routine blood, kidney and liver function tests were normal. Pregnandiol excretion before withdrawal bleeding was low in all but 1 case. Cervical mucus was also low and no crystal formation was observed. In the nidation menstrual stage the endometrial glands were few in number and adenomeres were small in size. In glandular cells, supranuclear vacuoles were found and interstices were coarse and edematous. Histological examinations in the implantation phase showed some alterations but their relationship to the contraceptive mechanism of this pill is not clear. Low-dose progestagens appear to be highly effective contraceptive agents that do not suppress ovulatory activity but their prescription must take careful note of dosage and formulas.

  13. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9-14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9-14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49-1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97-5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54-1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82-3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9-14 years).

  14. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9–14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9–14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49–1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97–5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54–1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82–3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9–14

  15. Excretion of radioactivity following the intraperitoneal administration of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDD, /sup 14/C-DDE and /sup 14/C-DDMU to the rat and Japanese Quail

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Bunyan, P.J.; Huson, L.W.; King, L.J.; Stanley, P.I.

    1981-09-01

    A study in progress to examine the metabolic fate of DDT in birds and mammals is discussed. The first phase of the study, which is reported in this article, has been to establish the rate of excretion of ratioactivity following the intraperitoneal administrations of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDE, /sup 14/C-DDD, and /sup 14/C-DDMU to male rats and male Japanese quail. The mean values from the three animals in each experimental group for the amount of radioactivity excreted daily are given, and it was found that the rats excreted the radioactivity administered as DDT, DDD, and DDE substantially faster than did the quail. DDMU was excreted relatively rapidly and at similar rates. This finding suggests that apparent differences in the rates of excretion of DDT by birds and mammals probably arise from differences in the conversion of DDT to DDD or DDE or in the degradation of these metabolites to DDMU. The Japanese quail differ from the rats in excreting substantial amounts of unchanged DDT, DDE, and DDD, which probably reflects the inability of the Japanese quail to readily metabolise these compounds.

  16. Episodic hypoglycemia with psi-hydroxy fatty acid excretion.

    PubMed

    Colle, E; Mamer, O A; Montgomery, J A; Miller, J D

    1983-02-01

    We present case histories of two young children with episodes of hypoglycemia, elevation of SGOT, low insulin levels, increased urinary excretion of psi-hydroxy fatty acids (5-hydroxyhexanoic, 7-hydroxyoctanoic and 9-hydroxydecanoic), traces of the corresponding psi-ketoacids and elevations of urinary adipic, suberic, and sebacic acids. The ratio of psi-hydroxy fatty acids to 3-hydroxybutyric in the urine of these patients is higher than in patients of similar ages with similar illnesses. These acids persisted while the patients were well. Increased urinary psi-hydroxy fatty acids could be reproduced by a load of medium chain triglycerides without precipitating other clinical symptoms. Three children with hypoglycemia were found not to excrete measurable amounts of these unusual acids while ill. A medium chain triglyceride load in one of these children after recovery failed to elicit psi-hydroxy acid excretion. Small amounts of urinary 5-hydroxyhexanoic acid only were found in two patients with acute Reye's syndrome and in three of five severely ill children with starvation ketonuria. In this last group, no urinary psi-hydroxyacids could be detected after recovery. Normal children do not excrete measurable amounts (less than 1 mg/g creatinine) of these psi-hydroxyacids.

  17. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  18. Increased leukotriene E4 excretion in systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Joseph H

    2010-06-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes such as LTE(4) are produced by mast cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. LTE(4) levels have not been reported in systemic mastocytosis, a disorder with a large increase in mast cell numbers. Urinary LTE(4) from patients referred for symptoms potentially due to mast cell degranulation or systemic mastocytosis was measured by a commercial cysteinyl leukotriene enzyme immunoassay kit. The diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis was established using current World Health Organization criteria. Compared with a control group of patients with various potential mast cell-related symptoms (e.g., "spells"), patients with systemic mastocytosis had a significant (P=.01) increase in urinary LTE(4) excretion, whether expressed as LTE(4) ng/g creatinine or as LTE(4) ng/24h. There was a moderate correlation of LTE(4) ng/24h with excretion of N-methyl histamine and serum tryptase but not with urinary 11beta-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (11beta-PGF(2alpha)) excretion. LTE(4) excretion is increased in patients with systemic mastocytosis and potentially contributes to clinical symptoms.

  19. Renal Regulation of Acid-Base Balance: Ammonia Excretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates changes in ammonia excretion and urine pH that occur in response to metabolic acidosis (induced by ammonium chloride ingestion) or metabolic alkalosis (produced by sodium bicarbonate ingestion). List of materials needed and background information are included. Typical results are provided and discussed.…

  20. Predicting nitrogen excretion in commercial grazing system dairy farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving nitrogen (N) management on dairy farms is best facilitated through management of dairy cow feed N intakes (NI), due to strong associations between NI, feed N use efficiencies (NUE, proportion of NI secreted as milk N) and manure N excretion (Nex). Milk urea N (MUN) has also been used as an...

  1. Endocytotic Uptake of Zoledronic Acid by Tubular Cells May Explain Its Renal Effects in Cancer Patients Receiving High Doses of the Compound

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Anja; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E.; D’Haese, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoledronic acid, a highly potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used for the treatment of pathological bone loss, is excreted unmetabolized via the kidney if not bound to the bone. In cancer patients receiving high doses of the compound renal excretion may be associated with acute tubular necrosis. The question of how zoledronic acid is internalized by renal tubular cells has not been answered until now. In the current work, using a primary human tubular cell culture system, the pathway of cellular uptake of zoledronic acid (fluorescently/radiolabeled) and its cytotoxicity were investigated. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that this primary cell culture model consistently mimics the physiological characteristics of molecular uptake/transport of the epithelium in vivo. Zoledronic acid was found to be taken up by tubular cells via fluid-phase-endocytosis (from apical and basolateral side) as evidenced by its co-localization with dextran. Cellular uptake and the resulting intracellular level was twice as high from the apical side compared to the basolateral side. Furthermore, the intracellular zoledronic acid level was found to be dependent on the administered concentration and not saturable. Cytotoxic effects however, were only seen at higher administration doses and/or after longer incubation times. Although zoledronic acid is taken up by tubular cells, no net tubular transport could be measured. It is concluded that fluid-phase-endocytosis of zoledronic acid and cellular accumulation at high doses may be responsible for the acute tubular necrosis observed in some cancer patients receiving high doses of the compound. PMID:25756736

  2. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  3. Increased Renal Solute Excretion in Rats Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moore, A. L.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Following space flight a diuresis, due to an increase in free water clearance, has been suggested in humans. To assess the effects of space flight on renal function, rats were flown in space for 14 days. Rats were divided into three groups; vivarium controls (V;n=6; housed 2/shoe box cage), flight controls (FC;n=6; group housed in a flight cage), and flight animals (F;n=6). Upon landing all animals were placed into individual metabolic cages. Urine was collected daily for 7 days and every other day for 14 days. Urine output was increased (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) following flight for 3 days. On postflight day 1, flow rates were, V=6.8 plus or minus 0.9, FC=8.711.8 and F=16.6 plus or minus 2.7 microliter/min. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate (V=7.9 plus or minus 0.9, FC=6.1 plus or minus 0.7 and F=13.5 plus or minus 0.7 uOsm/min). Creatinine excretion rate was increased over the first two postflight days. In the absence of changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, or K+ (samples obtained immediately post flight from similar rats compared to Day 14), GFR was increased following space flight. The increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and decreased reabsorption. Osmotic clearance was increased (V=28, FC=27 and F=51 microliter/min), while free water clearance was decreased post flight (V=-21,FC=-18 and F=-34 microliter/min). In rats, the postflight diuresis is the result of an increase in solute (osmotic) excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  4. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  5. Short wavelength light administered just prior to waking: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Kripke, Daniel F; Elliott, Jeffrey; Cole, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Bright light in the blue-green range, administered in the early morning hours (prior to waking) may be particularly effective in shifting circadian rhythms and may increase gonadotropin production. Accordingly, we tested the feasibility and utility of a mask that emits bright blue/green light (compared to a similar mask that emitted a dim red light) towards the end of sleep in a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study. The study included a 3-day baseline period, immediately followed by a 12-day intervention period. Subjects were 30 healthy young men with minimal-mild depression. The bright light masks were well-tolerated and demonstrated adequate safety and feasibility. Following the intervention, those who wore the bright light mask demonstrated altered sleep timing suggestive of an earlier sleep period, and excreted a slight increase in follicle-stimulating hormone. Overall, light masks may prove useful in future studies of bright light therapy. PMID:23275686

  6. Amorphous Silica Based Nanomedicine with Safe Carrier Excretion and Enhanced Drug Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Silu

    switch, led to not only high but also stable drug concentration in cytosol within a sustained period. This resulted in enhanced drug efficacy, which is especially manifested in multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells, due to the fact that the NP-carrier drug can efficiently bypass the efflux mechanisms and increase drug availability. Together with its feature of spontaneous carrier decomposition and safe excretion, this type of nanomedicine's high drug efficacy highlights its potential for low dose anticancer drug treatment and reduced adverse effect to biological system, holding great promise for clinical translation. The enhanced drug efficacy by employing the self-decomposable silica nanocarrier is also demonstrated in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The loose and fragmentable features of the self-decomposable SiO2-photosensitizer (PS) NPs promoted the outdiffusion of the generated ROS, which resulted in a higher efficacy than that of dense SiO2-PS NPs. On the other hand, we also explored another nanocarrier configuration of Au nanorods decorated SiO2 NP, with PS drug embedded into dense SiO2 matrix. A different mechanism of drug efficacy enhancement was presented as the Au's surface plasmon resonance enhanced the ROS production. Although the drug efficacy of such SiO2(PS)-Au NPs was similar to that of self-decomposable SiO2-PS NPs, their potential for clinical applications was limited without the feature of safe carrier excretion. In summary, the self-decomposable SiO2 based NP developed is a most promising system to serve as safe and effective carriers for drugs. Together with the known biocompatibility of silica, the feature of controllable drug release and simultaneous carrier decomposition achieved in the self-decomposable SiO2-drug NPs make it ideal for a wide range of therapeutic applications.

  7. Studies on Nonoxynol-9. II. Intravaginal absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chvapil, M; Eskelson, C D; Stiffel, V; Owen, J A; Droegemueller, W

    1980-09-01

    Some pharmacological aspects of Igepal CO-630, used by some pharmaceutical companies as the source of nonylphenoxypoly (ethyleneoxy) ethanol (Nonoxynol-9, N-9) in various spermicidal formulations, were studied. It was found that Igepal CO-630 contains at least 13 components, 70% having molecular weights near that of N-9. After intravaginal administration, the detergent is rapidly and quantitatively absorbed through the vaginal wall into the systemic circulation. The rate of vaginal absorption of N-9 depends on the vehicle in which the detergent is carried. Once in the blood, N-9 is excreted by liver-bile-feces and the kidney-urine routes, the first being more effective in rats, the latter in rabbits. Following intravaginal or intraperitoneal injection of radioactive N-9, the highest content of radioactivity was found in the liver and kidney. The detergent was detected in the milk of lactating rats and the serum of their pups within two hours after the intravaginal dose.

  8. Excretion of stable isotopes in man: A valuable source of information on trace metal kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennessey, P.V.; Miller, L.V.; Westcott, J.E.; Kindstrand, L.; Hambidge, K.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The analysis of individual fecal samples collected for at least ten days following an oral dose of {sup 70}Zn provides data on transit time, absorption and the excretion of isotope that has been absorbed and then secreted back into the lumen of the intestine. The analysis of data from more than 80 human studies where enriched Zn stable isotopes were given orally has provided a valuable data base on Zn kinetics. A plot of enrichment in the fecal samples as a function of time reveals the average time of maximum appearance as well as the time limit needed for elimination of unabsorbed isotope. A plot of cumulative enrichment as a function of time reveals information on both absorption and secretion rate of absorbed isotope. This data base provides investigators with new information that they can use to optimize their data collection schemes and serves as a model for the study of other trace metals.

  9. A comparison of the effects of glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis on urinary calcium and magnesium excretion in man

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Edward J.; Piering, Walter F.

    1970-01-01

    Both glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis have been reported to augment urinary calcium (UCa V) and magnesium (UMg V) excretion. Both also cause acidification of the urine and an increase in renal acid excretion. To examine whether a common mechanism of action was involved, the effects of glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis on UCa V and UMg V were tested in the same subjects. Glucose ingestion caused significant increases in both UCa V and UMg V. During stable NH4Cl acidosis, UCa V increased significantly, while UMg V was unaffected. When a glucose load was given during acidosis, the separate effects of acidosis and glucose on UCa V were additive, whereas UMg V increased less than observed during normal acid-base balance. Although renal acid excretion increased and the urine was acidified after glucose in the normal steady state, when glucose was administered during NH4Cl acidosis urine pH rose and there was no change in renal acid excretion. We concluded that NH4Cl acidosis and glucose ingestion reduce the renal tubular reabsorption of magnesium and (or) calcium, but they act through separate mechanisms. PMID:5432375

  10. Evaluation of differential disaccharide excretion in urine for non-invasive investigation of altered intestinal disaccharidase activity caused by alpha-glucosidase inhibition, primary hypolactasia, and coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Batt, R; Catt, S; Macpherson, A; Maxton, D; Menzies, I S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The reliability of a quantitative method for the non-invasive assessment of intestinal disaccharide hydrolysis was assessed. METHODS: Differential excretion of intact disaccharide, expressed as ratios of lactulose to appropriate hydrolysable disaccharides in urine collected following combined ingestion, has been investigated in healthy volunteers with drug induced alpha-glucosidase inhibition, in subjects with primary hypolactasia, and patients with coeliac disease. RESULTS: Oral administration of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor 'Acarbose' (BAY g 5421, 200 mg) together with sucrose and lactulose increased the urinary sucrose/lactulose excretion ratios (% dose/10 h) fivefold. The effect was quantitatively reproducible, a higher dose of 'Acarbose' (500 mg) increasing the excretion ratio to about 1.0 indicating complete inhibition of intestinal sucrase activity. The suitability of the method for measuring differences in dose/response and duration of action was assessed by comparing three different alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (BAY g 5421, BAY m 1099, and BAY o 1248) and found to be satisfactory. Subjects with primary adult hypolactasia had urine lactose/lactulose excretion ratios raised to values indicating reduced rather than complete absence of lactase activity whereas sucrose/lactulose ratios were not significantly affected. 'Whole' intestinal disaccharidase activity assessed by this method demonstrated impairment of lactase, sucrase, and isomaltase in eight, one, and seven, respectively, of 20 patients with coeliac disease. By contrast in vitro assay of jejunal biopsy tissue indicated pan-disaccharidase deficiency in all but five of these patients. This shows the importance of distinguishing between 'local' and 'whole' intestinal performance. CONCLUSIONS: Differential urinary excretion of ingested disaccharides provides a reliable, quantitative, and non-invasive technique for assessing profiles of intestinal disaccharidase activity. PMID:8949640

  11. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered...

  16. 40 CFR 282.74 - Mississippi State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mississippi State-Administered Program... Mississippi State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Mississippi is approved to administer and enforce an... administered by the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42...

  17. 40 CFR 282.74 - Mississippi State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mississippi State-Administered Program... Mississippi State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Mississippi is approved to administer and enforce an... administered by the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42...

  18. 40 CFR 282.74 - Mississippi State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mississippi State-Administered Program... Mississippi State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Mississippi is approved to administer and enforce an... administered by the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42...

  19. 40 CFR 282.74 - Mississippi State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mississippi State-Administered Program... Mississippi State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Mississippi is approved to administer and enforce an... administered by the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42...

  20. 40 CFR 282.74 - Mississippi State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mississippi State-Administered Program... Mississippi State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Mississippi is approved to administer and enforce an... administered by the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42...

  1. Antinociceptive profiles and mechanisms of orally administered coumarin in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Lim, Su-Min; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profiles of coumarin were examined in ICR mice. Coumarin administered orally (from 1 to 10 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner as measured in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Duration of antinociceptive action of coumarin maintained at least for 60 min. But, the cumulative response time of nociceptive behaviors induced by a subcutaneous (s.c.) formalin injection, intrathecal (i.t.) substance P (0.7 µg) or glutamate (20 µg) injection was not affected by coumarin. In addition, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration with coumarin (10-40 µg) attenuated acetic acid-induced writhing response in a dose dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with naloxone (5 µg) reversed the decreased acetic acid-induced writhing response. However, methysergide (a 5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Our results suggest that coumarin exerts a selective antinociceptive property in the acetic acid-induced visceral-derived pain model. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of coumarin may be mediated by activation of central opioid receptors, but not serotonergic and adrenergic receptors.

  2. Comparison of Four Commercial One-Dose Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccines Administered to Pigs Challenged with PCV2 and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus at 17 Weeks Postvaccination To Control Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex under Korean Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changhoon; Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Under Korean field conditions, coinfection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is most commonly observed in porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Despite the wide use of PCV2 vaccination, PRDC remains a serious respiratory problem. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of 4 one-dose PCV2 vaccines on 3-week-old pigs with an experimental PCV2-PRRSV challenge at 17 weeks postvaccination. Regardless of which commercial PCV2 vaccine was used, the vaccination of piglets at 3 weeks of age was efficacious against cochallenge of PCV2 and PRRSV, on the basis of growth performance and PCV2-associated lesions. However, the inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 and the PCV2 vaccines induced higher PCV2-specific neutralizing antibody (NA) titers and PCV2-specific gamma interferon-secreting cells and lower PCV2 viremia levels than the two PCV2 subunit vaccines. The vaccination of piglets against PCV2 at 3 weeks of age was effective in reducing PCV2 viremia and PCV2-associated lesions during the finishing period, which is an age at which pigs are frequently affected by PRDC caused by coinfection with PCV2 and PRRSV under Korean field conditions. PMID:24403524

  3. [Effect of dietary fiber on fecal excretion and liver distribution of PCDF in rats].

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Matsueda, T; Iida, T

    1995-05-01

    Forty male rats (126 g body weight) consisting of four rats a group were housed and rats of each group were given a treatment diets containing cellulose, rice-bran fiber, spinach fiber, burdock fiber, cabbage fiber, soybean fiber, Japanese-radish fiber, carrot fiber and corn fiber for five days. The remaining four rats were fed a non-fiber diet as controls. The animals were orally administered with 0.5 ml of the rice-bran oil used by Yusho patients and kept on the same diets for five days. The rice-bran oil was contaminated with 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2, 3, 7, 8-T4CDF, 458.7 ng/ml), 2, 3, 4, 7, 8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (2, 3, 4, 7, 8-P5CDF, 802.4 ng/ml) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8-hexachlorodibenzofuran (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8-H6CDF, 752.3 ng/ml). PCDF in feces and liver were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fecal excretion of 2, 3, 7, 8-T4CDF in the group fed rice-bran fiber and spinach fiber was significantly (p < 0.01) stimulated 11.3 and 6.8 times, respectively, as compared with controls. Moreover, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8-P5CDF and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8-H6CDF were excreted in stool at the rate of 4.1 and 3.4 times, respectively and 2.1 and 2.2 times, respectively, as compared with controls. These results suggest that administration of dietary fiber is useful for a new approach to therapy of Yusho patients.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, metabolism and excretion of δ-viniferin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ping; Lei, Yinping; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Chen; Jin, Bo; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    A highly rapid and sensitive liquid chromatographic–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC–ESI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of trans-δ-viniferin (Rs-1) in rat plasma, urine and feces. All biological samples were prepared by liquid–liquid extraction and hesperetin was included as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a shim-pack XR-ODS column using a gradient mobile phase. MS/MS detection was performed by negative ion electrospray ionization. The method was sensitive with a lower limit of quantification of 1.42 ng/mL and linear over the range of 1.42–2172 ng/mL in all matrices. The method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, metabolism, and excretion of Rs-1 in rats following a single oral or intravenous dose. Two metabolites, Rs-1 glucuronide and Rs-1 sulfate, were detected in plasma and in urine after administration of Rs-1. The absolute oral bioavailability of Rs-1 was 2.3%, and the total absorption rose to 31.5% with addition of its glucuronide and sulfate metabolites. Only 0.09% of the gavaged dose, including Rs-1 and metabolites, was excreted in the urine, while 60.3% was found in the feces in unchanged form. The results indicate that both poor absorption and extensive metabolism were the important factors that led to the poor bioavailability of Rs-1, which can provide a basis for further studies on structural modification and dosage form design. PMID:27175336

  5. Intake and urinary excretion of sodium chloride under varying conditions of effort and environment heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, E.; Adar, R.; Tennenbaum, J.; Kesten, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intake and urinary excretion of sodium were investigated in a group of young, healthy and acclimated men. The sodium excretions of workers and of machinists in the engine rooms of a ship were also investigated.

  6. Blood Clearance, Distribution, Transformation, Excretion, and Toxicity of Near-Infrared Quantum Dots Ag2Se in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huan; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Yang, Yi-Fan; Ke, Da-Ming; Liu, Jia-Hui; Chen, Xing; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yuanfang

    2016-07-20

    As a novel fluorescent probe in the second near-infrared window, Ag2Se quantum dots (QDs) exhibit great prospect in in vivo imaging due to their maximal penetration depth and negligible background. However, the in vivo behavior and toxicity of Ag2Se QDs still largely remain unknown, which severely hinders their wide-ranging biomedical applications. Herein, we systematically studied the blood clearance, distribution, transformation, excretion, and toxicity of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Ag2Se QDs in mice after intravenous administration with a high dose of 8 μmol/kg body weight. QDs are quickly cleared from the blood with a circulation half-life of 0.4 h. QDs mainly accumulate in liver and spleen and are remarkably transformed into Ag and Se within 1 week. Ag is excreted from the body readily through both feces and urine, whereas Se is excreted hardly. The toxicological evaluations demonstrate that there is no overt acute toxicity of Ag2Se QDs to mice. Moreover, in regard to the in vivo stability problem of Ag2Se QDs, the biotransformation and its related metabolism are intensively discussed, and some promising coating means for Ag2Se QDs to avert transformation are proposed as well. Our work lays a solid foundation for safe applications of Ag2Se QDs in bioimaging in the future.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin after oral administration of single and repeat doses in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin in healthy male subjects following single oral administration of doses ranging from 200 to 1200 mg, and following repeated oral administration of 400 and 800 mg doses are reported. Plasma levels of grepafloxacin reached a peak within 2 hours (on average) following drug administration and then declined bi-exponentially with concentrations being detectable (> 5 micrograms/L) in the plasma for at least up to 72 hours postdose. The high values for the apparent volume of distribution (5 to 8 L/kg) suggested extensive distribution of grepafloxacin in the tissues. Only a small percentage of the administered dose (ranging from 6% to 9.5%) was recovered in the urine as unchanged grepafloxacin, suggesting that metabolism, rather than urinary excretion, is the major elimination route. The half-life of grepafloxacin was about 12 hours after single doses and about 15 hours after repeat doses. The trough levels increased significantly over the first 3 days of repeat administration; thereafter, the changes were small, with steady-state being reached by the fifth day. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24 h) values observed on days 7 and 14 of repeat administration, at each dose level, were similar, suggesting that steady-state is maintained. The area values increased more than proportionally after administration of increasing single and repeat doses, suggesting nonlinear kinetics. The elimination half-life and renal clearance did not change with increasing doses. Saturation in the metabolism of grepafloxacin and possibly in the distribution into a peripheral compartment, as suggested by a decrease in the total plasma clearance and in the apparent volume of distribution, could be the origin of the nonlinear kinetics. However, this deviation from linearity is unlikely to be of clinical significance, since it was very small over the recommended range of therapeutic doses (400 to 600 mg once daily). Compared with other quinolones

  8. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Dewji, S.; Bellamy, M.; Hertel, N.; ...

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to estimate dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered 131I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with 131I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensivemore » effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the 131I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of 131I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after 131I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  9. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, S. Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K.; Hertel, N.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  10. Dosimetry and toxicity of Samarium-153-EDTMP administered for bone pain due to skeletal metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bayouth, J.E.; Macey, D.J.; Kasi, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Palliation of bone pain in patients with cancer metastatic to bone is being evaluated in several cancer centers by the administration of the bone-seeking phosphonate ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP) chelated with the beta particle-emitting radionuclide {sup 153}Sm. In this study {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP was intravenously injected into 19 patients over a 1-min period. Patients received up to four injections of 18.5 MBq (0.5 mCi) or 37 MBq (1.0mCi) per kilogram of body weight. Skeletal retention was calculated from urinary excretion. No uptake of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP in nonskeletal tissues was observed in whole-body gamma camera images. The mean skeletal uptake for all patients was 54% {plus_minus} 16% of the injected dose (%ID). This resulted in the bone marrow receiving 89 cGy/GBq {plus_minus} 27 cGy/GBq (3.28 cGy/mCi {plus_minus} 0.99 cGy/mCi), with calculated marrow doses ranging from 27 cGy to 338 cGy. For each patient, the estimated radiation absorbed dose to the marrow was correlated to the percent decrease in platelet number, ranging from 7.4% to 78.9%. Since the deviation of uptake between the four injections for a given patient (7.6% ID) was less than the deviation for all patients (16% ID), the initial dose may be used to estimate the skeletal uptake for the remaining doses. These radiation dose estimates permit patients at risk to be identified prior to reaching myelotoxicity and develop dose-response models. Thirteen patients (68%) reported significant pain relief from this radionuclide therapy. Bone pain appears to be alleviated by {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP with limited red marrow doses and no toxic effects in other organs. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 figs.

  11. N-Acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) a further product of human metabolism of acrylamide: comparison with the simultaneously excreted other mercaptuic acids.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Eva C; Boettcher, Melanie I; Bolt, Hermann M; Drexler, Hans; Angerer, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    The N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L: -cysteine (iso-GAMA) could be identified as a further human metabolite of acrylamide. In this study, we report the excretion of d(3)-iso-GAMA in human urine after single oral administration of deuterium labelled acrylamide (d(3)-AA). One healthy male volunteer ingested a dose of about 1 mg d(3)-AA which is equivalent to a dose of 13 microg/kg bodyweight. Over a period of 46 h the urine was collected and the d(3)-iso-GAMA levels analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The excretion of iso-GAMA begins five hours after application. It rises to a maximum concentration (c (max)) of 43 microg/l which was quantified in the urine excreted after 22 h (t (max)). The excretion pattern is parallel to that of the major oxidative metabolite N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Total recovery of iso-GAMA was about 1% of the applied dose. Together with N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L: -cysteine (AAMA) and GAMA, 57% of the applied dose is eliminated as mercapturic acids. The elimination kinetics of the three mercapturic acids of AA are compared. We show that dietary doses of acrylamide (AA) cause an overload of detoxification via AAMA and lead to the formation of carcinogenic glycidamide (GA) in the human body.

  12. Distribution, metabolism and excretion of a synthetic androgen 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, a potential male-contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Pramod Vishwanath; Arumugam, Ramamani; Willman, Mark; Ge, Ren-Shan; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Kumar, Narender

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic androgen 7alpha-Methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) has a potential for therapeutic use in 'androgen replacement therapy' for hypogonadal men or as a hormonal male-contraceptive in normal men. Its tissue distribution, excretion and metabolic enzyme(s) have not been reported. Therefore, the present study tested the distribution and excretion of MENT in Sprague-Dawley rats castrated 24h prior to the injection of tritium-labeled MENT ((3)H-MENT). Rats were euthanized at different time intervals after dosing, and the amount of radioactivity in various tissues/organs was measured following combustion in a Packard oxidizer. The radioactivity (% injected dose) was highest in the duodenal contents in the first 30min of injection. Specific uptake of the steroid was observed in target tissues such as ventral prostate and seminal vesicles at 6h, while in other tissues radioactivity equilibrated with blood. Liver and duodenum maintained high radioactivity throughout, as these organs were actively involved in the metabolism and excretion of most drugs. The excretion of (3)H-MENT was investigated after subcutaneous injection of (3)H-MENT into male rats housed in metabolic cages. Urine and feces were collected at different time intervals (up to 72h) following injection. Results showed that the radioactivity was excreted via feces and urine in equal amounts by 30h. Aiming to identify enzyme(s) involved in the MENT metabolism, we performed in vitro metabolism of (3)H-MENT using rat and human liver microsomes, cytosol and recombinant cytochrome P(450) (CYP) isozymes. The metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three putative metabolites (in accordance with the report of Agarwal and Monder [Agarwal AK, Monder C. In vitro metabolism of 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone by rat liver, prostate, and epididymis. Endocrinology 1988;123:2187-93]), [i] 3-hydroxylated MENT by both rat and human liver cytosol; [ii] 16alpha-hydroxylated MENT (a polar metabolite

  13. Toxicokinetics of the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane gamma: effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Szabo, David T; Diliberto, Janet J; Hakk, Heldur; Huwe, Janice K; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-10-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane-gamma (γ-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ), comprise the mixture. Despite the γ-diastereoisomer being the major diastereoisomer in the mixture and environmental samples, the α-diastereoisomer predominates human tissue and wildlife. This study was conducted to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion parameters of γ-HBCD with respect to dose and time following a single acute exposure and repeated exposure in adult female C57BL/6 mice. Results suggest that 85% of the administered dose (3 mg/kg) was absorbed after po exposure. Disposition was dose independent and did not significantly change after 10 days of exposure. Liver was the major depot (< 0.3% of dose) 4 days after treatment followed by blood, fat, and then brain. γ-HBCD was rapidly metabolized and eliminated in the urine and feces. For the first time, in vivo stereoisomerization was observed of the γ-diastereoisomer to the β-diastereoisomer in liver and brain tissues and to the α- and β-diastereoisomer in fat and feces. Polar metabolites in the blood and urine were a major factor in determining the initial whole-body half-life (1 day) after a single po exposure. Elimination, both whole-body and from individual tissues, was biphasic. Initial half-lives were approximately 1 day, whereas terminal half-lives were up to 4 days, suggesting limited potential for γ-diastereoisomer bioaccumulation. The toxicokinetic behavior reported here has important implications for the extrapolation of toxicological studies of the commercial HBCD mixture to the assessment of risk.

  14. Early Biochemical Effects of an Organic Mercury Fungicide on Infants: ``Dose Makes the Poison''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotelli, Carlos A.; Astolfi, Emilio; Cox, Christopher; Cernichiari, Elsa; Clarkson, Thomas W.

    1985-02-01

    Phenylmercury absorbed through the skin from contaminated diapers affected urinary excretion in infants in Buenos Aires. The effects were reversible and quantitatively related to the concentration of urinary mercury. Excretion of γ -glutamyl transpeptidase, an enzyme in the brush borders of renal tubular cells, increased in a dose-dependent manner when mercury excretion exceeded a ``threshold'' value. Urine volume also increased but at a higher threshold with respect to mercury. The results support the threshold concept of the systemic toxicity of metals. γ -Glutamyl transpeptidase is a useful and sensitive marker for preclinical effects of toxic metals.

  15. Copper binding components of blood plasma and organs, and their responses to influx of large doses of 65Cu, in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Anthony; Alonzo, Erin; Sauble, Eric; Chu, Yu Ling; Linder, Maria C.; Sato, Dee S.; Mason, Andrew Z.

    2008-01-01

    To establish for the first time how mice might differ from rats and humans in terms of copper transport, excretion, and copper binding proteins, plasma and organ cytosols from adult female C57CL6 mice were fractionated and analyzed by directly coupled size exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS, before and after i.p. injection of large doses of 65Cu. Plasma from untreated mice had different proportions of Cu associated with transcuprein/macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin and albumin than in humans and rats, and two previously undetected copper peaks (Mr 700k and 15k) were observed. Cytosols had Cu peaks seen previously in rat liver (Mr >1000k, 45k and 11k) plus one of 110kDa. 65Cu (141 μg) administered over 14h, initially loaded plasma albumin and mainly entered liver and kidney (especially 28kDa and 11kDa components). Components of other organs were less, but still significantly enriched. 63Cu/65Cu ratios returned almost to normal by 14d, indicating a robust system for excreting excess copper. We conclude that there are significant differences but also strong similarities in copper metabolism between mice, rats and humans; that the liver is able to buffer enormous changes in copper status; and that a large number of mammalian copper proteins remain to be identified. PMID:18357416

  16. Nitrogen balance and mineral excretion in growing male pigs injected with a human growth hormone-releasing factor analog.

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, P; Abribat, T; Brazeau, P; Lapierre, H

    1998-01-01

    A human growth hormone-releasing factor analog ([Desamino-Tyr1,D-Ala2,Ala15] hGRF(1-29) NH2) has been reported to reduce feed intake and increase growth and feed efficiency in a dose-dependent manner in growing pigs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of this analog on nitrogen (N) balance and mineral excretion. Fifteen castrated male Yorkshire x Landrace pigs (45.9 +/- 1.4 kg) were randomly allotted to 2 groups: control (saline, n = 7) and GRF (6.66 micrograms/kg sc, TID, n = 8). The animals were injected for 20 consecutive days: feces and urine were collected during the last 10 d of injection. The animals had free access to water and food until satiety (approximately 15 min) at 07:00, 11:00, 15:00, 19:00, 23:00 and 07:00 h. The diet consisted of a hog fattening ration (18.0% crude protein). Blood samples were collected on the last day of the study by venipuncture. This analog increased (P < 0.05) insulin-like growth factor-1 and glucose serum concentrations and decreased (P < 0.05) serum urea nitrogen concentration and feed intake. The GRF-treated animals ingested less N, excreted less N in urine and feces to retain a similar amount of N than controls. The apparent coefficient of digestibility of the N has been slightly increased (P < 0.05) by GRF. Urinary excretion of P, K, and Cl decreased (P < 0.01) with GRF treatment. In conclusion, this GRF analog increased N digestibility and retention relative to N ingestion and reduced urinary N, P, K, and Cl excretion. PMID:9442933

  17. A single dose mass balance study of the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449) in humans using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graham, Richard A; Lum, Bert L; Morrison, Glenn; Chang, Ilsung; Jorga, Karin; Dean, Brian; Shin, Young G; Yue, Qin; Mulder, Teresa; Malhi, Vikram; Xie, Minli; Low, Jennifer A; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2011-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a small-molecule Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, was well tolerated in patients with solid tumors and showed promising efficacy in advanced basal cell carcinoma in a Phase I trial. The purpose of the study presented here was to determine routes of elimination and the extent of vismodegib metabolism, including assessment and identification of metabolites in plasma, urine, and feces. Six healthy female subjects of nonchildbearing potential were enrolled; each received a single 30-ml oral suspension containing 150 mg of vismodegib with 6.5 μg of [(14)C]vismodegib to yield a radioactivity dose of approximately 37 kBq (1000 nCi). Plasma, urine, and feces samples were collected over 56 days to permit sample collection for up to 5 elimination half-lives. Nonradioactive vismodegib was measured in plasma using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry, and total radioactivity in plasma, urine, and feces was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Vismodegib was slowly eliminated by a combination of metabolism and excretion of parent drug, most of which was recovered in feces. The estimated excretion of the administered dose was 86.6% on average, with 82.2 and 4.43% recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Vismodegib was predominant in plasma, with concentrations representing >98% of the total circulating drug-related components. Metabolic pathways of vismodegib in humans included oxidation, glucuronidation, and uncommon pyridine ring cleavage. We conclude that vismodegib and any associated metabolic products are mainly eliminated through feces after oral administration in healthy volunteers.

  18. Efficient production of ectoine using ectoine-excreting strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-hua; Lang, Ya-jun; Nagata, Shinichi

    2009-07-01

    Halophilic bacteria strain Halomonas salina DSM 5928 was found to excrete ectoine, suggesting its potential in the development of a new method of ectoine production. We performed HPLC and LC-MS analyses that showed that Halomonas salina DSM 5928 excreted ectoine under constant extracellular osmolarity. Medium adopting monosodium glutamate as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen was beneficial for ectoine synthesis. The total concentration of ectoine was not affected by NaCl concentration in the range 0.5-2 mol l(-1). The total concentration of ectoine and productivity in a 10-l fermentor with 0.5 mol l(-1) NaCl were 6.9 g l(-1) and 7.9 g l(-1) d(-1), respectively. These findings show that Halomonas salina DSM 5928 efficiently produces ectoine at relatively low NaCl concentration. This research also indicates the potential application of free or immobilized cells for continuous culture to produce ectoine.

  19. Urinary selenium excretion in patients with cervical uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, M; Gaudry, A; Revel, G; Martínez, T; Cabrera, L

    2001-02-01

    In this work, we report on a relationship between urinary selenium and the development of cervical uterine cancer. A simple chemical method was developed to concentrate trace amounts of selenium from relatively large urine samples by use of small activated carbon filters. When these filters are irradiated with thermal neutrons, selenium can be determined either by 77mSe (t1/2 = 17.5 s) or 75Se (t1/2 = 120 d). In this article, we report the results for 82 urine samples from women with cervical uterine cancer in several stages of development and from healthy controls. These results show a statistically significant increase of selenium excretion in cancer patients as compared to controls. Urinary selenium excretion is highest for patients in the intermediate stages of the disease.

  20. Altered amino acid excretion in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Evans, Craig; Dunstan, R Hugh; Rothkirch, Tony; Roberts, Tim K; Reichelt, Karl L; Cosford, Robyn; Deed, Gary; Ellis, Libby B; Sparkes, Diane L

    2008-02-01

    Autism is a complex and life-long behavioural disorder of unknown aetiology. Recent reports have indicated the involvement of digestive tract dysfunction and possible complications from inadequate nutrition. In this study, 34 autistic children (12 untreated and 22 receiving therapeutic treatments related to digestive function and nutritional uptake) and 29 control subjects (all 5-15 years of age) were investigated to determine whether there were any anomalies in the urinary excretion of amino acids, glucose, sucrose, arabinose and tartaric acid using GC/FID and GC/MS analysis techniques. Significantly lower relative urinary levels of essential amino acids were revealed for both the untreated (mean +/- SEM, 32.53 +/- 3.09%) and treated (31.98 +/- 2.87%) autistic children compared with the controls (37.87 +/- 1.50%). There were no significant differences in measured excretions of sugars or tartaric acid. It was concluded that the untreated autistic children had evidence of altered metabolic homeostasis.

  1. III. Quantitative aspects of phosphorus excretion in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bravo, David; Sauvant, Daniel; Bogaert, Catherine; Meschy, François

    2003-01-01

    Ruminant phosphorus excretion and metabolism were studied through a database. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is the main pathway of phosphorus excretion and averages 0.85 of total faecal phosphorus. The remaining 0.15 is unabsorbed dietary phosphorus. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is mainly unabsorbed phosphorus, with saliva being the major source, and is correlated to factors influencing saliva secretion (DM intake, physical dietary characteristics and dietary phosphorus content). Another source of faecal endogenous phosphorus is rumen microbial phosphorus that escaped solubilisation during post-rumen digestion. All factors stimulating microbial growth would increase phosphorus uptake by the rumen microbes and consequently the faecal endogenous phosphorus. Understanding the determinants of faecal endogenous phosphorus flow will help to precise the determination of net phosphorus requirements for maintenance. The role of plasma phosphorus in urinary phosphorus loss is discussed.

  2. Results of a quality assurance exercise for urinary glycosaminoglycan excretion.

    PubMed

    Brimble, A; Pennock, C; Stone, J

    1990-03-01

    Urine samples collected from four patients with a mucopolysaccharide storage disease (MPS) and two non-MPS patients were distributed to up to 33 laboratories as a test of their ability to detect abnormal glycosaminoglycan excretion. Seven national reference laboratories made a correct diagnostic assignment to all samples analysed. Qualitative turbidity and spot tests were shown to be unreliable. Failure to identify the excretion pattern occurred when reliance was placed on one-dimensional electrophoresis or thin layer chromatography as the sole method for glycosaminoglycan identification. Two-dimensional electrophoresis appeared to be the method of choice provided that staff had adequate experience in interpretation. Clinically unacceptable delays in analysis were common, with 80% of laboratories taking longer than 10 days to issue a report.

  3. A Micropuncture Study of Potassium Excretion by the Remnant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Norman; Aynedjian, Hagop S.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of enhanced potassium excretion by the remaining nephrons of the remnant kidney, micropuncture and clearance experiments were carried out in rats after surgical ablation of 3/4 of the total renal mass. The potassium intake in all animals was approximately 5 meq/day. Animals were studied 24 h and 10-14 days after 3/4 nephrectomy. Balance measurements in the chronic animals before micropuncture study indicated that 24 h K+ excretion by the remnant kidney was equal to that of the two kidneys before ablation of renal mass. Measurements of distal tubular inulin and potassium concentrations revealed progressive reabsorption of potassium in this segment of the nephron in both the 24-h and chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats, as well as in normal control rats. A large increase in tubular fluid potassium content occurred between the end of the distal tubule and the final urine in the 3/4-nephrectomized rats, but not in the normal controls. These observations suggest that the segment of the nephron responsible for enhanced potassium excretion by remaining nephrons was the collecting duct. In additional experiments, potassium was completely eliminated from the diet of chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats before micropuncture study. In these animals, no addition of K+ occurred beyond the distal tubules. Normal rats infused with 0.15 M KCl to acutely elevate serum K+ concentration, demonstrated reabsorption of K+ in the distal tubule and a large addition of K+ to the urine beyond the distal tubule. We conclude that the collecting duct is the major site of regulation of urinary potassium excretion in normal rats and is responsible for the adaptation to nephron loss by the remnant kidney. PMID:4703232

  4. Steroid hormone excretion is enhanced by sucrose feeding to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, T.C.; Hsu, H.; Saunders, J.P.; Kim, S.S.; Given-Proctor, J.; Ahrens, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    The hypothesis tested was that feeding rats sucrose rather than invert sugar (50:50 mixture of glucose and fructose) or cornstarch would result in a more rapid excretion of intravenously injected 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone or 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol. The three carbohydrate sources provided 45% of dietary energy when fed, respectively, to one of three groups of 10 male, Sprague Dawley rats. After 4 or 8 weeks of ad lib feeding of the three diets 5 ..mu..CI of /sup 3/H-labeled hormones were injected intravenously and % recovery in urine and feces was measured for 4 days by liquid scintillation counting. Nearly 90% of the /sup 3/H injected as 1,2-/sup 3/H aldosterone was recovered over 4 days in the excreta of the sucrose fed rats. This recovery of /sup 3/H from aldosterone was significantly greater (P < 0.01) than when invert sugar (65%) or cornstarch (60%) were fed. The recovery of /sup 3/H from intravenously injected 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H cortisol followed a similar pattern. The authors anticipate that the excretion of all metabolic end products and xenobiotics excreted as glucuronides would be enhanced by sucrose feeding. Oxocarbonium ions from the glucose portion of sucrose digestion in the mammalian small intestine are thought to compete with oxocarbonium ions from the glucuronic acid portion of glucuronide hydrolysis. Such competition may slow glucuronide hydrolysis and promote glucuronide excretion, including the glucuronides derived from aldosterone and cortisol.

  5. Mechanism of Impaired Water Excretion in the Hypothyroid Rat

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouel, Dimitrios S.; Lindheimer, Marshall D.; Katz, Adrian I.

    1974-01-01

    The ability to excrete an oral water load and the renal diluting mechanism were studied in hypothyroid rats and in age-matched euthyroid controls. Hypothyroid animals excreted a significantly smaller fraction of a 50-ml/kg oral water load than controls, demonstrating the same limited ability to excrete free water as thyroid-deficient man. During hypotonic (0.45%) saline infusion, absolute sodium delivery to the diluting segment and free water clearance were markedly lower in hypothyroid rats. However, both fractional distal sodium delivery and fractional free water clearance were similar in hypothyroid and control animals, suggesting that the reduced absolute free water formation in hypothyroid rats was due to decreased net distal delivery. In support of this hypothesis was the observation that fractional distal sodium reabsorption was equal or higher in thyroid-deficient rats, which indicates that the sodium reabsorptive capacity of the diluting segment was preserved in these animals. The results cannot be attributed to incomplete suppression of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) since they were identical in diabetes insipidus rats, nor to different rates of non-ADH-dependent backflux of filtrate since tissue osmolality and solute concentrations in the cortex, medulla, and papilla were similar in hypothyroid and control rats of both Sprague-Dawley and Brattleboro strains. The functional integrity of the diluting segment in hypothyroid rats was further demonstrated in experiments in which distal delivery was increased by contralateral nephrectomy or by administration of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors which decrease proximal sodium reabsorption. In both studies, fractional free water clearance increased markedly reaching levels significantly greater than in euthyroid controls. These results demonstrate that the impaired ability of the hypothyroid rat to excrete a water load is not due to incomplete suppression of ADH or decreased reabsorptive capacity of the diluting segment

  6. Comparative metabolism studies of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers in male rats following a single oral dose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively 42% of dose for alpha-HBCD,...

  7. Microalbumin excretion in patients with positive exercise electrocardiogram tests.

    PubMed

    Horton, R C; Gosling, P; Reeves, C N; Payne, M; Nagle, R E

    1994-10-01

    Thirty-three subjects underwent exercise electrocardiogram testing, 20 had a history of myocardial infarction and 13 were age-matched volunteers. Exercise electrocardiograms were positive in 15 subjects, negative in 12 and anomalous in six. Urinary microalbumin excretion was measured at rest, 30 and 60 min after exercise. Urinary microalbumin excretion was expressed as the albumin-creatinine ratio in mg.mmol-1. In the positive exercise electrocardiogram group median albumin-creatinine ratio increased from 1.0 mg.mmol-1 (95% CI 0.94-1.49) at rest to 2.0 mg.mmol-1 (95% CI 1.51-3.94) 30 min after exercise, whilst in the negative electrocardiogram group median resting and 30 min post exercise albumin-creatinine ratio values of 0.85 (95% CI 0.53-1.32) and 1.80 (95% CI 0.63-2.32) mg.mmol-1 respectively were not significantly different. These results suggest that exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia is associated with increased urinary microalbumin excretion.

  8. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  9. A proteolytic modification of AIM promotes its renal excretion

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Hiramoto, Emiri; Takai, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Senda, Yoshie; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Nelson, Peter S.; Lucas, Jared M.; Morgan, Andrew; Li, Zhenghua; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM, encoded by cd5l) is a multi-functional circulating protein that has a beneficial role in the regulation of a broad range of diseases, some of which are ameliorated by AIM administration in mice. In blood, AIM is stabilized by association with IgM pentamers and maintains its high circulating levels. The mechanism regulating the excessive accumulation of blood AIM remains unknown, although it is important, since a constitutive increase in AIM levels promotes chronic inflammation. Here we found a physiological AIM-cleavage process that induces destabilization of AIM and its excretion in urine. In blood, IgM-free AIM appeared to be cleaved and reduced in size approximately 10 kDa. Cleaved AIM was unable to bind to IgM and was selectively filtered by the glomerulus, thereby excreted in urine. Amino acid substitution at the cleavage site resulted in no renal excretion of AIM. Interestingly, cleaved AIM retained a comparable potency with full-length AIM in facilitating the clearance of dead cell debris in injured kidney, which is a key response in the recovery of acute kidney injury. Identification of AIM-cleavage and resulting functional modification could be the basis for designing safe and efficient AIM therapy for various diseases. PMID:27929116

  10. Excreted Cytoplasmic Proteins Contribute to Pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Popella, Peter; Nega, Mulugeta; Luqman, Arif; Schittek, Birgit; Di Marco, Moreno; Stevanovic, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in pro- and eukaryotes, also referred to as “nonclassical protein export,” is a well-known phenomenon. However, comparatively little is known about the role of the excreted proteins in relation to pathogenicity. Here, the impact of two excreted glycolytic enzymes, aldolase (FbaA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), on pathogenicity was investigated in Staphylococcus aureus. Both enzymes bound to certain host matrix proteins and enhanced adherence of the bacterial cells to host cells but caused a decrease in host cell invasion. FbaA and GAPDH also bound to the cell surfaces of staphylococcal cells by interaction with the major autolysin, Atl, that is involved in host cell internalization. Surprisingly, FbaA showed high cytotoxicity to both MonoMac 6 (MM6) and HaCaT cells, while GAPDH was cytotoxic only for MM6 cells. Finally, the contribution of external FbaA and GAPDH to S. aureus pathogenicity was confirmed in an insect infection model. PMID:27001537

  11. Analysis of the urinary excretion of ifosfamide and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites in children using 31P-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiura, Konrad; Zubowska, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Amounts of ifosfamide (CAS 3778-73-2) and its N-dechloroethylated metabolites excreted in the urine were measured using 31P-NMR spectroscopy in 26 cancer children treated with this drug. Strong inter-patient variation in levels of these compounds were found. These differences were independent from patients age, body surface area, and sex, the dose of the drug, suggesting genetic base of observed variations in ifosfamide metabolism.

  12. Treatment of Not-Administered Items on Individually Administered Intelligence Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2012-01-01

    In administration of individually administered intelligence tests, items are commonly presented in a sequence of increasing difficulty, and test administration is terminated after a predetermined number of incorrect answers. This practice produces stochastically censored data, a form of nonignorable missing data. By manipulating four factors…

  13. Furosemide renal excretion rate and the effects of the diuretic on different tubular sites are modified by endogenous dopamine in normohydrated rats.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, S; Opezzo, J A; Levin, G; Gonzalez, D; Elias, M M

    1995-09-01

    The present study was designed to explore the involvement of endogenous dopamine in furosemide excretion and in the actions of the diuretic on tubular sodium reabsorption. The dose-response relationship for the diuretic effect of furosemide given as i.v. bolus injections (0.2-7.5 mg.kg-1) was studied by clearance technique in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats treated with vehicle, benserazide (BZ) (25 mg.kg-1 i.v.) or SCH 23390 (50 micrograms.kg-1 + 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 i.v.). Furosemide induced the maximal diuresis 15 to 30 min after i.v. administration. The diuretic response was dose-dependent and was reduced in the animals treated with BZ and SCH 23390. Fractional sodium excretion was also increased by furosemide from 1.8 to 7.5% during the same period. This effect was reduced by both BZ or SCH 23390 by 35 to 50%. The effects of furosemide on proximal and distal renal tubules were dissected by measuring the renal lithium clearance (C