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Sample records for administered orally daily

  1. Daily Oral Language: Is It Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff L.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the Daily Oral Language (DOL) program aimed at helping students learn mechanics of writing through daily editing exercises. This nine-month study sought to determine if DOL improved editing skills and actual writing skills of seventy fourth-grade students. While the results of this study did not statistically demonstrate the…

  2. The bioavailability of an orally administered medroxyprogesterone acetate suspension.

    PubMed

    Antal, E J; Gillespie, W R; Albert, K S

    1983-05-01

    The relative bioavailability of an orally administered aqueous suspension of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) intended for intramuscular injection (Depo-Provera) was determined in relation to orally administered tablets. Serum levels of MPA were determined by radioimmunoassay following the administration of 400-mg doses to 19 adult male volunteers in a crossover design after an overnight fast. The two treatments were judged bioequivalent based upon a comparison of the resultant MPA serum levels and the derived bioavailability parameters. Hence, the intramuscular suspension administered orally offers an alternative means of achieving optimal serum levels of MPA in patients requiring high dose therapy. PMID:6222996

  3. Patients with Advanced Ovarian Cancer Administered Oral Etoposide following Taxane as Maintenance Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Hiroaki; Tachibana, Yasunari; Kawakami, Megumi; Ueno, Mariko; Morita, Yoshihiro; Muraoka, Mitsue; Takagi, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The concept of maintenance therapy is one of the highly relevant approaches in the management of advanced ovarian cancer. The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes. We attempted to reinforce maintenance chemotherapy by adding oral etoposide following taxane administration. Cases We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who had achieved clinically defined complete response to a primary platinum/taxane chemotherapy regimen and who were administered oral etoposide (50 mg/day × 21 days per cycle monthly for 3–5 cycles) following paclitaxel or docetaxel administration as maintenance chemotherapy. With regard to oral etoposide toxicity, grade 2 oral mucositis and grade 3 anemia were observed in 1 patient each. Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity. The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%. Conclusion The results from this ovarian cancer treatment evaluation suggest that oral etoposide may be administered safely following paclitaxel or docetaxel as maintenance chemotherapy. We expect this regimen to contribute to the improvement in the survival outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:27099605

  4. Daily oral iron supplementation during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it may also improve other maternal and birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of daily oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (2 July 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 July 2012) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with daily iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results We included 60 trials. Forty-three trials, involving more than 27,402 women, contributed data and compared the effects of daily oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo. Overall, women taking iron supplements were less likely to have low birthweight newborns (below 2500 g) compared with controls (8.4% versus 10.2%, average risk ratio (RR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.97, 11 trials, 8480 women) and mean birthweight was 30.81 g greater for those infants whose mothers received iron during pregnancy (average mean difference (MD) 30.81; 95% CI 5.94 to 55.68, 14 trials, 9385 women). Preventive iron supplementation reduced the risk of maternal anaemia at term by 70% (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women) and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women

  5. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Fang-Biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), neural tube defects (NTDs) and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg) before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft) and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus. PMID:25420102

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Paradol Analogues Orally Administered to Rats.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Shuichi; Watase, Daisuke; Nagata-Akaho, Nami; Haratake, Akinori; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro

    2016-03-01

    The kinetics parameters of paradols with different acyl chain lengths have been evaluated to determine their antiobesity site of action. Rats were orally administered olive oil containing 0-, 6-, 8-, or 12-paradol, and blood samples were collected at different time points. The concentrations of the paradols in the plasma were analyzed both with and without β-glucuronidase treatment. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24h) of the parent compounds decreased with increasing acyl chain length. Whereas 12-paradol showed the largest AUC0-24h with the longest time to reach its maximum plasma concentration of all of the compounds tested, the AUC0-24h values of the metabolites decreased with increasing acyl chain length. These results indicate that increasing acyl chain length leads to a decrease in the absorption of paradols via the intestinal tract, the wall of which was estimated to be their antiobesity site of action. PMID:26868188

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Dapsone Administered Daily and Weekly in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Mirochnick, Mark; Cooper, Ellen; McIntosh, Ken; Xu, Jing; Lindsey, Jane; Jacobus, David; Mofenson, Lynne; Sullivan, John L.; Dankner, Wayne; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Nachman, Sharon; Wara, Diane W.; Johnson, Daniel; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Rathore, Mobeen H.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; McNamara, James

    1999-01-01

    Although dapsone is a commonly used alternative agent for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in children intolerant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there are few data that describe dapsone pharmacokinetics in children. We studied dapsone pharmacokinetics in 30 children (median age, 2.8 years; age range, 0.3 to 12 years) receiving a new proprietary liquid preparation by three dosing regimens (1 mg/kg of body weight daily, 2 mg/kg daily, or 4 mg/kg weekly). Dosing of children with 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly resulted in peak concentrations equivalent to those reached in adults receiving 100-mg tablets daily. For the entire population, the median half-life was 22.2 h (range, 7.1 to 40.3 h), the median oral clearance was 0.0365 liter/kg/h (range, 0.0104 to 0.1021 liter/kg/h), and the median oral apparent volume of distribution was 1.13 liters/kg (range, 0.50 to 2.32 liters/kg). The median dapsone oral clearance was significantly increased in those infants less than 2 years of age compared to the oral clearance in those over 2 years of age (0.0484 versus 0.0278 liter/kg/h; P = 0.011). These data suggest that absorption of this liquid preparation is adequate and that the concentrations in the sera of children receiving 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly are equivalent to those seen in adults receiving standard dapsone dosing. Dapsone oral clearance appears to be increased in children under 2 years of age. PMID:10543733

  8. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Control and Production Safety Training § 250.1508 What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Control and Production Safety Training § 250.1508 What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Control and Production Safety Training § 250.1508 What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do when BSEE administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL...

  11. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... authorized representative to administer written or oral tests; and (b) Identify personnel by current...

  12. Intravenous linezolid administered orally: a novel desensitization strategy.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Michael J; Lipka, Ozana

    2006-04-01

    A 41-year-old woman with a history of myasthenia gravis was admitted to a local hospital because of severe muscle weakness, ptosis, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, and fever. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecium resistant to several antimicrobial agents. The organism had minimum inhibitory concentrations above 16 microg/ml for vancomycin and above 2 microg/ml for quinupristin-dalfopristin. In the absence of therapeutic alternatives, treatment with linezolid was required (minimum inhibitory concentration 1.5 microg/ml). The first dose of linezolid resulted in a hypersensitivity reaction consistent with an immunoglobulin E-mediated response requiring medical intervention. Because of a lack of intravenous access and because of limited availability of the oral suspension from the manufacturer, a desensitization protocol was implemented in which the intravenous formulation of linezolid was given orally. The patient was successfully desensitized by using an escalating, 14-dose procedure. We believe this is the first case in the English language literature to describe successful desensitization with the oral administration of intravenous linezolid in a patient with E. faecium bacteremia who was allergic to oxazolidinone. PMID:16553517

  13. Absorption of magnesium from orally administered magnesium sulfate in man.

    PubMed

    Morris, M E; LeRoy, S; Sutton, S C

    1987-01-01

    The use of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) as a cathartic in patients with impaired renal function can lead to severe toxicity due to hypermagnesemia. Although toxicity is uncommon in healthy subjects, little is known concerning the extent of absorption of magnesium after a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. The bioavailability of magnesium following a large oral dose of magnesium sulfate in normal volunteers was examined in the present investigation. Baseline 24-hour urinary excretion rates of magnesium and creatinine were determined over 3 consecutive days in 6 healthy men. The oral administration of 13.9 g (56.5 mmoles) magnesium sulfate U.S.P., in 4 equal hourly increments, resulted in the urinary excretion (corrected for baseline excretion rate) of 4.0 +/- 2.9% (mean +/- SD) of the dose of magnesium during the first 24 hours and 6.9 +/- 7.0% of the dose during a 72-hour interval. Magnesium sulfate administration had no effect on the 24-hour urinary excretion rate of creatinine. The baseline excretion rate of magnesium was significantly correlated with that of creatinine (r = 0.875) and inorganic sulfate (r = 0.921). All of the subjects experienced mild or moderate diarrhea. Therefore, magnesium is absorbed to a limited and variable extent in healthy adults following a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. PMID:3430654

  14. Oral absorption of ofloxacin administered together with aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Navarro, A; Martínez Cabarga, M; Dominguez-Gil Hurlé, A

    1994-01-01

    A clinical study was carried out to establish the influence of aluminum on the oral absorption of ofloxacin. Ten healthy volunteers were included in a crossover study based on a Latin square design. The treatments that all volunteers received were A, consisting of 400 mg of ofloxacin, and B, consisting of 400 mg of ofloxacin plus 11 g of colloidal aluminum phosphate. The absorption constant and other ofloxacin parameters were calculated from data on levels in plasma by using model-independent calculation methods. There were no statistically significant differences between the mean values of the areas under the curve corresponding to the administration of ofloxacin alone and those of ofloxacin with aluminum. Regarding the other pharmacokinetic parameters, a significant difference between the absorption constants was found. The presence of aluminum reduces the absorption rate of this quinolone but does not modify the percentage of the absorbed dose. PMID:7840600

  15. Numerical taxonomy of Bacillus isolated from orally administered drugs.

    PubMed

    Gil, M C; de la Rosa, M C; Mosso, M A; García Arribas, M L

    1986-10-01

    Numerical taxonomy procedures were used to study 118 strains of Bacillus isolated from non-sterile drugs prepared for oral administration. Similarities between pairs of strains were calculated by the simple matching coefficient of Sokal and Michener (SSM). Each strain was tested for 60 unit characters and three clusters were defined. The strains in each cluster presented a similarity level of at least 60%. Cluster A comprised the strains identified as Bacillus cereus (SSM = 93.13%), cluster B contained three subgroups corresponding to the species B. pumilus, B. subtilis and B. licheniformis (SSM = 84.35%) and cluster C also included three subgroups that belonged to the species B. firmus, B. lentus and B. badius (SSM = 80.14%). The most discriminating tests were selected to differentiate the clusters from the subgroups. The feature with the highest discriminating power between clusters A and B was the lack of acid production from arabinose and mannitol. The Voges-Proskauer, methyl red tests and sensitivity to polymyxin B clearly distinguished cluster A from C. The Voges-Proskauer test and acid production from arabinose were the best to differentiate between B and C. Bacillus pumilus and B. subtilis differed in starch hydrolysis and B. licheniformis in growing anaerobically. To discriminate B. firmus from B. lentus the most important tests were the acid production from glucose and sucrose; intermediate strains were found. Bacillus badius was differentiated from B. firmus by 10 tests, and from B. lentus by the production of urease. PMID:3096933

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Study of Amikacin Administered Once or Twice Daily to Febrile, Severely Neutropenic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tod, Michel; Lortholary, Olivier; Seytre, Delphine; Semaoun, Rémi; Uzzan, Bernard; Guillevin, Loïc; Casassus, Philippe; Petitjean, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Once-daily (o.d.) administration of 20 mg of amikacin per kg of body weight to neutropenic patients has been validated by clinical studies, but amikacin pharmacokinetics have been documented only for the 7.5-mg/kg twice-daily (b.i.d.) regimen in this population. In order to determine in neutropenic patients (i) the influence of the dosing regimen on the kinetics of amikacin, (ii) the linearity of kinetics of amikacin in the range of 7.5 to 20 mg/kg, and (iii) the influence of patient characteristics on the disposition of amikacin and (iv) to provide a rationale for dosing recommendations, we evaluated the population pharmacokinetics of amikacin administered to 57 febrile neutropenic adults (neutrophil count, <500/mm3) being treated for a hematological disorder and receiving amikacin at 7.5 mg/kg b.i.d. (n = 29) or 20 mg/kg o.d. (n = 28) and administered intravenously over 0.5 h. A total of 278 blood samples were obtained (1 to 14 samples per patient) during one or several administration intervals (1 to 47). Serum amikacin levels were measured by the enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique. A mixed-effect modeling approach was used to fit a bicompartmental model to the data (NONMEM software). The influences of the dosing regimen and the demographic and biological indices on the pharmacokinetic parameters of amikacin were evaluated by the maximum-likelihood ratio test on the population model. The dosing regimen had no influence on amikacin pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., the kinetics of amikacin were linear over the range of 7.5 to 20 mg/kg. Amikacin elimination clearance (CL) was only correlated with creatinine clearance or its covariates, namely, sex, age, body weight, and serum creatinine level. The interindividual variability of CL was 21%, while those of the central volume of distribution, the distribution clearance, and the tissue volume of distribution were 15, 30, and 25%, respectively. On the basis of the expected distribution of amikacin concentrations in

  17. Differential effects of orally versus parenterally administered qinghaosu derivative artemether in dogs.

    PubMed

    Classen, W; Altmann, B; Gretener, P; Souppart, C; Skelton-Stroud, P; Krinke, G

    1999-11-01

    Artemether (AM) is an antimalarial drug derived from artemisinin (Qinghaosu), an extract of the herb Artemisia annua L., sweet wormwood. Its antiparasitic effect is that of a schizontocide and is explained by rapid uptake by parasitized erythrocytes and interaction with a component of hemoglobin degradation resulting in formation of free radicals. It has been shown to exhibit a high clinical cure rate. Previous animal safety studies with Qinghaosu derivatives revealed dose-dependent neurotoxicity with movement disturbances and neuropathic changes in the hindbrain of intramuscularly treated dogs, rats and monkeys. Such effects have not been seen in man. The objective of our present studies was to compare the effects of high levels of AM administered to dogs p.o. versus i.m. In a pilot study 20 mg/kg/day of AM was given i.m. to groups of 3 male Beagle dogs for 5 and 30 days, respectively. Clinical signs of neurotoxicity were noted in some individual dogs from test day 23 on. One dog had to be sacrificed pre-term. Hematologic findings indicated a hypochromic, microcytic anemia. Microscopic examination demonstrated neuropathic changes only at 30 days, but not at 5 days. The animals had neuronal and secondary axonal damage, most prominent in the cerebellar roof, pontine and vestibular nuclei, and in the raphe/paralemniscal region. The affected neurons showed loss of Nissl substance, cytoplasmic eosinophilia, shrinkage of the nucleus and in advanced stages scavenging by microglia. In a subsequent experiment, AM was administered to groups of 4 male and 4 female dogs, respectively, at 8 daily doses of 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg i.m., or 0, 50, 150 and 600 mg/kg p.o. Neurologic signs were seen at high i.m. doses only. In most animals they were inconspicuous and consisted of reduced activity with convulsions seen in single dogs shortly before death. Neuronal damage occurred in all animals at 40 and 80 mg/kg following i.m. treatment. At 20 mg/kg minimal effects occurred in 5

  18. Multidose pharmacokineetecs of orally administered florfenicol in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma disposition of florfenicol in channel catfish was investigated after an oral dose (10mg/kg for 10 days) administered in freshwater at water temperatures ranging from 24.7 to 25.9°C. Florfenicol concentrations in plasma were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography with MS/MS detection. Af...

  19. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled 241Am

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Huckle, James E.; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Jay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [14C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared to a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of 241Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of 241Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  20. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled (241)Am.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Huckle, James E; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Jay, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [(14) C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared with a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of (241) Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of (241) Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  1. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Haarberg, Kelley MK; Wymore Brand, Meghan J; Overstreet, Anne-Marie C; Hauck, Catherine C; Murphy, Patricia A; Hostetter, Jesse M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Wannemuehler, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris (P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle (5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract (2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencing weight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10 (4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9 (1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα (9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced (P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon (2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells (2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells (2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly

  2. Direct oral anticoagulants: a guide for daily practice.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Pierre; Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Bounameaux, Henri; Boehlen, Françoise; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, small oral compounds that specifically block activated coagulation factor X (FXa) or thrombin (FIIa) have become alternatives to the anticoagulants that had been used for several decades. As of today, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) include dabigatran etexilate (thrombin inhibitor) and apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban (inhibitors of FXa). While there is no doubt that DOACs represent a major step forward in the management of patients with venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation, new challenges have arisen. They need to be addressed with the necessary pragmatism on the basis of evidence. Indeed, a better understanding of the management of these last-generation antithrombotics will favour safer use and increase confidence of the practitioner for the prescription of these drugs. The aim of this article is to present practical suggestions for the prescription and use of these drugs in everyday clinical practice, based on clinical experience and recently updated recommendations of the European Heart Rhythm Association and the American College of Chest Physicians among other scientific organisations. We address issues such as pharmacokinetics, dosing, side effects, limitations of use, drug interactions, switching from and to other anticoagulants, renal function, concomitant administration of antiplatelet agents and perioperative use. We also address the issue of monitoring and reversal, taking advantage of the most recent development in this latter area. Rather than being one additional set of recommendations, our narrative review aims at assisting the practicing physician in his or her daily handling of these novel anticoagulant compounds, based on frequently asked questions to the authors, a group of experienced specialists in the field who have, however, no commitment to issue guidelines. PMID:26964028

  3. [Dynamic analysis of pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs using positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful and noninvasive technology for molecular imaging in living systems. Its high sensitivity and high spatial-temporal resolution make this technology particularly useful to analyze the disposition of drugs in the body. PET technology could be applied to analyze the process of distribution of orally administered drugs on the basis of time-profiles of radioactivity in vivo. Kinetic analysis of radioactivity derived from 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose administered orally to rats under several conditions indicated that not only gastric emptying and intestinal transit but also the rate constant of intestinal absorption and limited process of oral absorption could be evaluated quantitatively. After oral administration of 11C-labeled telmisartan with or without non-radiolabeled telmisartan, systemic bioavailability and hepatic distribution of radioactivity significantly increased non-linearly with dose. In the intestinal lumen, telmisartan and its glucuronide, converted by UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), were detected and the ratio of telmisartan decreased at a high dose of telmisartan. In vitro permeation study revealed that telmisartan is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). It was reported that hepatic uptake of telmisartan is mediated by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) and most of the hepatic radioactivity in the liver is derived from telmisartan. These results indicated that P-gp for intestinal absorption, OATP1B3 for hepatic uptake and UGT for glucuronidation could be considered as limiting steps of orally administered telmisartan. Therefore, PET study is highly anticipated to be a potent tool for better understanding of gastrointestinal absorption and the subsequent tissue distribution of various drugs and candidates. PMID:22864349

  4. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions. PMID:26056878

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Orally Administered Intravenous Midazolam Versus a Commercially Prepared Syrup

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Katayoun; Khoshrang, Hossein; Kousha, Maryam; Hoseini, Mahboobeh; Ranjbar, Marzieh; Baniasadi, Shadi; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among different categories of sedative agents, benzodiazepines have been prescribed for more than three decades to patients of all ages. The effective and predictable sedative and amnestic effects of benzodiazepines support their use in pediatric patients. Midazolam is one of the most extensively used benzodiazepines in this age group. Oral form of drug is the best accepted route of administration in children. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a commercially midazolam syrup versus orally administered IV midazolam in uncooperative dental patients. Second objective was to determine whether differences concerning sedation success can be explained by child‘s behavioral problems and dental fear. Patients and Methods: Eighty eight uncooperative dental patients (Frankl Scales 1,2) aged 3 to 6 years, and ASA I participated in this double blind, parallel randomized, controlled clinical trial. Midazolam was administered in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg for children under the age 5 and 0.2 mg/kg in patients over 5 years of age. Physiologic parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and blood pressure were recorded. Behavior assessment was conducted throughout the course of treatment using Houpt Sedation Rating Scale and at critical moments of treatment (injection and cavity preparation) by North Carolina Scale. Dental fear and behavioral problems were evaluated using Child Fear Schedule Survey-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Independent t-test, Chi-Square, and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. Results: Acceptable overall sedation ratings were observed in 90% and 86% of syrup and IV/Oral group respectively; Chi-Square P = 0.5. Other domains of Houpt Scale including: sleep, crying and movement were also not significantly different between groups. Physiological parameters remained in normal limits during study without significant

  6. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides. PMID:25627942

  7. Review of the spectrum and potency of orally administered cephalosporins and amoxicillin/clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Jacobs, Michael R; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum and in vitro potency of the most frequently prescribed orally administered cephalosporins (cefaclor, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, cefuroxime axetil, cephalexin) and amoxicillin/clavulanate are reviewed. These beta-lactam agents have been widely used in the outpatient arena for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract and other mild-to-moderate infections. The data presented here were obtained from critical review articles on each of these compounds. Cephalexin and cefaclor were among the least potent and had the narrowest antimicrobial spectrums against the pathogens evaluated. In contrast, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, and cefuroxime were highly active against penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae and retained some activity against penicillin-intermediate strains, whereas amoxicillin/clavulanate was the most active against S. pneumoniae, including most penicillin nonsusceptible strains. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefdinir were the most potent compounds against methicillin (oxacillin)-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, whereas cefpodoxime was the most potent compound against Haemophilus influenzae. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefdinir, and cefpodoxime were also active against Moraxella catarrhalis, including beta-lactamase-producing strains. In summary, orally administered "3rd-generation" or extended spectrum cephalosporins exhibited more balanced spectrums of activity against the principal bacterial pathogens responsible for outpatient respiratory tract and other infections when compared with other widely used oral cephalosporins of earlier generations or amoxicillin alone. PMID:17292577

  8. In vivo uptake and acute immune response to orally administered chitosan and PEG coated PLGA nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Semete, B.; Booysen, L.I.J.; Kalombo, L.; Venter, J.D.; Katata, L.; Ramalapa, B.; Verschoor, J.A.; Swai, H.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems offer great promise in addressing challenges of drug toxicity, poor bioavailability and non-specificity for a number of drugs. Much progress has been reported for nano drug delivery systems for intravenous administration, however very little is known about the effects of orally administered nanoparticles. Furthermore, the development of nanoparticulate systems necessitates a thorough understanding of the biological response post exposure. This study aimed to elucidate the in vivo uptake of chitosan and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Poly, DL, lactic-co-glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles and the immunological response within 24 h of oral and peritoneal administration. These PLGA nanoparticles were administered orally and peritoneally to female Balb/C mice, they were taken up by macrophages of the peritoneum. When these particles were fluorescently labelled, intracellular localisation was observed. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70 and TNF-{alpha} in plasma and peritoneal lavage was found to remain at low concentration in PLGA nanoparticles treated mice as well as ZnO nanoparticles during the 24 hour period. However, these were significantly increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mice. Of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-12p70 were produced at the highest concentration in the positive control group. The anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and chemokines INF-{gamma}, IL-4, IL-5 remained at normal levels in PLGA treated mice. IL-10 and INF-{gamma} were significantly increased in LPS treated mice. MCP-1 was found to be significantly produced in all groups in the first hours, except the saline treated mice. These results provide the first report to detail the induction of cytokine production by PLGA nanoparticles engineered for oral applications.

  9. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of biapenem administered thrice daily for the treatment of pneumonia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Ho; Kameyama, Youjyu; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Sohei; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Chieko; Terajima, Tomoko; Maezawa, Kayoko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Sandoh, Mitsuru; Ishii, Makoto; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Kanayama, Akiko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kizu, Junko; Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Biapenem has been widely used to treat bacterial pneumonia; however, there is little information concerning its efficacy and safety in elderly patients. Based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic theory, administration of biapenem thrice rather than twice daily would be expected to be more effective because of longer time above the minimum inhibitory concentration. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of biapenem (300 mg) administered thrice daily in pneumonic patients aged 65 years or older. Biapenem was effective in 22 of 25 patients, as assessed by the improvement in clinical symptoms and/or the eradication of the causative organisms, and caused no serious adverse events. The pharmacokinetic profile was established based on simulations using a modeling program. Among 17 patients whose causative organisms were detected, time above the minimum inhibitory concentration was estimated to be 100% in 16 patients, all of whom showed clinical improvement. The results of this study confirmed the efficacy and safety of 300 mg of biapenem administered thrice daily for the treatment of pneumonia in elderly patients. PMID:24725621

  10. [Investigations on the acute, carrageenan-induced inflammatory reaction and pharmacology of orally administered sodium salicylate in turkeys].

    PubMed

    Cramer, Kerstin; Schmidt, Volker; Richter, Andreas; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Abraham, Getu; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The complex mechanisms of acute inflammation have been subject to veterinary investigations since a long time. However, knowledge on the role of specific inflammatory mediators, as well as pharmacokinetics (PK) and -dynamics (PD) of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in birds is limited. The objective of this work therefore was to establish a modified tissue cage-model to investigate the acute, carrageenan-mediated inflammatory response, as well as plasma and exudate-kinetics and the antiphlogistic effect of orally administered sodium salicylate on the elicited inflammatory reaction in turkeys. Within the class Aves, comparable studies have so far only been published in chicken. Following bilateral subcutaneous implantation of carrageenan-treated synthetic sponges in the lateral thoracic region, sodium salicylate was administered orally at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight (BW; therapy group) twice daily on three consecutive days, while a control group received drinking water as a placebo (n = 24 per group). Combined PK and PD of sodium salicylate were evaluated on the basis of salicylate- and prostaglandin (PG) E2-plasma- and -exudate-concentrations, exudate volumes, as well as leukocyte exudate counts. Sodium salicylate was readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and accumulated in the inflammatory exudate. At 4, 6, and 10 h after first application, sodium salicylate significantly reduced PG E2-concentrations in the inflammatory exudate when compared to the control group, whereas leukocyte exudate counts increased over time in both study groups, unaffected by sodium salicylate The described modified tissue cage-model can be beneficial for further research on the pathophysiology of avian inflammatory processes and the investigation of the combined pharmacodynamics and -kinetics of drugs in birds of adequate size. PMID:26054231

  11. Orally Administered Enoxaparin Ameliorates Acute Colitis by Reducing Macrophage-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Stewart, Niall; Peterson, Gregory M.; Gueven, Nuri; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The currently available treatments are not effective in all patients, can be expensive and have potential to cause severe side effects. This prompts the need for new treatment modalities. Enoxaparin, a widely used antithrombotic agent, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties and therefore we evaluated its therapeutic potential in a mouse model of colitis. Acute colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were treated once daily with enoxaparin via oral or intraperitoneal administration and monitored for colitis activities. On termination (day 8), colons were collected for macroscopic evaluation and cytokine measurement, and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Oral but not intraperitoneal administration of enoxaparin significantly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis. Oral enoxaparin-treated mice retained their body weight and displayed less diarrhea and fecal blood loss compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon weight in enoxaparin-treated mice was significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and edema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice showed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of edema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral enoxaparin. Reduced number of macrophages in the colon of oral enoxaparin-treated mice was accompanied by decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Oral enoxaparin significantly reduces the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis in mice and could therefore represent a novel therapeutic option for the management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:26218284

  12. Influence of glutathione on the bioactivity of subcutaneously or orally administered insulin to rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Kurdi, Zakieh I; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Leharne, Stephen A; Qinna, Nidal A; Al-Omari, Mahmoud M H; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione on the bioactivity of insulin was studied. A polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) of insulin with low molecular weight chitosan (13 kDa) was prepared and characterized. The PEC was then solubilized, in the presence and absence of GSH and GSSG, in a reverse micelle consisting of oleic acid and two surfactants (PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides and polyglycerol-6-dioleate). The in vitro and in vivo performances of the reverse micelle formulations (RMFs) were evaluated in rats. At pH 6.5 the association efficiency of the PEC was 76.2%. In vitro insulin release from the RMs was negligible at pH 1.2 and was markedly increased at pH 6.8. The hypoglycemic activity of insulin in the PEC was reduced when administered via the subcutaneous route, regardless of the GSH content. On the other hand, the presence of GSSG significantly enhanced hypoglycemia. When the RMF was administered via the oral route, the presence of GSH had no effect on the hypoglycemic activity of insulin compared with the GSH free system. However, the presence of GSSG in the oral preparation increased the hypoglycemic activity of insulin; probably by inhibiting insulin degradation, thereby prolonging its effect. Thus, incorporation of GSSG in the RMF reduces blood glucose levels in rats and protects insulin from degradation. PMID:25896162

  13. Comparative capacity of orally administered amoxicillin and parenterally administered penicillin-streptomycin to protect rabbits against experimentally induced streptococcal endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Pujadas, R; Escriva, E; Jane, J; Fernandez, F; Fava, P; Garau, J

    1986-01-01

    A single-intramuscular-dose immunization regimen with a penicillin G-streptomycin combination was compared with three oral-dose amoxicillin regimens for the capacity to prevent Streptococcus sanguis infections of experimentally induced valvular heart lesions in rabbits. Challenge doses of 10(4), 10(6), and 10(8) CFU of a strain of S. sanguis equally susceptible to penicillin and amoxicillin were used in this study. Measured by recovery of test organisms from endocardial lesions, the lowest concentration of these inocula was infective for 60% of the recipients; the two higher-concentration inocula were infective for all recipients. The penicillin G-streptomycin combination provided complete protection against infection with inocula of all sizes. A single-oral-dose amoxicillin regimen (50 mg/kg of body weight) prevented endocarditis when rabbits were challenged with 10(4) CFU, but protection diminished with increasing inoculum concentrations. Similar results were achieved when five oral doses of amoxicillin (8.5 mg/kg of body weight) added at 8-h intervals were included in the single-oral-dose regimen. In contrast, when rabbits received two oral doses of amoxicillin (50 mg/kg of body weight) with a 10-h interval between doses, prophylaxis was fully effective with even the highest inoculum concentration. PMID:3729348

  14. Evaluation of the prenatal developmental toxicity of orally administered arsenic trioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Holson, J F; Stump, D G; Clevidence, K J; Knapp, J F; Farr, C H

    2000-05-01

    A thorough review of the literature revealed no published repeated-dose oral developmental toxicity studies of inorganic arsenic in rats. In the present study, which was conducted according to modern regulatory guidelines, arsenic trioxide was administered orally beginning 14 days prior to mating and continuing through mating and gestation until gestational day 19. Exposures began prior to mating in an attempt to achieve a steady state of arsenic in the bloodstream of dams prior to embryo-foetal development. Groups of 25 Crl:CD(SD)BR female rats received doses of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10mg/kg/day by gavage. The selection of these dose levels was based on a preliminary range-finding study, in which excessive post-implantation loss and markedly decreased foetal weight occurred at doses of 15 mg/kg/day and maternal deaths occurred at higher doses. Maternal toxicity in the 10mg/kg/day group was evidenced by decreased food consumption and decreased net body weight gain during gestation, increased liver and kidney weights, and stomach abnormalities (adhesions and eroded areas). Transient decreases in food consumption in the 5mg/kg/day group caused the maternal no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) to be determined as 2. 5mg/kg/day. Intrauterine parameters were unaffected by arsenic trioxide. No treatment-related foetal malformations were noted in any dose group. Increased skeletal variations at 10mg/kg/day were attributed to reduced foetal weight at that dose level. The developmental NOAEL was thus 5mg/kg/day. Based on this study, orally administered arsenic trioxide cannot be considered to be a selective developmental toxicant (i.e. it is not more toxic to the conceptus than to the maternal organism), nor does it exhibit any propensity to cause neural tube defects, even at maternally toxic dose levels. PMID:10762732

  15. Safety and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of aclidinium bromide administered twice daily in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, K; Dilzer, S; Jansat, J M; Garcia Gil, E; Caracta, C F; Ortiz, S

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airway obstruction and increased cholinergic tone. The global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) guidelines recommend long-acting anticholinergics for COPD maintenance treatment. Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist developed for the treatment of COPD. A phase I, randomized, single-blind, multiple-dose clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of multiple doses of twice-daily (BID) aclidinium in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male and female subjects received aclidinium 200 μg, 400 μg, 800 μg, or placebo twice daily for 7 days. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 cohorts and 10 subjects in each cohort were randomized (8:2) to either aclidinium or placebo groups. Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs), laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and ECGs. Plasma samples were obtained at multiple time points throughout the study and analyzed for aclidinium and its inactive acid and alcohol metabolites using a fully validated method of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 9 treatment-emergent AEs were reported (1, placebo; 3, aclidinium 400 μg; 5, aclidinium 800 μg), all of which were mild in severity. No serious AEs were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. PK parameters on Day 7 following BID dosing of aclidinium showed that steady state was achieved for aclidinium and its metabolites. On Days 1 and 7, maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of aclidinium were generally observed at the first PK time point (5 min postdose) and rapidly declined, with plasma concentrations generally less than 10% of Cmax by 6 h postdose in all aclidinium groups. Mean effective t(½) after the evening dose on Day 7 ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 h for aclidinium 400 μg and 800 μg, similar to the terminal t(½) observed on Day 1 (4.5-5.9 h

  16. A metabolomic and pharmacokinetic study on the mechanism underlying the lipid-lowering effect of orally administered berberine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shenghua; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Tang, Yueqing; Paletta, Janice L; Wu, Xiaolei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Linsheng; Zha, Weibin; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Ridlon, Jason M; Radlon, Jason M; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2015-02-01

    Clinical and animal studies demonstrated that orally administered berberine had a distinct lipid-lowering effect. However, pharmacokinetic studies showed that berberine was poorly absorbed into the body so the levels of berberine in the blood and target tissues were far below the effective concentrations revealed. To probe the underlying mechanism, the effect of berberine on the biological system was studied on a high-fat-diet-induced hamster hyperlipidemia model. Our results showed that intragastrically-administered berberine was poorly absorbed into circulation and most berberine accumulated in gut content. Although the bioavailability of intragastrically administered berberine was much lower than that of intraperitoneally administered berberine, it had a stronger lipid-lowing effect, indicating that the gastrointestinal tract is a potential target for the hypolipidemic effect of berberine. A metabolomic study on both serum and gut content showed that orally administered berberine significantly regulated molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and increased the generation of bile acids in the hyperlipidemic model. DNA analysis revealed that the orally administered berberine modulated the gut microbiota, and berberine showed a significant inhibition of the 7α-dehydroxylation conversion of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid, indicating a decreased elimination of bile acids in the gut. However, in model hamsters, elevated bile acids failed to downregulate the expression and function of CYP7A1 in a negative feedback loop. It was suggested that the hypocholesterolemic effect of orally administered berberine involves modulating the turnover of bile acids and the farnesoid X receptor signal pathway. PMID:25411028

  17. The urinary excretion of orally administered pteroyl-l-glutamic acid by the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blair, J. A.; Dransfield, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The urinary excretion of folates after oral administration of [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was studied by assaying the radioactivity in the urine and in materials purified and characterized by t.l.c. 2. Radioactivity excreted was 6.8, 5.9 and 30.7% of the oral dose in the first 24h after doses of 3.1, 32 and 320μg/kg respectively. 3. Extensive decomposition of urinary folates to pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was prevented by antioxidants or collection of urine frozen. 4. At the three dosages, two major and one minor radioactive compounds were isolated. One of the major metabolites was 5-methyltetrahydropteroylglutamic acid. The others were unidentified but were not pteroylglutamic acid, 7,8-dihydro-, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-, 5- or 10-formyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylidyne-tetrahydro-, 5-formimidoyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylene-tetrahydro-, 5-methyltetrahydro-pteroylglutamic acid, nor any decomposition products of these compounds formed during isolation. Labelled unconjugated pteridines were absent. 5. Labelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was displaced by oral administration of unlabelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid (1.6mg/kg) when given 3.5h after, but not when given 24h after the labelled dose. 6. The results show that orally administered [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid is absorbed without metabolism and is then metabolized into naturally occurring tetrahydro-folates. 7. These findings are discussed with reference to previous work. PMID:5124394

  18. Comparative study using oral solutions of bambuterol once daily or terbutaline three times daily in 2-5-year-old children with asthma. Bambuterol Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed

    Kuusela, A L; Marenk, M; Sandahl, G; Sanderud, J; Nikolajev, K; Persson, B

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare safety and efficacy of bambuterol hydrochloride (10 mg) oral solution administered once daily in the evening with terbutaline sulphate (0.075 mg/kg body weight) oral solution administered three times daily in 2-5-year-old children with asthma. There were two treatment groups: (2/3) of the patients received bambuterol and (1/3) received terbutaline. The study was double-blind, randomized, and of a parallel group design, and it lasted for 3 months after a 2-week run-in period. The primary objective was to evaluate safety (adverse events, and changes in blood pressure, pulse rate, hematology, and clinical chemistry parameters). Plasma concentrations of terbutaline and/or bambuterol were also measured. Evaluation of efficacy (diary card data) was a secondary objective. A total of 155 patients (range, 2-6 years; 3 patients were 6 years old at randomization) were treated with the study drugs; 104 patients received bambuterol and 51 patients received terbutaline. Both treatments showed a good safety profile with respect to clinical and laboratory tests, and they were generally well tolerated. Reported adverse events were mild to moderate. There were no statistically significant differences between treatment groups in any of the efficacy variables (diary variables: peak expiratory flow (PEF), asthma symptoms, restlessness, other reported symptoms, use of inhaled bronchodilators, and nighttime awakenings). For morning PEF, the mean increase from run-in to treatment was 16.9 L/min in the terbutaline group and 23.3 L/min in the bambuterol group. For evening PEF, the mean increase was 20.2 L/min in the terbutaline group and 20.6 L/min in the bambuterol group. In conclusion, once-daily bambuterol is as safe and effective as terbutaline given three times daily. The study also confirmed that bambuterol has a 24-hr duration of action, and therefore its once daily administration, makes it a preferred bronchodilator agent. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000

  19. Metabolism of orally administered branched-chain alpha-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Dalton, R N; Chantler, C

    1983-11-01

    The changes in serum branched-chain alpha-keto acid (BCKA) and plasma amino acid concentrations, in response to a therapeutic oral dose of an essential amino acid/keto acid mixture, were studied in fasting healthy adults. Of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), only the plasma leucine concentration rose significantly despite increases in al three serum BCKA concentrations. The plasma valine concentration tended to rise, but plasma isoleucine concentrations fell. When KMVA (keto-isoleucine) alone was given, there followed an increase in plasma isoleucine concentration and a fall in valine and leucine. Similarly, when KIVA (keto-valine) was given, plasma valine rose and leucine and isoleucine fell. These results suggest some transamination of the keto acid with amino groups of the other BCAA. KICA (keto-leucine), however, produced larger falls in plasma valine and isoleucine than was expected from the rise in leucine. In addition, KICA caused significant, insulin-independent reductions in plasma threonine, serine, cystine, methionine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and alanine. We conclude that although orally administered BCKA's will increase the BCAA supply, their value may not simply relate to the supply of essential amino acids for protein synthesis but to a direct effect of KICA on protein metabolism. PMID:6368946

  20. Recovery of Cognitive Dysfunction via Orally Administered Redox-Polymer Nanotherapeutics in SAMP8 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vong, Long Binh; Imaizumi, Natsuka; Ozaki, Yuki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Excessively generated reactive oxygen species are associated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether scavenging of reactive oxygen species in the brain by orally administered redox nanoparticles, prepared by self-assembly of redox polymers possessing antioxidant nitroxide radicals, facilitates the recovery of cognition in 17-week-old senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) mice. The redox polymer was delivered to the brain after oral administration of redox nanoparticles via a disintegration of the nanoparticles in the stomach and absorption of the redox polymer at small intestine to the blood. After treatment for one month, levels of oxidative stress in the brain of SAMP8 mice were remarkably reduced by treatment with redox nanoparticles, compared to that observed with low-molecular-weight nitroxide radicals, resulting in the amelioration of cognitive impairment with increased numbers of surviving neurons. Additionally, treatment by redox nanoparticles did not show any detectable toxicity. These findings indicate the potential of redox polymer nanotherapeutics for treatment of the neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25955022

  1. Intestinal absorption and biological effects of orally administered amorphous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although amorphous silica nanoparticles are widely used in the production of food products (e.g., as anticaking agents), there is little information available about their absorption and biological effects after oral exposure. Here, we examined the in vitro intestinal absorption and in vivo biological effects in mice of orally administered amorphous silica particles with diameters of 70, 300, and 1,000 nm (nSP70, mSP300, and mSP1000, respectively) and of nSP70 that had been surface-modified with carboxyl or amine groups (nSP70-C and nSP70-N, respectively). Analysis of intestinal absorption by means of the everted gut sac method combined with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer showed that the intestinal absorption of nSP70-C was significantly greater than that of nSP70. The absorption of nSP70-N tended to be greater than that of nSP70; however, the results were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that silica nanoparticles can be absorbed through the intestine and that particle diameter and surface properties are major determinants of the degree of absorption. We also examined the biological effects of the silica particles after 28-day oral exposure in mice. Hematological, histopathological, and biochemical analyses showed no significant differences between control mice and mice treated with the silica particles, suggesting that the silica nanoparticles evaluated in this study are safe for use in food production. PMID:25288919

  2. Orally administered β-glucan attenuates the Th2 response in a model of airway hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burg, Ashley R; Quigley, Laura; Jones, Adam V; O'Connor, Geraldine M; Boelte, Kimberly; McVicar, Daniel W; Orr, Selinda J

    2016-01-01

    β-Glucan is a polysaccharide that can be extracted from fungal cell walls. Wellmune WGP(®), a preparation of β-1,3/1,6-glucans, is a dietary supplement that has immunomodulating properties. Here we investigated the effect WGP had on a mouse model of asthma. OVA-induced asthma in mice is characterized by infiltration of eosinophils into the lung, production of Th2 cytokines and IgE. Daily oral administration of WGP (400 µg) significantly reduced the influx of eosinophils into the lungs of OVA-challenged mice compared to control mice. In addition, WGP inhibited pulmonary production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), however serum IgE levels were unaffected by WGP treatment. These data indicate that WGP could potentially be useful as an oral supplement for some asthma patients, however, it would need to be combined with therapies that target other aspects of the disease such as IgE levels. As such, further studies that examine the potential of WGP in combination with other therapies should be explored. PMID:27390655

  3. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  4. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients. PMID:26611666

  5. Evaluation of computed tomographic enterography with an orally administered lactulose solution in clinically normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Keh, Seoyeon; Sohn, Jungmin; Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Jang, Jaeyoung; Kim, Hyunwook; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine optimal techniques for CT enterography in clinically normal dogs and to evaluate luminal distention after oral administration of lactulose solution as a contrast agent. ANIMALS 15 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES CT was performed in a control group (2 dogs that underwent CT to evaluate metastasis and 5 other dogs). In a bolus administration group (5 dogs from the control group), lactulose solution (1.34 g/mL) was administered (60 mL/kg) rapidly via gastric tube to anesthetized dogs, and CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. In a continuous administration group of 8 other dogs, lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) was administered slowly via nasoesophageal tube over a period of 45 minutes. Then, 15 minutes after anesthetic induction, CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. Luminal distention of the small intestines was evaluated qualitatively by use of a 3-point scale. RESULTS All small intestinal segments had poor luminal distention in the control group. The terminal ileum had poor luminal distention for the bolus administration group. Nearly all segments had good luminal distention for the continuous administration group with mild adverse effects. Luminal distention scores from 0 to 20 minutes after lactulose administration were significantly higher than scores from 30 to 60 minutes. Interobserver reproducibility was high for all intestinal segments. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CT performed between 0 and 20 minutes after continuous administration of lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) may reveal adequate luminal distention for examination of small intestinal segments in dogs. PMID:27027835

  6. A first-in-human phase I study to evaluate the MEK1/2 inhibitor, cobimetinib, administered daily in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Lee S; LoRusso, Patricia; Ma, Wen Wee; Goldman, Jonathan W; Weise, Amy; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Adjei, Alex; Yazji, Salim; Shen, Angela; Johnston, Stuart; Hsieh, Hsin-Ju; Chan, Iris T; Sikic, Branimir I

    2016-10-01

    Objective Cobimetinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, was administered to patients with advanced solid tumors to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and anti-tumor activity. Methods For dose-escalation, a 3 + 3 design was used. Oral cobimetinib was administered once daily on a 21-day on/7-day off (21/7) or a 14-day on/14-day off (14/14) schedule. Serial plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis on Day 1 and at steady state. In expansion stages, patients with RAS or RAF mutant tumors were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the 21/7 or 14/14 schedule. Results Ninety-seven patients received cobimetinib. In the 21/7 dose escalation, 36 patients enrolled in 8 cohorts (0.05 mg/kg-80 mg). Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were Grade 4 hepatic encephalopathy, Grade 3 diarrhea, and Grade 3 rash. In the 14/14 dose escalation, 20 patients enrolled in 4 cohorts (60-125 mg). DLTs were Grade 3 rash and Grade 3 blurred vision associated with presence of reversible subretinal fluid. The MTD was 60 mg on 21/7 schedule and 100 mg on 14/14 schedule. Cobimetinib PK showed dose-proportional increases in exposure. The most frequent adverse events attributed to cobimetinib were diarrhea, rash, fatigue, edema, nausea, and vomiting. In patients treated at the 60-mg (21/7) or 100-mg (14/14) dose, one unconfirmed complete response and 6 confirmed partial responses were observed. All responses occurred in melanoma patients; 6 harbored the BRAF(V600E) mutation. Conclusions Cobimetinib is generally well tolerated and durable responses were observed in BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma patients. Evaluation of cobimetinib in combination with other therapies is ongoing. PMID:27424159

  7. Metabolism of orally administered tauroursodeoxycholic acid in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Setchell, K D; Rodrigues, C M; Podda, M; Crosignani, A

    1996-03-01

    The metabolism of tauroursodeoxycholic acid orally administered and its effects on the bile acid pool of patients with asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic primary biliary cirrhosis is described. Patients were randomly assigned 500, 1000, or 1500 mg/day of tauroursodeoxycholate for six months. Biliary and serum bile acids were measured before and during treatment by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high performance liquid chromatography. During tauroursodeoxycholate administration, the proportion of total ursodeoxycholate in bile reached mean (SEM) 34.4 (4.5)%, 32.8 (2.8)%, and 41.6 (3.0)% with doses of 500, 1000, and 1500 mg/day, respectively. Significant decreases in the proportions of chenodeoxycholate and cholate resulted. The glycine/taurine ratio of the biliary bile acid pool decreased from 1.9 at baseline, to 1.1 with the highest dose. Ursodeoxycholate in bile was conjugated with glycine and taurine, indicating that tauroursodeoxycholate undergoes significant deconjugation and reconjugation during its enterohepatic recycling. The proportion of lithocholate in bile remained unchanged. Fasting serum conjugated ursodeoxycholate concentration positively correlated with the tauroursodeoxycholate dose, and the increased proportion of ursodeoxycholate was accompanied by substantial decreases in the endogenous bile acids. Compared with previously published data for ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, these findings indicate that the shift toward a more hydrophilic bile acid pool is greater and potentially more favourable with tauroursodeoxycholate, and this is because of the reduced intestinal biotransformation of tauroursodeoxycholate. PMID:8675100

  8. Dose-response toxicity studies on tributoxyethyl phosphate orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Laham, S.; Szabo, J.; Long, G.; Schrader, K.

    1985-08-01

    The response of the peripheral nervous system to various dose levels of tributoxyethyl phosphate (TBOP) was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of randomized female and male rats (10 rats/gender/dose level) were administered a single oral dose of TBOP (1.0 to 3.2 g/kg for females;1.0 to 9.0 g/kg for males). Physiological parameters were measured in surviving rats three weeks following TBOP administration. A significant reduction (p<0.05) in caudal nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was observed in both female and male rats. Light and electron microscopic examination of sciatic nerve sections showed degenerative changes in both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of female (2.0 g/kg) and male (6.8 g/kg) groups. Advanced degeneration was observed only in the highest dose level of both genders (3.2 g/kg for females; 8.0 and 9.0 g/kg for males). Although similar morphological changes were observed in both genders, females were more susceptible than males to the toxic effects of this compound.

  9. Effect of alpha-chloralose on disposition and pharmacological action of orally administered chlorzoxazone in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, I; Takeuchi, Y; Fukumori, Y; Fukuda, T

    1991-08-01

    The pharmacodynamic behavior of orally administered chlorzoxazone (CZX) was studied in rats. From the time course of CZX plasma concentration data under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg, i.p.) anesthesia, it was found that CZX obeyed a one-compartment model with first-order absorption. The pharmacological response intensity of CZX on the crossed extensor reflex was closely related to the plasma concentration data via Hill's equation under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg) anesthesia, but not at a 150 mg/kg dose. The influence of alpha-chloralose at the latter dose on CZX pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics appeared to be due to the pharmacodynamic interaction of alpha-chloralose and CZX, thus suggesting that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic concept proposed by Smolen was not applicable to CZX's behavior at such a dose in rats. Under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg) anesthesia, the biophase compartment was determined to be identical to the central compartment using our proposed model. On the basis of the effect of anesthetics on drug behavior, one may select an appropriate anesthetic dose to evaluate the relationship between the plasma levels and the onset and duration of the drug action. At the higher dose of alpha-chloralose (150 mg/kg), the free fraction of CZX was increased and a possible enhancement in CZX action was suggested. PMID:1774620

  10. [Orally administered polaprezinc significantly improves taste disorders in ovarian cancer patient undergoing chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Shota; Yanase, Toru; Hata, Yuki; Tamura, Ryo; Tsuneki, Ikunosuke; Tamura, Masaki; Kurabayashi, Takumi

    2011-04-01

    The subject was a 75-year-old female who was receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin(TC)chemotherapy every other week after surgery for ovarian cancer. She greatly complained of taste disorders after four cycles(of every other week administration) of TC chemotherapy. To understand how the taste disorder was caused by chemotherapy objectively, taste examinations were conducted for the patient in our department. These examinations were conducted after receiving the informed consent from the patient. The authors conducted taste examinations for the patient using serum zinc measurement, tongue cell culture, electrogustometry, and filter paper disc tests(before and after starting chemotherapy), and found that her serum zinc level fell significantly after four cycles of chemotherapy. Orally disintegrating tablets of polaprezinc were then administered to the patient, after which the subjective symptom of taste disorder improved. Her serum zinc level increased, and the electrogustometric threshold rapidly fell(an improvement). The filter paper disc test showed some improvement, particularly in the glossopharyngeal nerve and the greater petrosal nerve field. PMID:21499007

  11. Effect of self-administered daily irrigation with 0.02% SnF2 on periodontal disease activity.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P; Quinn, R; Buchanan, S; Eakle, W; Chambers, D

    1985-07-01

    To determine the effect on periodontal health of a daily self-administered irrigation with 0.02% stannous fluoride (SnF2) solution, 28 subjects who had moderate to advanced periodontitis were randomly divided into 3 groups: a control group (n = 9) which used no irrigation, a group (n = 8) which used a self-administered water irrigation device (Water Pik) daily with water (H2O group) and a group (n = 11) which used the Water Pik in a similar manner but with SnF2 solution (SnF2 group). All subjects were instructed in routine tooth brushing and flossing but received no other periodontal treatment. 4 study sites were selected from each patient which had pocket depths greater than 4 mm and bleeding upon probing. Plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, pocket depth, loss of attachment, and microbiologic samples of subgingival plaque for morphologic determinations were collected from all study sites at baseline, 2, 6, and 10 weeks. A cross-over was then initiated for 2 additional monthly checks in which the H2O group changed to SnF2 and the SnF2 group was divided into 2 subgroups which either continued to use SnF2 or changed to H2O. The control group completed the study at the beginning of the crossover. The clinical data showed significantly more improvement in periodontal health during the first 10 weeks for the SnF2 group (p less than 0.01). After cross-over, the clinical data indicated the group that changed from H2O to SnF2 significantly improved their periodontal health, while the group that changed from SnF2 to H2O became worse. The microbiologic data showed trends which agreed with the clinical data during the first 10 weeks but were less significant. After cross-over, the %s of motile rods and spirochetes were too small (0-7%) to establish statistically significant changes considering the accuracy of the technique used. PMID:3860511

  12. Pharmacokinetics of AT-2266 Administered Orally to Mice, Rats, Dogs, and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Kurobe, Nobuyuki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Ohue, Tomio; Takase, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Masanao

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of AT-2266 (1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-1,8-naphthyridine- 3-carboxylic acid) were studied in various experimental animals and compared in a number of aspects with those of norfloxacin. Both agents were administered orally. The mean peak plasma levels of AT-2266 in mice, rats, and dogs (given a single dose of 50 mg/kg for mice and rats and 25 mg/kg for dogs) were 2.39, 1.63, and 5.00 μg/ml, respectively, with elimination half-lives of 2.24, 2.81, and 5.76 h. The respective mean plasma levels of norfloxacin at similar dosages were 0.510, 0.410, and 0.700 μg/ml; elimination half-lives were 1.40, 2.35, and 6.06 h. In dogs repeatedly dosed with 25 mg of AT-2266 per kg every 12 h, the mean peak plasma levels after the third and fifth doses were about 1.4 times those after the first dose. The binding rates of AT-2266 and norfloxacin to plasma of mice, rats, and dogs and to human serum ranged from 27.6 to 40.2% and 39.8 to 44.2%, respectively. In rats receiving a single dose of 50 mg/kg, the respective mean peak levels of AT-2266 in plasma, lung, muscle, and kidney were 2.47, 4.60, 5.35, and 33.9 μg/ml or g, whereas those of norfloxacin were 0.234, 0.390, 0.272, and 2.05 μg/ml or g. AT-2266 was widely distributed in tissues of dogs and monkeys after repeated dosage. The respective 24-h recoveries of AT-2266 from urine of mice, rats, and dogs after single doses of 50, 50, and 25 mg/kg were 56.6, 40.5, and 64.1%, and recoveries of norfloxacin at these doses were 4.40, 2.91, and 5.34%. The respective 24-h recoveries of AT-2266 from bile and feces of rats given a single dose of 50 mg/kg were 2.47 and 52.7%. Bioautography of plasma and urine indicated that AT-2266 was metabolized to but a slight degree. The results indicate that AT-2266 is better than norfloxacin in oral absorption and similar to the latter in stability to metabolic inactivation. Images PMID:6226241

  13. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  14. Orally Administered DTPA Di-ethyl Ester for Decorporation of 241Am in dogs: Assessment of Safety and Efficacy in an Inhalation-Contamination Model

    PubMed Central

    Huckle, James E.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Agha, Bushra J.; Susick, Robert L.; Mumper, Russell J.; Jay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for decorporation of 241Am, however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The diethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Materials and methods Single dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-hours post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a 241Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Results Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased 241Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of 241Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. Conclusions The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of 241Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies. PMID:25912343

  15. Effects of Once-Daily Oral and Transdermal Methylphenidate on Sleep Behavior of Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Bukstein, Oscar G.; Lopez, Frank A.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Findling, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Methylphenidate is a leading first-line treatment for ADHD (AD/HD). This stimulant has long been suspected to adversely affect sleeping patterns of treated individuals, especially children. There are few studies on the effects of recently developed longer-acting methylphenidate treatments, such as once-daily oral or transdermal…

  16. Orally administered betaine has an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine and plasma homocysteine concentrations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ursula; Törrönen, Anneli; Meririnne, Esa; Saarinen, Markku; Alfthan, Georg; Aro, Antti; Uusitupa, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Betaine, i.e., trimethylglycine, is linked to homocysteine metabolism. A 3-mo daily betaine supplementation decreased even normal plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in humans. The pharmacokinetic characteristics and metabolism of betaine in humans have not been investigated in detail. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of orally administered betaine and its acute effect on plasma tHcy concentrations. Healthy volunteers (n = 10; 3 men, 7 women) with normal body weight (mean +/- SD, 69.5 +/- 17.0 kg), 40.8 +/- 12.4 y old, participated in the study. The betaine doses were 1, 3, and 6 g. The doses were mixed with 150 mL of orange juice and ingested after a 12-h overnight fast by each volunteer according to a randomized double-blind crossover design. Blood samples were drawn for 24 h and a 24-h urine collection was performed. Orally administered betaine had an immediate and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration. Single doses of 3 and 6 g lowered plasma tHcy concentrations (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001, respectively), unlike the 1-g dose. After the highest dose, the concentrations remained low during the 24 h of monitoring. The change in plasma tHcy concentration was linearly associated with betaine dose (P = 0.006) and serum betaine concentration (R2 = 0.17, P = 0.025). The absorption and elimination of betaine were dose dependent. The urinary excretion of betaine seemed to increase with an increasing betaine dose, although a very small proportion of ingested betaine was excreted via urine. In conclusion, a single dose of orally administered betaine had an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration and resulted in lowered plasma tHcy concentrations within 2 h in healthy subjects. PMID:16365055

  17. Consequences of Daily Administered Parathyroid Hormone on Myeloma Growth, Bone Disease, and Molecular Profiling of Whole Myelomatous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Angela; Ling, Wen; Li, Xin; Khan, Sharmin; Wang, Yuping; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of osteolytic bone lesions in multiple myeloma is caused by an uncoupling of osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation. Current management of myeloma bone disease is limited to the use of antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effects of daily administered parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone disease and myeloma growth, and we investigated molecular mechanisms by analyzing gene expression profiles of unique myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells engrafted in SCID-rab and SCID-hu mouse models. PTH resulted in increased bone mineral density of myelomatous bones and reduced tumor burden, which reflected the dependence of primary myeloma cells on the bone marrow microenvironment. Treatment with PTH also increased bone mineral density of uninvolved murine bones in myelomatous hosts and bone mineral density of implanted human bones in nonmyelomatous hosts. In myelomatous bone, PTH markedly increased the number of osteoblasts and bone-formation parameters, and the number of osteoclasts was unaffected or moderately reduced. Pretreatment with PTH before injecting myeloma cells increased bone mineral density of the implanted bone and delayed tumor progression. Human global gene expression profiling of myelomatous bones from SCID-hu mice treated with PTH or saline revealed activation of multiple distinct pathways involved in bone formation and coupling; involvement of Wnt signaling was prominent. Treatment with PTH also downregulated markers typically expressed by osteoclasts and myeloma cells, and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress and inflammation. PTH receptors were not expressed by myeloma cells, and PTH had no effect on myeloma cell growth in vitro. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that PTH-induced bone formation in myelomatous bones is mediated by activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in osteoblastogenesis and attenuated bone resorption

  18. Oral impacts affecting daily performance in a low dental disease Thai population.

    PubMed

    Adulyanon, S; Vourapukjaru, J; Sheiham, A

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the study was to measure incidence of oral impacts on daily performances and their related features in a low dental disease population. 501 people aged 35-44 years in 16 rural villages in Ban Phang district, Khon Kaen, Thailand, were interviewed about oral impacts on nine physical, psychological and social aspects of performance during the past 6 months, and then had an oral examination. The clinical and behavioural data showed that the sample had low caries (DMFT = 2.7) and a low utilization of dental services. 73.6% of all subjects had at least one daily performance affected by an oral impact. The highest incidence of performances affected were Eating (49.7%), Emotional stability (46.5%) and Smiling (26.1%). Eating, Emotional stability and Cleaning teeth performances had a high frequency or long duration of impacts, but a low severity. The low frequency performances; Physical activities, Major role activity and Sleeping were rated as high severity. Pain and discomfort were mainly perceived as the causes of impacts (40.1%) for almost every performance except Smiling. Toothache was the major causal oral condition (32.7%) of almost all aspects of performance. It was concluded that this low caries people have as high an incidence of oral impacts as industrialized, high dental disease populations. Frequency and severity presented the paradoxical effect on different performances and should both be taken into account for overall estimation of impacts. PMID:9007354

  19. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. PMID:25278142

  20. The Effects of Orally Administered Beta-Glucan on Innate Immune Responses in Humans, a Randomized Open-Label Intervention Pilot-Study

    PubMed Central

    Leentjens, Jenneke; Quintin, Jessica; Gerretsen, Jelle; Kox, Matthijs; Pickkers, Peter; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale To prevent or combat infection, increasing the effectiveness of the immune response is highly desirable, especially in case of compromised immune system function. However, immunostimulatory therapies are scarce, expensive, and often have unwanted side-effects. β-glucans have been shown to exert immunostimulatory effects in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal models. Oral β-glucan is inexpensive and well-tolerated, and therefore may represent a promising immunostimulatory compound for human use. Methods We performed a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study in 15 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to either the β -glucan (n = 10) or the control group (n = 5). Subjects in the β-glucan group ingested β-glucan 1000 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood was sampled at various time-points to determine β-glucan serum levels, perform ex vivo stimulation of leukocytes, and analyze microbicidal activity. Results β-glucan was barely detectable in serum of volunteers at all time-points. Furthermore, neither cytokine production nor microbicidal activity of leukocytes were affected by orally administered β-glucan. Conclusion The present study does not support the use of oral β-glucan to enhance innate immune responses in humans. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01727895 PMID:25268806

  1. Daily biofilm control and oral health: consensus on the epidemiological challenge--Latin American Advisory Panel.

    PubMed

    Rode, Sigmar de Mello; Gimenez, Xiomara; Montoya, Victoria Criado; Gómez, Mariel; Blanc, Silvia Lopez de; Medina, Marco; Salinas, Elmer; Pedroza, Janeth; Zaldivar-Chiapa, Rosi Maria; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Cortelli, José Roberto; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of dental plaque biofilm has evolved since the nonspecific plaque hypothesis that considered plaque as a nonspecific mass of native microorganisms that, because of lack of oral hygiene, builds up in proportions great enough to overcome the host resistance threshold and affect the tooth structure and tooth supporting tissues. A great diversity of microorganisms-over 700 species-was detected in the oral cavity, and evidence shows that the investigation of specific microorganisms or associations of microorganisms as etiological agents for periodontal diseases and caries is not a simplistic approach. Although clinical evidence shows that oral mechanical hygiene is fundamental to prevent and control caries and periodontal disease, it is important to highlight that optimal control is not achieved by most individuals. Thus the complementary use of chemotherapeutic agents has been investigated as a way to overcome the deficiencies of mechanical oral hygiene habits, insofar as they reduce both plaque formation and gingival inflammation, and represent a valid strategy to change the biofilm and maintain dental and periodontal health. The role of the dental professional is to monitor patients and offer them the best recommendations to preserve oral health throughout their life. With this in mind, chemical control should be indicated as part of daily oral hygiene, together with mechanical procedures, for all individuals who present supragingival and/or subgingival biofilm, taking into account age, physical and/or psychological limitations, allergies, and other factors. PMID:23318756

  2. An orally administered DNA vaccine targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 inhibits lung carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Xin; Jin, Cong Guo; Zhou, Yong Chun; Navab, Roya; Jakobsen, Kristine Raaby; Chen, Xiao Qun; Li, Jia; Li, Ting Ting; Luo, Lu; Wang, Xi Cai

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality and 5-year survival rate is very low worldwide. Recent studies show that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) signaling pathway contributes to lung cancer progression. So we hypothesize that an oral DNA vaccine that targets VEGFR-3 carried by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium strain SL3261 has impacts on lung cancer progression. In this study, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed appreciable inhibition of tumor growth and tumor lymphatic microvessels in lung cancer mice model. Moreover, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed remarkable increases in both VEGFR-3-specific antibody levels and cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed a significant increase in the levels of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell intracellular cytokine expression (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α). After inoculation with murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell numbers obviously declined in control groups whereas high levels were maintained in the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine group. These results demonstrated that the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine could induce specific humoral and cellular immune responses and then significantly inhibit lung carcinoma growth via suppressing lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26376999

  3. Do self-efficacy and depression predict oral impacts on daily performances across time? A 2-yr follow-up of students in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Åstrøm, Anne N; Lie, Stein A; Mbawalla, Hawa

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the longitudinal validity of the oral impacts on daily performance (OIDP) and to identify psychosocial determinants, in terms of self-efficacy and depressive symptoms, of the OIDP across time. Following conceptual frameworks of oral health, it was hypothesized that sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors predict oral impacts across time at both population- averaged and person-specific levels. Whether the effects of sociodemographic and clinical factors were accounted for, totally or in part, by psychosocial factors were also investigated. Self administered questionnaires and oral clinical examinations at baseline (2009) and follow-up (2011) were completed by 1,714 and 727 secondary school students, respectively. Generalized equalized equations and a random intercept model were used to account for the dependency in repeated observations. Mean OIDP change scores were negative (worsened) among those who reported worsened self-reported oral health. Psychosocial, clinical, and sociodemographic factors were independently associated with oral impacts at the population-averaged and person-specific levels. Mediation of sociodemographic and clinical variables according to psychosocial variables was not observed. Satisfactory longitudinal evaluative properties of the OIDP, and independent effects of psychosocial factors on oral impacts across time, were confirmed among secondary school students in Tanzania. PMID:27086611

  4. A Pharmacokinetic Study Comparing Eslicarbazepine Acetate Administered Orally as a Crushed or Intact Tablet in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Kharidia, Jahnavi; Schutz, Ralph; Blum, David; Cheng, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    The relative bioequivalence of crushed versus intact eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) tablets (800 mg) administered orally in healthy adults was evaluated in an open-label, randomized, 2-period crossover study with a 5-day washout between treatments. Sample blood levels of eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine were determined; pharmacokinetic parameters were derived for eslicarbazepine. Bioequivalence was established if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the geometric mean treatment ratios of eslicarbazepine AUC(0-∞) and Cmax were within the prespecified 80%-125% range. Twenty-seven subjects in the intent-to-treat population (n = 28) completed both treatment periods. Eslicarbazepine exposure measures were similar for crushed versus intact ESL tablets: average Cmax , 11 700 versus 11 500 ng/mL; AUC(0-∞) , 225 000 versus 234 000 ng·h/mL; AUC(0-last) , 222 000 versus 231 000 ng·h/mL, respectively. Geometric least squares mean ratios (90%CIs) comparing eslicarbazepine exposure measures were within the 80%-125% range (Cmax , 102.63% [97.07%-108.51%]; AUC(0-∞) , 96.72% [94.36%-99.13%]; AUC0-last , 96.69% [94.24%-99.21%]). In conclusion, ESL administered orally as a crushed tablet sprinkled on applesauce, or intact were bioequivalent in healthy subjects. Eslicarbazepine bioavailability was not significantly altered by crushing, indicating that ESL tablets can be administered intact or crushed. PMID:27249205

  5. Oral antihistamine or nasal steroid in hay fever: a double-blind double-dummy comparative study of once daily oral astemizole vs twice daily nasal beclomethasone dipropionate.

    PubMed

    Wood, S F

    1986-05-01

    Seventy-four patients with a well documented history of seasonal allergic rhinitis were randomly allocated to receive either astemizole 10 mg orally per day or beclomethasone 100 micrograms in each nostril twice daily on a double-blind double-dummy basis. The patients were studied in a general practice setting and were seen at entry, during the study and at the end of the study by a single observer, the author. Assessment was by diary card incorporating five 10 cm visual analogue scales related to the four symptoms of sneezing, rhinorrhoea, blocked nose and itchy eyes and an overall assessment of hay fever symptoms. Patients were asked if the medication had upset them in any way at each observer assessment. Symptom severity, as recorded by the visual analogue scales, was not significantly different for sneezing, rhinorrhoea, blocked nose or overall between the two groups but the symptom scores for itchy eyes were significantly better for the astemizole group. Adverse effects were minimal and of a minor nature only. There was no real difference between the two groups regarding adverse effects. The study suggests that oral astemizole is at least as good as nasal beclomethasone in the maintenance treatment of hay fever and that it offers the additional advantage of improved control of eye symptoms. PMID:3087656

  6. A polychromatic action spectrum for photosensitivity to orally administered 8-methoxypsoralen in humans.

    PubMed

    Bech-Thomsen, N; Wulf, H C

    1994-01-01

    The action spectrum for producing minimal phototoxic erythema after oral administration of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) was determined in the range of 312-368 nm in 12 human volunteers using six different UV radiation sources. The peak sensitivity was found to be at 343 nm. The 8-MOP photosensitivity was at a high level (> or = 0.75 of maximum) between 336 and 355 nm. Conventional UVA radiation sources, like the Philips TL/09R tube, have a high energy output within 335 and 355 nm, and are therefore highly recommended in oral psoralen plus UVA radiation treatment. PMID:8313631

  7. Anthocyanidins but not anthocyanins inhibit P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein extrusion - possible implication for orally administered drugs.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim

    2016-06-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition represents a promising therapeutic strategy for oncologic patients. The inhibition by naturally occurring anthocyans would bring certain benefits. Unfortunately, due to the low bioavailability and consequently low blood level, they cannot be used for cancer therapy. However, due to the food supplementation, significant concentration can raise up in the intestine, where P-gp is abundantly expressed. As many drugs are orally taken, simultaneous administration might affect the concentration of these drugs in the blood. Here, we found that anthocyanidins (aglycons) but not anthocyanins (glycosides) can significantly inhibit P-gp up to 60% of positive control, verapamil. This inhibitory activity was observed for 500 μm concentrations of malvidin and pelargonidin. We conclude that these compounds may be the source of food-drug interactions either for orally taken drugs or for intravenously administered drugs eliminated via biliary excretion which are the substrates of P-gp. PMID:26821071

  8. COMPARATIVE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION OF VARIOUS GLYCOL ETHERS ORALLY ADMINISTERED TO FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oral dosing of adult rats F344 rats with the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) or its principal metabolite 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA) results in the suppression of the primary plaque-forming cell (PFC) response to trinitrophenyl-lipopolysaccharide (TNP_LPS). n the present study,...

  9. Effects of Orally Administered Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt on Dry Skin Conditions in Mice and Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Watanabe, Fumiko; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Etsushi; Fukagawa, Mitsuhiko; Hasumi, Keiji; Suzuki, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a coenzyme involved in the redox-cycling system. The supplemental use of PQQ has been examined based on its properties as an antioxidant and redox modulator. Although an animal study on deficiency of PQQ suggested that PQQ contributes to skin conditions, its efficacy in humans has not been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of orally administered PQQ on skin moisture, viscoelasticity, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) both in dry skin mouse models and in healthy female subjects with a subjective symptom of dry skin. In our dry skin mouse model study, oral intake of PQQ (0.0089%, w/w, in the diet for 6 wk) significantly decreased the number of mast cells in the dermis and the number of CD3⁺ T-cells in the epidermis. In our human study, oral intake of PQQ (20 mg/d for 8 wk) significantly inhibited the increase in TEWL on the forearm. Finally, subject questionnaires showed positive impressions for the improvement of skin conditions. These results suggest that oral intake of PQQ improves skin conditions both in female subjects with dry skin and in mice with a compromised skin barrier function. PMID:26226961

  10. Modulation of human humoral immune response through orally administered bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    He, F; Tuomola, E; Arvilommi, H; Salminen, S

    2001-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized into two treatment groups and consumed liquid prepackaged bovine colostrum whey and placebo for 7 days. On days 1, 3 and 5, an attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a oral vaccine was given to all subjects to mimic an enteropathogenic infection. The circulating antibody secreting cells and the expression of phagocytosis receptors of the subjects before and after oral immunization were measured with the ELISPOT assay and flow cytometry. All subjects responded well to the vaccine. No significant differences were observed in ELISPOT values for IgA, IgG, IgM, Fcgamma and CR receptor expression on neutrophils and monocytes between the two groups. There was a trend towards greater increase in specific IgA among the subjects receiving their vaccine with bovine colostrum. These results suggest that bovine colostrum may possess some potential to enhance human special immune responses. PMID:11549415

  11. Evaluation of orally administered PEGylated phenylalanine ammonia lyase in mice for the treatment of Phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Christineh N; Kang, Tse Siang; Gámez, Alejandra; Scriver, Charles R; Stevens, Raymond C

    2011-11-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), a Mendelian autosomal recessive phenotype (OMIM 261600), is an inborn error of metabolism causing impaired postnatal cognitive development in the absence of treatment. We used the Pah(enu2/enu2) PKU mouse model to study oral enzyme substitution therapy with various chemically modified formulations of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (Av-p.C503S/p.C565S/p.F18A PAL). In vivo studies with the most therapeutically effective formulation (5kDa PEG-Av-p.C503S/p.C565S/p.F18A PAL) revealed that this conjugate, given orally, yielded statistically significant (p=0.0029) and therapeutically relevant reduction (~40%) in plasma phenylalanine (Phe) levels. Phe reduction occurred in a dose- and loading-dependent manner; sustained clinically and statistically significant reduction of plasma Phe levels was observed with treatment ranging between 0.3 IU and 9 IU and with more frequent and smaller dosings. Oral PAL therapy could potentially serve as an adjunct therapy, perhaps with dietary treatment, and will work independently of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), correcting such forms of hyperphenylalaninemias regardless of the PAH mutations carried by the patient. PMID:21803624

  12. Oral drug dosage forms administered to hospitalized children: Analysis of 117,665 oral administrations in a French paediatric hospital over a 1-year period.

    PubMed

    Lajoinie, A; Henin, E; Nguyen, K A; Malik, S; Mimouni, Y; Sapori, J M; Bréant, V; Cochat, P; Kassai, B

    2016-03-16

    Selecting the most appropriate dosage form, that ensures safe administration and adherence of medications, is a major issue for children. Marketed drugs, however, have rarely been tested for their use in children. There is a need for more data on drug formulations administered to children to identify unmet needs, and drive future paediatric research. We observed, over a 12-month follow-up, 117,665 oral drug administrations to 1998 hospitalized children. Nine-tenths belonged to five Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classes: Alimentary tract & metabolism, Nervous system, Cardiovascular system, Anti-infectives for systemic use and Blood & blood forming organs, one third of drug doses administered to school-age children and adolescents were liquids, and extemporaneous capsules were commonly used in younger children. Our study shows that despite the advantages of solid dosage forms and recent evidence from randomized controlled trials showing their acceptability in infants, they are seldom used in paediatric practice. PMID:26804927

  13. Difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Durezol®) administered two times daily for managing ocular inflammation and pain following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen; Lorenz, Douglas; Peace, James; McLeod, Kimberly; Crockett, RS; Vogel, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of twice-daily difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Durezol®) versus placebo administered before surgery for managing inflammation and pain following cataract extraction. Methods: Eligible subjects (N = 121) were randomized 2:1 to topical treatment with 1 drop difluprednate or placebo administered twice daily for 16 days, followed by a 14-day tapering period. Dosing was initiated 24 hours before unilateral ocular surgery. Clinical signs of inflammation (anterior chamber [AC] cell and flare grade, bulbar conjunctival injection, ciliary injection, corneal edema, and chemosis), ocular pain/discomfort, intraocular pressure (IOP), and adverse events were assessed. Results: Clearing of inflammation on day 14 (primary endpoint), defined as an AC cell grade of 0 (≤5 cells) and a flare grade of 0 (complete absence), was achieved in a significantly greater percentage of subjects treated with difluprednate, compared with placebo (74.7% vs 42.5%; P = 0.0006). A significantly greater percentage of difluprednate-treated subjects were free of ocular pain/discomfort on day 14 than placebo-treated subjects (64.6% vs 30.0%; P = 0.0004). Three subjects (3.7%) in the difluprednate group had a clinically significant IOP rise (defined as ≥21 mmHg and a change from baseline ≥10 mmHg at same visit). Conclusions: Difluprednate, administered 2 times daily starting 24 hours before cataract surgery, was highly effective for managing ocular inflammation and relieving pain and discomfort postoperatively. Difluprednate was well tolerated and provides a convenient twice-daily option for managing postoperative ocular inflammation. PMID:20856594

  14. Viper and Cobra Venom Neutralization by Alginate Coated Multicomponent Polyvalent Antivenom Administered by the Oral Route

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Kundu, P. P.; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-01-01

    Background Snake bite causes greater mortality than most of the other neglected tropical diseases. Snake antivenom, although effective in minimizing mortality in developed countries, is not equally so in developing countries due to its poor availability in remote snake infested areas as, and when, required. An alternative approach in this direction could be taken by making orally deliverable polyvalent antivenom formulation, preferably under a globally integrated strategy, for using it as a first aid during transit time from remote trauma sites to hospitals. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, multiple components of polyvalent antivenom were entrapped in alginate. Structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, entrapment efficiency, loading capacity, swelling study, in vitro pH sensitive release, acid digestion, mucoadhesive property and venom neutralization were studied in in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that alginate retained its mucoadhesive, acid protective and pH sensitive swelling property after entrapping antivenom. After pH dependent release from alginate beads, antivenom (ASVS) significantly neutralized phospholipaseA2 activity, hemolysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lethality of venom. In ex vivo mice intestinal preparation, ASVS was absorbed significantly through the intestine and it inhibited venom lethality which indicated that all the components of antivenom required for neutralization of venom lethality were retained despite absorption across the intestinal layer. Results from in vivo studies indicated that orally delivered ASVS can significantly neutralize venom effects, depicted by protection against lethality, decreased hemotoxicity and renal toxicity caused by russell viper venom. Conclusions/Significance Alginate was effective in entrapping all the structural components of ASVS, which on release and intestinal absorption effectively reconstituted the function of antivenom in neutralizing viper and cobra

  15. Allergy to nickel: first results on patients administered with an oral hyposensitization therapy.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; De Marco, G; Persechino, S; Narcisi, A; Camplone, G

    2009-01-01

    Nickel sulphate allergy is the most common contact allergy. In fact, nickel sulphate is an ubiquitous element, contained in various objects and food; it occurs in igneous rocks, as a free metal and together with iron, but it is also a component of living organism, mainly vegetables. We carried out a clinical trial of oral hyposensitization therapy with low doses of nickel in a group of 67 patients affected by systemic allergy to this sensitizer element. We obtained good results on consequent tolerance to nickel in treated patients. PMID:19822100

  16. Pharmacokinetics of cephradine administered intravenously and orally to young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Schwinghammer, T L; Norden, C W; Gill, E

    1990-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of IV and oral cephradine in healthy young male and female volunteers (ages 19 to 25, n = 10) were compared to those of older individuals (ages 65 to 81, n = 9). Subjects received 1 gram of cephradine by a 5-minute intravenous (IV) infusion followed the next day by a 1-gram oral dose. Serial serum and urine samples collected over a period of 12 hours after the dose were analyzed for cephradine concentration by a microbiologic assay. After IV administration, mean serum cephradine concentrations in the elderly group were significantly higher at both 6 hours (1.52 +/- 0.41 mcg/mL) and 8 hours (0.73 +/- 0.22 mcg/mL) than in the young group at 6 hours (0.43 +/- 0.11 mcg/mL). Total systemic clearance was significantly lower (2.64 +/- 0.34 vs. 4.81 +/- 0.59 ml/min/kg) and the elimination half-life was significantly longer (1.71 +/- 0.20 vs 1.12 +/- 0.13 hours) in the elderly group (P = .0001). Systemic cephradine clearance correlated positively with creatinine clearance (r2 = 0.34, P = .0110) and negatively with age (r2 = 0.79, P = .0052). The mean volume of distribution was not significantly different between the two groups. Mean renal clearance was significantly lower in the elderly group (P = .0001), but more than 80% of the dose was excreted in the urine within 6 hours in both groups. After oral administration, the mean peak concentration and time to peak concentration did not differ between groups. The relative oral bioavailability was approximately 94% in both groups. The mean serum concentrations in the elderly were higher at both 6 and 8 hours than in the young group at 6 hours. There were no differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female subjects. Because of reduced cephradine clearance secondary to an age-related decline in renal function, administration of cephradine every 8 hours, rather than every 6 hours, may be sufficient in elderly patients. PMID:2229449

  17. Discovery of sarolaner: A novel, orally administered, broad-spectrum, isoxazoline ectoparasiticide for dogs.

    PubMed

    McTier, Tom L; Chubb, Nathan; Curtis, Michael P; Hedges, Laura; Inskeep, Gregory A; Knauer, Christopher S; Menon, Sanjay; Mills, Brian; Pullins, Aleah; Zinser, Erich; Woods, Debra J; Meeus, Patrick

    2016-05-30

    The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide, sarolaner, was identified during a lead optimization program for an orally-active compound with efficacy against fleas and ticks on dogs. The aim of the discovery program was to identify a novel isoxazoline specifically for use in companion animals, beginning with de novo synthesis in the Zoetis research laboratories. The sarolaner molecule has unique structural features important for its potency and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, including spiroazetidine and sulfone moieties. The flea and tick activity resides in the chirally pure S-enantiomer, which was purified to alleviate potential off-target effects from the inactive enantiomer. The mechanism of action was established in electrophysiology assays using CHO-K1 cell lines stably expressing cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) RDL (resistance-to-dieldrin) genes for assessment of GABA-gated chloride channel (GABACls) pharmacology. As expected, sarolaner inhibited GABA-elicited currents at both susceptible (CfRDL-A285) and resistant (CfRDL-S285) flea GABACls with similar potency. Initial whole organism screening was conducted in vitro using a blood feeding assay against C. felis. Compounds which demonstrated robust activity in the flea feed assay were subsequently tested in an in vitro ingestion assay against the soft tick, Ornithodoros turicata. Efficacious compounds which were confirmed safe in rodents at doses up to 30mg/kg were progressed to safety, PK and efficacy studies in dogs. In vitro sarolaner demonstrated an LC80 of 0.3μg/mL against C. felis and an LC100 of 0.003μg/mL against O. turicata. In a head-to-head comparative in vitro assay with both afoxolaner and fluralaner, sarolaner demonstrated superior flea and tick potency. In exploratory safety studies in dogs, sarolaner demonstrated safety in dogs≥8 weeks of age upon repeated monthly dosing at up to 20mg/kg. Sarolaner was rapidly and well absorbed following oral dosing. Time to maximum plasma concentration

  18. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Katherine A.; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, noninvasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50 mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat. PMID:23500335

  19. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  20. Pre-systemic metabolism of orally administered drugs and strategies to overcome it.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2014-10-28

    The oral bioavailability of numerous drugs is not only limited by poor solubility and/or poor membrane permeability as addressed by the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) but also by a pre-systemic metabolism taking place to a high extent in the intestine. Enzymes responsible for metabolic reactions in the intestine include cytochromes P450 (CYP450), transferases, peptidases and proteases. Furthermore, in the gut nucleases, lipases as well as glycosidases influence the metabolic pathway of drugs and nutrients. A crucial role is also played by the intestinal microflora able to metabolize a wide broad of pharmaceutical compounds. Strategies to provide a protective effect towards an intestinal pre-systemic metabolism are based on the co-administration of enzyme inhibitor being optimally immobilized on unabsorbable and undegradable polymeric excipients in order to keep them concentrated there where an inhibitory effect is needed. Furthermore, certain polymeric excipients such as polyacrylates exhibit per se enzyme inhibitory properties. In addition, by incorporating drugs in cyclodextrines, in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) or liposomes a protective effect towards an intestinal enzymatic attack can be achieved. Being aware of the important role of this pre-systemic metabolism by integrating it in the BCS as third dimension and keeping strategies to overcome this enzymatic barrier in mind, the therapeutic efficacy of many orally given drugs can certainly be substantially improved. PMID:25128718

  1. Comparison of two formulations of buprenorphine in cats administered by the oral transmucosal route.

    PubMed

    Bortolami, Elisa; Slingsby, Louisa; Love, Emma J

    2012-08-01

    This randomised, blinded, cross-over study investigated the ease of oral transmucosal administration of two formulations of buprenorphine using glucose as a control in 12 cats. The cats received three treatments: buprenorphine multi-dose, buprenorphine and the equivalent volume of glucose 5%. Ease of treatment administration, observation of swallowing, changes in pupil size, sedation, salivation, vomiting, behaviour and food intake were assessed. The data were analysed using MLwiN and multi-level modelling. Ease of administration of buprenorphine multi-dose was statistically different from glucose (P <0.001), and the administration of all treatments became easier over the study periods. Swallowing was not statistically different between groups (P >0.05). Mydriasis was evident after the administration of both formulations of buprenorphine. Sedation, salivation, vomiting, behavioural changes or in-appetence were not observed after any treatment. Cats tolerated oral transmucosal administration of glucose better than buprenorphine multi-dose, while buprenorphine administration was tolerated as well as glucose. PMID:22403414

  2. Studies on genotoxicity of orally administered crocidolite asbestos in rats: implications for ingested asbestos induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Varga, C; Pocsai, Z; Horváth, G; Timbrell, V

    1996-01-01

    The early genotoxic action of oral exposure to UICC crocidolite asbestos fibres was studied in different short-term tests. Fischer-344 rats were gavaged with 50 mg/b.w.kg untreated asbestos fibres and fibres which had been allowed to adsorb benzo(a)pyrene molecules from extremely low concentration (0.25-2.5 microg/ml) aqueous solutions. This system can be considered a model for the drinking of potable water contaminated by asbestos fibres together with biologically active organic micro-pollutants. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay was performed on concentrated urine and serum samples of treated animals. The formation of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges was also studied in the bone marrow of the exposed rats. The micronucleus analysis indicated marginal genotoxic activity only upon treatment with crocidolite prepared from the solution of 1 microg/ml. A dose-dependent increase was, however, demonstrated in the sister chromatid exchange frequency upon treatment with benzo(a)pyrene coated fibres. These experiments suggest the acute cogenotoxic activity of such fibres in orally exposed animals. PMID:8687133

  3. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S.; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  4. Improving the prediction of the brain disposition for orally administered drugs using BDDCS

    PubMed Central

    Broccatelli, Fabio; Larregieu, Caroline A.; Cruciani, Gabriele; Oprea, Tudor I.; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo outcome. Passive permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) efflux have been successfully recognized to impact xenobiotic extrusion from the brain, as Pgp is known to play a role in limiting the BBB penetration of oral drugs in humans. However, these two properties alone fail to explain the BBB penetration for a significant number of marketed central nervous system (CNS) agents. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) has proved useful in predicting drug disposition in the human body, particularly in the liver and intestine. Here we discuss the value of using BDDCS to improve BBB predictions of oral drugs. BDDCS class membership was integrated with in vitro Pgp efflux and in silico permeability data to create a simple 3-step classification tree that accurately predicted CNS disposition for more than 90% of 153 drugs in our data set. About 98% of BDDCS class 1 drugs were found to markedly distribute throughout the brain; this includes a number of BDDCS class 1 drugs shown to be Pgp substrates. This new perspective provides a further interpretation of how Pgp influences the sedative effects of H1-histamine receptor antagonists. PMID:22261306

  5. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  6. Low-dose cyclophosphamide administered as daily or single dose enhances the antitumor effects of a therapeutic HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shiwen; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Akpeng, Belinda; Wu, Annie; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2013-01-01

    Although therapeutic HPV vaccines are able to elicit systemic HPV-specific immunity, clinical responses have not always correlated with levels of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells in human clinical trials. This observed discrepancy may be attributable to an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in which the CD8(+) T cells are recruited. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are cells that can dampen cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell function. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a systemic chemotherapeutic agent, which can eradicate immune cells, including inhibitory Tregs. The optimal dose and schedule of CTX administration in combination with immunotherapy to eliminate the Treg population without adversely affecting vaccine-induced T-cell responses is unknown. Therefore, we investigated various dosing and administration schedules of CTX in combination with a therapeutic HPV vaccine in a preclinical tumor model. HPV tumor-bearing mice received either a single preconditioning dose or a daily dose of CTX in combination with the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Both single and daily dosing of CTX in combination with vaccine had a synergistic antitumor effect as compared to monotherapy alone. The potent antitumor responses were attributed to the reduction in Treg frequency and increased infiltration of HPV16 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells, which led to higher ratios of CD8(+)/Treg and CD8(+)/CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). There was an observed trend toward decreased vaccine-induced CD8(+) T-cell frequency with daily dosing of CTX. We recommend a single, preconditioning dose of CTX prior to vaccination due to its efficacy, ease of administration, and reduced cumulative adverse effect on vaccine-induced T cells. PMID:23011589

  7. Plasma concentrations and effects of salbutamol administered orally to patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, R; Michoud, M C; Jeanneret-Grosjean, A; Ong, H; Du Souich, P

    1995-01-01

    1. To test whether cystic fibrosis (CF) altered the kinetics and dynamics of oral salbutamol, 11 patients with CF (19-33 years old; five females; FEV1: 37 +/- 12% of predicted value) and 10 healthy volunteers (20-41 years old; five females; FEV1: 99 +/- 14% of predicted value) received orally 4 mg salbutamol. 2. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters of salbutamol in patients with CF were identical to those in healthy subjects. For instance, peak plasma concentrations of salbutamol were 10.5 +/- 2.6 (mean +/- s.d.) and 10.2 +/- 2.9 ng ml-1 (NS), and the area under salbutamol plasma concentrations as a function of time (AUC (0, 7 h)) was 43.0 +/- 9.3 ng ml-1 h and 43.3 +/- 12.7 ng ml-1 h (NS) in CF patients and in healthy subjects, respectively. Since on a mg kg-1 dose basis, CF patients received a dose 28% greater than healthy subjects, this lack of differences implies a decrease in the amount of salbutamol absorbed, or alternatively, an increase in both clearance and volume of distribution of salbutamol. 3. Salbutamol did not elicit bronchodilation in CF patients, but increased heart rate from 77 +/- 2 to 103 +/- 3 beats min-1 (P < 0.05). 4. Salbutamol decreased plasma potassium concentrations from 4.5 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 0.1 mmol l-1 in the CF group (P < 0.05) and from 4.1 +/- 0.2 to 3.4 +/- 0.1 mmol l-1 in the controls (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554933

  8. Orally administered myelin basic protein in neonates primes for immune responses and enhances experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in adult animals.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Lider, O; Abramsky, O; Weiner, H L

    1994-05-01

    Antigen-driven tolerance is an effective method for suppression of autoimmune diseases. Adult animals can be tolerized against the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by both oral and parenteral administration of myelin basic protein (MBP). We have found that in contrast to previous studies of neonatal tolerance in which parenterally administered autoantigens induced tolerance, the oral administration of MBP in neonatal rats did not result in tolerization to MBP, but instead, primed for immunologic responses. Proliferative responses to MBP and its encephalitogenic epitope were present in animals fed with MBP as neonates and co-culture of encephalitogenic T cells with cells from neonatal rats fed with MBP were associated with enhanced MBP responses rather than the suppression observed with cells from adult rats fed with MBP. Furthermore, neonates fed with MBP and immunized 6-8 weeks later with MBP in adjuvant to induce EAE revealed enhancement of disease severity, and were not protected from a second attack upon active reinduction of EAE. Subcutaneous injection of soluble MBP into neonates had no effect on EAE induction as adults, whereas intraperitoneal injection of MBP in neonates was associated with marked suppression of disease in adults. Suppression of EAE began to appear in animals fed with MBP at 4 weeks of age, and was similar to oral tolerance in adult animals when animals were fed at 6 weeks of age. These results suggest that immaturity of the immunoregulatory network associated with oral tolerance and sensitization to autoantigens via the gut in the neonatal period may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:7514126

  9. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hyoung-Mi; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics. Methods We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m2/g, respectively) on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats. Results N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen, were the major corona proteins, regardless of particle size. A biokinetic study revealed that orally delivered N-Cal was more rapidly absorbed into the blood stream than B-Cal, but no significant differences were observed between the two in terms of absorption efficiencies or tissue distributions. Both calcium carbonates were primarily present as particulate forms in gastrointestinal fluids but enter the circulatory system in dissolved Ca2+, although both types showed partial phase transformation to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate. Relatively low dissolution (about 4%), no remarkable protein–particle interaction, and the major particulate fate of calcium carbonate in vivo gastrointestinal fluids can explain its low oral absorption (about 4%) regardless of particle size. Conclusion We conclude that calcium

  10. The Influence of Intestinal Tract and Probiotics on the Fate of Orally Administered Drugs.

    PubMed

    Stojančević, Maja; Bojić, Gordana; Salami, Hani Al; Mikov, Momir

    2014-01-01

    Although the liver has long been considered as a main organ responsible for drug metabolism, the role of the gut metabolizing enzymes and the gut microflora is becoming more profoundly evident in drug metabolism, absorption and overall efficacy. This review will explore various mechanisms by which the gut-microflora influences drug pharmacokinetics including biotransformation, bioactivation, and biodegradation as well as up- or down-regulation of the epithelial transporters. The gut-luminal fluids, intestinal mucosa and gut microflora contain high concentrations of various enzymes which are responsible for the oxidation, hydrolysis and conjugation of drugs. Such metabolic reactions may lead to either drug over- or under-dosing, which impacts the drugs efficacy and safety. The processes, by which the intestinal enzymes and gut-protein transporters influence drug pharmacokinetic parameters, will be detailed. Since the intestinal microflora plays an important role in physiological, nutritional, metabolic, and immunological processes in human body, there is currently some interest in the manipulation of its composition and activity by administering probiotics. This review will also examine the capacity of probiotics to interact with resident microbial community, affecting the respective enzymes or by providing their own specific enzymatic activities that may consequently change the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of concomitantly taken drugs. PMID:24002548

  11. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  12. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mou, K H; Han, D; Liu, W L; Li, P

    2016-07-25

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  13. Gastrointestinal behavior of orally administered radiolabeled erythromycin pellets in man as determined by gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Digenis, G.A.; Sandefer, E.P.; Parr, A.F.; Beihn, R.; McClain, C.; Scheinthal, B.M.; Ghebre-Sellassie, I.; Iyer, U.; Nesbitt, R.U.; Randinitis, E. )

    1990-07-01

    The behavior of single 250-mg doses of a multiparticulate form of erythromycin base (ERYC(R)), each including five pellets radiolabeled with neutron-activated samarium-153, was observed by gamma scintigraphy in seven male subjects under fasting and nonfasting conditions. The residence time and locus of radiolabeled pellets within regions of the gastrointestinal tract were determined and were correlated with plasma concentrations of erythromycin at coincident time points. Administration of food 30 minutes postdosing reduced fasting plasma erythromycin Cmax and area under the plasma erythromycin versus time curve (AUC) values by 43% and 54%, respectively. Mean peak plasma concentration of erythromycin (Cmax) in the fasting state was 1.64 micrograms/mL versus 0.94 micrograms/mL in the nonfasting state. Total oral bioavailability, as determined by mean AUC (0-infinity) of the plasma erythromycin concentration versus time curve, was 7.6 hr/micrograms/mL in the fasted state, versus 3.5 hr/micrograms/mL in the nonfasting state. Mean time to peak plasma erythromycin concentration (tmax) in the fasting state was 3.3 hours, versus 2.3 hours in the nonfasting state. Plasma concentrations of erythromycin in both fasting and nonfasting states were within acceptable therapeutic ranges.

  14. Antiosteoporotic effect of orally administered yolk-derived peptides on bone mass in women

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Adham M; Watabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Tetsuro; Isono, Tadayuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Kawahito, Seiji; Takeshima, Kazuhito; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Mujo

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to verify the effect of oral intake of a yolk-derived peptide preparation (HYP) obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of yolk water-soluble protein on bone markers and bone density in 65 perimenopausal women with an average age of 47.6 ± 5.2 years. Subjects were divided into three groups, and then enrolled in a 6-month, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Bone formation and resorption markers were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months, while bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spines was measured at 0 and 6 months. Although the bone formation marker levels showed the similarity changes among the groups, bone resorption markers in the test HYP group were significantly decreased after 3 and 6 months in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). After 6 months, BMD in the test HYP group maintained at healthy numerical values whereas BMD values were decreased in other groups. Hence HYP would be an antiosteoporotic agent originated from natural food to maintain bone health, especially for women. PMID:24936288

  15. Toxicity of colloidal silica nanoparticles administered orally for 90 days in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Seung-Young; Lee, Eun Jeong; Park, Sung Ha; Seong, Nak-won; Seo, Heung-Sik; Shin, Sung-Sup; Kim, Seon-Ju; Meang, Eun-Ho; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Son, Sang Wook; Seo, Young Rok; Kang, Boo Hyon; Han, Beom Seok; An, Seong Soo A; Lee, Beom-Jun; Kim, Meyoung-Kon

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential toxicity and establish the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) and target organ(s) of negatively charged colloidal silica particles of different sizes, ie, SiO2EN20(−) (20 nm) or SiO2EN100(−) 2(100 nm), administered by gavage in Sprague-Dawley rats. After verification of the physicochemical properties of the SiO2 particles to be tested, a preliminary dose range-finding study and 90-day repeated dose study were conducted according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development test guideline. Based on the results of the 14-day dose range-finding study, a high dose was determined to be 2,000 mg/kg, and middle and low doses were set at 1,000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In the 90-day toxicity study, there were no animal deaths in relation to administration of SiO2 particles of either size. In addition, no treatment-related clinical changes or histopathological findings were observed in any of the experimental groups. Moreover, no difference in toxic effects from chronic exposure to SiO2EN20(−)(20 nm) or SiO2EN100(−) (100 nm) was observed. The results of this study indicate that the NOAEL for SiO2EN20(−) and SiO2 EN100(−) would most likely be 2,000 mg/kg, and no target organ was identified in rats of either sex. PMID:25565827

  16. Comparative bioavailability study of two cefixime formulations administered orally in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi; Islambulchilar, Ziba

    2008-01-01

    The bioavailability of a new cefixime ((6R,7R)-7-[(Z)-2-(2-amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-(carboxymethoxyimino) acetamido]-8-oxo-3-vinyl-5-thia-1-azabicyclo-[4,2,0]-oct-2-ene-2-carboxylic acid, CAS 79350-37-1) tablet preparation (Loprax) was compared with that of a reference preparation of the drug in 24 healthy male volunteers. The trial was designed as an open, randomized, single-blind, two-sequence, two-period crossover study. Under fasting conditions, each subject received a single oral dose of 400 mg cefixime tablet as a test or reference formulation on 2 treatment days. The treatment periods were separated by a one-week washout period. The plasma concentrations of the drug were analyzed by a rapid and sensitive HPLC method with UV detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters included AUC0-24h, AUC0-infinity, Cmax, t1/2, and Ke. The mean AUC0-infinity of cefixime was 45008.7 +/- 10989.9 and 45221.3 +/- 2155.7 n x h/ml for the test and reference formulation, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of cefixime was on average 4746.9 +/- 1284 ng/ml for the test and 4726.3 +/- 1206.9 ng/ml for the reference product. No statistical differences were observed for Cmax and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve for test and reference tablets. The calculated 90% confidence intervals based on the ANOVA analysis for the mean test/reference ratios of Cmax, AUC0-infinity and AUC0-24h of cefixime were in the bioequivalence range (94%-112%). Therefore, the two formulations were considered to be bioequivalent. PMID:18412024

  17. Plasma Drug Concentrations of Orally Administered Rosuvastatin in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Papich, Mark G; Brandão, João; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic diseases are common in pet psittacine birds, in particular Amazon parrots. While hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia have not definitely been associated with increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis in parrots, these are important and well-known risk factors in humans. Therefore statin drugs such as rosuvastatin constitute the mainstay of human treatment of dyslipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerosis. No pharmacologic studies have been performed in psittacine birds despite the high prevalence of atherosclerosis in captivity. Thirteen Hispaniolan Amazon parrots were used to test a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg of rosuvastatin with blood sampling performed according to a balanced incomplete block design over 36 hours. Because low plasma concentrations were produced in the first study, a subsequent pilot study using a dose of 25 mg/kg in 2 Amazon parrots was performed. Most plasma samples for the 10 mg/kg dose and all samples for the 25 mg/kg dose had rosuvastatin concentration below the limits of quantitation. For the 10 mg/kg study, the median peak plasma concentration and time to peak plasma concentration were 0.032 μg/mL and 2 hours, respectively. Our results indicate that rosuvastatin does not appear suitable in Amazon parrots as compounded and used at the dose in this study. Pharmacodynamic studies investigating lipid-lowering effects of statins rather than pharmacokinetic studies may be more practical and cost effective in future studies to screen for a statin with more ideal properties for potential use in psittacine dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:25867662

  18. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors. PMID:26276695

  19. Amelioration of Radiation Esophagitis by Orally Administered p53/Mdm2/Mdm4 Inhibitor (BEB55) or GS-Nitroxide

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HYUN; BERNARD, MARK E.; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; SHEN, HONGMEI; AMOSCATO, ANDREW; DIXON, TRACY M.; DOEMLING, ALEXANDER S.; LI, SONG; GAO, XIANG; WIPF, PETER; WANG, HONG; ZHANG, XICHEN; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Esophagitis is a significant toxicity of radiation therapy for lung cancer. In this study, reduction of irradiation esophagitis in mice, by orally administered p53/Mdm2/Mdm4 inhibitor, BEB55, or the GS-nitroxide, JP4-039, was evaluated. Materials and Methods BEB55 or JP4-039 in F15 (liposomal) formulation was administered intraesophageally to C57BL/6 mice prior to thoracic irradiation of 29 Gy × 1 or 11.5 Gy × 4 thoracic irradiation. Progenitor cells were sorted from excised esophagus, and nitroxide was quantified, by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Mice with Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) orthotopic lung tumors were treated with BEB55 or JP4-039 prior to 20 Gy to determine if the drugs would protect the tumor cells from radiation. Results Intraesophageal BEB55 and JP4-039 compared to formulation alone increased survival after single fraction (p=0.0209 and 0.0384, respectively) and four fraction thoracic irradiation (p=0.0241 and 0.0388, respectively). JP4-039 was detected in esophagus, liver, bone marrow, and orthotopic Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumor. There was no significant radiation protection of lung tumors by BEB55 or JP4-039 compared to formulation only as assessed by survival (p=0.3021 and 0.3693, respectively). Thus, BEB55 and JP4-039 safely ameliorate radiation esophagitis in mice. PMID:22021675

  20. Alterations of calf venous and arterial compliance following acclimation to heat administered at a fixed daily time in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Megumi; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Koga, Miki; Shido, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of heat acclimation on venous and arterial compliance in humans. Four male and four female volunteers were exposed to an ambient temperature of 40°C and relative humidity of 40% for 4 h (1330 1730 hours) per day for 9 10 consecutive days. The calf venous compliance (CV) was estimated using venous occlusion plethysmography with a mercury-in-silastic strain gauge placed around the right calf at its maximum girth. The compliance of the small (CSA) and large (CLA) arteries were assessed by reflective and capacitance compliance by analyzing the radial artery blood pressure waveforms, basing on the use of a modified Windkessel model. The calf CV, CSA, CLA, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate and core temperature were determined twice a day, 0930 1100 hours (AM test) and 1500 1630 hours (PM test), in both heat-acclimated and non-heat-acclimated (control) conditions. Heat acclimation appeared to decrease blood pressures, heart rate and significantly lowered core temperature only in the PM test. In the control condition, the calf CV was not affected by the time of day and the CSA was significantly depressed in the PM test. After acclimation to heat, the calf CV significantly increased and the CSA did not decrease in the PM test. The results presented suggest that repeated heat exposure in humans, for 4 h at a fixed time daily, increases the calf CV and the CSA particularly during the period when the subjects were previously exposed to heat.

  1. Efficacy of the oral neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant administered with ondansetron for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Seong; Kim, Yoon-Hee; Park, Sang-Il; Kim, Jae-Kook; Kim, Myoung-Joong; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2013-01-01

    Background 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone and droperidol were used for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Recently, neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist has been used for PONV. We evaluated the effect of oral aprepitant premedication in addition to ondansetron. Methods A total 90 patients scheduled for elective rhinolaryngological surgery were allocated to three groups (Control, Ap80, Ap125), each of 30 at random. Ondansetron 4 mg was injected intravenously to all patients just before the end of surgery. On the morning of surgery, 80 mg and 125 mg aprepitant were additionally administered into the Ap80 group and Ap125 group, respectively. The rhodes index of nausea, vomiting and retching (RINVR) was checked at 6 hr and 24 hr after surgery. Results Twelve patients who used steroids unexpectedly were excluded. Finally 78 patients (control : Ap80 : Ap125 = 24 : 28 : 26) were enrolled. Overall PONV occurrence rate of Ap125 group (1/26, 3.9%) was lower (P = 0.015) than the control group (7/24, 29.2%) at 6 hr after surgery. The nausea distress score of Ap125 group (0.04 ± 0.20) was lower (P = 0.032) than the control group (0.67 ± 1.24) at 6 hr after surgery. No evident side effect of aprepitant was observed. Conclusions Oral aprepitant 125 mg can be used as combination therapy for the prevention of PONV. PMID:23560185

  2. Effect of acid secretion blockade by omeprazole on the relative bioavailability of orally administered furazolidone in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Calafatti, Silvana A; Ortiz, Rodrigo A M; Deguer, Maristela; Martinez, Márcio; Pedrazzoli, José

    2001-01-01

    Aims The administration of omeprazole may interfere with the absorption of orally administered drugs by reducing gastric pH and hence tablet dissolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 5 day administration of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of furazolidone. Methods Eighteen healthy (nine male and nine female) volunteers were selected. The study had an open randomized two-period crossover design with a 21 day washout period between the phases. Serum concentrations of furazolidone were measured by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. with ultraviolet detection. Results Administration of omeprazole caused a significant reduction of Cmax [0.34 µg ml−1 (range 0.25–0.43) vs 0.24 µg ml−1 (range 0.15–0.34)] with no significant delay in absorption tmax [2.5 h (range 1.85–3.0) vs 2.4 h (range 2.06–2.71)]. Conclusions Furazolidone was rapidly absorbed after oral administration. Short-term treatment with omeprazole did alter the relative bioavailability of this drug, probably through an effect on absorption kinetics or first-pass metabolism. PMID:11488780

  3. Orally administered P22 phage tailspike protein reduces salmonella colonization in chickens: prospects of a novel therapy against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Waseh, Shakeeba; Hanifi-Moghaddam, Pejman; Coleman, Russell; Masotti, Michael; Ryan, Shannon; Foss, Mary; MacKenzie, Roger; Henry, Matthew; Szymanski, Christine M; Tanha, Jamshid

    2010-01-01

    One of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in man and economically important animals is bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The emergence of difficult-to-treat infections, primarily caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, demands for alternatives to antibiotic therapy. Currently, one of the emerging therapeutic alternatives is the use of lytic bacteriophages. In an effort to exploit the target specificity and therapeutic potential of bacteriophages, we examined the utility of bacteriophage tailspike proteins (Tsps). Among the best-characterized Tsps is that from the Podoviridae P22 bacteriophage, which recognizes the lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, we utilized a truncated, functionally equivalent version of the P22 tailspike protein, P22sTsp, as a prototype to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Tsps in the GI tract of chickens. Bacterial agglutination assays showed that P22sTsp was capable of agglutinating S. Typhimurium at levels similar to antibodies and incubating the Tsp with chicken GI fluids showed no proteolytic activity against the Tsp. Testing P22sTsp against the three major GI proteases showed that P22sTsp was resistant to trypsin and partially to chymotrypsin, but sensitive to pepsin. However, in formulated form for oral administration, P22sTsp was resistant to all three proteases. When administered orally to chickens, P22sTsp significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the gut and its further penetration into internal organs. In in vitro assays, P22sTsp effectively retarded Salmonella motility, a factor implicated in bacterial colonization and invasion, suggesting that the in vivo decolonization ability of P22sTsp may, at least in part, be due to its ability to interfere with motility… Our findings show promise in terms of opening novel Tsp-based oral therapeutic approaches against bacterial infections in production animals and potentially in humans. PMID:21124920

  4. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a low dose and FDA-labeled dose of diclazuril administered orally as a pelleted topdressing in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Hunyadi, L; Papich, M G; Pusterla, N

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of the FDA-approved labeled dose of diclazuril and compare it to a low dose in plasma and CSF in adult horses. During each research period, six healthy adult horses received 0.5 mg/kg of 1.56% diclazuril pellets (Protazil(TM) , Merck Animal Health) compared to the approved labeled dose of 1 mg/kg orally once in two separate phases. A dose of 0.5 mg/kg was calculated to each horse's weight. Blood was then collected immediately before diclazuril administration and then at regular intervals up to a 168 h. After the last blood collection following the single dose at hour 168, a once daily oral dose was administered for the next 10 days to ensure the drug's concentration reached steady-state. To determine the CSF concentration at steady-state, CSF samples were collected after the 9th oral dose. Blood was then collected after the 10th dose and then at regular intervals up to 168 h. A washout period of 4 weeks was allowed before repeating this protocol for the FDA-labeled dose at 1 mg/kg. Plasma and CSF samples were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order oral absorption was fitted to the single administration data. Steady-state pharmacokinetics was performed using noncompartmental analysis for steady-state analysis. The mean (standard deviation) concentration of diclazuril in CSF following the low dose was 26 ng/mL (5 ng/mL), while CSF in the FDA-labeled dose was 25 ng/mL (4 ng/mL), P = 0.3750. Substantial accumulation in plasma occurred at steady-state after the 10th dose for both doses. The results of this study show that diclazuril pellets given at the approved label dose and a lower dose both produce similar plasma drug concentrations at steady-state and attain plasma and CSF concentrations known to inhibit Sarcocystis neurona in cell culture. PMID:25329774

  6. Antiviral Effects of Lamivudine, Emtricitabine, Adefovir Dipivoxil, and Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Administered Orally Alone and in Combination to Woodchucks with Chronic Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Menne, Stephan; Butler, Scott D.; George, Andrea L.; Tochkov, Ilia A.; Zhu, Yuao; Xiong, Shelly; Gerin, John L.; Cote, Paul J.; Tennant, Bud C.

    2008-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) are nucleotide analogs that inhibit the replication of wild-type hepatitis B virus (HBV) and lamivudine (3TC)-resistant virus in HBV-infected patients, including those who are coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. The combination of ADV or TDF with other nucleoside analogs is a proposed strategy for managing antiviral drug resistance during the treatment of chronic HBV infection. The antiviral effect of oral ADV or TDF, alone or in combination with 3TC or emtricitabine (FTC), against chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection was evaluated in a placebo-controlled study in the woodchuck, an established and predictive model for antiviral therapy. Once-daily treatment for 48 weeks with ADV plus 3TC or TDF plus FTC significantly reduced serum WHV viremia levels from the pretreatment level by 6.2 log10 and 6.1 log10 genome equivalents/ml serum, respectively, followed by TDF plus 3TC (5.6 log10 genome equivalents/ml), ADV alone (4.8 log10 genome equivalents/ml), ADV plus FTC (one survivor) (4.4 log10 genome equivalents/ml), TDF alone (2.9 log10 genome equivalents/ml), 3TC alone (2.7 log10 genome equivalents/ml), and FTC alone (2.0 log10 genome equivalents/ml). Individual woodchucks across all treatment groups also demonstrated pronounced declines in serum WHV surface antigen, characteristically accompanied by declines in hepatic WHV replication and the hepatic expression of WHV antigens. Most woodchucks had prompt recrudescence of WHV replication after drug withdrawal, but individual woodchucks across treatment groups had sustained effects. No signs of toxicity were observed for any of the drugs or drug combinations administered. In conclusion, the oral administration of 3TC, FTC, ADV, and TDF alone and in combination was safe and effective in the woodchuck model of HBV infection. PMID:18676881

  7. Effects of Orally Administered Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on the Well-Being and Salmonella Colonization of Young Chicks ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Atterbury, Robert J.; Hobley, Laura; Till, Robert; Lambert, Carey; Capeness, Michael J.; Lerner, Thomas R.; Fenton, Andrew K.; Barrow, Paul; Sockett, R. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a bacterium which preys upon and kills Gram-negative bacteria, including the zoonotic pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Bdellovibrio has potential as a biocontrol agent, but no reports of it being tested in living animals have been published, and no data on whether Bdellovibrio might spread between animals are available. In this study, we tried to fill this knowledge gap, using B. bacteriovorus HD100 doses in poultry with a normal gut microbiota or predosed with a colonizing Salmonella strain. In both cases, Bdellovibrio was dosed orally along with antacids. After dosing non-Salmonella-infected birds with Bdellovibrio, we measured the health and well-being of the birds and any changes in their gut pathology and culturable microbiota, finding that although a Bdellovibrio dose at 2 days of age altered the overall diversity of the natural gut microbiota in 28-day-old birds, there were no adverse effects on their growth and well-being. Drinking water and fecal matter from the pens in which the birds were housed as groups showed no contamination by Bdellovibrio after dosing. Predatory Bdellovibrio orally administered to birds that had been predosed with a gut-colonizing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 strain (an important zoonotic pathogen) significantly reduced Salmonella numbers in bird gut cecal contents and reduced abnormal cecal morphology, indicating reduced cecal inflammation, compared to the ceca of the untreated controls or a nonpredatory ΔpilA strain, suggesting that these effects were due to predatory action. This work is a first step to applying Bdellovibrio therapeutically for other animal, and possibly human, infections. PMID:21705523

  8. Systemic effects of orally-administered zinc and tin (IV) metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Ichiro; Wong, Ronald J; Abate, Aida; Vreman, Hendrik J; Contag, Christopher H; Stevenson, David K

    2006-05-01

    Some metalloporphyrins (Mps) inhibit heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of bilirubin, and are potential compounds for the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We studied the safety and efficacy of Mps following oral administration. Adult HO-1-luc reporter mice were administered 30 micromol/kg body weight of tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), zinc bis glycol deuteroporphyrin (ZnBG), or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), or vehicle by oral gavage. Bilirubin production was measured as total body carbon monoxide (CO) excretion (VeCO). HO activity was quantitated via CO measurements by gas chromatography. HO-1 protein was determined by Western blot. HO-1 transcription levels were assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. A significant 28% decrease in bilirubin production occurred within 3 h of SnMP treatment and persisted beyond 48 h. Bilirubin production decreased 15% and 9% by 3 h after administration of ZnBG and ZnPP, respectively, but returned to baseline within 48 h. Maximal inhibition of liver, spleen, and intestine HO activity was seen at 3 h with inhibitory effects decreasing in the order: SnMP > or = ZnBG > or = ZnPP. After SnMP treatment, HO-1 transcription increased 5.7-fold after 24 h. Furthermore, liver and spleen HO-1 protein significantly increased 3.7- and 2.0-fold, respectively, after 24 h. HO-1 transcription and protein were not affected in ZnBG- or ZnPP-treated mice. We conclude that the three Mps are absorbed at different rates in the mouse and affect bilirubin production and HO-1 expression in a tissue- and time-dependent manner. PMID:16627879

  9. Multicenter Study of Decitabine Administered Daily for 5 Days Every 4 Weeks to Adults With Myelodysplastic Syndromes: The Alternative Dosing for Outpatient Treatment (ADOPT) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Baer, Maria R.; Slack, James L.; Buckstein, Rena; Godley, Lucy A.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Albitar, Maher; Larsen, Julie S.; Arora, Sujata; Cullen, Michael T.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Decitabine, a DNA-targeted hypomethylating agent, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) on a schedule of 15 mg/m2 administered via intravenous (IV) infusion every 8 hours for 3 days. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of an alternative dosing regimen administered on an outpatient basis in academic and community-based practices. Patients and Methods Patients were treated with decitabine 20 mg/m2 by IV infusion daily for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks. Eligible patients were ≥ 18 years of age and had MDS (de novo or secondary) of any French-American-British (FAB) subtype and an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score ≥ 0.5. The primary end point was the overall response rate (ORR) by International Working Group (IWG 2006) criteria; secondary end points included cytogenetic responses, hematologic improvement (HI), response duration, survival, and safety. Results Ninety-nine patients were enrolled; the ORR was 32% (17 complete responses [CR] plus 15 marrow CRs [mCRs]), and the overall improvement rate was 51%, which included 18% HI. Similar response rates were observed in all FAB subtypes and IPSS risk categories. Among patients who improved, 82% demonstrated responses by the end of cycle 2. Among 33 patients assessable for a cytogenetic response, 17 (52%) experienced cytogenetic CR (n = 11) or partial response (n = 6). Conclusion Decitabine given on a 5-day schedule provided meaningful clinical benefit for patients with MDS, with more than half demonstrating improvement. This suggests that decitabine can be administered in an outpatient setting with comparable efficacy and safety to the United States Food and Drug Administration–approved inpatient regimen. PMID:19528372

  10. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  11. Identification of urinary metabolites of orally administered N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine in male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Cheol; Ghanbari, Katayoon; Kracko, Dean A; Weber, Waylon M; McDonald, Jacob D; Dix, Kelly J

    2007-05-15

    The metabolism of orally administered N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) in male F344 rats was investigated. The rat urinary metabolite profile was determined by analytical reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Four radiolabeled peaks were observed, isolated, and purified by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and preparative HPLC methods. The 4 peaks were identified as p-(N-acetylhydroxyamino)hippuric acid (M1), DMPT N-oxide (M2), N-methyl-p-toluidine (M3), and parent DMPT. Metabolites M1 and M2 were identified by spectrometric and spectroscopic methods, including mass fragmentation pattern identification from both liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and from chemical analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Structural confirmation of metabolite M2 was accomplished by comparison with a synthetic standard. Peaks M3 and the peak suspected to be DMPT were identified by comparison of their HPLC retention times and mass fragmentation patterns with authentic standards of N-methyl-p-toluidine and DMPT, respectively. DMPT metabolism is similar to that reported for N,N-dimethylaniline. PMID:17454554

  12. TEN- AND NINETY-DAY TOXICITY STUDIES OF 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE ADMINISTERED BY ORAL GAVAGE TO SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subacute (10-day) and subchronic (90-day) toxicity studies of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. ,2-Dichlorobenzene was administered in corn oil by oral gavage; control animals received corn oil. t time of sacrifice, gross necropsies ...

  13. Safety and toxicokinetic profiles associated with daily oral administration of grapiprant, a selective antagonist of the prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor, to cats.

    PubMed

    Rausch-Derra, Lesley C; Rhodes, Linda

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate safety and toxicokinetic profiles associated with daily oral administration of grapiprant, a new analgesic that selectively blocks the prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor, to cats. ANIMALS 24 healthy domestic shorthair cats (12 males and 12 females). PROCEDURES Cats were randomly assigned (3 of each sex/group) to receive a placebo capsule or grapiprant at 3, 9, or 15 mg/kg, administered PO once daily for 28 days, beginning on day 0. Food consumption and behavior were observed daily, body weight was measured weekly, and clinicopathologic tests were performed on blood and urine samples collected on days -7, 14, and 25. Blood samples for toxicokinetic analyses were collected after treatment on days 0 and 27. Cats were euthanized on day 28, and full necropsies and histologic evaluations were performed. RESULTS Grapiprant rapidly reached peak serum concentrations and maintained substantial concentrations throughout the 28-day period. By day 27, maximum serum concentrations ranged from 683 ng/mL to 4,950 ng/mL, which were attained by 1 to 4 hours after administration. Serum half-lives on day 27 ranged from approximately 2 to 14 hours (median, approx 5 to 6 hours). Grapiprant was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were detected at doses ≤ 15 mg/kg. No significant effects of grapiprant were identified on body weight, food consumption, clinicopathologic variables, or gross or histologic necropsy findings. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested the safety of daily oral administration of grapiprant to cats. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of grapiprant for treatment of cats with osteoarthritis. PMID:27347820

  14. Effect of orally administered L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 on markers of metabolic syndrome: an in vivo analysis using ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Jones, Mitchell L; Labbé, Alain; Rodes, Laetitia; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, encompassing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, is a growing health concern of industrialized countries. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic acid found in foods normally consumed by humans that has demonstrated antioxidant activity, cholesterol-lowering capabilities, and anti-tumorigenic properties. Select probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, produce FA due to intrinsic ferulic acid esterase activity. The aim of the present research was to investigate a FA-producing probiotic, L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, as a biotherapeutic for metabolic syndrome. The probiotic formulation was administered daily for 8 weeks to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. Results show that the probiotic formulation reduced fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance, significantly reduced serum triglycerides (p = 0.016), lowered serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.008), and significantly reduced the atherogenic (p = 0.016) and atherosclerosis (p = 0.012) index as compared to the control animals. In addition, the probiotic formulation significantly increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.041) as compared to the control animals. This research indicates that administration of the FA-producing L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 has the potential to reduce insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, and other markers involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Further studies are required to investigate the human clinical potential of the probiotic formulation in affecting the markers and pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24121931

  15. Comparison of prospective daily diaries and retrospective recall to measure oral contraceptive adherence

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Larissa R. Brunner; Broel, Elizabeth C.; Mitchelides, Ashley N.; Dmochowski, Jacek; Dulin, Michael; Scholes, Delia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to determine if retrospective recall of oral contraceptive (OC) adherence provides data that are similar to data collected via daily diaries over the same time period. Factors associated with inconsistent agreement between prospective and retrospective measurements of adherence also were explored. STUDY DESIGN A total of 185 women participated in a longitudinal, prospective cohort of OC users and 113 of these women provided complete information on OC adherence during follow-ups. Concordance beyond chance was assessed using weighted kappa statistics and logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with inconsistent reporting of adherence. RESULTS There was substantial agreement between prospective and retrospective adherence information (weighted kappa=0.64; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.77). Participants with a high school education or less and those who had problems with feeling sad while using OCs had increased odds of inconsistent reporting of adherence (OR=4.38, 95% CI: 1.41, 13.61 and OR=3.52, 95% CI: 1.25, 9.94; respectively). CONCLUSION While prospective data collection via diaries may improve accuracy, the added expense and burden on study participants may not be necessary. However, the use of retrospective recall may not be appropriate for all study populations. PMID:23582236

  16. Lack of effect of brivanib on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a CYP3A4 substrate, administered intravenously and orally in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shariq; Clemens, Pamela L; Lathers, Deanne; Kollia, Georgia; Dhar, Arindam; Walters, Ian; Masson, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Brivanib alaninate is the orally available prodrug of brivanib, a dual inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathways that is under therapeutic investigation for various malignancies. Brivanib alaninate inhibits CYP3A4 in vitro, and thus there is potential for drug-drug interaction with CYP3A4 substrates, such as midazolam. The present study evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters and safety/tolerability upon coadministration of brivanib alaninate and midazolam. Healthy participants received intravenous (IV) or oral midazolam with and without oral brivanib alaninate. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were collected up to 12 hours after midazolam and up to 48 hours after brivanib alaninate. Twenty-four participants were administered study drugs; 21 completed the trial. No clinically relevant effect of brivanib alaninate on the overall exposure to midazolam following IV or oral administration was observed. Orally administered brivanib alaninate was generally well tolerated in the presence of IV or oral midazolam. The lack of a pharmacokinetic interaction between brivanib and midazolam indicates that brivanib alaninate does not influence either intestinal or hepatic CYP3A4 and confirms that brivanib alaninate may be safely coadministered with midazolam and other CYP3A4 substrates. PMID:21659627

  17. Effect of orally administered probiotic E. coli strain Nissle 1917 on intestinal mucosal immune cells of healthy young pigs.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Swantje C; Lorentz, Axel; Schroeder, Bernd; Breves, Gerhard; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2006-06-15

    Several beneficial effects of probiotics have been described in studies using rodent disease models and in human patients; however, the underlying mechanisms remained mostly unclear. Only a few studies focused on the effects of probiotics on the intestinal mucosal immune system. Here, we studied the effect of the probiotic strain E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) administered orally to young pigs at two concentrations (10(9) and 10(11)CFU/d for 21 days) on the gut-associated lymphatic tissue. This probiotic strain was shown recently to reduce recurrence of inflammation in ulcerative colitis patients. We quantified the number and distribution of intestinal immune cells (granulocytes, mast cells, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, IgA+ lymphocytes) and the mucosal mRNA expression of cytokines (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IL-10) and antimicrobial peptides (PR-39, NK-lysin, prepro-defensin-beta 1, protegrins). The number and distribution of cells were highly different between small intestinal and colon segments in all groups, but were not influenced by EcN, except high dose EcN fed pigs (10(11) CFU/d) showing an increase in mucosal CD8+ cells in the ascending colon. The mRNA analysis revealed no changes associated with EcN feeding. In conclusion, according to our analyses EcN has only minor effects on the distribution of mucosal immune cells in the gut of healthy individuals. The well-established preventive effects of EcN might therefore be relate to other mechanisms than simple modulation of immune cell distribution. PMID:16530848

  18. Hypocholesterolaemic effect of rat-administered oral doses of the isolated 7S globulins from cowpeas and adzuki beans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ederlan S; Amaral, Ana Lucia S; Demonte, Aureluce; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Capraro, Jessica; Duranti, Marcello; Neves, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The role of seed proteins, especially soyabean 7S globulins, in controlling dyslipidaemia is widely acknowledged. Amino acid sequence homology among the proteins of this family could reflect similar biological functions in other species. The aim of the present study was to unveil a hypolipidaemic effect of the 7S globulins from cowpeas (7S-C) and adzuki beans (7S-A), administered orally to rats fed a hypercholesterolaemic (HC; high cholesterol and TAG) diet for 28 d. A total of forty-five rats were divided into five groups (nine rats per group): (1) standard (STD) diet; (2) HC diet; (3) HC diet + 7S-C (300 mg/kg per d); (4) HC diet + 7S-A (300 mg/kg per d); and (5) HC diet + simvastatin (SVT; 50 mg/kg per d), as a control. Significant decreases in food intake and final body weight of rats receiving HC + 7S-C and HC + 7S-A diets compared with groups fed the HC and STD diets were observed. Significant decreases in serum total and non-HDL-cholesterol of 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups were also observed. HDL-cholesterol levels increased in the 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups, while hepatic cholesterol and TAG concentrations were significantly lower than in the HC diet group for the 7S-C-supplemented group only. Faecal excretions of fat and cholesterol in HC diet groups were considerably higher in animals consuming the 7S globulins. The results show that cowpea and adzuki bean 7S globulins promote cholesterol-decreasing effects in hypercholesterolaemic rats even at low dosages, as already observed for other legume seed storage proteins of this family. This main effect is discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26090103

  19. Treatment of Dry Eye Syndrome with Orally Administered CF101: Data from a Phase 2 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Avni, Isaac; Garzozi, Hanna J.; Barequet, Irina S.; Segev, Fanni; Varssano, David; Sartani, Gil; Chetrit, Noa; Bakshi, Erez; Zadok, David; Tomkins, Oren; Litvin, Gilad; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fishman, Sari; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Bar Yehuda, Sara; Silverman, Michael H.; Kerns, William D.; Bristol, David R.; Cohn, Ilan; Fishman, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the safety and efficacy of CF101, an A3 adenosine receptor agonist, in patients with moderate-to-severe dry eye syndrome Design Phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Participants 68 patients completed the study, 35 patients in the placebo group and 33 patients in the CF101 group. Intervention Patients were orally treated with either 1 mg CF101 pills or matching vehicle-filled placebo pills, given twice daily for 12 weeks, followed by a 2-week post-treatment observation. Main Outcome Measures Efficacy an improvement of >25% over baseline at week 12 in one of the following parameters: (a) tear break-up time (BUT); (b) superficial punctate keratitis assessed by fluorescein staining (FS); (c) Schirmer tear test 1 (ST1). Safety clinical laboratory safety tests, ophthalmic examinations, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements, electrocardiographic evaluations, vital sign measurements and monitoring of adverse events. Results A statistically significant increase in the proportion of patients who achieved more than 25% improvement in the corneal staining and in the clearance of corneal staining was noted between the CF101-treated group and the placebo group. Treatment with CF101 resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the mean change from baseline at week 12 of the corneal staining, BUT, and tear meniscus (TM) height in the CF101-treated group CF101 was well tolerated and exhibited an excellent safety profile with no serious adverse events. A statistically significant decrease from baseline was observed in the IOP of the CF101-treated group in comparison with the placebo group. Conclusions CF101, given orally, induced a statistically significant improvement in the corneal staining and an improvement in the BUT and TM in patients with moderate-to-severe dry eye syndrome. The drug was very well tolerated. These data and the anti-inflammatory characteristic of CF101 support further study

  20. 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of l-tyrosine in rats by daily oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Terutaka; Gonsho, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of l-tyrosine, 4 groups of Crl:CD(SD) rats of both sexes were administered l-tyrosine in water suspension by gavage once daily for 13 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle), 200, 600 or 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Findings related to l-tyrosine administration were as follows. Edema of the cornified layer at the limiting ridge or forestomach was seen in 600 mg/kg bw/day female group and in both sexes of 2000 mg/kg bw/day group. In the liver, increased weight and hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes were seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day, associated with slight increases in ALT and AST. Regarding the kidney morphology and function, increased hyaline droplets in the proximal tubules and increased urinary protein were seen in the 2000 mg/kg bw/day male group. In addition, increased kidney weight was also observed in both sexes of the 2000 mg/kg bw/day group, although the histological changes attributable to the weight increase remained unclear. As for blood chemistry, increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, potassium ion, calcium, total protein, and α1 globulin were also seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Thus, in this study the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of l-tyrosine was considered to be 600 mg/kg bw/day for males and 200 mg/kg bw/day for females. PMID:26646752

  1. Factor analysis of two versions of the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance scale.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Luciane M; Scalco, Giovana P C; Abegg, Claides; Celeste, Roger K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the factorial structure and agreement of two scoring versions of the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) scale, and to compare the fit of the originally proposed factorial structure, as opposed to an alternative model. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) were conducted to explore the dimensional structure of the OIDP on a convenience sample of 200 adults (S1). Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed on a random sample of 720 adults (S2). The Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the total and frequency versions of the OIDP scale were, respectively, 0.81 and 0.70 for S1, and 0.82 and 0.79 for S2, with a quadratic Kappa κ = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75-0.89) in S1 and κ = 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89-0.94) in S2. Exploratory factor analyses showed one factor for the total version and three factors (non-interpretable) for the frequency version. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the frequency version for the one-factor model (Model 1) had the best fit [Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.04; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.98; Tucker-Lewis index (TLI) = 0.97, χ(2) P-value < 0.01]. The one-factor model was not significantly different from the original three-factor model. These findings suggest that the scale captures only one overall quality of life dimension, and that the frequency version was the most parsimonious model of the OIDP scale. PMID:26935779

  2. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the oral cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AZD5438 when administered at intermittent and continuous dosing schedules in patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Boss, D. S.; Schwartz, G. K.; Middleton, M. R.; Amakye, D. D.; Swaisland, H.; Midgley, R. S.; Ranson, M.; Danson, S.; Calvert, H.; Plummer, R.; Morris, C.; Carvajal, R. D.; Chirieac, L. R.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Shapiro, G. I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: AZD5438 is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin E-cdk2, cyclin A-cdk2 and cyclin B-cdk1 complexes. Three phase I studies assessed the clinical safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AZD5438 when administered in different dosing schedules. Patients and methods: AZD5438 was administered four times daily, once every 7 days (study 1), for 14 consecutive days followed by 7 days of rest (study 2), or continuously (study 3), to patients with advanced solid tumours. Dose escalation proceeded until the emergence of dose-limiting toxic effects. Results: Sixty-four patients were included across the three studies (19, 17 and 28, respectively). Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. When dosed continuously, 40 mg four times daily was considered intolerable, and due to safety issues, all studies were terminated prematurely. Consequently, no intolerable dose was identified during the weekly schedule. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated dose-proportional exposure, high interpatient variability and accumulation after multiple doses. Skin biopsies indicated reduced retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation at cdk2 phospho-sites; other pharmacodynamic assessments did not reveal consistent trends. Conclusions: AZD5438 was generally well tolerated in a weekly dosing schedule, but not in continuous schedules. The clinical development programme for AZD5438 was discontinued owing to tolerability and exposure data from these studies. PMID:19825886

  3. Mechanism by which orally administered beta-1,3-glucans enhance the tumoricidal activity of antitumor monoclonal antibodies in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Yan, Jun; Baran, Jarek T; Allendorf, Daniel J; Hansen, Richard D; Ostroff, Gary R; Xing, Pei Xiang; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Ross, Gordon D

    2004-07-15

    Antitumor mAb bind to tumors and activate complement, coating tumors with iC3b. Intravenously administered yeast beta-1,3;1,6-glucan functions as an adjuvant for antitumor mAb by priming the inactivated C3b (iC3b) receptors (CR3; CD11b/CD18) of circulating granulocytes, enabling CR3 to trigger cytotoxicity of iC3b-coated tumors. Recent data indicated that barley beta-1,3;1,4-glucan given orally similarly potentiated the activity of antitumor mAb, leading to enhanced tumor regression and survival. This investigation showed that orally administered yeast beta-1,3;1,6-glucan functioned similarly to barley beta-1,3;1,4-glucan with antitumor mAb. With both oral beta-1,3-glucans, a requirement for iC3b on tumors and CR3 on granulocytes was confirmed by demonstrating therapeutic failures in mice deficient in C3 or CR3. Barley and yeast beta-1,3-glucan were labeled with fluorescein to track their oral uptake and processing in vivo. Orally administered beta-1,3-glucans were taken up by macrophages that transported them to spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow. Within the bone marrow, the macrophages degraded the large beta-1,3-glucans into smaller soluble beta-1,3-glucan fragments that were taken up by the CR3 of marginated granulocytes. These granulocytes with CR3-bound beta-1,3-glucan-fluorescein were shown to kill iC3b-opsonized tumor cells following their recruitment to a site of complement activation resembling a tumor coated with mAb. PMID:15240666

  4. Treatment of primary Sjögren's syndrome with low-dose natural human interferon-alpha administered by the oral mucosal route: a phase II clinical trial. IFN Protocol Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ship, J A; Fox, P C; Michalek, J E; Cummins, M J; Richards, A B

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the safety and efficacy of four dosages of natural human interferon-alpha (nHuIFN-alpha) delivered over a 12-week period orally in lozenges (150 IU and 450 IU, once [QD] or three times [TID] daily) compared to placebo in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome. This randomized, double-blinded clinical trial demonstrated that nHuIFN-alpha at a dose of 150 IU administered TID by oral lozenge significantly improved stimulated whole saliva output compared to placebo after 12 weeks of treatment. The 150 IU TID dose also was suggestive of benefit for 5 of 7 subjective measures of oral and ocular comfort. IFN lozenges demonstrated a good safety profile, with no serious adverse events found in any treatment group. There were no significant differences between the placebo and the four doses of IFN for adverse events by total number, organ system, severity, dropouts, and number judged to be related to treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the use of 150 IU IFN lozenges TID for 12 weeks in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome improved salivary output and decreased complaints of xerostomia without causing significant adverse medical events. PMID:10476942

  5. The efficacy and plasma profiles of abamectin plus levamisole combination anthelmintics administered as oral and pour-on formulations to cattle.

    PubMed

    Leathwick, D M; Miller, C M; Sauermann, C W; Candy, P M; Ganesh, S; Fraser, K; Waghorn, T S

    2016-08-30

    In phase I, faecal egg count reduction tests (FECRT) were conducted on six commercial cattle farms to compare the performance of two pour-on and one oral combination anthelmintic. Groups of 12-15 calves were sampled for faecal nematode egg count (FEC) before treatment with either abamectin oral, levamisole oral, an abamectin+levamisole oral combination or one of two abamectin+levamisole combination pour-ons. Samples were collected again 14days after treatment to calculate the percentage reduction in FEC. The proportions of infective stage larvae (L3) in faecal cultures were used to apportion egg counts to, and calculate efficacy against, the main parasite genera. Abamectin oral was effective against Ostertagia except on one farm where resistance was indicated, but had reduced efficacy against Cooperia on four farms. Levamisole oral was effective against Cooperia on all farms, but had variable efficacy against Ostertagia. The abamectin+levamisole oral was effective against both species on all farms. The abamectin+levamisole pour-ons were effective on some farms but not on others. In particular, pour-on 2 failed to achieve 95% efficacy in 45% of evaluations, 4/6 against Cooperia and 1/5 against Ostertagia. On some farms the combination pour-ons were less effective than their constituent actives administered alone as orals. In phase II, 8 groups of 6 calves, grazing parasite-free pasture, were infected with putatively ML-resistant isolates of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Once infections were patent groups were treated with oral or pour-on formulations of abamectin alone, levamisole alone, abamectin+levamisole (two pour-ons) or remained untreated. Blood samples were collected for analysis and after 8days all calves were euthanized and abomasa and intestines recovered for worm counts. All treatments were effective against O. ostertagi and all treatments containing levamisole were effective against C. oncophora. Animals treated with the oral combination

  6. Oral temperatures of the elderly in nursing homes in summer and winter in relation to activities of daily living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yutaka; Maeda, Akira

    This study was conducted to clarify the seasonal difference in body temperature in summer and winter, and to document the thermal environment of the elderly living in nursing homes. The subjects were 57 healthy elderly people aged >=63 years living in two nursing homes in Japan. One of the homes was characterized by subjects with low levels of activities of daily living (ADL). Oral temperatures were measured in the morning and afternoon, with simultaneous recording of ambient temperature and relative humidity. Oral temperatures in summer were higher than in winter, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05) of 0.25 (SD 0.61) °C in the morning and 0.24 (SD 0.50) °C in the afternoon. Differences between oral temperatures in summer and winter tended to be greater in subjects with low ADL scores, even when their room temperature was well-controlled. In conclusion, the oral temperatures of the elderly are lower in winter than summer, particularly in physically inactive people. It appears that those with low levels of ADL are more vulnerable to large changes in ambient temperature.

  7. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:8575807

  8. Reducing blood glucose levels in TIDM mice with an orally administered extract of sericin from hIGF-I-transgenic silkworm cocoons.

    PubMed

    Song, Zuowei; Zhang, Mengyao; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we reported that the blood glucose levels of mice with type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) was reduced with orally administered silk gland powder from silkworms transgenic for human insulin-like growth factor-I (hIGF-I). However, potential safety hazards could not be eliminated because the transgenic silk gland powder contained heterologous DNA, including the green fluorescent protein (gfp) and neomycin resistance (neo) genes. These shortcomings might be overcome if the recombinant hIGF-I were secreted into the sericin layer of the cocoon. In this study, silkworm eggs were transfected with a novel piggyBac transposon vector, pigA3GFP-serHS-hIGF-I-neo, containing the neo, gfp, and hIGF-I genes controlled by the sericin-1 (ser-1) promoter with the signal peptide DNA sequence of the fibrin heavy chain (Fib-H) and a helper plasmid containing the piggyBac transposase sequence under the control of the Bombyx mori actin 3 (A3) promoter, using sperm-mediated gene transfer to generate the transformed silkworms. The hIGF-I content estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was approximately 162.7 ng/g. To estimate the biological activity of the expressed hIGF-I, streptozotocin-induced TIDM mice were orally administered sericin from the transgenic silkworm. The blood glucose levels of the mice were significantly reduced, suggesting that the extract from the transgenic hIGF-I silkworm cocoons can be used as an orally administered drug. PMID:24632065

  9. Antidiabetic effect of orally administered conophylline-containing plant extract on streptozotocin-treated and Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikio; Takei, Izumi; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Conophylline, a vinca alkaloid from Ervatamia microphylla, is known to induce the differentiation of pancreatic precursor cells to insulin-producing cells. In the present research we examined the antidiabetic effects of this alkaloid in vivo by oral administration. Crude conophylline preparations were prepared from the leaves of Tabernaemontana divaricata collected in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Conophylline was orally absorbed and showed an increase in its plasma level in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. The plasma conophylline concentration reached its maximum from 1.5 to 3h after a single oral administration and gradually decreased in 24h. The alkaloid decreased the blood glucose level and increased the plasma insulin level in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after repetitive administration for 15 days. Fasting blood glucose levels in rats treated orally with conophylline at 0.11 and 0.46 mg/kg/day were 411+/-47 and 381+/-65 mg/dl, respectively; whereas the glucose level of the control rats was 435+/-46 mg/dl. Conophylline also decreased the fasting blood glucose level in Goto-Kakizaki rats in a dose-dependent manner after repetitive administration for 42 days. These results suggest that the extract from conophylline-containing leaves may be useful as a functional food for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:19217246

  10. Distribution and residues of orally administered 2,4,6-trinitro[14C]toluene in ruminating sheep.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a persistent contaminant of some military and industrial soils. The purpose of this study was to determine the fate of 14C-TNT in ruminating sheep. Animals were dosed with 35.5 mg each of dietary unlabelled TNT for 21 consecutive d. On d 22 sheep were orally dosed with...

  11. First results on the incorporation and excretion of 15N from orally administered urea in lactating pony mares.

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Zander, R; Gruhn, K; Hennig, A

    1991-05-01

    Two lactating pony mares were given oral offers of 20 g 15N urea [95 atom-% 15N-excess (15N')] on 6 subsequent days. About 80% of the consumed 15N' were excreted via urine and faeces, but only about 2% via milk. The 15N' secreted via milk-lysine only amounted to 0.04% of the 15N' intake. The recovery was about 90% in each case. Tissues with active metabolism had an unexpectedly high labelling (greater than 0.3 atom-% 15N'). The low extent of the conversion of oral urea N into milk-lysine speaks against an essential participation of the enteral synthesis in meeting the amino acid requirement of lactating mares. It was already concluded from this results that the determination of the amino acid requirement will be necessary for this group of performance. PMID:1888274

  12. Effects of Orally Administered Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase-Containing Tablets on Clinical and Bacteriological Profiles in Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Eiju; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of oral administration of lactoferrin (LF) and lactoperoxidase-(LPO-)containing tablet on periodontal condition. Seventy-two individuals with chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to take either bovine LF and LPO-containing tablets (test group, n = 37) or control tablets (control group, n = 35) every day for 12 weeks. Periodontal parameters and levels of subgingival plaque bacteria, human and bovine LF, and endotoxin in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were evaluated at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. Significant differences were observed in GCF levels of bovine LF between the test and control groups throughout the study (P < .05). However, clinical and bacteriological parameter values proved comparable between the two groups at 1 week to 12 weeks. Therefore, the effect of oral administration of LF and LPO-containing tablets might be weak on periodontal and bacteriological profile in this study. PMID:21747858

  13. Efficacy of bath and orally administered praziquantel and fenbendazole against Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a monogenean parasite of silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell).

    PubMed

    Forwood, J M; Harris, J O; Deveney, M R

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the efficacy of praziquantel (PZQ) and fenbendazole (FBZ), each administered by bath and orally, against the monogenean Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a gill parasite of the freshwater fish silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell). PZQ and FBZ were each administered by bath at 10 mg L⁻¹ for 48 h and on surface-coated feed pellets at 75 mg kg⁻¹ per body weight (BW) per day for 6 days. Bath treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 99% and 91%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Oral treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 79% and 95%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Fish rejected feed pellets surface-coated with PZQ, suggesting that palatability of surface-coated PZQ-medicated feed is poor, which undermined efficacy. In all trials, some juvenile parasites were present on fish after treatment during efficacy assessment, indicating that efficacy may be lower against juvenile parasites or that recruitment occurred post-treatment, demonstrating that repeat treatments are necessary to effectively control L. bidyana in aquaculture. PMID:23488766

  14. Enhanced oral bioavailability of morin administered in mixed micelle formulation with PluronicF127 and Tween80 in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon Ah; Yoon, You Hyun; Choi, Kwangik; Kwon, Mihwa; Goo, Soo Hyeon; Cha, Jin-Sun; Choi, Min-Koo; Lee, Hye Suk; Song, Im-Sook

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the low oral bioavailability of morin, a mixed micelle formulation with pharmaceutical excipients that facilitate solubilization and modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo rats. Morin-loaded mixed micelle formulation with a morin-PluronicF127-Tween80 ratio of 1 : 10 : 0.02 (w/w/w) was prepared by a thin-film hydration method. The solubility, size distribution, drug encapsulation efficiency, and percent drug loading of the formulation were characterized. Subsequently, in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of morin loaded in a PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed-micelle formulation were investigated in rats. Absolute bioavailability of morin was dramatically increased by the oral administration of morin-loaded PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed micelle from 0.4% to 11.2% without changing the systemic clearance and half-life. In Caco-2 cells, absorption permeability of morin from the novel formulation was increased 3.6-fold compared with that of morin alone. P-gp inhibition by cyclosporine A (CsA) increased absorptive permeability of morin 2.4-fold but decreased the efflux of morin by 52%, which was consistent with increased plasma concentration of morin in the pretreatment of CsA in rats. The morin formulation inhibited P-gp transport activity by 83.1% at 100 µM as morin concentration. Moreover, morin formulation increased paracellular permeability of Lucifer yellow by 1.6-1.8 fold. In conclusion, enhanced oral bioavailability of morin from morin-loaded PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed micelle formulation can be attributed to increased intestinal permeation of morin, which was mediated at least by P-gp inhibition and enhanced paracellular route. PMID:25747979

  15. Choice in HIV testing: the acceptability and anticipated use of a self-administered at-home oral HIV test among South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Cheruvillil, Sonia; Christian, Stephanie; Mantell, Joanne E; Milford, Cecilia; Rambally-Greener, Letitia; Mosery, Nzwakie; Greener, Ross; Smit, Jennifer A

    2016-07-01

    Combination HIV prevention is being widely promoted by funders. This strategy aims to offer HIV prevention choices that can be selected and combined to decrease HIV risk in ways that fit with each individual's situation. Treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis are two new evidence-based strategies to decrease HIV incidence, both of which require high HIV testing rates to be effective, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a goal of 90% of HIV-positive individuals knowing their status by 2030. However, HIV testing rates in many countries remain suboptimal. Just as no single HIV prevention method is ideal for all people in all situations, no single HIV testing modality is likely to be acceptable to everyone. By offering HIV testing choices, we may be able to increase testing rates. However, many low-resourced countries have been slow to take up new HIV testing options such as the self-administered at-home oral HIV test that is currently available in the United States. In this paper, we present findings from 20 in-depth interviews, conducted in 2010, documenting opinions about self-administered at-home oral HIV testing, a testing modality still largely unavailable in Africa. Participants were clients of three primary healthcare clinics in South Africa. Self-testing was seen as enabling confidentiality/privacy, saving time, and facilitating testing together with partners. However, concerns were raised about psychological distress when testing at home without a counsellor. Some suggested this concern could be minimised by having experienced clinic-based HIV testing and counselling before getting self-testing kits for home use. Thus, self-administered HIV testing could be an option added to the current testing modalities to address some important barriers to testing. PMID:27399040

  16. Long-acting injectable versus daily oral antipsychotic treatment trials in schizophrenia: pragmatic versus explanatory study designs

    PubMed Central

    Alphs, Larry D.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2015-01-01

    Trial design characteristics related to the explanatory : pragmatic spectrum may contribute toward the inconsistent results reported in studies comparing long-acting injectable (LAI) versus daily oral antipsychotic (AP) treatments in schizophrenia. A novel approach examined the hypothesis that a more pragmatic design is important to show the advantages of LAI versus oral APs. A literature search identified comparative studies assessing the clinical efficacy/effectiveness of LAI versus oral APs in more than 100 schizophrenia patients, with 6-month or more duration/follow-up, and published between January 1993 and December 2013 (n=11). Each study’s design was rated using the six-domain ASPECT-R (A Study Pragmatic : Explanatory Characterization Tool-Rating). Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum tests compared ratings of studies supporting (n=7) and not supporting (n=4) a LAI advantage. ASPECT-R total and domain scores were significantly higher (more pragmatic) in studies finding a LAI versus oral AP treatment advantage than those that did not. The rank order of this significance among domains was as follows: ‘participant compliance assessment’ (P=0.005), ‘medical practice setting/practitioner expertise’ (P=0.006), ‘intervention flexibility’ (P=0.007), ‘follow-up intensity/duration’ (P=0.009), ‘primary trial outcomes’ (P=0.012), and ‘participant eligibility’ (P=0.015). Findings support that more pragmatic, less explanatory design features are important to show advantages for LAI treatment. Explanatory studies may introduce features that obscure advantages related to adherence. PMID:26049673

  17. Long-acting injectable versus daily oral antipsychotic treatment trials in schizophrenia: pragmatic versus explanatory study designs.

    PubMed

    Bossie, Cynthia A; Alphs, Larry D; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-09-01

    Trial design characteristics related to the explanatory : pragmatic spectrum may contribute toward the inconsistent results reported in studies comparing long-acting injectable (LAI) versus daily oral antipsychotic (AP) treatments in schizophrenia. A novel approach examined the hypothesis that a more pragmatic design is important to show the advantages of LAI versus oral APs. A literature search identified comparative studies assessing the clinical efficacy/effectiveness of LAI versus oral APs in more than 100 schizophrenia patients, with 6-month or more duration/follow-up, and published between January 1993 and December 2013 (n=11). Each study's design was rated using the six-domain ASPECT-R (A Study Pragmatic : Explanatory Characterization Tool-Rating). Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum tests compared ratings of studies supporting (n=7) and not supporting (n=4) a LAI advantage. ASPECT-R total and domain scores were significantly higher (more pragmatic) in studies finding a LAI versus oral AP treatment advantage than those that did not. The rank order of this significance among domains was as follows: 'participant compliance assessment' (P=0.005), 'medical practice setting/practitioner expertise' (P=0.006), 'intervention flexibility' (P=0.007), 'follow-up intensity/duration' (P=0.009), 'primary trial outcomes' (P=0.012), and 'participant eligibility' (P=0.015). Findings support that more pragmatic, less explanatory design features are important to show advantages for LAI treatment. Explanatory studies may introduce features that obscure advantages related to adherence. PMID:26049673

  18. Discriminative ability of the generic and condition specific Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP) among adolescents with and without hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to (1) investigate to what extent the generic and condition specific (CS) forms of the oral impact of daily performance (OIDP) inventory discriminate between a group of patients with hypodontia and a group of patients having malocclusion, (2) assess the association of the generic and CS OIDP with severity and localisation of hypodontia, whilst adjusting for patients’ age and sex. Methods A total of 163 patients aged 10–17 years were included in a cross-sectional study. Two groups were investigated: 62 patients with non-syndromic hypodontia and 101 non-hypodontia patients. Both groups had a malocclusion of similar treatment need. All patients underwent a clinical and radiographic examination and completed a Norwegian version of the generic and the CS OIDP inventory. CS scores were established for impacts attributed to hypodontia. Results The mean number of missing teeth in the hypodontia group was 6.2. The prevalence of generic and CS oral impacts in the hypodontia group were 64% and 30%, and the corresponding rates in the non-hypodontia group were 62% and 10%. The generic OIDP did not discriminate between the two groups with respect to overall scores. The CS OIDP discriminated strongly between patients with and without hypodontia regarding problems with emotional status, showing teeth, social contact, speaking and carrying out work. Compared to the non-hypodontia group, patients with hypodontia, with severe hypodontia (≥ 6 missing teeth) and upper anterior hypodontia were respectively 3.4, 2.5 and 7.0 times more likely to report any oral impact attributed to small teeth, gaps between teeth and missing teeth. Conclusions Hypodontia and malocclusion patients report a considerable burden of oral impacts. The CS-OIDP measure discriminated most effectively between patients with and without hypodontia and was related to severity and upper anterior localisation of hypodontia. PMID:24884584

  19. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Orally Administered Botanical Composition, UP446-Part III: Effects on Fertility and Early Embryonic Development to Implantation in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, high prevalence of adverse effects associated to the use of traditional medicines during pregnancy is becoming alarming due to the self-medication of oral supplements by expecting mothers without supervision. Many expectant mothers use alternative and complementary medicines as a supplement to conventional pregnancy management with an inherent belief of considering herbal remedies as harmless. To the contrary, herbal remedies could incur a potential teratogenic risk both to the child bearing mother and the developing fetuses when consumed before or at the time of gestation. Here, we describe the potential adverse effects of orally administered UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, on fertility and early embryonic development to implantation in Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg. Besides body weight and food consumption, reproductive functions, sperm motility and morphology, estrus cycle, and fertility rate were monitored. There were no statistically significant differences in reproductive function in all UP446 treated groups in both genders. Test substance impacts on reproductive parameters were very minimal. Neither sperm motility nor morphology was affected as a result of oral UP446 administrations in males. There were no treatment-related effects on estrus cycle stages in females. No significant changes in necropsy or histopathology were observed for all the groups. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of UP446 was considered to be 1000 mg/kg, the highest dose tested, in both genders. PMID:26173630

  20. Adherence to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy administered by once-daily or once-weekly injection in patients with type 2 diabetes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Ouwens, Mario JNM; Grandy, Susan; Johnsson, Kristina; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to compare 6-month adherence to therapy with exenatide once weekly (Bydureon®) vs liraglutide once daily (Victoza®) in patients with type 2 diabetes under primary care in Germany. Methods A nationwide longitudinal prescription database (LRx), (between January 2011 and September 2014) was used to analyze adherence to therapy. The proportion of days covered (PDC) by prescription was used as a measure of adherence in the 6-month postindex period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapy adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Results Therapy was initiated in 5,449 patients with exenatide once weekly (age: 59.7±11.8 years; 51.4% were male) and in 24,648 patients with liraglutide once daily (age: 59.4±11.4 years; 49.7% were male). The median PDC was 0.88 for exenatide once weekly and 0.77 for liraglutide once daily (P<0.05). Once-weekly exenatide was associated with significantly higher adherence. Odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for having a PDC of ≥0.80 was 1.78 (1.62–1.96) for exenatide once weekly compared with liraglutide once daily after adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Conclusion Adherence to treatment with exenatide once weekly was significantly increased compared to that with liraglutide once daily over 6 months in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27418849

  1. Prospective evaluation of long-term safety of dual-release hydrocortisone replacement administered once daily in patients with adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, A G; Marelli, C; Fitts, D; Bergthorsdottir, R; Burman, P; Dahlqvist, P; Ekman, B; Edén Engström, B; Olsson, T; Ragnarsson, O; Ryberg, M; Wahlberg, J; Lennernäs, H; Skrtic, S; Johannsson, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective was to assess the long-term safety profile of dual-release hydrocortisone (DR-HC) in patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI). Design Randomised, open-label, crossover trial of DR-HC or thrice-daily hydrocortisone for 3 months each (stage 1) followed by two consecutive, prospective, open-label studies of DR-HC for 6 months (stage 2) and 18 months (stage 3) at five university clinics in Sweden. Methods Sixty-four adults with primary AI started stage 1, and an additional 16 entered stage 3. Patients received DR-HC 20–40 mg once daily and hydrocortisone 20–40 mg divided into three daily doses (stage 1 only). Main outcome measures were adverse events (AEs) and intercurrent illness (self-reported hydrocortisone use during illness). Results In stage 1, patients had a median 1.5 (range, 1–9) intercurrent illness events with DR-HC and 1.0 (1–8) with thrice-daily hydrocortisone. AEs during stage 1 were not related to the cortisol exposure-time profile. The percentage of patients with one or more AEs during stage 1 (73.4% with DR-HC; 65.6% with thrice-daily hydrocortisone) decreased during stage 2, when all patients received DR-HC (51% in the first 3 months; 54% in the second 3 months). In stages 1–3 combined, 19 patients experienced 27 serious AEs, equating to 18.6 serious AEs/100 patient-years of DR-HC exposure. Conclusions This long-term prospective trial is the first to document the safety of DR-HC in patients with primary AI and demonstrates that such treatment is well tolerated during 24 consecutive months of therapy. PMID:24944332

  2. Oral levofloxacin 500 mg once daily in the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Naber, K G; Roscher, K; Botto, H; Schaefer, V

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm further the efficacy and safety of levofloxacin in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) in Europe. Men with a history of CBP were enrolled in a prospective, multinational (eight countries), open-label study to receive levofloxacin 500 mg once daily per os (p.o.) for 28 days. Patients were followed for 6 months. A total of 117 patients were treated. Gram-negative bacteria were identified in 57/106 patients (mainly Escherichia coli (n=37)) and Gram-positive bacteria in 60/106 patients (mainly Enterococcus faecalis (n=18) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=14)). Among the intention-to-treat population (n=116), the clinical success rate (cured and improved patients) was 92% (95% confidence interval (CI) 84.8-96.5%), 77.4% (95% CI 68.2-84.9%), 66.0% (95% CI 56.2-75.0%) and 61.9% (95% CI 51.9-71.2%) at 5-12 days, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months post treatment. The microbiological eradication rate according to evaluation scheme II was 82/98 (83.7%, 95% CI 74.8-90.4%) at 1 month and the continued eradication rate was 52/57 (91.2%, 95% CI 80.7-97.1%) at 6 months post treatment. Comparison of four classification schemes showed similar results. Thus, the present investigation is suitably comparable in methods and results to previous studies. Levofloxacin was well tolerated. Four patients (3.4%) discontinued therapy due to adverse events and 15 patients (12.8%) experienced at least one adverse event. Levofloxacin 500 mg p.o. once daily for 28 days is clinically and microbiologically effective in the treatment of CBP caused by susceptible pathogens and is well tolerated. PMID:18571904

  3. Rapid and complete urinary elimination of (/sup 14/C)-5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde administered orally or intravenously to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Germond, J.E.; Philippossian, G.; Richli, U.; Bracco, I.; Arnaud, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), is a major product of sugar degradation found in food and solutions used in parenteral nutrition. Labeled (/sup 14/C)HMF was synthesized by dehydration of (/sup 14/C)fructose on ion-exchange resin and administered per os (po) and intravenously (iv) to rats. Metabolic balance of radioactivity demonstrated that HMF or its metabolites are rapidly eliminated in the urine with a recovery of 95-100% after 24 h. Literature reported, in some cases, 50% retention in the body. HMF was completely converted to two metabolites, which have been identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid and N-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoyl)glycine. Administration of high doses of HMF showed a similar rapid elimination, but a proportional reduction of the amount of the glycine conjugate produced. Whole-animal-body autoradiography confirm that shortly after administration radioactive material was present in the liver but was mostly in the kidney and the bladder. The only significant difference between po and iv administration was the presence of a higher level of radioactive material in the brain of iv-treated rats.

  4. Age-Related P-Glycoprotein Expression in the Intestine and Affecting the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Enrofloxacin in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of P-gp mRNA in the liver, jejunum and ileum, than at other ages. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg•ml-1, P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg•ml-1•h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h-1, P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of broilers for

  5. Daily testosterone and gonadotropin levels are similar in azoospermic and nonazoospermic normal men administered weekly testosterone: implications for male contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K; Anawalt, B D; Bremner, W J; Matsumoto, A M

    2001-01-01

    Weekly intramuscular administration of testosterone esters such as testosterone enanthate (TE) suppresses gonadotropins and spermatogenesis and has been studied as a male contraceptive. For unknown reasons, however, some men fail to achieve azoospermia with such regimens. We hypothesized that either 1) daily circulating serum fluoroimmunoreactive gonadotropins were higher or testosterone levels were lower during the weekly injection interval, or 2) monthly circulating bioactive gonadotropin levels were higher in nonazoospermic men. We therefore analyzed daily testosterone and fluoroimmunoreactive gonadotropin levels as well as pooled monthly bioactive and fluoroimmunoreactive gonadotropin levels in normal men receiving chronic TE injections and correlated these levels with sperm production. After a 3-month control period, 51 normal men were randomly assigned to receive intramuscular TE at 25 mg (n = 10), 50 mg (n = 9), 100 mg (n = 10), 300 mg (n = 10), or placebo (n = 12) weekly for 6 months. After 5 months of testosterone administration, morning testosterone and fluoroimmunoreactive follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured daily for a 1-week period between TE injections. In addition, fluoroimmunoreactive and bioactive FSH and LH levels were measured in pooled monthly blood samples drawn just before the next TE injection. In the 100-mg and 300-mg TE groups, mean monthly fluoroimmunoreactive FSH and LH levels were suppressed by 86%-97%, bioactive FSH and LH levels by 62%-80%, and roughly half the subjects became azoospermic. In the 1-week period of month 6, daily testosterone levels between TE injections were within the normal range in men receiving placebo, or 25 or 50 mg of weekly TE, but were significantly elevated in men receiving 100 or 300 mg of weekly TE. At no point during treatment, however, were there significant differences in daily testosterone or fluoroimmunoreactive gonadotropin levels, or monthly bioactive

  6. Selective enhancement of systemic Th1 immunity in immunologically immature rats with an orally administered bacterial extract.

    PubMed

    Bowman, L M; Holt, P G

    2001-06-01

    Infant rats primed during the first week of life with soluble antigen displayed adult-equivalent levels of T-helper 2 (Th2)-dependent immunological memory development as revealed by production of secondary immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody responses to subsequent challenge, but in contrast to adults failed to prime for Th1-dependent IgG2b responses. We demonstrate that this Th2 bias in immune function can be redressed by oral administration to neonates of a bacterial extract (Broncho-Vaxom OM-85) comprising lyophilized fractions of several common respiratory tract bacterial pathogens. Animals given OM-85 displayed a selective upregulation in primary and secondary IgG2b responses, accompanied by increased gamma interferon and decreased interleukin-4 production (both antigen specific and polyclonal), and increased capacity for development of Th1-dependent delayed hypersensitivity to the challenge antigen. We hypothesize that the bacterial extract functions via enhancement of the process of postnatal maturation of Th1 function, which is normally driven by stimuli from the gastrointestinal commensal microflora. PMID:11349036

  7. Selective Enhancement of Systemic Th1 Immunity in Immunologically Immature Rats with an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, L. M.; Holt, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    Infant rats primed during the first week of life with soluble antigen displayed adult-equivalent levels of T-helper 2 (Th2)-dependent immunological memory development as revealed by production of secondary immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody responses to subsequent challenge, but in contrast to adults failed to prime for Th1-dependent IgG2b responses. We demonstrate that this Th2 bias in immune function can be redressed by oral administration to neonates of a bacterial extract (Broncho-Vaxom OM-85) comprising lyophilized fractions of several common respiratory tract bacterial pathogens. Animals given OM-85 displayed a selective upregulation in primary and secondary IgG2b responses, accompanied by increased gamma interferon and decreased interleukin-4 production (both antigen specific and polyclonal), and increased capacity for development of Th1-dependent delayed hypersensitivity to the challenge antigen. We hypothesize that the bacterial extract functions via enhancement of the process of postnatal maturation of Th1 function, which is normally driven by stimuli from the gastrointestinal commensal microflora. PMID:11349036

  8. International guidelines for bioequivalence of systemically available orally administered generic drug products: a survey of similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C; Conner, Dale P; Yu, Lawrence X

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA, and the World Health Organization. We began with a comparison of how the various jurisdictions and organizations define a generic product and its corresponding reference product. We then compared the following bioequivalence approaches: recommended bioequivalence study designs, method of pharmacokinetic calculations and bioequivalence acceptance limits, recommendations for modifying bioequivalence study designs and limits for highly variable drugs and narrow therapeutic index drugs, provisions for waiving bioequivalence study requirements (granting biowaivers), and implementation of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. We observed that, overall, there are more similarities than differences in bioequivalence approaches among the regulatory authorities surveyed. PMID:23821352

  9. Orally administered betaine reduces photodamage caused by UVB irradiation through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Lee, Hee Jeong; Youn, Ui Joung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Betaine is widely distributed in plants, microorganisms, in several types of food and in medical herbs, including Lycium chinense. The administration of 100 mg betaine/kg body weight/day is an effective strategy for preventing ultraviolet irradiation‑induced skin damage. The present study aimed to determine the preventive effects of betaine on ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation‑induced skin damage in hairless mice. The mice were divided into three groups: Control (n=5), UVB‑treated vehicle (n=5) and UVB‑treated betaine (n=5) groups. The level of irradiation was progressively increased between 60 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 1 (one minimal erythematous dose = 60 mJ/cm2) and 90 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 7. The formation of wrinkles significantly increased following UVB exposure in the UVB‑treated vehicle group. However, treatment with betaine suppressed UVB‑induced wrinkle formation, as determined by the mean length, mean depth, number, epidermal thickness and collagen damage. Furthermore, oral administration of betaine also inhibited the UVB‑induced expression of mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), and matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9). These findings suggested that betaine inhibits UVB‑induced skin damage by suppressing increased expression of MMP‑9 through the inhibition of MEK and ERK. PMID:26648401

  10. Effects of Orally Administered Viable Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS on Mouse Lymphocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; ElNezami, Hani S.; Salminen, Seppo J.; Ahokas, Jorma T.; Wright, Paul F. A.

    1999-01-01

    Immunomodulation by probiotics is a subject of growing interest, but the knowledge of dose response and time profile relationships is minimal. In this study we examined the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii JS (PJS) on the proliferative activity of murine lymphocytes ex vivo. Dose dependency was assessed by treating animals perorally with a low or a high dose (i.e., 109 or 1012 viable bacteria/kg of body weight) for 7 days. The lower dose levels of each strain appeared to enhance T-cell proliferation at the optimal concanavalin A (ConA) concentration (by 69 to 84%) and B-cell proliferation at the optimal and supraoptimal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (by 57 to 82%). B-cell proliferation was also enhanced by the high LGG dose (by 32 to 39%) but was accompanied by a marginal decrease in T-cell proliferation (by 8%) at the optimal ConA concentration. The time profiles of the immune responses were assessed after daily treatment with the higher dose for 3, 7, and 14 days. A significant decrease in basal lymphoproliferation (by 32 to 42%) was observed with PJS treatment after the 3- and 7-day periods; however, this activity returned to control levels after 14 days of treatment, which also resulted in significantly enhanced T-cell proliferation at optimal and supraoptimal ConA concentrations (by 24 to 80%). The 14-day LGG treatment also enhanced the latter activity (by 119%). In conclusion, LGG and PJS have specific dose- and duration-dependent immunomodulatory effects on the proliferative activity of B and T lymphocytes and may also reduce lymphocyte sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of lectin mitogens. PMID:10548566

  11. Some dietary fibers increase elimination of orally administered polychlorinated biphenyls but not that of retinol in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yasuo; Buddington, Randal K

    2004-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplementation can increase the size and nutrient absorption capacities of the small intestine in some mammals, but does this increase the risk of accumulating environmental contaminants? This study addressed this question by feeding mice diets containing various types of fiber at 0 or 100 g/kg (cellulose, lactosucrose, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, soy polysaccharide, rice bran and chitosan) for 10 wk. During the final 2 wk, the mice were fed retinol and a dose of Arochlor 1254 [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)] estimated to be 5% of the median lethal dose. Accumulation was determined using whole blood samples collected on days 1, 3 and 7 as well as eight tissues (whole blood, small and large intestine, liver, gall bladder, mesentery, kidney and brain). Elimination of Arochlor 1254 and retinol was determined using daily collections of feces and urine. The patterns of accumulation and elimination differed between Arochlor 1254 and retinol, among tissues, and among mice fed diets with various amounts and types of fiber. Dietary fiber supplementation did not decrease accumulation of PCB. However, the diet with chitosan increased fecal excretion of Arochlor 1254 compared to the fiber-free diet (P<0.05). The diets with fermentable fiber (polydextrose, indigestible dextrin and soy polysaccharides) increased urinary excretion of PCB compared to the diets with water-insoluble fiber (cellulose, rice bran and chitosan; P<0.05). The most efficacious diets for minimizing accumulation of environmental contaminants and accelerating elimination likely include a combination of soluble and insoluble fiber, but the specific types, proportions and amounts remain to be determined. PMID:14704306

  12. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    < 0.001), which was similar to the anti-inflammatory effect of indomethacin. Furthermore, no significant anti-inflammatory effects were observed following different treatments using α1AGp as an RA indicator. Pretreatment with all supplied diets significantly inhibited the development of paw swelling induced by CFA (P < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the oral intake of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin can improve the biochemical and clinical parameters of induced RA in rat. PMID:27427194

  13. The assessment of generalized anxiety disorder: psychometric validation of the Spanish version of the self-administered GAD-2 scale in daily medical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim To psychometrically validate the Spanish version of the self-administered 2-item GAD-2 scale for screening probable patients with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The GAD-2 was self-administered by patients diagnosed with GAD according to DSM-IV criteria and by age- and sex-matched controls who were recruited at random in mental health and primary care centres. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined for different cut-off values. Concurrent validity was also established using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHODAS II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to complete the questionnaire. Reliability (internal consistency) was high; Cronbach’s α = 0.875. A cut-off point of 3 showed adequate sensitivity (91.5%) and specificity (85.8%), with a statistically significant area under the curve (AUC = 0.937, p < 0.001), to distinguish GAD patients from controls. Concurrent validity was also high and significant with HAM-A (0.806, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.825, p < 0.001) and WHO-DAS II (0.642, p < 0.001) scales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the GAD-2 scale has been shown to have appropriate psychometric properties to rapidly detect probable cases of GAD in the Spanish cultural context under routine clinical practice conditions. PMID:22992432

  14. [Evaluation of voriconazole oral dosage in Japan].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Kawasumi, Noriyo; Hirai, Jun; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2014-10-01

    Voriconazole (VRCZ), a broad-spectrum triazole, is served in two dosage forms-injection and oral. VRCZ is difference dosage of oral and intravenous administration writing a medical package insert in Japan. 6 mg/kg intravenous injection (IV) twice daily for first day as initial loading dose, followed by 3-4 mg/kg IV twice daily between meals is recommended. 300 mg orally twice daily for first day as initial loading dose, followed by 150-200 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended. Patients weighing over 40 kg, 200 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended. Patients weighing under 40 kg, 100 mg orally twice daily between meals is recommended, increase to 150 mg twice daily if inadequate response. This study evaluated VRCZ trough concentration and oral dosage in the 23 cases which administered VRCZ to analysis for TDM in Aichi University Hospital. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated to examine relationships among variables. The level of statistical significance was set at p=0.05. All data were analyzed and processed on JMP 8 (SAS Institute Japan). There was a significant positive correlation between VRCZ trough concentration and dose/weight (r=0.47 p<0.05). In this result, VRCZ oral dosage is appropriate to administer dose/weight (mg/kg) twice a day as same as IV. PMID:25566590

  15. Prevalence, intensity and extent of Oral Impacts on Daily Performances associated with self-perceived malocclusion in 11-12-year-old children

    PubMed Central

    Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Sheiham, Aubrey

    2007-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence, intensity and extent of the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances associated with self-perceived malocclusion among Peruvian schoolchildren. Methods Eight hundred and five children aged 11 to 12 years attending 4 of 7 randomly selected schools linked to a Health Centre in Lima, Peru, participated in the study. The Spanish (Peru)Child-OIDP was used to assess the prevalence, intensity and extent of oral impacts on 8 daily performances (eating, speaking, teeth cleaning, sleeping, smiling, studying, emotion and social contact). Self-perceived malocclusion included complaints about position of teeth, spacing of teeth and deformity of mouth or face. The prevalence of oral impacts was compared by covariables using the Chi-square test, whereas the intensity and extent of oral impacts were compared by covariables through the Mann-Whitney test. Results Only 15.5% of children reported impacts associated with self-perceived malocclusion during the last 3 months. Of them, 18.4% reported impacts of severe or very severe intensity and 76.0% reported impacts on only one daily performance. Psychosocial activities such as smiling, emotion and social contact were the most frequently and severely impacted everyday activities. Conclusion Impacts of self-perceived malocclusion primarily affected psychological and social everyday activities. These findings provide further evidence to support the importance of psychological and social components of oral health on children's lives. PMID:17506880

  16. Didanosine Population Pharmacokinetics in West African Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children Administered Once-Daily Tablets in Relation to Efficacy after One Year of Treatment▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Déborah; Bardin, Christophe; Diagbouga, Serge; Nacro, Boubacar; Hien, Hervé; Zoure, Emmanuelle; Rouet, François; Ouiminga, Adama; Urien, Saik; Foulongne, Vincent; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Msellati, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to study didanosine pharmacokinetics in children after the administration of tablets, the only formulation available in Burkina Faso for which data are missing, and to establish relationships between doses, plasma drug concentrations, and treatment effects (efficacy/toxicity). Didanosine concentrations were measured for 40 children after 2 weeks and for 9 children after 2 to 5 months of treatment with a didanosine-lamivudine-efavirenz combination. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM. The link between the maximal concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), and the decrease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 RNA levels after 12 months of treatment was evaluated. The threshold AUC that improved efficacy was determined by the use of a Wilcoxon test for HIV RNA, and an optimized dosing schedule was simulated. Didanosine pharmacokinetics was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The apparent clearance and volume of distribution were higher for tablets, probably due to a lower bioavailability with tablets than with pediatric powder. The decrease in the viral load after 12 months of treatment was significantly correlated with the didanosine AUC and Cmax (P ≤ 0.02) during the first weeks of treatment. An AUC of >0.60 mg/liter·h was significantly linked to a greater decrease in the viral load (a decrease of 3 log10 versus 2.4 log10 copies/ml; P = 0.03) than that with a lower AUC. A didanosine dose of 360 mg/m2 administered as tablets should be a more appropriate dose than 240 mg/m2 to improve efficacy for these children. However, data on adverse events with this dosage are missing. PMID:19581461

  17. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  18. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species. PMID:26352950

  19. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  20. The neurotoxic effect of clindamycin - induced gut bacterial imbalance and orally administered propionic acid on DNA damage assessed by the comet assay: protective potency of carnosine and carnitine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comet assay is a quick method for assessing DNA damage in individual cells. It allows the detection of single and double DNA strand breaks, which represent the direct effect of some damaging agents. This study uses standard comet quantification models to compare the neurotoxic effect of orally administered propionic acid (PA) to that produced as a metabolite of bacterial overgrowth induced by clindamycin. Additionally, the protective effect of carnosine and carnitine as natural dietary supplements is assessed. Methods Single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assays) were performed on brain cortex and medulla samples after removal from nine groups of hamsters including: a control (untreated) group; PA-intoxicated group; clindamycin treated group; clindamycin-carnosine group and; clindamycin-carnitine group. Results There were significant double strand breaks recorded as tail length, tail moment and % DNA damage in PA and clindamycin-treated groups for the cortex and medulla compared to the control group. Neuroprotective effects of carnosine and carnitine were observed. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve (ROC) analysis showed satisfactory values of sensitivity and specificity of the comet assay parameters. Conclusion Percentage DNA damage, tail length, and tail moment are adequate biomarkers of PA neurotoxicity due to oral administration or as a metabolite of induced enteric bacterial overgrowth. Establishing biomarkers of these two exposures is important for protecting children’s health by documenting the role of the imbalance in gut microbiota in the etiology of autism through the gut-brain axis. These outcomes will help efforts directed at controlling the prevalence of autism, a disorder recently related to PA neurotoxicity. PMID:23587115

  1. Estrogen-like effects of diet-derived cadmium differ from those of orally administered CdCl(2) in the ERE-luc estrogen reporter mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Mäkelä, Sari; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-04-25

    Cadmium (Cd), an environmental and dietary contaminant, has been described to mimic the effects of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in selected model systems when studied as an inorganic salt. However, inorganic Cd salts do not represent the main form of Cd exposure in general human populations. The aims of this study were to compare the estrogen-like effects and the bioavailability of dietary Cd to inorganic CdCl(2). Adult ovariectomized ERE-luc reporter mice were administered two bread based diets containing different concentrations of Cd (17.57 and 49.22μg/kg, corresponding to oral intakes of 1.8 and 5.1μg/kg body weight (bw) per day, respectively), inorganic CdCl(2) (1μg/kg bw per day by gavage) or E(2) (5μg/kg bw per day pellet) for 21 days. The effects on estrogen signaling were investigated by studying the uterine weights, luciferase activation, and expression of endogenous estrogen target genes. The uterine weight was significantly increased by both CdCl(2) and E(2) but not by the Cd containing diets. All treatments modulated the expression of luciferase and the endogenous estrogen target genes; however, there was no consistent overlap between the responses triggered by the bread diets and the responses stimulated by CdCl(2) or E(2). Oral exposure to Cd was calculated and the concentrations in liver and kidneys quantified to estimate the amount of absorbed Cd retained in tissues. The results suggest significantly lower absorption and/or tissue retention of dietary Cd compared to CdCl(2) following oral exposure. Altogether, our results support previous reports on in vivo estrogenicity of CdCl(2) but do not suggest the same activity for diet bound Cd. This study calls for caution when extrapolating results from pure compound studies (e.g. estrogenicity of CdCl(2)) to dietary exposure scenarios (e.g. estrogenicity of diet bound Cd). Further basic research is needed on the mechanisms of interaction between Cd and the estrogen signaling, biologically active species of

  2. Effects of SiC nanoparticles orally administered in a rat model: Biodistribution, toxicity and elemental composition changes in feces and organs

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, Omar; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Mejia, Jorge; Rolin, Stéphanie; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; and others

    2012-10-15

    Background: Silicon carbide (SiC) presents noteworthy properties as a material such as high hardness, thermal stability, and photoluminescent properties as a nanocrystal. However, there are very few studies in regard to the toxicological potential of SiC NPs. Objectives: To study the toxicity and biodistribution of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model after acute (24 h) and subacute (28 days) oral administrations. The acute doses were 0.5, 5, 50, 300 and 600 mg·kg{sup −1}, while the subacute doses were 0.5 and 50 mg·kg{sup −1}. Results: SiC biodistribution and elemental composition of feces and organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) have been studied by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). SiC and other elements in feces excretion increased by the end of the subacute assessment. SiC did not accumulate in organs but some elemental composition modifications were observed after the acute assessment. Histopathological sections from organs (stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys) indicate the absence of damage at all applied doses, in both assessments. A decrease in the concentration of urea in blood was found in the 50 mg·kg{sup −1} group from the subacute assessment. No alterations in the urine parameters (sodium, potassium, osmolarity) were found. Conclusion: This is the first study that assesses the toxicity, biodistribution, and composition changes in feces and organs of SiC nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model. SiC was excreted mostly in feces and low traces were retrieved in urine, indicating that SiC can cross the intestinal barrier. No sign of toxicity was however found after oral administration. -- Highlights: ► SiC nanoparticles were orally administered to rats in acute and subacute doses. ► SiC was found in low traces in urine. It is mostly excreted in feces within 5 days. ► SiC excretion rate, feces and organ elemental composition change with time. ► No morphological alteration were found on GI tract, liver, kidneys

  3. Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir: A Once-Daily Oral Treatment Option for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christopher M; Holle, Lisa M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 historically has been the most difficult to treat HCV genotype, and patients infected with this genotype had been previously treated with interferon-based therapy. In recent years, however, treatment options for chronic HCV infection have rapidly changed to an all-oral regimen. Ledipasvir-sofosbuvir is an oral fixed-dose (ledipasvir 90 mg-sofosbuvir 400 mg) combination of two direct-acting antiviral drugs. Four phase 3 clinical trials (ION-1-4) evaluated ledipasvir-sofosbuvir with and without ribavirin in patients with HCV genotype 1. High rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) occurred with ledipasvir-sofosbuvir alone in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients without cirrhosis as well as in treatment-naïve patients with cirrhosis when administered for 12 weeks. In treatment-experienced patients with cirrhosis, 24 weeks of ledipasvir-sofosbuvir was also highly effective. Furthermore, treatment-naïve patients without cirrhosis (particularly those with HCV RNA serum concentrations < 6 million IU/ml) can achieve a similar SVR with only 8 weeks of therapy. Similarly, in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and HCV genotype 1 who were treated with ledipasvir-sofosbuvir for 12 weeks, a high SVR was observed in those with and without cirrhosis as well as treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Ledipasvir-sofosbuvir is well tolerated, with fatigue, headache, nausea, diarrhea, and insomnia being the most common adverse effects, which are typically mild to moderate in nature. This combination antiviral can be taken with or without food. Key factors to consider when prescribing ledipasvir-sofosbuvir are drug interactions including those mediated by the P-glycoprotein transporter and increased pH, cost of the drug or insurance coverage, comorbid conditions, and patient and provider preferences. Postmarketing experience and ongoing clinical trials will further define the safety and role

  4. [Clinical efficacy of tebipenem pivoxil treatment in children with pneumonia, who had no relief despite having administered oral beta-lactam antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    We assessed the clinical efficacy of tebipenem pivoxil (TBPM-PI) in 30 children with pneumonia who, despite having received oral administration of beta-lactam antibiotics at the standard dose for at least 3 days, had no relief of symptoms and showed an abnormal shadow on the chest X-ray and elevated serum CRP levels of 3.0 mg/dl or more between December 2009 and November 2010. TBPM-PI was administered at a single dose of 4 mg/kg twice a day for 3 days. The children ranged in age from 8 months to 5 years. The serum CRP level ranged from 3.05 to 12.9 mg/dl. In 28 of the 30 children, either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae or both were detected. Of the 28 children, 7 carried penicillin resistant S. pneumoniae; 9 carried beta-lactamase nonproducing ampicillin resistant H. influenzae; and 3 carried both. In all children, defervescence was observed within 48 hours of the start of TBPM-PI administration, and the severity of coughing/wheezing reduced significantly by the 3rd to 5th day. Thus, TBPM-PI was determined to be effective. Diarrhea or loose stool was observed as an adverse reaction in 4 children (13.3%). PMID:21861308

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  6. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6-16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9-79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4-72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5-77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9-59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  7. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  8. Orally administered fructose increases the numbers of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to gamma or SPE-like proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point.

  9. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, A L; Ni, J; Lin, L; Kennedy, A R

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  10. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  11. Dextran sulfate sodium administered orally is depolymerized in the stomach and induces cell cycle arrest plus apoptosis in the colon in early mouse colitis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Bamba, Tadao; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Kanauchi, Osamu; Ban, Hiromitsu; Bamba, Shigeki; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for human inflammatory bowel disease remain poorly understood. The pathogenic factors for dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, one of the experimental animal colitis models, also remain unknown. Furthermore, detailed studies on DSS metabolism in the gut lumen have not been reported. Therefore, we investigated DSS metabolism in the mouse gut lumen and report the mechanisms which induce colitis. DSS was labeled with 2-aminopyridine (pyridylamino-DSS, PA-DSS). PA-DSS was administered orally to male BALB/cA Jcl mice. The metabolites and histological findings were observed using HPLC and light or fluorescence microscopy. PA-DSS with Mr 5000 was depolymerized rapidly in the gastric lumen, and the depolymerized PA-DSS was absorbed in the small intestine. Therefore, the majority of the PA-DSS in the cecal contents returned to Mr 5000 PA-DSS, escaping absorption in the small intestine. Mr 5000 DSS induced severe colitis, and immunostaining using an anti-mouse Ki-67 antibody and the TUNEL assay showed that DSS arrested the cell cycle at the G0 phase and induced apoptosis of the colonic epithelium. Mr 2500 PA-DSS, however, induced these same effects weakly. During these processes, we observed that the epithelial cells can depolymerize DSS themselves. An in vitro study using Caco-2 cells also showed similar effects. Mr 5000 DSS was depolymerized in the gut lumen and epithelial cells. Therefore, the molecular mass distribution of the DSS differed between each part in the lumen. As an early stage event, DSS induced colitis through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis according to its molecular mass. PMID:22895560

  12. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Holida, Myrl; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Nicholls, Kathy; Thomas, Mark; Eyskens, Francois; Shankar, Suma; Adera, Mathews; Sitaraman, Sheela; Khanna, Richie; Flanagan, John J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Barth, Jay; Barlow, Carrolee; Valenzano, Kenneth J.; Lockhart, David J.; Boudes, Pol; Johnson, Franklin K.

    2015-01-01

    Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin) is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal) or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme). Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK) enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%). Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871 PMID:26252393

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-01-01

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC0–24h was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the kel was 0.068 h−1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. PMID:26265043

  14. Daily oral intake of theanine prevents the decline of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation in hippocampal dentate gyrus with concomitant alleviation of behavioral abnormalities in adult mice with severe traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kakuda, Takami; Nakazato, Ryota; Kokubo, Hiroshi; Ikeno, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Saki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is a long-lasting psychiatric disease with the consequence of hippocampal atrophy in humans exposed to severe fatal stress. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the transient decline of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and long-lasting behavioral abnormalities in mice with traumatic stress. Here, we investigated pharmacological properties of theanine on the declined BrdU incorporation and abnormal behaviors in mice with traumatic stress. Prior daily oral administration of theanine at 50-500 mg/kg for 5 days significantly prevented the decline of BrdU incorporation, while theanine significantly prevented the decline in the DG even when administered for 5 days after stress. Consecutive daily administration of theanine significantly inhibited the prolonged immobility in mice with stress in forced swimming test seen 14 days later. Although traumatic stress significantly increased spontaneous locomotor activity over 30 min even when determined 14 days later, the increased total locomotion was significantly ameliorated following the administration of theanine at 50 mg/kg for 14 days after stress. These results suggest that theanine alleviates behavioral abnormalities together with prevention of the transient decline of BrdU incorporation in the hippocampal DG in adult mice with severe traumatic stress. PMID:25837925

  15. Long-term maintenance combination chemotherapy with OPEC/MPEC (vincristine or methotrexate, prednisolone, etoposide and cyclophosphamide) or with daily oral etoposide and prednisolone can improve survival and quality of life in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Matsumoto, T; Ohtsubo, H; Fujiwara, H; Imamura, N; Hidaka, S; Kukita, T; Tei, C; Matsumoto, M; Arima, N

    1999-12-01

    Acute leukemia and lymphoma varieties of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) usually carry a poor prognosis. While etoposide is generally useful for treating ATL, especially as a daily oral maintenance regimen, etoposide has not proven effective in severe types of ATL efficient in some patients. Of 87 ATL patients whom we have treated, 51 had acute leukemia, 22 lymphoma and 14 progressive chronic leukemia. Seventy-nine patients were treated with a long term maintenance combination protocol, OPEC/MPEC (weekly doses of vincristine, 0.7 mg/m2 or methotrexate, 14 mg/m2; prednisolone, 20 mg/m2; etoposide, 70 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide, 200 mg/m2). The other 8 patients, 3 with acute leukemia, 2 with lymphoma and 3 with progressive chronic leukemia, were treated with daily oral administration of 25 mg of etoposide and 10 mg of prednisolone (DOEP). The dose administered was modified in individual cases to maintain the granulocyte count and reduce the number of ATL cells. Considering both protocols, a complete response and a partial response were achieved in 31.0% and 58.6% patients, respectively. Median survival times (MST) of all patients and, acute leukemia, lymphoma and progressive chronic leukemia types were 7.5, 6.7, 9.6 and 12.4 months, respectively. Respective MST of patients treated with OPEC/MPEC or DOEP protocols were 7.1 and 18.0 months. Relatively normal WBC counts, lower lactate dehydrogenase concentration and normal calcium concentration, limited numbers of anatomic sites involved, good performance status and good response to chemotherapy were significantly associated with long survival time. Drug toxicity was not apparent, and about half of patients were treated in an outpatient setting. PMID:10613451

  16. Orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus modulates the respiratory immune response triggered by the viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some studies have shown that probiotics, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, had the potential to beneficially modulate the outcome of certain bacterial and viral respiratory infections. However, these studies did not determine the mechanism(s) by which probiotics contribute to host defense against respiratory viruses. Results In this work we demonstrated that orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr1505) was able to increase the levels of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-6 in the respiratory tract and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells. To mimic the pro-inflammatory and physiopathological consecuences of RNA viral infections in the lung, we used an experimental model of lung inflammation based on the administration of the artificial viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C). Nasal administration of poly(I:C) to mice induced a marked impairment of lung function that was accompanied by the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell recruitment into the airways. The preventive administration of Lr1505 reduced lung injuries and the production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in the respiratory tract after the challenge with poly(I:C). Moreover, Lr1505 induced a significant increase in lung and serum IL-10. We also observed that Lr1505 was able to increase respiratory IFN-γ levels and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells after poly(I:C) challenge. Moreover, higher numbers of both CD103+ and CD11bhigh dendritic cells and increased expression of MHC-II, IL-12 and IFN-γ in these cell populations were found in lungs of Lr1505-treated mice. Therefore, Lr1505 treatment would beneficially regulate the balance between pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-10, allowing an effective inflammatory response against infection and avoiding tissue damage. Conclusions Results showed that Lr1505 would induce a mobilization of cells from intestine and changes in cytokine profile that would be able to beneficially modulate

  17. 21 CFR 520.2220c - Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Sulfadimethoxine oral suspension. (a) Chemical name. N′-(2,6-Dimethoxy-4-pyrimidinyl) sulfanilamide. (b... dogs. (2) On the first day of treatment administer an oral dose of 25 milligrams per pound of body weight, then follow with a daily dosage of 12.5 milligrams per pound of body weight. Length of...

  18. A comparison of patient adherence and preference of packaging method for oral anticancer agents using conventional pill bottles versus daily pill boxes.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, P W; Pond, G R; Pond, B J; Leung, V; Siu, L L

    2007-07-01

    Adherence to medications is an important issue in oncology due to the increasing number of anticancer agents, such as targeted therapies, formulated for oral dosing. A prospective, crossover design was utilized in which patients on capecitabine were randomly assigned to one of two packaging methods for one cycle, and then switched over to the alternate packaging method in the subsequent cycle. Twenty-five patients were accrued to this study. Adherence rates were similar when using the daily pill boxes (17/21 = 81%) and when using the conventional pill bottles (18/21 = 86%). However, more patients were satisfied with the daily pill boxes (61% versus 11%, P = 0.027), preferred the daily pill boxes (61% versus 17%, P = 0.061), and thought the daily pill boxes were more helpful in reminding them to take their medications (50% versus 11%, P = 0.070). In conclusion, this small pilot study did not demonstrate that the use of daily pill boxes improved patient adherence with capecitabine, but patient satisfaction and preference for this packaging method were greater than for the conventional pill bottles. Further exploration of this intervention in a larger study is warranted. PMID:17587364

  19. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  20. Understanding Adherence to Daily and Intermittent Regimens of Oral HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mugo, Peter Mwangi; Sanders, Eduard J; Mutua, Gaudensia; van der Elst, Elisabeth; Anzala, Omu; Barin, Burc; Bangsberg, David R; Priddy, Frances H; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-05-01

    A qualitative assessment of Kenyan men who have sex with men taking daily and intermittent oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) found stigma, sex work, mobility, and alcohol impacted adherence. We analyzed quantitative data from the same cohort to explore different definitions of intermittent adherence. Volunteers were randomized to daily emtricitabine/tenofovir or placebo, or intermittent (prescription: Mondays/Fridays/after sex, maximum 1 dose/day) emtricitabine/tenofovir or placebo (2:1:2:1), and followed for 4 months. By electronic monitoring, median adherence for daily dosing was 80 %. Median adherence for intermittent dosing was 71 % per a "relaxed" definition (accounting for off-prescription dosing) and 40 % per a "strict" definition (limited to the prescription). Factors associated with lower adherence included travel, transactional sex, and longer follow-up; higher adherence was associated with daily dosing and an income. The definition of intermittent dosing strongly affects interpretation of adherence. These findings suggest interventions should address challenges of mobility, sex work, and long-term PrEP. PMID:25432877

  1. Comparison of efficacy and tolerance of intravenously and orally administered ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients with acute exacerbations of lung infection.

    PubMed

    Strandvik, B; Hjelte, L; Lindblad, A; Ljungberg, B; Malmborg, A S; Nilsson-Ehle, I

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients (17-27 yr) with cystic fibrosis were given ciprofloxacin at 30 pulmonary infectious exacerbations. All patients were chronically colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Twenty-five courses were completed, 13 orally (15 mg/kg b.i.d.) and 12 intravenously (4-6 mg/kg b.i.d.). Clinical efficacy was excellent or good in 85-90% of the courses and growth of P. aeruginosa was markedly reduced in 33-46%. Body weight and clinical score improved significantly. White blood cell count decreased and pulmonary function was improved. Reversible adverse effects, mainly rash and urticaria, appeared at seven occasions, five severe enough to cause interruption of treatment. Clinical efficacy and tolerance were better with oral than intravenous administration at the dosages used in this study. Excellent bioavailability provides additional basis for oral treatment with ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:2756354

  2. Discovery of IWP-051, a Novel Orally Bioavailable sGC Stimulator with Once-Daily Dosing Potential in Humans.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Takashi; Perl, Nicholas R; Barden, Timothy C; Carvalho, Andrew; Fretzen, Angelika; Germano, Peter; Im, G-Yoon J; Jin, Hong; Kim, Charles; Lee, Thomas W-H; Long, Kimberly; Moore, Joel; Rohde, Jason M; Sarno, Renee; Segal, Chrissie; Solberg, Erik O; Tobin, Jenny; Zimmer, Daniel P; Currie, Mark G

    2016-05-12

    In recent years, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, EC 4.6.1.2) has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular diseases and diseases associated with fibrosis and end-organ failure. Herein, we describe our design and synthesis of a series of 4-hydroxypyrimidine sGC stimulators starting with an internally discovered lead. Our efforts have led to the discovery of IWP-051, a molecule that achieves good alignment of potency, stability, selectivity, and pharmacodynamic effects while maintaining favorable pharmacokinetic properties with once-daily dosing potential in humans. PMID:27190594

  3. Lower-dose (6 mg Daily) versus High-dose (30 mg Daily) Oral Estradiol Therapy of Hormone-receptor-positive, Aromatase-inhibitor-resistant Advanced Breast Cancer: A Randomized Phase 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew J.; Gao, Feng; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Jeffe, Donna B.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Carey, Lisa A.; Dickler, Maura N.; Silverman, Paula; Fleming, Gini F.; Kommareddy, Aruna; Jamalabadi-Majidi, Shohreh; Crowder, Robert; Siegel, Barry A

    2012-01-01

    Context Estrogen deprivation therapy with aromatase inhibitors (AI) has been hypothesized to paradoxically sensitize hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer tumor cells to low-dose estradiol therapy. Objective To determine if estradiol 6-mg daily is a viable endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with advanced AI-resistant hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Design, Setting and Patients A randomized Phase 2 trial of 6-mg versus 30-mg oral estradiol daily opened in April 2004 and was closed to enrollment in February 2008 (NCT00324259). Eligible patients had metastatic breast cancer treated with an AI with at least 24 weeks progression-free survival, or relapse after two or more years of adjuvant AI. Patients at high risk of estradiol-related adverse events were excluded. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate – CBR (response plus stable disease at 24 weeks). Secondary outcomes included toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure (TTF), quality of life (QOL) and the predictive properties of the FDG-PET metabolic flare reaction. Results 66 patients were enrolled. The grade 3+ adverse event rate on the 30-mg arm (11/32; 95% CI: 23%–47%) was higher than that in 6-mg arm (4/34; 95% CI: 5%–22%) (P=.03). CBRs were 28% (9/32; 95% CI: 18% – 41%) on the 30-mg arm and 29% (10/34; 95% CI: 19% – 42%) on the 6-mg arm. An estradiol44 stimulated increase in FDG uptake of ≥12% (prospectively defined) was predictive of response (positive predictive value of 80%; 95% CI: 61%–92%). Seven patients with estradiol-sensitive disease were retreated with AI upon estradiol progression, with two PR and one SD, suggesting resensitization to estrogen deprivation. Conclusions In women with advanced breast cancer and acquired resistance to AI, an estradiol dose of 6-mg daily provided a similar CBR as 30-mg daily, with fewer serious adverse events. The efficacy of treatment with the lower dose should be further examined

  4. Effect of orally administered cadmium of in situ pH, PCO{sub 2}, and bicarbonate concentration in rat testis and epididymis

    SciTech Connect

    Caflisch, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    Acute injections of high doses of cadmium (Cd) induce marked testicular necrosis. However, the effects of low-dose oral Cd exposure, on a chronic basis, are not well documented. The present investigation was designed to examine the effects of such exposure on in situ pH, PCO{sub 2}, and bicarbonate concentration ([HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]) in the rat testis and epididymis, plasma testosterone levels, and testis and epididymis weights. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 50 or 100 ppm Cd for 40 d. Oral administration of 50 or 100 ppm Cd was associated with significant alkalinization of luminal fluid in seminiferous tubules (ST) but did not alter in situ pH values in proximal caput (PCP), middle caput (MCP), or proximal cauda epididymidis (PCD). The in situ PCO{sub 2} values in ST, PCP, MCP, and PCD of control animals were indistinguishable from each other and from values after Cd exposure, and all values were significantly higher than system arterial blood (SAB) PCO{sub 2}. Oral Cd exposure at 50 or 100 ppm did not change the values for bicarbonate in SAB, PCP, or MCP but increased markedly the value in ST. Plasma testosterone levels and testis and epididymis weights were not altered after oral cadmium administration. These findings suggest that, at the doses employed in this study, Cd exposure may result in subtle alterations in the blood-testis barrier and subsequent impairment of acid-base pathways. Furthermore, the traditional view of Cd-related testicular insult based on acute injection protocols needs to be reevaluated in terms of environmental relevance. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Phase II Study of Weekly Intravenous Oxaliplatin Combined With Oral Daily Capecitabine and Radiotherapy With Biologic Correlates in Neoadjuvant Treatment of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. BullardDunn, Kelli; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Andrews, Chris; Rustum, Youcef M.; Ross, Mary Ellen; LeVea, Charles; Puthillath, Ajithkumar; Park, Young-Mee; Rajput, Ashwani

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers. Methods: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly five times starting the first day of RT. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction), five fractions weekly. Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response. T-downstaging occurred in 52% of patients, and N-downstaging occurred in 53%. Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients. Only 2 patients experienced disease recurrence, with a median of 20 months of follow-up. Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response. Conclusion: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.

  6. In vitro activity of orally administered antimicrobial agents against Haemophilus influenzae recovered from children monitored longitudinally in a group day-care center.

    PubMed

    George, M J; Kitch, B; Henderson, F W; Gilligan, P H

    1991-10-01

    To determine whether the prevalence of resistance to commonly used oral antimicrobial agents varied over time, we compared the in vitro susceptibilities of 217 strains of Haemophilus influenzae recovered from nasopharyngeal secretions of children in a day-care center studied longitudinally between 1979 and 1987. The overall rate of beta-lactamase production in these strains was 18%, with rates of 57% in type b isolates (n = 21) and 14% in non-type b isolates (n = 196). The percentages of isolates for which MICs were less than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/ml for amoxicillin alone, amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid, and cefuroxime alone were 82, 92, and 93%, respectively. The percentage of strains for which cefaclor MICs were less than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/ml was only 0.5%. Isolates for which chloramphenicol MICs were greater than 2.0 micrograms/ml or for which trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole MICs were greater than 0.5/9.5 micrograms/ml were uncommon: 1 and less than 1%, respectively. High concentrations of erythromycin alone and in combination with sulfisoxazole were required to inhibit the majority of test strains; there was no evidence of erythromycin-sulfisoxazole synergy. In vitro susceptibility to commonly used oral antimicrobial agents remained at a constant level when H. influenzae isolates collected from children in a day-care center during 1979 through 1983 were compared with strains collected during 1984 through 1987. PMID:1759814

  7. Immunogenicity in Swine of Orally Administered Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing Classical Swine Fever Virus E2 Protein in Conjunction with Thymosin α-1 as an Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Gang; Guan, Xue-Ting; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Tian, Chang-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Classical swine fever, caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease that results in enormous economic losses in pig industries. The E2 protein is one of the main structural proteins of CSFV and is capable of inducing CSFV-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities in vivo. Thymosin α-1 (Tα1), an immune-modifier peptide, plays a very important role in the cellular immune response. In this study, genetically engineered Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria expressing CSFV E2 protein alone (L. plantarum/pYG-E2) and in combination with Tα1 (L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1) were developed, and the immunogenicity of each as an oral vaccine to induce protective immunity against CSFV in pigs was evaluated. The results showed that recombinant L. plantarum/pYG-E2 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 were both able to effectively induce protective immune responses in pigs against CSFV infection by eliciting immunoglobulin A (IgA)-based mucosal, immunoglobulin G (IgG)-based humoral, and CTL-based cellular immune responses via oral vaccination. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the levels of immune responses were observed between L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2, suggesting a better immunogenicity of L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 as a result of the Tα1 molecular adjuvant that can enhance immune responsiveness and augment specific lymphocyte functions. Our data suggest that the recombinant Lactobacillus microecological agent expressing CSFV E2 protein combined with Tα1 as an adjuvant provides a promising strategy for vaccine development against CSFV. PMID:25819954

  8. Immunogenicity in Swine of Orally Administered Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing Classical Swine Fever Virus E2 Protein in Conjunction with Thymosin α-1 as an Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Gang; Guan, Xue-Ting; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Tian, Chang-Yong; Cui, Li-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever, caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease that results in enormous economic losses in pig industries. The E2 protein is one of the main structural proteins of CSFV and is capable of inducing CSFV-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities in vivo. Thymosin α-1 (Tα1), an immune-modifier peptide, plays a very important role in the cellular immune response. In this study, genetically engineered Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria expressing CSFV E2 protein alone (L. plantarum/pYG-E2) and in combination with Tα1 (L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1) were developed, and the immunogenicity of each as an oral vaccine to induce protective immunity against CSFV in pigs was evaluated. The results showed that recombinant L. plantarum/pYG-E2 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 were both able to effectively induce protective immune responses in pigs against CSFV infection by eliciting immunoglobulin A (IgA)-based mucosal, immunoglobulin G (IgG)-based humoral, and CTL-based cellular immune responses via oral vaccination. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the levels of immune responses were observed between L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2, suggesting a better immunogenicity of L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 as a result of the Tα1 molecular adjuvant that can enhance immune responsiveness and augment specific lymphocyte functions. Our data suggest that the recombinant Lactobacillus microecological agent expressing CSFV E2 protein combined with Tα1 as an adjuvant provides a promising strategy for vaccine development against CSFV. PMID:25819954

  9. Effects of dietary pantethine levels on drug-metabolizing system in the liver of rats orally administered varying amounts of autoxidized linoleate.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, N; Kishida, T; Natake, M

    1989-08-01

    The effects of dietary pantethine levels on the drug-metabolizing system were investigated under administration of varying amounts of autoxidized linoleate (AL) with rat liver microsomes and S-9 fractions. AL having 800 meq/kg of peroxide value and 1,700 meq/kg of carbonyl value was dosed to the rats of each group given drinking water containing 0 mg% (deficient), 6.25 mg% (normal), and 125 mg% pantethine (sufficient). The contents and activities of the enzymes in the drug-metabolizing system in the rat liver of each pantethine-level group changed essentially in a similar manner, that is, they were induced at an AL daily dose of 0.2 ml/100 g body weight (i.e., small dose) for 5 successive days and lowered at a daily dose of 0.4 ml/100 g body weight (i.e., large dose) by the same administration period, compared with respective non-AL groups in each of the three pantethine levels. In both non-AL and the small-dose AL, enzyme activities of the electron transfer system in rat liver microsomes, aminopyrine-N-demethylase activity, and metabolic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene in S-9 fractions were significantly higher in the pantethine-deficient group than in the pantethine-normal and -sufficient groups. In the large-dose AL, the enzyme activities in the drug-metabolizing system decreased significantly in any pantethine levels, though the survival rate of the rats was higher in the pantethine-sufficient group than in the pantethine-normal groups. The results suggest that the pantethine relieves the effect of dosed AL on the drug-metabolizing system in rat liver. PMID:2585150

  10. Electronmicroscopic observations on the effects of orally administered aspirin and aspirin-bicarbonate mixtures on the development of gastric mucosal damage in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rainsford, K D

    1975-01-01

    The effects of administering a single dose of (200 mg to 50 mg/kg body weight) aspirin or an equimolar mixture of aspirin (200 mg/kg body wt) with sodium bicarbonate on the fine structure of the rat gastric mucosa were investigated in order to establish the role of particles of the drug in the development of gastric damage. The sequence of cellular events involved in the development of a lesion and the influence of short-term starvation were also investigated. Aspirin-bicarbonate solutions produced much less damage in starved rats than aspirin suspensions given at low (50 mg/kg body weight) or high therapeutic doses (200 mg/kg body weight). Also, when non-starved rats were given 200 mg/kg aspirin, only slight damage was observed. The presence of particles of the drug in intimate contact with the mucosa is thus important in the development of gastric damage. A sequence of events with time involving direct physical exfoliation of mucosal cells and selective structural damage to parietal cells followed by structural damage indicative of a disturbance to oxidative and biosynthetic functions in cells near the developing erosion was observed. The implications of these results on the development of aspirin-induced lesions are discussed. Images Fig 3a Fig 3b Fig 1a Fig 1b Fig 1c Fig 2a Fig 2b Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:1158188

  11. Identification of the absorptive constituents and their metabolites in vivo of Puerariae Lobatae Radix decoction orally administered in WZS-miniature pigs by HPLC-ESI-Q-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Le; Wang, Ying-Feng; Yang, Dong-Hui; Xu, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Jing; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the technique of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q-TOFMS) was used to analyze and identify the absorptive constituents and their metabolites in drug-containing urine of Wuzhishan (WZS)-miniature pigs administered with Puerariae Lobatae Radix (PLR) decoction. With the accurate mass measurements (<5 ppm) and effective MS(2) fragment ions, 96 compounds, including eight original constituents and 88 metabolites, were identified from the drug-containing urine. Among these, 64 metabolites were new ones and their structures can be categorized into five types: isoflavones, puerols, O-desmethylangolensins, equols and isoflavanones. In particular, puerol-type constituents in PLR were first proved to be absorptive in vivo. Meanwhile, the metabolic pathways of PLR in vivo were investigated. On the basis of relative content of the identified compounds, 13 major metabolites accounting for approximately 50% of the contents, as well as their corresponding 12 prototype compounds, were determined as the major original absorptive constituents and metabolites of PLR in vivo. The HPLC-ESI-Q-TOFMS technique proved to be powerful for characterizing the chemical constituents from the complicated traditional Chinese medicine matrices in this research. PMID:23760803

  12. Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam.

    PubMed

    Stebler, T; Guentert, T W

    1993-08-01

    Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam relative to single oral and relative to intravenous doses was determined in two separate randomized crossover studies. Twelve healthy volunteers (12 males, age 20-30 years) received a rapid intravenous injection and a single intramuscular dose and 12 other subjects (11 males, 1 female, age 21-25 years) a single oral and a single intramuscular dose of 20 mg of tenoxicam on two different occasions. The wash-out period between the two consecutive treatments was 4 weeks. Plasma concentrations after dosing were determined by a specific HPLC method. Differences in tenoxicam concentration-time profiles after the different routes of administration were limited to the first 2 h after dosing. Later, plasma concentrations were almost superimposable within and across the two studies. The extent of absorption of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam was complete (mean +/- CV per cent: F(abs) 0.99 +/- 20 per cent) with no difference between the two extravascular administrations (F(rel) 0.95 +/- 10 per cent, intramuscular vs oral). After intramuscular administration tenoxicam was more rapidly absorbed compared to the oral dose (Tmax 0.71 h +/- 80 per cent vs 1.4 h +/- 62 per cent; p > 0.05). Peak concentrations after oral and intramuscular administration (Cmax 2.5 mg l-1 +/- 19 per cent vs 2.7 mg l-1 +/- 14 per cent; p < 0.05) were very similar. PMID:8218966

  13. Effects of orally administered tetracycline on the intestinal community structure of chickens and on tet determinant carriage by commensal bacteria and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, A S; Smith, J L; Idris, U; Lu, J; Sanchez, S; Purvis, L B; Hofacre, C; Lee, M D

    2005-10-01

    There is a growing concern that antibiotic usage in animal production has selected for resistant food-borne bacteria. Since tetracyclines are common therapeutic antibiotics used in poultry production, we sought to evaluate the effects of oral administration on the resistance of poultry commensal bacteria and the intestinal bacterial community structure. The diversity indices calculated from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons did not indicate significant changes in the cecal bacterial community in response to oxytetracycline. To evaluate its effects on cultivable commensals, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter spp. were isolated from the cecal droppings of broiler chickens. Enterococcus spp. and E. coli expressed tetracycline MICs of >8 microg/ml and harbored a variety of tet resistance determinants regardless of the tetracycline exposure history of the birds. The enterococcal isolates possessed tetM (61%), tetL (25.4%), and tetK (1.3%), as well as tetO (52.5%), the determinant known to confer a tetracycline resistance phenotype in Campylobacter jejuni. E. coli isolates harbored tetA (32.2%) or tetB (30.5%). Tetracycline MICs remained at <2 microg/ml for Campylobacter isolates before and after tetracycline treatment of the chickens, even though isolates expressing MICs of >16 mug/ml were commonly cultured from flocks that did not receive oxytetracycline. The results imply that complex ecological and genetic factors contribute to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance arising from resistance gene transfer in the production environment. PMID:16204498

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity and MIC quality control guidelines of RPR 106972 (RPR 112808/RPR106950): a novel orally administered streptogramin combination. The Quality Control Study Group.

    PubMed

    Putnam, S D; Jones, R N; Johnson, D M

    1997-07-01

    RPR 106972 is a novel oral streptogramin combination with reported therapeutic potency against Gram-positive and certain respiratory tract pathogens. MICs for RPR 106972, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and seven comparison drugs were determined by the reference methods against 337 strains selected to define spectrum and potency. RPR 106972 demonstrated antimicrobial activity against oxacillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC ranges of 0.12 to 2 micrograms/ml and 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml, respectively), and coagulase-negative staphylococci were also inhibited by RPR 106972 (MIC90, < or = 0.5 microgram/ml) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (MIC90, < or = 0.25 microgram/ml). Against all streptococcal strains tested (including penicillin-resistant pneumococcus), RPR 106972 was highly active with MIC results at < or = 1 microgram/ml. RPR 106972 inhibited Corynebacterium jeikeium (MIC90, 0.5 microgram/ml). Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90, 0.25 microgram/ml), and some Haemophilus influenzae (MIC50, 2 micrograms/ml). RPR 106972 and quinupristin/dalfopristin demonstrated little activity against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC90s, 4 to 32 micrograms/ml) as compared to Enterococcus faecium (MIC90s, 0.5 to 1 microgram/ml) and other Enterococcus ssp. (MIC90s, 1 microgram/ml). Studies to establish MIC quality-control guidelines indicated the following ranges: for E. faecalis ATCC 29212, 0.5 to 4 micrograms/ml; for S. aureus ATCC 29213, 0.25 to 1 microgram/ml; and for Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619, 0.06 to 0.5 microgram/ml. The results of this study indicate that the in vitro activity of RPR 106972 against Gram-positive bacteria and selected Gram-negative respiratory organisms is promising and warrants additional studies of pharmacokinetics, and in vivo infection model dynamics. PMID:9294704

  15. Efficacy of orally administered Silexan in patients with anxiety-related restlessness and disturbed sleep--A randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Anghelescu, Ion; Dienel, Angelika

    2015-11-01

    The anxiolytic effect of Silexan, a patented active substance with an essential oil produced from Lavandula angustifolia flowers, was investigated in patients with anxiety-related restlessness and disturbed sleep. 170 out-patients with a diagnosis of restlessness (ICD-10 R45.1), a Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) total score ≥18 points and ≥2 points for HAMA items 'Tension' and 'Insomnia' participated in this randomized, double-blind trial and received 80mg Silexan or placebo once daily for 10 weeks. Patients with clinically important other psychiatric or neurological disorders potentially interfering with the assessment of treatment efficacy were excluded. Outcome variables were the HAMA as well as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale, a State Check inventory and the Clinical Global Impressions questionnaire. In the Silexan group the HAMA total score decreased from an average of 25.5±6.0 points at baseline to 13.7±7.0 points at treatment end, compared to a decrease from 26.5±6.1 to 16.9±9.8 for placebo, corresponding to decreases of 12.0 and 9.3 points (marginal means), respectively (group difference: p=0.03, ANCOVA with factor treatment and baseline value as covariate). In all outcome measures the treatment effect of Silexan was more pronounced than with placebo. According to the HAMA, 48.8% and 33.3% of the patients were responders (Silexan, placebo; reduction ≥50%; p=0.04) and 31.4% and 22.6% achieved remission (HAMA<10; p=0.20). 33.7% (Silexan) and 35.7% (placebo) of the participants reported adverse events. The study confirms the calming and anxiolytic efficacy of Silexan. PMID:26293583

  16. Disruption of the arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase gene in the mouse alters the phenotype for methylation of arsenic and affects distribution and retention of orally administered arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Narenmandura, Hua; Kubachka, Kevin M.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Styblo, Miroslav; Le, X. Chris; Creed, John T.; Maeda, Noboyu; Hughes, Michael F.; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a 43 kDa protein that catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic. Altered expression of AS3MT in cultured human cells controls arsenic methylation phenotypes, suggesting a critical role in arsenic metabolism. Because methylated arsenicals mediate some toxic or carcinogenic effects linked to inorganic arsenic exposure, studies of the fate and effects of arsenicals in mice which cannot methylate arsenic could be instructive. This study compared retention and distribution of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice and in wild-type C57BL/6 mice in which expression of the As3mt gene is normal. Male and female mice of either genotype received an oral dose of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kg containing [73As]-arsenate. Mice were radioassayed for up to 96 hours after dosing; tissues were collected at 2 and 24 hours after dosing. At 2 and 24 hours after dosing, livers of As3mt knockouts contained a greater proportion of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic than did livers of C57BL/6 mice. A similar predominance of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic was found in the urine of As3mt knockouts. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained significantly higher percentages of arsenic dose in liver, kidneys, urinary bladder, lungs, heart, and carcass than did C57BL/6 mice. Whole body clearance of [73As] in As3mt knockouts was substantially slower than in C57BL/6 mice. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained about 50% and C57BL/6 mice about 6% of the dose. After 96 hours, As3mt knockouts retained about 20% and C57BL/6 mice retained less than 2% of the dose. These data confirm a central role for As3mt in metabolism of inorganic arsenic and indicate that phenotypes for arsenic retention and distribution are markedly affected by the null genotype for arsenic methylation, indicating a close linkage between the metabolism and retention of arsenicals. PMID:19691357

  17. Daily Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know Online Tools Enhancing Daily Life Daily Plan Activities Communication Food & Eating Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing ... Tweet Email | Print Create a Daily Routine Daily Plan Activities Communication Food/Eating Get Tips on Personal Care Bathing ...

  18. The efficacy and safety of once-daily nifedipine administered without food: the coat-core formulation compared with the gastrointestinal therapeutic system formulation in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Nifedipine Study Group.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S P; Ripa, S R; Allenby, K S; Schwartz, L A; Commins, B M; Jungerwirth, S

    1995-01-01

    A parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, forced-titration, multicenter study was done to compare the efficacy and safety of once-daily nifedipine coat-core (NIF CC) and once-daily nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (NIF GITS) dosed in the fasting state in patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension. Both formulations have been shown to effectively and safely lower blood pressure in placebo-controlled trials. After a 4-week placebo run-in period, 228 patients were randomized to 4 weeks of treatment with either NIF CC 30 mg daily or NIF GITS 30 mg daily. This period was followed by a forced-titration period to nifedipine 60 mg daily for an additional 4 weeks of double-blind therapy. After the 30-mg treatment period (the primary time point), there were no statistically significant differences between treatment groups in mean change from baseline in trough supine diastolic blood pressure, the primary efficacy variable (NIF CC patients, -7.0 mm Hg; NIF GITS patients, -8.4 mm Hg; P = 0.139). Also, because the upper bound of the treatment difference confidence interval was < 3.0 mm Hg, equivalence--as defined in the protocol--was established. After the 60-mg treatment period, the change from baseline in trough supine diastolic blood pressure was significantly greater for patients treated with NIF GITS than for patients treated with NIF CC (NIF GITS patients, -12.0 mm Hg; NIF CC patients, -8.4 mm Hg; P < 0.001). Because the upper bound of the confidence interval was > 3 mm Hg, equivalence cannot be claimed. No statistically significant differences were noted for the comparison of mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring changes. Both formulations were well tolerated. PMID:7614530

  19. Explication of Definitional Description and Empirical Use of Fraction of Orally Administered Drugs Absorbed From the Intestine (Fa) and Intestinal Availability (Fg): Effect of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A on Fa and Fg.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuta; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, it is believed that the fraction of orally administered drugs absorbed from the intestine (Fa) and intestinal availability (Fg) are independently determined by the apical membrane permeation and intestinal metabolism, respectively. However, the validity of this belief has not been well discussed, and Fa and Fg are often used without careful definition. In this review, Fa and Fg are mathematically described based on their definitions under the linear kinetics of metabolism and transport. Even considering with different models, intestinal metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450 3A affected both Fa and Fg, whereas apical efflux transporters including P-glycoprotein had no influence on Fg at least under the linear condition. To determine whether Fa and Fg calculated using different clinical methods are identical, empirical Fa and Fg were mathematically described based on "feces method" and "grapefruit juice method" and compared with their definitions. Fa and Fg obtained by the feces method corresponded with their definitions whereas the grapefruit juice method provided smaller Fa and larger Fg particularly for dual substrates of P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A with low membrane permeability. Our analyses suggest that the definitions and calculation methods of Fa and Fg should be considered when we intend to separately determine these values. PMID:26869410

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of FV-100, a Novel Oral Anti-Herpes Zoster Nucleoside Analogue, Administered in Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Young Adult and Elderly Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Pentikis, Helen S.; Matson, Mark; Atiee, George; Boehlecke, Brian; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey W.; Morris, Amy

    2011-01-01

    FV-100 is the prodrug of the highly potent anti-varicella zoster virus bicyclic nucleoside analogue CF-1743. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral FV-100, 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were conducted: (i) a single-ascending-dose study in 32 healthy subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100-, 200-, 400-, and 800-mg doses) with an evaluation of the food effect in the 400-mg group; (ii) a multiple-ascending-dose study in 48 subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100 mg once daily [QD], 200 mg QD, 400 mg QD, 400 mg twice a day, and 800 mg QD for 7 days); and (iii) a 2-part study in subjects aged 65 years and older with a single 400-mg dose in 15 subjects and a 400-mg QD dosing regimen for 7 days in 12 subjects. FV-100 was rapidly and extensively converted to CF-1743, the concentration of which remained above that required to reduce viral activity by 50% for the 24-hour dosing period. Renal excretion of CF-1743 was very low. A high-fat meal reduced exposure to CF-1743; a low-fat meal did not. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly subjects were comparable to those for the younger subjects. FV-100 was well tolerated by all subjects. The pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of FV-100 support its continued investigation for the treatment of herpes zoster and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with once-daily dosing and without dose modifications for elderly or renally impaired patients. PMID:21444712

  1. Validity and Reproducibility of a Self-Administered Semi-Quantitative Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Estimating Usual Daily Fat, Fibre, Alcohol, Caffeine and Theobromine Intakes among Belgian Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bolca, Selin; Huybrechts, Inge; Verschraegen, Mia; De Henauw, Stefaan; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A novel food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed and validated to assess the usual daily fat, saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid, fibre, alcohol, caffeine, and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women participating in dietary intervention trials with phyto-oestrogens. The relative validity of the FFQ was estimated by comparison with 7 day (d) estimated diet records (EDR, n 64) and its reproducibility was evaluated by repeated administrations 6 weeks apart (n 79). Although the questionnaire underestimated significantly all intakes compared to the 7 d EDR, it had a good ranking ability (r 0.47–0.94; weighted κ 0.25–0.66) and it could reliably distinguish extreme intakes for all the estimated nutrients, except for saturated fatty acids. Furthermore, the correlation between repeated administrations was high (r 0.71–0.87) with a maximal misclassification of 7% (weighted κ 0.33–0.80). In conclusion, these results compare favourably with those reported by others and indicate that the FFQ is a satisfactorily reliable and valid instrument for ranking individuals within this study population. PMID:19440274

  2. Serum pharmacokinetics of clindamycin hydrochloride in normal dogs when administered at two dosage regimens.

    PubMed

    Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Salame, Michel; Chatzis, Manolis K; Katsoudas, Vassilis; Pappas, Ioannis S

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this cross-over study was to compare clindamycin pharmacokinetics in the serum of clinically normal dogs when administered orally at two dosage regimens (5.5 mg/kg, twice daily, and 11 mg/kg, once daily), separated by a 1 week wash-out period. Serum samples were obtained from six clinically normal laboratory beagles before, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h after the first and fifth dose of clindamycin at 5.5 mg/kg, twice daily, and before, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 h after the first and third dose at 11 mg/kg, once daily. Serum clindamycin concentrations were determined by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results were analysed using Student's paired t-test, at a 5% level of significance. Values of pharmacokinetic parameters that differed significantly between the two dosage regimens included the following: maximal concentration and area under the concentration-time curve were higher at 11 mg/kg, once daily, than at 5.5 mg/kg, twice daily; and, more importantly, the ratio of AUC(0-24) to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.5 μg/mL for a 24 h period (AUC(0-24)/MIC) was higher when clindamycin was administered at 11 than at 5.5 mg/kg, at least during the first day of drug administration. Therefore, a better pharmacokinetic profile may be expected when clindamycin is administered at 11 mg/kg, once daily, for the treatment of canine pyoderma caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. PMID:21418348

  3. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  4. 78 FR 30197 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Clindamycin; Enrofloxacin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...) Conditions of use in dogs and cats--(1) Amount. Administer orally as a single, daily dose or divided into two equal doses at 12- hour intervals. (i) Dogs. 5 to 20 mg per kilogram (/kg) (2.27 to 9.07 mg per...

  5. Oral heparins.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Linda M

    2002-01-01

    The antithrombotic drug heparin is administered parenterally and believed not effective orally. Oral heparin would be most suitable for long term administration, often required for the prevention of thrombosis. Following parenteral administration, heparin is taken up by endothelial cells. Our laboratory has shown that heparin is similarly taken up by endothelium following oral administration, despite low plasma heparin concentrations. In a twenty-four hour period, endothelial heparin concentrations are greatest within 15 minutes of oral dosing although plasma levels never exceed one percent of dose. Endothelial uptake accounts for a considerable amount of absorption if the total body endothelium is considered. In support of oral heparin absorption, we demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in thrombosis incidence in a rat jugular vein model following single oral doses of unfractionated heparins (bovine and porcine) or low molecular weight heparins (reviparin, logiparin and ardeparin). Low molecular weight heparins were effective at lower doses than unfractionated heparins where a fifty percent reduction in thrombosis was observed with 0.025 mg/kg reviparin, 0.1 mg/kg logiparin, versus 7.5 mg/kg bovine unfractionated heparin. These studies support the work of others demonstrating measurable systemic changes following oral heparin administration and suggest that heparin may be effective when administered by the oral route. It also indicates that the presence of heparin in plasma likely reflects a much greater amount associated with endothelium. PMID:11934211

  6. Daily reduction of oral malodor with the use of a sonic tongue brush combined with an antibacterial tongue spray in a randomized cross-over clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Saad, S; Gomez-Pereira, P; Hewett, K; Horstman, P; Patel, J; Greenman, J

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this clinical investigation was to test the effectiveness on breath odor of a newly designed sonic tongue brush (TongueCare+, TC). It consists of a soft silicone brush optimally designed based on the tongue's anatomy to remove bacterial biofilm from the tongue's complex surface, and it is coupled with a sonic power toothbrush handle. TC was used in combination with an antibacterial tongue spray (BreathRx, BRx) containing 0.09% cetylpyridinium chloride and 0.7% zinc gluconate. A total of 21 participants with oral malodor exceeding the threshold for recognition took part in this cross-over clinical investigation, which consisted of a single use of four treatment arms with one week washout period in between. The treatments consisted of: (1) TC  +  BRx, (2) TC  +  water, (3) BRx and (4) water. Malodor levels and bacterial density were monitored up to 6 h by organoleptic scoring and selective plating, respectively. The organoleptic score and bacterial density were significantly lower after using TC  +  BRx compared to all alternative treatments at all time points. A significant decrease in both parameters was detected after a single use of TC  +  BRx, from levels characteristic of high oral malodor, to barely noticeable levels after treatment and this was maintained up to 6 h. Moreover, we identified a significant positive correlation between bacterial density and organoleptic score, confirming that bacterial tongue biofilm is the root cause of oral malodor in these subjects. The results of this clinical investigation demonstrated that the combined treatment of a sonic tongue brush with the antibacterial tongue spray is able to deliver more than 6 h of fresh breath following a single use. The clinical investigation was registered at the ISRCTN registry under study identification number ISRCTN38199132. PMID:26869586

  7. Face to Face with Oral Isotretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2012-01-01

    Oral isotretinoin, available in the United States for four decades, has been used for the treatment of recalcitrant nodular and deep inflammatory acne vulgaris. This drug revolutionized the management of patients affected by severe inflammatory disease due to its ability to markedly induce acne clearance coupled with prolonged durations of remission after completion of a course of therapy, usually over approximately five months. Over time, it has become recognized that prolonged remission correlates with achieving a threshold cumulative exposure range of approximately 120 to 150 mg/kg of oral isotretinoin. Lesser exposures have demonstrated a higher risk of earlier recurrence of acne vulgaris and a greater likelihood that the patient will require retreatment. As the oral bioavailability of oral isotretinoin is variable, and highly dependent on administration with food, it is very conceivable that earlier relapse may occur if patients have often ingested oral isotretinoin on an empty stomach, thus leading to lesser actual cumulative drug exposure despite the daily dose administered. This article provides an overview on the dosing of oral isotretinoin, reported data on factors that influence relapse after oral isotretinoin therapy, and the potential impact of coadministration with food. PMID:23198008

  8. “How I Wish This Thing Was Initiated 100 Years Ago!” Willingness to Take Daily Oral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njenga, Serah Nduta; Mulwa, Rueben; Kilonzo, Nduku; Bahati, Prince; O’reilley, Kevin; Gelmon, Lawrence; Mbaabu, Stephen; Wachihi, Charles; Githuka, George; Kiragu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background The MSM population in Kenya contributes to 15% of HIV incidence. This calls for innovative HIV prevention interventions. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been efficacious in preventing HIV among MSM in trials. There is limited data on the willingness to take daily oral PrEP in sub-Sahara Africa. PrEP has not been approved for routine use in most countries globally. This study aimed to document the willingness to take PrEP and barriers to uptake and adherence to PrEP in Kenya. The findings will inform the design of a PrEP delivery program as part of the routine HIV combination prevention. Methods Eighty MSM were recruited in 2 Counties in December 2013. Quantitative data on sexual behaviour and willingness to take PrEP were collected using semi-structured interviews and analysed using SPSS. Qualitative data on knowledge of PrEP, motivators and barriers to uptake and adherence to PrEP were collected using in-depth interviews and FGDs and analysed using Nvivo. Analysis of data in willingness to take PrEP was conducted on the HIV negative participants (n = 55). Results 83% of MSM were willing to take daily oral HIV PrEP. Willingness to take PrEP was higher among the bi-sexual and younger men. Motivators for taking PrEP were the need to stay HIV negative and to protect their partners. History of poor medication adherence, fear of side effects and HIV stigma were identified as potential barriers to adherence. Participants were willing to buy PrEP at a subsidized price. Conclusions There is willingness to take PrEP among MSM in Kenya and there is need to invest in targeted education and messaging on PrEP to enhance adherence, proper use and reduce stigma in the general population and among policy makers. PMID:27073896

  9. Oral versus intramuscular phytomenadione: safety and efficacy compared.

    PubMed

    von Kries, R

    1999-07-01

    Oral and intramuscular phytomenadione (vitamin K1) prophylaxis became an issue following the report of a potential carcinogenic effect of intramuscular but not oral phytomenadione prophylaxis. There is increasing evidence, however, that oral phytomenadione prophylaxis is less effective for the prevention of late vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) than intramuscular prophylaxis. Following a report of an increased cancer risk after intramuscular phytomenadione, a series of papers on this issue appeared. Although an increased risk for solid tumours could almost certainly be excluded, a potential risk for acute lymphatic leukaemia in childhood could not be ruled out definitively. Almost all cases of late VKDB are preventable with intramuscular phytomenadione prophylaxis administered once at birth, whereas a single oral dose given at birth is much less effective. Repeated oral phytomenadione doses given to breast-fed infants either weekly (1 mg) or daily (25 microg) seem to be as effective as intramuscular phytomenadione prophylaxis. The efficacy of 3 oral 2mg doses with the new mixed micellar preparation ('Konakion MM') remains to be established. Although a number of studies have failed to confirm a cancer risk with phytomenadione, these studies have been unable to rule out a risk definitely because absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. A meta-analysis of the available studies might provide 95% confidence intervals narrow enough to exclude even a small cancer risk with some certainty. Oral prophylaxis will probably be as safe as the intramuscular prophylaxis if given daily (25 microg) or weekly (1 mg). PMID:10433349

  10. Once Daily Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Improves Glycemic Control in Oral Hypoglycemic Agents (OHA)–Treated Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Shin-ichi; Nishimura, Akiko; Ikeda, Kaori; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yanyan; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare glycemic control between SMBG-continued and -discontinued subjects with type 2 diabetes in the SMBG-OHA study. Method: Of the 96 subjects from the SMBG-OHA study, 59 were recruited for the 24-week, comparison follow-up study. The study outcomes were the differences in change in HbA1c levels at 24 weeks between the 2 groups, and change in SMBG frequency in SMBG-continued subjects. Results: Although health insurance does not cover the cost of SMBG, 22.0% of subjects continued SMBG of their own will after the SMBG-OHA study was completed. HbA1c levels were maintained from 6.81 ± 0.55% to 6.64 ± 0.53% in SMBG-continued subjects. Conversely, HbA1c levels were increased from 7.18 ± 0.63% to 7.48 ± 0.84% in SMBG-discontinued subjects. HbA1c levels were significantly different by 0.83 ± 0.25% (95% CI: −1.33 to −0.36). The difference in change in HbA1c between the groups was −0.46% (95% CI: −0.78 to −0.15). SMBG frequency was decreased from 2.02 ± 1.06 to 1.53 ± 0.86 times a day. Conclusions: HbA1c levels were maintained in SMBG-continued subjects but increased in SMBG-discontinued subjects. The study implied that almost once daily SMBG is helpful to maintain glycemic control in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:26428934

  11. Implementation of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in daily practice: the need for comprehensive education for professionals and patients.

    PubMed

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Berti, Dana; Campos, Manuel; Desteghe, Lien; Freixo, Ana Parente; Nunes, António Robalo; Roldán, Vanessa; Toschi, Vincenzo; Lassila, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. NOACs do not require routine coagulation monitoring, creating a challenge to established systems for patient follow-up based on regular blood tests. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are required to cope with a mixture of patients receiving either a vitamin K antagonist or a NOAC for the same indications, and both professionals and patients require education about the newer drugs. A European working group convened to consider the challenges facing HCPs and healthcare systems in different countries and the educational gaps that hinder optimal patient management. Group members emphasised the need for regular follow-up and noted national, regional and local variations in set-up and resources for follow-up. Practical incorporation of NOACs into healthcare systems must adapt to these differences, and practical follow-up that works in some systems may not be able to be implemented in others. The initial prescriber of a NOAC should preferably be a true anticoagulation specialist, who can provide initial patient education and coordinate the follow-up. The long-term follow-up care of patients can be managed through specialist coagulation nurses, in a dedicated anticoagulation clinic or by general practitioners trained in NOAC use. The initial prescriber should be involved in educating those who perform the follow-up. Specialist nurses require access to tools, potentially including specific software, to guide systematic patient assessment and workflow. Problem cases should be referred for specialist advice, whereas in cases for which minimal specialist attention is required, the general practitioner could take responsibility for patient follow-up. Hospital departments and anticoagulation clinics should proactively engage with all downstream HCPs (including pharmacists) to ensure

  12. [Oral health care by utilizing food function].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuuki

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of spices and herbs on Candida albicans to develop therapeutic tools against oral diseases such as oral candidiasis. C. albicans, a dimorphic fungus, is a component of the healthy human microbial flora. However, the excessive overgrowth of C. albicans causes oral candidiasis, and the symptoms, accompanied by severe inflammation, reduce the quality of life of elderly people. We found that spices such as clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum) exhibit inhibitory activity against Candida mycelial growth and show therapeutic efficacy in a murine oral candidiasis model. Our studies also demonstrated that the inhibitory activity of cinnamaldehyde was strengthened in parallel with a prolonged treatment time. Furthermore, when cinnamaldehyde in combination with methylcellulose was administered to the model mice, the therapeutic effect was potentiated. Here, we summarize up-to-date findings on how to use spices and herbs on a daily basis to improve or prevent oral problems such as oral candidiasis with the presentation of our recent data. PMID:25742994

  13. A comparative evaluation of the effect of diclofenac sodium with and without per-orally administered methylprednisolone on the sequelae of impacted mandibular third molar removal: A cohort randomized double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Deepti V.; Pahwa, Deepti; Kalia, Vimal; Jindal, Govind; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: This study evaluated the efficacy of oral methylprednisolone and diclofenac sodium on post-operative sequelae after third molar surgery. Settings and Design: A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted (with institutional and university approval for dissertation) to evaluate the effect of methylprednisolone with diclofenac sodium (group A) as compared with diclofenac sodium and placebo (group B) on three variables: Pain, swelling and trismus, after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive consenting patients for surgical removal of mandibular impacted third molar were randomly placed into two groups of 15 each (groups A and B). Pain, swelling and trismus were observed by visual analog scale, facial measurements and inter-incisal opening. Scores were recorded after 24 and 72 h and on the seventh post-operative day. Results were subjected to the Chi-square test and independent sample t-test (P = 0.05). Results: Mean difference in pain experienced between the two groups was statistically significant at 24 h (P = 0.015) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh day (P = 0.005). Difference in inter-incisal distance was insignificant (P = 0.239) pre-operatively, but significant after 24 h (P = 0.014) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.001). Mean difference in swelling was highly significant after 24 h (P = 0.001) and 72 h (P = 0.0001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.047). Conclusions: The combination of oral dose of methylprednisolone (a corticosteroid) diclofenac sodium (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) was found to be more effective than diclofenac sodium alone on the sequelae of surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:27134449

  14. The Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Adherence to Daily Oral PrEP in Men who have Sex with Men and Transgender Women: A Marginal Structural Model Analysis of The iPrEx OLE Study.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Megha L; Glidden, David V; McMahan, Vanessa; Amico, K Rivet; Hosek, Sybil; Defechereux, Patricia; Mayer, Kenneth H; Veloso, Valdilea G; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Avelino-Silva, Vivian I; Schechter, Mauro; Grant, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    We assessed the role of depressive symptoms on adherence to daily oral FTC/TDF for HIV PrEP in cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women who have sex with men (TGW) using data from the iPrEx OLE study. A marginal structural logistic regression model was used to estimate the effect of time-varying CES-D scores on having protective levels of drug concentration, adjusting for confounding by sexual practices over time, prior adherence, and baseline demographic characteristics. We found a non-monotonic relationship between CES-D score and odds of protective FTC/TDF levels in MSM. We found evidence that the effect of depression on adherence varied between MSM and TGW, and that depressive symptoms did not contribute greatly to decreased adherence on a population scale. We recommend that depressive symptoms not preclude the prescription of PrEP, and that MSM and TGW be studied separately. PMID:27125241

  15. Brain histamine H1 receptor occupancy of orally administered antihistamines measured by positron emission tomography with 11C-doxepin in a placebo-controlled crossover study design in healthy subjects: a comparison of olopatadine and ketotifen

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Manabu; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sakurada, Yumiko; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Sasaki, Toru; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Aims The strength of sedation due to antihistamines can be evaluated by using positron emission tomography (PET). The purpose of the present study is to measure histamine H1 receptor (H1R) occupancy due to olopatadine, a new second-generation antihistamine and to compare it with that of ketotifen. Methods Eight healthy males (mean age 23.5 years-old) were studied following single oral administration of olopatadine 5 mg or ketotifen 1 mg using PET with 11C-doxepin in a placebo-controlled crossover study design. Binding potential ratio and H1R occupancy were calculated and were compared between olopatadine and ketotifen in the medial prefrontal (MPFC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), insular (IC), temporal (TC), parietal (PC), occipital cortices (OC). Plasma drug concentration was measured, and correlation of AUC to H1R occupancy was examined. Results H1R occupancy after olopatadine treatment was significantly lower than that after ketotifen treatment in the all cortical regions (P < 0.001). Mean H1R occupancies for olopatadine and ketotifen were, respectively: MPFC, 16.7 vs. 77.7; DLPFC, 14.1 vs. 85.9; ACC, 14.7 vs. 76.1; IC, 12.8 vs. 69.7; TC, 12.5 vs. 66.5; PC, 13.9 vs. 65.8; and OC, 19.5 vs. 60.6. Overall cortical mean H1R occupancy of olopatadine and ketotifen were 15% and 72%, respectively. H1R occupancy of both drugs correlated well with their respective drug plasma concentrations (P < 0.001). Conclusion It is suggested that 5 mg oral olopatadine, with its low H1R occupancy and thus minimal sedation, could safely be used an antiallergic treatment for various allergic disorders. Abbreviations histamine H1 receptor (H1R), histamine H1 receptor occupancy (H1RO), dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), positron emission tomography (PET), blood–brain barrier (BBB), binding potential ratio (BPR), distribution volume (DV) PMID:16390347

  16. Fluticasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... by mouth using an inhaler and as a powder to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. Fluticasone ... Flovent® HFA) is usually inhaled twice daily. Fluticasone powder for oral inhalation (Flovent® Diskus) is usually inhaled ...

  17. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-09-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents. PMID:26424254

  18. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-01-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents. PMID:26424254

  19. Pharmacokinetic profile of rizatriptan 10-mg tablet and 10-mg orally disintegrating tablet administered with or without water in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomized, single-dose, 3-period crossover study.

    PubMed

    Swan, Suzanne K; Alcorn, Harry; Rodgers, Anthony; Hustad, Carolyn M; Ramsey, Karen E; Woll, Susan; Skobieranda, Franck

    2006-02-01

    This open-label, 3-period crossover study compared the plasma concentration profiles of rizatriptan tablet, orally disintegrating tablet with water (ODTc), and ODT without water (ODTs) in 24 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. At each period, subjects received a single dose of either 10-mg rizatriptan tablet, 10-mg rizatriptan ODTs, or 10-mg rizatriptan ODTc. The authors hypothesized that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) than ODTs and that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) than tablet. A secondary end point was to compare the time of occurrence of the maximum rizatriptan plasma concentration (t(max)) of each dosing method. ODTc had a statistically significantly greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) compared with ODTs (33.84 h x ng/mL vs 18.83 h x ng/mL; P < .001). ODTc had a slightly, but not statistically significantly, greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) compared with rizatriptan tablet (17.07 h x ng/mL vs 13.32 h x ng/mL). The median t(max) was 0.67 hours for ODTc and tablet and 1.33 hours for ODTs. ODTc showed a slightly, but not significantly, faster rate of absorption compared with tablet. ODTs with water had a faster rate of absorption than ODTc. Future studies are needed to determine whether this pharmacokinetic difference produces differential efficacy in a clinical setting. PMID:16432269

  20. Daily Tips for Good Oral Hygiene

    MedlinePlus

    ... all areas easily. Use an antimicrobial toothpaste containing fluoride, which helps protect your teeth from decay. Clean ... plaque activity, which cause gingivitis and gum disease. Fluoride mouth rinses also help reduce and prevent tooth ...

  1. Treatment of relapse in herpes simplex on labial and facial areas and of primary herpes simplex on genital areas and "area pudenda" with low-power He-Ne laser or Acyclovir administered orally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez-Gonzalez, Mariano; Urrea-Arbelaez, Alejandro; Nicolas, M.; Serra-Baldrich, E.; Perez, J. L.; Pavesi, M.; Camarasa, J. M.; Trelles, Mario A.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty patients (greater than 16 yrs old) suffering primary or relapse genital herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and relapse labial HSV were appointed for this study. Three or more relapses were experienced per year. Patients (under treatment) were divided into two groups (distribution areas), corresponding to either labial herpes or genital herpes. These groups were sub-divided into 3 groups. The total number of labial or facial HSV patients was 36 (10 in group 1, 12 in group 2, 14 in group 3) and 24 for genital, buttocks, or 'area pudenda' HSV patients (6 in group 1, 8 in group 2, 10 in group 3). The design was a randomized, double- blind study. The setting was hospital and outpatient. The patients diagnosed as having the HVS disease were sent to the dermatology department and were assigned to a group at random. Treatment was begun as follows: During the treatment signs and symptoms were assessed and after the treatment, the relapses were also assessed (biochemical and hematological tests before and after the treatment) and the diagnosis of the HSV type I and II. The statistical evaluation of the results was performed and carried out with the SPSS and BMDP program. The relapses of the herpes infection in the lips and the face were significantly reduced (p less than 0.026) in patients treated with laser He-Ne and laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. The interim between the relapses also increased significantly (p less than 0.005) in relation with the group treated with Acyclovir. The duration of the herpetic eruptions was clearly reduced in all locations in patients treated with laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. No differences were noted between patients treated with laser He-Ne only or Acyclovir only. Therefore it is probable that therapeutic synergism took place. In relation with this, laser He-Ne shows the same therapeutic efficacy as Acyclovir taken orally. The association of Acyclovir and laser Ne-Ne could be an alternative method for the treatment of HSV in the face. The number

  2. Memantine extended release (28 mg once daily): a review of its use in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2015-05-01

    Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that is a well-established treatment option for moderate to severe dementia of the Alzheimer's type, either alone or in combination with cholinesterase inhibitors. The immediate-release (IR) formulations of memantine (tablets and oral solution) have been available in numerous countries, including the USA, for more than a decade and are administered orally twice daily at a maximum recommended total daily dosage of 20 mg/day. The memantine extended-release (ER) (Namenda XR(®)) 28 mg once-daily capsule formulation was approved in the USA in 2010 and became available more recently. The potential advantages of memantine ER over the IR formulation include a more convenient dosage regimen and lower pill burden that may improve adherence to therapy; also, memantine ER capsules may be opened and the contents sprinkled on applesauce for patients who have difficulty swallowing. Memantine ER provides a higher total daily dosage than the recommended memantine IR regimen and pharmacokinetic data indicate greater exposure with the ER formulation, but the clinical implications of this are unclear, as the two formulations have not been assessed in a comparative clinical trial. The efficacy of memantine ER 28 mg once daily was demonstrated in a large, multinational, phase III trial, which showed that the addition of memantine ER to ongoing oral cholinesterase inhibitors improved key outcomes compared with cholinesterase inhibitor monotherapy, including measures of cognition and global status, which were the co-primary endpoints of the study. The most common adverse events were headache, diarrhoea and dizziness. PMID:25899711

  3. Comparison of insulin lispro protamine suspension versus insulin glargine once daily added to oral antihyperglycaemic medications and exenatide in type 2 diabetes: a prospective randomized open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, R F; Blevins, T C; Wise, J K; Liljenquist, D R; Jiang, H H; Jacobson, J G; Martin, S A; Jackson, J A

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare efficacy and safety of two, once-daily basal insulin formulations [insulin lispro protamine suspension (ILPS) vs. insulin glargine (glargine)] added to oral antihyperglycaemic medications (OAMs) and exenatide BID in suboptimally controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Methods This 24-week, open-label, multicentre trial randomized patients to bedtime ILPS (n = 171) or glargine (n = 168). Non-inferiority of ILPS versus glargine was assessed by comparing the upper limit of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for change in haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline to week 24 (adjusted for baseline HbA1c) with non-inferiority margin 0.4%. Results Non-inferiority of ILPS versus glargine was demonstrated: least-squares mean between-treatment difference (ILPS minus glargine) (95% CI) was 0.22% (0.06, 0.38). Mean HbA1c reduction was less for ILPS- versus glargine-treated patients (−1.16 ± 0.84 vs. −1.40 ± 0.97%, p = 0.008). Endpoint HbA1c < 7.0% was achieved by 53.7% (ILPS) and 61.7% (glargine) (p = NS). Overall hypoglycaemia rates (p = NS) and severe hypoglycaemia incidence (p = NS) were similar. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia rate was higher in patients treated with ILPS versus glargine (p = 0.004). Weight gain was similar between groups (ILPS: 0.27 ± 3.38 kg; glargine: 0.66 ± 3.93 kg, p = NS). Endpoint total insulin doses were lower in patients treated with ILPS versus glargine (0.30 ± 0.17 vs. 0.37 ± 0.17 IU/kg/day, p < 0.001). Conclusions ILPS was non-inferior to glargine for HbA1c change over 24 weeks, but was associated with less HbA1c reduction and more nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Treat-to-target basal insulin therapy improves glycaemic control and is associated with minimal weight gain when added to OAMs and exenatide BID for suboptimally controlled T2D. PMID:24298995

  4. Development and preclinical evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of an oral ETEC vaccine containing inactivated E. coli bacteria overexpressing colonization factors CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 combined with a hybrid LT/CT B subunit antigen, administered alone and together with dmLT adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Bourgeois, L; Carlin, N; Clements, J; Gustafsson, B; Lundgren, A; Nygren, E; Tobias, J; Walker, R; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-05-01

    A first-generation oral inactivated whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine, comprising formalin-killed ETEC bacteria expressing different colonization factor (CF) antigens combined with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), when tested in phase III studies did not significantly reduce overall (generally mild) ETEC diarrhea in travelers or children although it reduced more severe ETEC diarrhea in travelers by almost 80%. We have now developed a novel more immunogenic ETEC vaccine based on recombinant non-toxigenic E. coli strains engineered to express increased amounts of CF antigens, including CS6 as well as an ETEC-based B subunit protein (LCTBA), and the optional combination with a nontoxic double-mutant heat-labile toxin (LT) molecule (dmLT) as an adjuvant. Two test vaccines were prepared under GMP: (1) A prototype E. coli CFA/I-only formalin-killed whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine, and (2) A "complete" inactivated multivalent ETEC-CF (CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 antigens) whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine. These vaccines, when given intragastrically alone or together with dmLT in mice, were well tolerated and induced strong intestinal-mucosal IgA antibody responses as well as serum IgG and IgA responses to each of the vaccine CF antigens as well as to LT B subunit (LTB). Both mucosal and serum responses were further enhanced (adjuvanted) when the vaccines were co-administered with dmLT. We conclude that the new multivalent oral ETEC vaccine, both alone and especially in combination with the dmLT adjuvant, shows great promise for further testing in humans. PMID:23541621

  5. Disposition of Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid after Controlled Around-the-Clock Oral THC Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral fluid, a promising alternative matrix for drug monitoring in clinical and forensic investigations, offers noninvasive sample collection under direct observation. Cannabinoid distribution into oral fluid is complex and incompletely characterized due to the lack of controlled drug administration studies. Methods To characterize cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid, we administered around-the-clock oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (Marinol®) doses to 10 participants with current daily cannabis use. We obtained oral fluid samples (n = 440) by use of Quantisal™ collection devices before, during, and after 37 20-mg THC doses over 9 days. Samples were extracted with multiple elution solvents from a single SPE column and analyzed by 2-dimensional GC-MS with electron-impact ionization for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), cannabidiol, and cannabinol and negative chemical ionization for 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges were 0.5–50 μg/L, with the exception of cannabinol (1–50 μg/L) and THCCOOH (7.5–500 ng/L). Results THCCOOH was the most prevalent analyte in 432 samples (98.2%), with concentrations up to 1117.9 ng/L. In contrast, 11-OH-THC was not identified in any sample; cannabidiol and cannabinol were quantified in 3 and 8 samples, respectively, with maximum concentrations of 2.1 and 13 μg/L. THC was present in only 20.7% of samples, with highest concentrations near admission (median 4.2 μg/L, range 0.6–481.9) from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. Conclusions Measurement of THCCOOH in OF not only identifies cannabis exposure, but also minimizes the possibility of passive inhalation. THCCOOH may be a better analyte for detection of cannabis use. PMID:20530732

  6. Loss of orally administered drugs in GI tract

    PubMed Central

    Gavhane, Yogeshkumar Nanasaheb; Yadav, Adhikrao Vyankatrao

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a broad perspective on intestinal absorption and the impact of intestinal first-pass metabolism on both clearance and drug–drug interaction prediction along with its historical perspectives. The review also considers abilities to bridge the gap between the increasing amount of intestinal in vitro data and the importance of intestinal first-pass metabolism in vivo. The significance of efflux transporters on the intestinal absorption is also discussed. PMID:23960808

  7. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  8. Development and pharmacokinetic evaluation of erythromycin lipidic formulations for oral administration in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Serdoz, Francesca; Voinovich, Dario; Perissutti, Beatrice; Grabnar, Iztok; Hasa, Dritan; Ballestrazzi, Rodolfo; Coni, Ettore; Pellegrini, Enrico

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to enhance the bioavailability of erythromycin base when administered orally in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Since erythromycin is normally given in the form of medicated feed, in this study three new types of feed formulation were developed. A self-emulsifying system and two types of double microemulsions (O/W/O) were prepared, characterized and adsorbed on a commercial extruded diet for fish. The emulsified systems were based on saturated polyglycolized glycerides and mono- and diglycerides of medium-chain fatty acids (as oily phase), Tween 80 (as surfactant) and, in the case of double microemulsions, distilled water. The systems differed in percentage composition and for the amount and position of erythromycin in different phases. The three medicated feed were then administered orally by means of a gastric probe to rainbow trout and their relative bioavailability was estimated in comparison with that obtained after oral administration of feed with erythromycin powder. For each medicated feed, 80 fish were tested. Finally, plasma profiles of erythromycin after single administration of medicated feeds were used to predict profiles obtainable by administering once-daily medicated feeds for 7 consecutive days. The results proved that the feeds containing microemulsified erythromycin provided largely superior oral bioavailability and the advantage of obtaining the same efficacy against bacterial infections with a much lower dose of drug. PMID:21402156

  9. Comparison of Glucosamine Absorption After Administration of Oral Liquid, Chewable, and Tablet Formulations to Dogs.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Lara K; Regier, Penny; Achanta, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Glucosamine (GS) is commonly administered as a nutritional supplement to support joint function. Although many supplements are available, the effect of formulation on oral absorption in dogs is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative bioavailability of GS for liquid, chewable, and tablet formulations containing GS sulfate or hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate. In a randomized cross-over design, supplements were administered daily for 8 days with a 1 wk washout period between treatments. Liquid or Tablet A was administered to four dogs, whereas Liquid or Tablet B was administered to four additional dogs. When nutraceutical exposure was normalized to the administered dose of GS free base, similar relative bioavailabilities were determined for all three formulations. However, the dose-normalized maximum plasma GS concentration was higher for the liquid supplement (5.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL) than for the two tablets (3.1 ± 0.6 and 2.1 ± 0.6 μg/mL, P < 0.001). Similarly, the time at which maximal plasma GS concentrations occurred was shorter for the liquid formulation (0.7 ± 0.5 hr) than for the two tablets (4.2 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.6 hr, P < 0.001). These data show that the formulation of joint supplements affects the oral absorption of GS in dogs. PMID:26808433

  10. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  11. Maternal coordination of the daily rhythm of malate dehydrogenase activity in testes from young rats: effect of maternal sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland and administration of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Gallará, R V; Carpentieri, A R; Bellavía, S L

    1995-02-01

    Chronic sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland by bilateral removal of the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) was performed on female rats 30 days before impregnation. The offspring, maintained in the dark from birth, had disruption of the malate dehydrogenase circadian rhythm in the testes at 25 days of age. A daily injection of melatonin (1 mg/kg s.c. at 10:00 or 18:00 h) to denervated mothers from the 14th day of pregnancy up to the 10th day postpartum produced one daily phase in the enzyme activity of tests in the offspring. Entrainment of daily enzyme activity also was obtained when the hormone was administered orally to the pups during the postnatal period or when pups were reared by intact (not denervated) foster mothers. The results indicate the involvement of the maternal pineal gland in the maternal transfer of photoperiodic information necessary for the coordination of the circadian system in young rats. PMID:7750160

  12. Oral administration of stavudine induces hyperalgesia without affecting activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Weber, Juliane; Mitchell, Duncan; Kamerman, Peter R

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated whether long-term oral administration of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine affects nociception in Sprague-Dawley rats, and whether any changes of nociception are accompanied by deterioration in activity and appetite. Stavudine (50 mg kg(-1)) was administered to rats orally once daily for six weeks in gelatine cubes. Mechanical hyperalgesia of the tail was assessed using a bar algometer, and thermal hyperalgesia by tail immersion in 49 degrees C water. Withdrawal latencies were compared to those of rats receiving placebo gelatine cubes. Withdrawal latencies to the noxious thermal challenge were not affected by stavudine, but those to the mechanical challenge were significantly decreased in rats receiving stavudine, compared to rats receiving placebo, from week three to week six of drug administration (P<0.05, ANCOVA with Newman Keuls post-hoc comparisons). The overall condition of the rats was assessed by recording daily voluntary wheel running distance and maximum running speed, food intake and body mass. Daily stavudine administration did not adversely affect voluntary running activity, appetite or growth. We have shown that long-term daily oral administration of the NRTI stavudine results in mechanical hyperalgesia in rats within three weeks without affecting appetite, growth and physical activity. PMID:17632188

  13. Some pharmacokinetic indices of oral fluconazole administration to koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) infected with cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Govendir, M; Black, L A; Jobbins, S E; Kimble, B; Malik, R; Krockenberger, M B

    2016-08-01

    Three asymptomatic koalas serologically positive for cryptococcosis and two symptomatic koalas were treated with 10 mg/kg fluconazole orally, twice daily for at least 2 weeks. The median plasma Cmax and AUC0-8 h for asymptomatic animals were 0.9 μg/mL and 4.9 μg/mL·h, respectively; and for symptomatic animals 3.2 μg/mL and 17.3 μg/mL·h, respectively. An additional symptomatic koala was treated with fluconazole (10 mg/kg twice daily) and a subcutaneous amphotericin B infusion twice weekly. After 2 weeks the fluconazole Cmax was 3.7 μg/mL and the AUC0-8 h was 25.8 μg/mL*h. An additional three koalas were treated with fluconazole 15 mg/kg twice daily for at least 2 weeks, with the same subcutaneous amphotericin protocol co-administered to two of these koalas (Cmax : 5.0 μg/mL; mean AUC0-8 h : 18.1 μg/mL*h). For all koalas, the fluconazole plasma Cmax failed to reach the MIC90 (16 μg/mL) to inhibit C. gattii. Fluconazole administered orally at either 10 or 15 mg/kg twice daily in conjunction with amphotericin is unlikely to attain therapeutic plasma concentrations. Suggestions to improve treatment of systemic cryptococcosis include testing pathogen susceptibility to fluconazole, monitoring plasma fluconazole concentrations, and administration of 20-25 mg/kg fluconazole orally, twice daily, with an amphotericin subcutaneous infusion twice weekly. PMID:26667113

  14. [Pharmacokinetics of cefatrizine administered in repeated doses].

    PubMed

    Couet, W; Reigner, B G; Lefebvre, M A; Bizouard, J; Fourtillan, J B

    1988-05-01

    Twelve healthy volunteers received cefatrizine orally at doses equal to 500 mg every 12 h for 5 days. Cefatrizine was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in plasma and urines collected after the first and/or the last administration. Cefatrizine absorption was rapid; its peak plasma level was reached at time 1.79 +/- 0.07 h following the first dose, it was equal to 7.37 +/- 0.31 micrograms.ml-1. Its apparent elimination half-life was equal to 1.50 +/- 0.05 h, it explains the lack of accumulation with time during multiple administrations every 12 hours. Comparisons between peak plasma concentration and area under curves following the first and last dosing showed significant (p less than 0.01) but weak (close to 15%) reduction of these 2 parameters with time which could be explained by a slight reduction of cefatrizine absorption with time. In conclusion, cefatrizine does not accumulate when administered repeatedly at a dose equal to 500 mg every 12 h in young adult, and its pharmacokinetics is virtually linear with time. PMID:3043350

  15. Comparison of tissue and plasma levels of ibuprofen after oral and topical administration.

    PubMed

    Dominkus, M; Nicolakis, M; Kotz, R; Wilkinson, F E; Kaiser, R R; Chlud, K

    1996-12-01

    The penetration and absorption of ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) from a topical gel and oral tablets were tested in an open study, performed in 17 patients with degenerative knee disorders requiring an operation. Patients administered the topical test preparation (ibugel, 3 x 375 mg ibuprofen daily) or the standard oral preparation (2 x 600 mg ibuprofen daily) for 3 days prior to the operation. Samples of blood, synovial fluid, muscle, fasciae and subcutis were obtained during the operation (15 h after the last administration) and analysed for ibuprofen content using a validated HPLC method. Different absorption profiles were observed for topical and oral administration. Oral administration led to higher concentrations in the plasma, synovial fluid and fasciae, while higher levels in the muscle and subcutis were found after topical administration. After topical application, the concentrations in the fasciae, muscle and subcutis were significantly higher than those in the blood plasma and synovial fluid (p < 0.05). Very low levels of ibuprofen were observed in the subcutis after oral administration. This can be explained by the different pathways. This study demonstrated that concentrations of ibuprofen in the various biological samples were still within therapeutically effective levels 15 h after topical or oral administration. By use of an oral comparison group, it has been possible to show that the concentrations in times directly under the site of topical application lie in the same order of magnitude as those found after preoral treatment. Therapy of intra-articular inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases requires oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, based on the results of this study, topical therapy with NSAIDs can be recommended for soft tissue rheumatism and periarticular insertion tendinopathia. PMID:9006788

  16. Measuring Disability: Application of the Rasch Model to Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, T. Joseph; DeChello, Laurie M.; Garcia, Ramon; Fifield, Judith; Rothfield, Naomi; Reisine, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Performed a comparative analysis of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) items administered to 4,430 older adults and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living administered to 605 people with rheumatoid arthritis scoring both with Likert and Rasch measurement models. Findings show the superiority of the Rasch approach over the Likert method. (SLD)

  17. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  18. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  19. Bioequivalence of oral and intravenous carbamazepine formulations in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Dwain; Cloyd, James; Biton, Victor; Bekersky, Ihor; Walzer, Mark; Wesche, David; Drummond, Rebecca; Lee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and comparative pharmacokinetics (PK) of intravenous and oral carbamazepine. Methods In this phase 1, open-label study, adult patients with epilepsy on a stable oral carbamazepine dosage (400–2,000 mg/day) were converted to intravenous carbamazepine (administered at 70% of the oral dosage). A 28-day outpatient period preceded an up to 10-day inpatient period and a 30-day follow-up period. Intravenous carbamazepine was administered over 15 or 30 min every 6 h on days 1–7; some patients in the 15-min group were eligible to receive four 2- to 5-min (rapid) infusions on day 8. Patients underwent blood sampling to determine the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) for carbamazepine and metabolite carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide following oral (day 0) and intravenous carbamazepine administration (days 1, 7, and 8). Bioequivalence was evaluated in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance >80 ml/min). Safety assessments were conducted through day 38. Results Ninety-eight patients enrolled and 77 completed the PK component. The mean daily oral and intravenous carbamazepine dosage for 64 PK-evaluable patients with normal renal function was 962.5 and 675.1 mg (70% of oral dosage), respectively. Steady-state minimum concentration (Cmin) and overall exposure (AUC0–24) for intravenous carbamazepine infused over 30, 15, or 2–5 min were similar to oral carbamazepine. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratios of the adjusted means for AUC0–24, maximum concentration (Cmax), and Cmin were within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for 30-min intravenous infusions versus oral administration, but exceeded the upper limit for Cmax for the 15-min and rapid infusions. All intravenous carbamazepine infusions were well tolerated. Significance Intravenous carbamazepine infusions (70% of oral daily dose) of 30-, 15-, and 2- to 5-min duration, given every 6 h, maintained patients’ plasma

  20. Managing Daily Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... To Cure MD PPMD Merchandise Host an Event Create a Personal Page My Donor Portfolio™ Sponsor Programs Other Ways to Help About Us Mission Financials History Staff & Board Media Awards Partners Contact Us Home / Care for Duchenne / Managing Daily Life Print Email Managing Daily Life Environmental ...

  1. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  2. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  3. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  4. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  5. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  6. Chronic daily headaches

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Fayyaz; Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Khalil, Modar

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches. PMID:23024563

  7. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects. PMID:26773506

  8. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  9. Amphiphilic Antimony(V) Complexes for Oral Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Flaviana R.; Ferreira, Weverson A.; Campos, Mariana A.; Ramos, Guilherme S.; Kato, Kelly C.; Almeida, Gregório G.; Corrêa, José D.; Melo, Maria N.; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The need for daily parenteral administration is an important limitation in the clinical use of pentavalent antimonial drugs against leishmaniasis. In this study, amphiphilic antimony(V) complexes were prepared from alkylmethylglucamides (L8 and L10, with carbon chain lengths of 8 and 10, respectively), and their potential for the oral treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was evaluated. Complexes of Sb and ligand at 1:3 (SbL8 and SbL10) were obtained from the reaction of antimony(V) with L8 and L10, as evidenced by elemental and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analyses. Fluorescence probing of hydrophobic environment and negative-staining transmission electron microscopy showed that SbL8 forms kinetically stabilized nanoassemblies in water. Pharmacokinetic studies with mice in which the compound was administered by the oral route at 200 mg of Sb/kg of body weight indicated that the SbL8 complex promoted greater and more sustained Sb levels in serum and liver than the levels obtained for the conventional antimonial drug meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime [Glu]). The efficacy of SbL8 and SbL10 administered by the oral route was evaluated in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania infantum after a daily dose of 200 mg of Sb/kg for 20 days. Both complexes promoted significant reduction in the liver and spleen parasite burdens in relation to those in the saline-treated control group. The extent of parasite suppression (>99.96%) was similar to that achieved after Glu given intraperitoneally at 80 mg of Sb/kg/day. As expected, there was no significant reduction in the parasitic load in the group treated orally with Glu at 200 mg of Sb/(kg day). In conclusion, amphiphilic antimony(V) complexes emerge as an innovative and promising strategy for the oral treatment of VL. PMID:23796930

  10. [Risk factors for the oral use of antibiotics and animal treatment incidence of weaners in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Hirsiger, P; Malik, J; Kommerlen, D; Vidondo, B; Arnold, C; Harisberger, M; Spring, P; Sidler, X

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, risk factors for the use of oral antibiotics in weaned piglets were collected on 112 pig farms by a personal questionaire. The most common indication for an antibiotic group therapy was diarrhoea, and the most frequently used antibiotic was Colistin. On average, 27.33 daily doses in the control farms and 387.21 daily doses in the problem farms per 1000 weaners were administered on a given day. The significant risk factors in the multivariate model were poor hygiene in the water supply of suckling piglets, less than two doses ofprestarter feed daily, lack of an all-in-and-all-out production system in weaners, no herd book performance data analysis, and less than two of the legally prescribed veterinary visits per year. Furthermore, the treatment incidence of weaners for oral antibiotics was calculated on the basis of the drug inventory. This study provides evidence that the use of oral antibiotics in weaners can be reduced by interventions in hygiene and management. PMID:26891574

  11. Pharmacokinetics of R 82913 in AIDS patients: a phase I dose-finding study of oral administration compared with intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, S; Hermans, P; Sommereijns, B; O'Doherty, E; Westenborghs, R; van de Velde, V; Cauwenbergh, G F; Clumeck, N

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral administration of R 82913, or tetrahydroimidazol [4,5,1-jk]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one or -thione (TIBO), was compared with those of intravenous administration in five AIDS patients. TIBO was administered as a single daily 1-h infusion of 100 mg for 29 days and orally as a single daily dose for 14 days with three consecutive regimens of 100, 200, and 100 mg with probenecid (1 g) daily. Each cycle was followed by a wash-out period. Oral bioavailability of TIBO appears to be low and is not improved by the adjunction of probenecid. Trough levels obtained with oral administration systematically remained far below the 90% inhibitory concentration of TIBO against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Tolerance of TIBO was excellent. No clinical efficacy could be demonstrated. p24 antigenemia decreased significantly in one patient under intravenous therapy. TIBO derivatives are promising anti-HIV-1 agents in vitro, but improvement of oral bioavailability is needed before implementation of long-term efficacy and tolerability studies. Moreover, rapid emergence of resistance, which has been recently documented, constitutes a major problem with most nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:1482134

  12. Oral vaccination of dogs with recombinant rabies virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Blanton, Jesse; Manangan, Jamie; Morrill, Patricia; Murphy, Staci; Niezgoda, Michael; Orciari, Lillian A; Schumacher, Carolin L; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2005-07-01

    Oral rabies virus (RV) vaccines are used to immunize a diversity of mammalian carnivores, but no single biological is effective for all major species. Recently, advances in reverse genetics have allowed the design of recombinant RV for consideration as new vaccines. The objective of this experiment was to examine the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of recombinant RV vaccines administered to captive dogs by the oral route, compared to a commercial vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) recombinant virus vaccine. Animals consisted of naive purpose-bred beagles of both sexes, and were 6 months of age or older. Dogs were randomly assigned to one of six groups, and received either diluent or vaccine (PBS; V-RG; RV SN10-333; RV SPBN-Cyto c; RV SPBNGA; RV SPBNGAGA), with at least six animals per group. On day 0, 1 ml of each vaccine (or PBS) was administered to the oral cavity of each dog, at an approximate concentration of 10(8) to 10(9) TCID50. After vaccination, dogs were observed daily and bled weekly, for 5 weeks, prior to RV challenge. No signs of illness related to vaccination were detected during the observation period. Excluding the controls, RV neutralizing antibodies were detected in the majority of animals within 1-2 weeks of primary vaccination. Thereafter, all dogs were inoculated in the masseter muscle with a street virus of canine origin. All control animals developed rabies, but no vaccinates succumbed, with the exception of a single dog in the V-RG group. Review of these preliminary data demonstrates the non-inferiority of recombinant RV products, as concerns both safety and efficacy, and supports the suggestion that these vaccines may hold promise for future development as oral immunogens for important carnivore species, such as dogs. PMID:15896409

  13. Oral administration of osteocalcin improves glucose utilization by stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Yasutake, Yu; Higashi, Sen; Kawakubo-Yasukochi, Tomoyo; Chishaki, Sakura; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masato

    2014-12-01

    Uncarboxylated osteocalcin (GluOC), a bone-derived hormone, regulates energy metabolism by stimulating insulin secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We previously showed that the effect of GluOC on insulin secretion is mediated largely by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secreted from the intestine in response to GluOC exposure. We have now examined the effect of oral administration of GluOC on glucose utilization as well as the fate of such administered GluOC in mice. Long-term intermittent or daily oral administration of GluOC reduced the fasting blood glucose level and improved glucose tolerance in mice without affecting insulin sensitivity. It also increased the fasting serum insulin concentration as well as the β-cell area in the pancreas. A small proportion of orally administered GluOC reached the small intestine and remained there for at least 24h. GluOC also entered the general circulation, and the serum GLP-1 concentration was increased in association with the presence of GluOC in the intestine and systemic circulation. The putative GluOC receptor, GPRC6A was detected in intestinal cells, and was colocalized with GLP-1 in some of these cells. Our results suggest that orally administered GluOC improved glucose handling likely by acting from both the intestinal lumen and the general circulation, with this effect being mediated in part by stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Oral administration of GluOC warrants further study as a safe and convenient option for the treatment or prevention of metabolic disorders. PMID:25230237

  14. Oral Fluid and Plasma Cannabinoid Ratios after Around-the-Clock Controlled Oral Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral fluid (OF) testing is increasingly important for drug treatment, workplace, and drugged-driving programs. There is interest in predicting plasma or whole-blood concentrations from OF concentrations; however, the relationship between these matrices is incompletely characterized because of few controlled drug-administration studies. METHODS Ten male daily cannabis smokers received around-the-clock escalating 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, dronabinol) doses (40–120 mg/day) for 8 days. Plasma and OF samples were simultaneously collected before, during, and after dosing. OF THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by GC-MS at 0.5-μg/L, 0.5-μg/L, and 7.5-ng/L limits of quantification (LOQs), respectively. In plasma, the LOQs were 0.25 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 0.5 μg/L for 11-hydroxy-THC. RESULTS Despite multiple oral THC administrations each day and increasing plasma THC concentrations, OF THC concentrations generally decreased over time, reflecting primarily previously self-administered smoked cannabis. The logarithms of the THC concentrations in oral fluid and plasma were not significantly correlated (r = −0.10; P = 0.065). The OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations, albeit with 1000-fold higher concentrations in plasma, increased throughout dosing. The logarithms of OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations were significantly correlated (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), although there was high interindividual variation. A high OF/plasma THC ratio and a high OF THC/THCCOOH ratio indicated recent cannabis smoking. CONCLUSIONS OF monitoring does not reliably detect oral dronabinol intake. The time courses of THC and THCCOOH concentrations in plasma and OF were different after repeated oral THC doses, and high inter-individual variation was observed. For these reasons, OF cannabinoid concentrations cannot predict concurrent plasma concentrations. PMID:21875944

  15. Oral self-care practices among university students in Port Harcourt, Rivers State

    PubMed Central

    Bashiru, Braimoh Omoigberai; Anthony, Ilochonwu Nzube

    2014-01-01

    Background: The maintenance of optimum oral health is dependent on the efficacy of oral self-care. The objective of the present study was to evaluate oral self-care practices and knowledge among non-medical students at the University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate students at the University of Port Harcourt Nigeria, in January, 2014. Self-administered questionnaire elicited information on demography, frequency of tooth brushing, type of tooth brush, use of dental floss and previous visit to the dentist. Results: A total of 360 young adults, 188 males and 172 females, aged 18-33 years participated in the study. Brushing habits of the study population was at least once a day (90%). Approximately half (52.5 %) of the samples used medium-sized bristles and about 28.8% of the students replaced their toothbrush every 3 months. Regarding oral hygiene aids, few students, 5.8% and 4.2% used dental floss and mouthwash, respectively, as oral cleaning aid. Most of the students (71.6%) had never visited the dentist, 18.1% visited due to dental pain and 8.1% for extraction. Regarding knowledge on oral hygiene practice, approximately 60% of students knew that we have to brush our teeth twice daily, 31% knew we need to visit the dentist twice a year and only 18% knew what was dental floss. Conclusion: Oral hygiene practices among the students were poor. Therefore, oral health education and promotion is required to improve oral hygiene practices and health among young adults and the general population. PMID:25538367

  16. Factors Associated with Adherence and Concordance Between Measurement Strategies in an HIV Daily Oral Tenofovir/Emtricitabine as Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) Clinical Trial, Botswana, 2007-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kebaabetswe, Poloko M.; Stirratt, Michael J.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Henderson, Faith L.; Gray, Simone C.; Rose, Charles E.; Williams, Tiffany; Paxton, Lynn A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined study product adherence and its determinants in the Botswana oral pre-exposure prophylaxis efficacy trial. Among the 1,219 participants, the mean adherence by pill count and 3-day self-report was 94 % for each. In multivariable models, pill count adherence was significantly associated with adverse events (nausea, dizziness, vomiting) (RR 0.98 95 % CI 0.98–1.00; p = 0.03) and side effect concerns (RR 0.98 95 % CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.01). Self-reported adherence was significantly associated with having an HIV-positive partner (RR 1.02 95 % CI 1.00–1.04; p = 0.02) and Francistown residence (RR 0.98 95 % CI 0.96, 0.99; p = 0.0001). Detectable drug concentrations showed modest associations with self-report and pill count adherence, and drug levels were higher among those self-reporting 100 % adherence than those reporting <100 %. Most common adherence barriers involved refill delays and other logistic challenges; cellphone alarm reminder use was the most common facilitator. PMID:25186785

  17. Expression of Cytochrome P450s in the Liver of Rats Administered with Socheongryong-tang, a Traditional Herbal Formula

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seong Eun; Ha, Hyekyung; Seo, Chang-Seob; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Jeong, Soo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential influences of Socheongryong-tang (SCRT) on the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) in vivo. Materials and Methods: SCRT was orally administered to either male or female Sprague-Dawley rats once daily at doses of 0, 1000, 2000, or 5000 mg/kg/day for 13 weeks. The mRNA expression of CYP450s (CYP1A1, 1A2, 2B1/2, 2C11, 2E1, 3A1, 3A2, and 4A1) in liver tissues was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. And then, the protein expression of CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 in liver tissues was analyzed by the Western blot. Results: We found no significant influence in the mRNA expression of hepatic CYP1A2, 2C11, 2E1, 3A1, 3A2, and 4A1 after repeated administration of SCRT for 13 weeks. By contrast, the mRNA and protein expression of hepatic CYP1A1 was increased by repeated SCRT treatment in male rats, but not in female rats. The mRNA and protein expression of hepatic CYP2B1/2 in both genders was increased by administration of SCRT. Conclusion: A caution is needed when SCRT is co-administered with substrates of CYP2B1/2 for clinical usage. In case of male, an attention is also required when SCRT and drugs metabolized by CYP1A1 are taken together. Our findings provide information regarding the safety and effectiveness of SCRT when combined with conventional drugs. SUMMARY Oral administration of Socheongryong-tang for 13 weeks did not affect the mRNA expression of hepatic CYP1A2, 2C11, 2E1, 3A1, 3A2, and 4A1In male rats, oral administration of Socheongryong-tang for 13 weeks induced the mRNA and protein expression of hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2In female rats, oral administration of Socheongryong-tang for 13 weeks induced the mRNA and protein expression of hepatic CYP2B1/2. Abbreviations used: SCRT: Socheongryong-tang, CYP450: Cytochrome P450, HPLC: High performance liquid chromatography, RT-PCR: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PMID

  18. IDEA Oral Language Proficiency Test (IPT II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.

    The IDEA Oral Language Proficiency Test (IPT II), an individually-administered measure of speaking and listening proficiency in English as a Second Language designed for secondary school students, is described and discussed. The test consists of 91 items and requires 5-25 minutes to administer. Raw scores are converted to one of seven proficiency…

  19. Accuracy of audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) and self-administered questionnaires for the assessment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Beedy, Dianne; Carey, Michael P; Tu, Xin

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the accuracy of two retrospective methods and assessment intervals for recall of sexual behavior and assessed predictors of recall accuracy. Using a 2 [mode: audio-computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) vs. self-administered questionnaire (SAQ)] by 2 (frequency: monthly vs. quarterly) design, young women (N =102) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions. Participants completed baseline measures, monitored their behavior with a daily diary, and returned monthly (or quarterly) for assessments. A mixed pattern of accuracy between the four assessment methods was identified. Monthly assessments yielded more accurate recall for protected and unprotected vaginal sex but quarterly assessments yielded more accurate recall for unprotected oral sex. Mode differences were not strong, and hypothesized predictors of accuracy tended not to be associated with recall accuracy. Choice of assessment mode and frequency should be based upon the research question(s), population, resources, and context in which data collection will occur. PMID:16721506

  20. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Ruscello, Dennis M.

    Although speech-language pathologists are expected to be able to administer and interpret oral examinations, there are currently no screening tests available that provide careful administration instructions and data for intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability. The Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination (OSMSE) is designed primarily for…

  1. Ziprasidone and the pharmacokinetics of a combined oral contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, G J; Harness, J; Holt, P R; Oliver, S; Anziano, R J

    2000-01-01

    Aims To determine whether multiple doses of ziprasidone alter the steady-state pharmacokinetics of the component steroids, ethinyloestradiol and levonorgestrel, of an oral contraceptive; to evaluate the tolerability of a co-administered combined oral contraceptive and ziprasidone; and to compare plasma concentrations of prolactin in subjects taking a combined oral contraceptive with placebo or ziprasidone. Methods Nineteen women taking a combined oral contraceptive (ethinyloestradiol 30 µg day−1 and levonorgestrel 150 µg day−1) were enrolled into a double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study. They received ziprasidone 40 mg day−1 in two divided daily doses or placebo for 8 days (days 8–15) in one of two 21 day treatment periods separated by a 7 day washout period. Venous blood samples were collected immediately before and up to 24 h after the morning dose of oral contraceptive and ziprasidone or placebo on day 15 of each 21 day treatment period. These were assayed for ethinyloestradiol and levonorgestrel and the resulting data used to derive pharmacokinetic data for these steroids. Additional samples were collected immediately before and 4 h after the morning dose of oral contraceptive and ziprasidone or placebo on day 15 of each 21 day treatment period for prolactin assay. All observed and volunteered adverse events were recorded throughout the study. Results The mean AUC(0,24 h), Cmax and tmax for ethinyloestradiol and the mean AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax for levonorgestrel during ziprasidone co-administration were not statistically significantly different from corresponding values occurring during placebo co-administration. The tmax for levonorgestrel was approximately 0.5 h longer. Concomitant therapy with a combined oral contraceptive and ziprasidone did not result in adverse events not previously seen with either preparation alone. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that, based on pharmacokinetic and tolerability data, ziprasidone

  2. The pharmacokinetics of the oral cephalosporins--a review.

    PubMed

    Wise, R

    1990-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the older and more recent oral cephalosporins are reviewed. With the exception of cefadroxil the older agents (cephalexin, cephradine and cefaclor) have serum elimination half-lives of less than or equal to 1 h and hence have to be administered three to four times daily. The urinary recovery of these agents is high (greater than 80% of oral dose) with the exception of cefaclor (54%). Cefaclor is also chemically unstable. The newer agents can be divided into those that are prodrugs (cefpodoxime proxetil and cefuroxime axetil) and compounds that are absorbed as such (cefixime, cefprozil and ceftibuten). They all have half-lives greater than 1.25 h and can be given once or twice daily. The penetration of these agents into an inflammatory exudate was studied and found to be cefixime 132%, ceftibuten 113%, cefpodoxime 104%, cefuroxime 92% and cefprozil 79% of the serum concentration. The penetration of cefpodoxime and cefixime into the respiratory tract was also studied; the mean percentage bronchial mucosal penetration was 52% for the former and 38% for cefixime. The urinary recovery of these newer agents (with the exception of ceftibuten) tends to be less than that of the earlier agents. There was a relationship between the serum elimination half-life of these agents and the degree of tissue penetration, those agents with longer half-lives penetrating to a greater extent. PMID:2292525

  3. Characterization of acute biliary hyperplasia in Fisher 344 Rats administered the Indole-3-Carbinol Analog, NSC-743380

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, Sandy R.; Covey, Joseph; Morris, Joel; Fang, Bingliang; Horn, Thomas L.; Elsass, Karen E.; Hamre, John R.; McCormick, David L.; Davis, Myrtle A.

    2014-12-15

    NSC-743380 (1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carbinol) is in early stages of development as an anticancer agent. Two metabolites reflect sequential conversion of the carbinol functionality to a carboxaldehyde and the major metabolite, 1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid. In an exploratory toxicity study in rats, NSC-743380 induced elevations in liver-associated serum enzymes and biliary hyperplasia. Biliary hyperplasia was observed 2 days after dosing orally for 2 consecutive days at 100 mg/kg/day. Notably, hepatotoxicity and biliary hyperplasia were observed after oral administration of the parent compound, but not when major metabolites were administered. The toxicities of a structurally similar but pharmacologically inactive molecule and a structurally diverse molecule with a similar efficacy profile in killing cancer cells in vitro were compared to NSC-743380 to explore scaffold versus target-mediated toxicity. Following two oral doses of 100 mg/kg/day given once daily on two consecutive days, the structurally unrelated active compound produced hepatic toxicity similar to NSC-743380. The structurally similar inactive compound did not, but, lower exposures were achieved. The weight of evidence implies that the hepatotoxicity associated with NSC-743380 is related to the anticancer activity of the parent molecule. Furthermore, because biliary hyperplasia represents an unmanageable and non-monitorable adverse effect in clinical settings, this model may provide an opportunity for investigators to use a short-duration study design to explore biomarkers of biliary hyperplasia. - Highlights: • NSC-743380 induced biliary hyperplasia in rats. • Toxicity of NSC-743380 appears to be related to its anticancer activity. • The model provides an opportunity to explore biomarkers of biliary hyperplasia.

  4. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  5. "I'll Speak in Proper Slang": Language Ideologies in a Daily Editing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, Amanda J.; Carpenter, Brian D.; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the language ideologies--the assumptions about the nature of language, language variation, and language learning--reflected in a widespread daily editing activity often known as Daily Oral Language or Daily Language Practice. Through a yearlong ethnographic study of grammar instruction in three urban,…

  6. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  7. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  8. 16 CFR 0.4 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 0.4 Section 0.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.4 Laws administered. The Commission exercises enforcement and administrative authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C....

  9. 16 CFR 0.4 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 0.4 Section 0.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.4 Laws administered. The Commission exercises enforcement and administrative authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C....

  10. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administering agencies. 247.3 Section 247.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies....

  11. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  12. Assessing Students' Oral Proficiency: A Case for Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fall, Thekla; Adair-Hauck, Bonnie; Glisan, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the Pittsburgh Public Schools Oral Ratings Assessment for Language Students (PPS ORALS) project, a Title VI Foreign Language Assistance Program grant-funded project to create an online testing Software program that makes large-scale oral testing in a world language not only feasible, but also easy to create, administer, and…

  13. Effect of epidermal growth factor against radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook; Jung, Kwon Il; Kim, Yeun Wha B.S.; Jung, Heun Don; Kim, Hyun Sook; Hong, Joon Pio . E-mail: joonphong@amc.seoul.kr

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: We tested the efficacy of oral recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) against radiation-induced oral mucositis in a rat model. Methods and Materials: Each of 35 Sprague-Dawley rats, 7 to 8 weeks of age and weighing 178 {+-} 5 grams, was irradiated once in the head region with 25 Gy, using a 4-MV therapeutic linear accelerator at a rate of 2 Gy/min. The irradiated rats were randomly divided into four groups: those receiving no treatment (Group 1), those treated with vehicle only three times per day (Group 2), and those treated with 50 {mu}g/mL (Group 3), or 100 {mu}g/mL (Group 4) rhEGF three times per day. Results: Rats were monitored for survival rate and daily activity, including hair loss, sensitivity, and anorexia. We found that survival rate and oral intake were significantly increased and histologic changes were significantly decreased in the rhEGF-treated rats. There was no difference, however, between rats treated with 50 {mu}g/mL or 100 {mu}g/mL rhEGF. Conclusion: These findings suggest that orally administered rhEGF decreased radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats.

  14. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Lúcia; Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Macedo, Daniela; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity. PMID:26421283

  15. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  16. Effects of Oral and Intravenous Administration of Buspirone on Food–Cocaine Choice in Socially Housed Male Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Drugs acting at D3 dopamine receptors have been suggested as medications for cocaine dependence. These experiments examined the effects of intravenously and orally administered buspirone, a D2-like receptor antagonist with high affinity for D3 and D4 receptors, on the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine in group-housed male cynomolgus monkeys. Use of socially housed monkeys permitted the assessment of whether social status, known to influence D2-like receptor availability, modulates the behavioral effects of buspirone. Buspirone was administered acutely to monkeys self-administering cocaine under a food–drug choice procedure in which a cocaine self-administration dose–effect curve was determined daily. When administered by either route, buspirone significantly decreased cocaine choice in dominant-ranked monkeys. In subordinate monkeys, however, i.v. buspirone was ineffective on average, and oral buspirone increased choice of lower cocaine doses. The effects of buspirone only differed according to route of administration in subordinate monkeys. Moreover, it is noteworthy that the effects of buspirone were similar to those of the D3 receptor-selective antagonist PG01037 and qualitatively different than those of less selective drugs that act at D2-like or serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors, suggesting a D3 and possibly D4 receptor mechanism of action for buspirone. Taken together, the data support the utility of drugs targeting D3/D4 receptors as potential treatments for cocaine addiction, particularly in combination with enriching environmental manipulations. PMID:25393717

  17. Coal daily by fax

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    COAL Daily lets you quickly and easily track U.S. coal market developments, including spot coal prices and market and business news. The Btu-, quality- and location-specific prices and analyses reflect the large investment to systematically collect accurate coal market price data Fieldston has made.

  18. Toothbrushing: Do It Daily.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Offers a practical guide for promoting daily toothbrushing in young children. Discusses the importance of proper dental care, explains the causes of tooth decay, describes proper dental care for infants and young children, recommends materials and teaching methods, and discusses visits to the dentist and the benefits of fluoride for dental health.…

  19. Tips for Daily Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Share Plus on Google Plus I Have Alzheimer's Disease alz.org | IHaveAlz I Have Alz Homepage Know ... others living with Alzheimer's back to top The Alzheimer's ... living with the disease, share their personal insights about the daily strategies ...

  20. Pediatric phase I trial of oral sorafenib and topotecan in refractory or recurrent pediatric solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reed, Damon R; Mascarenhas, Leo; Manning, Kathleen; Hale, Gregory A; Goldberg, John; Gill, Jonathan; Sandler, Eric; Isakoff, Michael S; Smith, Tiffany; Caracciolo, Jamie; Lush, Richard M; Juan, Tzu-Hua; Lee, Jae K; Neuger, Anthony M; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Targeted kinase inhibitors and camptothecins have shown preclinical and clinical activity in several cancers. This trial evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities of sorafenib and topotecan administered orally in pediatric patients with relapsed solid tumors. Sorafenib was administered twice daily and topotecan once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each 28-day course. The study utilized a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation design. Three dose levels (DL) were evaluated: (1) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1 mg/m(2) ; (2) sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) ; and (3) sorafenib 200 mg/m(2) and topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) . Pharmacokinetics were ascertained and treatment response assessed. Thirteen patients were enrolled. DL2 was the determined MTD. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia delaying therapy for >7 days was observed in one of six patients on DL2, and grade 4 neutropenia that delayed therapy in two of three patients on DL3. A patient with preexisting cardiac failure controlled with medication developed a transient drop in the left ventricular ejection fraction that improved when sorafenib was withheld. Sorafenib exposure with or without topotecan was comparable, and the concentration-time profiles for topotecan alone and in combination with sorafenib were similar. One objective response was noted in a patient with fibromatosis. We determined MTD to be sorafenib 150 mg/m(2) twice daily orally on days 1-28 combined with topotecan 1.4 mg/m(2) once daily on days 1-5 and 8-12. While these doses are 1 DL below the MTD of the agents individually, pharmacokinetic studies suggested adequate drug exposure without drug interactions. The combination had limited activity in the population studied. PMID:26714427

  1. Choline magnesium trisalicylate: comparative pharmacokinetic study of once-daily and twice-daily dosages.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M J; Kann, J

    1984-07-01

    This randomized crossover study compared the pharmacokinetics of choline magnesium trisalicylate tablets administered once daily (3000 mg of salicylate) or twice daily (1500 mg of salicylate) for six d. Serum salicylate levels were measured by HPLC. Mean "trough" concentrations fell within the therapeutic range (5-30 mg/dL) with either regimen and were relatively constant, indicating that the steady state had been reached. The 24-h area under the salicylate curve (AUC0-24 h) after the final 3000-mg salicylate dose averaged about twice the mean 12-h AUC after the last 1500-mg dose, indicating that the two dosing regimens were equally bioavailable. Clinical observations and results of laboratory safety studies indicate that both dosage schedules of the drug are well tolerated. The present findings support the once-daily therapeutic use of choline magnesium trisalicylate. PMID:6470965

  2. Comparison and Equating of Paper-Administered, Computer-Administered and Computerized Adaptive Tests of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, James B.; And Others

    Student achievement test scores were compared and equated, using three different testing methods: paper-administered, computer-administered, and computerized adaptive testing. The tests were developed from third and sixth grade mathematics item banks of the California Assessment Program. The paper and the computer-administered tests were identical…

  3. A phase II and pharmacokinetic study with oral piritrexim for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, E. G.; Gietema, J. A.; Workman, P.; Scott, J. E.; Crawshaw, A.; Dobbs, H. J.; Dennis, I.; Mulder, N. H.; Sleijfer, D. T.; Willemse, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    Piritrexim is a lipid-soluble antifolate which, like methotrexate, has a potent capacity to inhibit dihydrofolate reductase. We performed a multicentre phase II study with piritrexim in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four patients of which sixteen had received prior chemotherapy, were initially treated with 25 mg piritrexim orally administered trice daily for four days, repeated weekly, with provision for dose escalation or reduction according to observed toxicity. Of twenty-one patients evaluable for tumour response, one patient achieved a partial response which lasted for 24 weeks. Three patients had stable disease during 12 weeks of treatment, seventeen had progressive disease. Pirtrexim was generally well tolerated, in eighteen patients the dose could be escalated. Myelotoxicity was the most frequent observed toxicity of this piritrexim regimen. Leucopenia and thrombocytopenia grade 3/4 occurred in 38% of the patients sometime during treatment. Pharmacokinetic analysis of piritrexim in three patients during the first treatment cycle, revealed peak levels 1 to 2 h after an oral dose, with a trend towards a higher peak plasma levels and AUCs on the fourth dosing day compared with the first dosing day. In conclusion, orally administered piritrexim appears to be a regimen with little activity in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast carcinoma. PMID:8353055

  4. Systemic Absorption of Rifamycin SV MMX Administered as Modified-Release Tablets in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, A. F. D.; Rusca, A.; Loprete, L.; Dröge, M. J.; Moro, L.; Assandri, A.

    2011-01-01

    The new oral 200-mg rifamycin SV MMX modified-release tablets, designed to deliver rifamycin SV directly into the colonic lumen, offer considerable advantages over the existing immediate-release antidiarrheic formulations. In two pharmacokinetics studies of healthy volunteers, the absorption, urinary excretion, and fecal elimination of rifamycin SV after single- and multiple-dose regimens of the new formulation were investigated. Concentrations in plasma of >2 ng/ml were infrequently and randomly quantifiable after single and multiple oral doses. The systemic exposure to rifamycin SV after single and multiple oral doses of MMX tablets under fasting and fed conditions or following a four-times-a-day (q.i.d.) or a twice-a-day (b.i.d.) regimen could be considered negligible. With both oral regimens, the drug was confirmed to be very poorly absorbable systemically. The amount of systemically absorbed antibiotic excreted by the renal route is far lower than 0.01% of the administered dose after both the single- and multiple-dose regimens. The absolute bioavailability, calculated as the mean percent ratio between total urinary excretion amounts (ΣXu) after a single intravenous injection and after a single oral dose under fasting conditions, was 0.0410 ± 0.0617. The total elimination of the unchanged rifamycin SV with feces was 87% of the administered oral dose. No significant effect of rifamycin SV on vital signs, electrocardiograms, or laboratory parameters was observed. PMID:21402860

  5. The new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David; Libby, Edward; Crowther, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Although their first application in clinical practice occurred in the 1940s, vitamin K antagonists remain the only form of oral anticoagulant medication approved for long-term use. Although the available vitamin K antagonists are highly effective for the prevention and/or treatment of most thrombotic disease, the significant interpatient and intrapatient variability in dose-response, the narrow therapeutic index, and the numerous drug and dietary interactions associated with these agents have led clinicians, patients, and investigators to search for alternative agents. Three new orally administered anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban) are in the late stages of development and several others are just entering (or moving through) earlier phases of investigation. These novel anticoagulant medications are being studied for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes published clinical trial data pertinent to apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban. PMID:19880491

  6. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2220a - Sulfadimethoxine oral solution and soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfadimethoxine oral solution and soluble powder... § 520.2220a Sulfadimethoxine oral solution and soluble powder. (a) Approvals. (1) For oral solution... use. The oral solution is administered as a cattle drench or diluted as directed to prepare...

  9. Multiple daily fractionation schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Peschel, R.E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Although conventional fractionation schedules have been satisfactory for the treatment of some tumors, there is reason to believe that the results of radiation therapy could be improved in some cases by appropriate alterations in treatment schedules. The pharmacological characteristics of some of the electron affinic radiation sensitizers have provided added incentive to investigate newer fractionation schemes, particularly ones which deliver the majority of the radiation dose in short periods of time. This editorial discusses three papers describing preliminary clinical studies using multi-daily fractionated (MDF) radiation therapy. Two of these studies also make use of the radiation sensitizer misonidazole. (KRM)

  10. Self-administered treatment for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Curry, Susan J; Ludman, Evette J; McClure, Jennifer

    2003-03-01

    Self-administered treatment for smoking cessation has the potential to reach a broad spectrum of the population of smokers. This article focuses on self-administration of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for smoking cessation. Evidence for the effectiveness of written manuals to self-administer behavioral treatment is mixed. There is no evidence that self-help manuals alone are effective. However, they do increase quit rates when combined with personalized adjuncts such as written feedback and outreach telephone counseling. Efficacy trials of first-line pharmacotherapies (nicotine gum, nicotine patch, and bupropion) result in doubling of cessation rates compared to placebo. It is difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacotherapies when self-administered under real-world conditions. The general consensus is that they improve quit rates, although poor compliance and early discontinuation reduce their effectiveness. Areas for further research include randomized trials of the use of new technologies (e.g., hand-held computers and the Internet) to disseminate self-administered treatments as well as improved surveillance of the use of self-administered treatment in population-based health surveys. PMID:12579547

  11. Toxicity Evaluation of Bisphenol A Administered by Gavage to Sprague Dawley Rats From Gestation Day 6 Through Postnatal Day 90

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, K. Barry; Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M.; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Latendresse, John R.; Olson, Greg R.; Davis, Kelly J.; Patton, Ralph E.; da Costa, Gonçalo Gamboa; Woodling, Kellie A.; Bryant, Matthew S.; Chidambaram, Mani; Trbojevich, Raul; Juliar, Beth E.; Felton, Robert P.; Thorn, Brett T.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume industrial chemical to which there is widespread human oral exposure. Guideline studies used to set regulatory limits detected adverse effects only at doses well above human exposures and established a no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. However, many reported animal studies link BPA to potentially adverse effects on multiple organ systems at doses below the NOAEL. The primary goals of the subchronic study reported here were to identify adverse effects induced by orally (gavage) administered BPA below the NOAEL, to characterize the dose response for such effects and to determine doses for a subsequent chronic study. Sprague Dawley rat dams were dosed daily from gestation day 6 until the start of labor, and their pups were directly dosed from day 1 after birth to termination. The primary focus was on seven equally spaced BPA doses (2.5–2700 μg/kg bw/day). Also included were a naïve control, two doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) to demonstrate the estrogen responsiveness of the animal model, and two high BPA doses (100,000 and 300,000 μg/kg bw/day) expected from guideline studies to produce adverse effects. Clear adverse effects of BPA, including depressed gestational and postnatal body weight gain, effects on the ovary (increased cystic follicles, depleted corpora lutea, and antral follicles), and serum hormones (increased serum estradiol and prolactin and decreased progesterone), were observed only at the two high doses of BPA. BPA-induced effects partially overlapped those induced by EE2, consistent with the known weak estrogenic activity of BPA. PMID:24496637

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  13. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  14. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  15. Oral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Charruf, Laurie Frey

    1984-01-01

    Oral tests for speaking skills evaluate two major skills: linguistic competence, including accuracy of pronunciation, vocabulary, and structure, and communication ease. Four factors affect students' oral performance: verbal intelligence, short-term auditory and visual memory, sound-symbol association skill, and grammatical analysis. Personality…

  16. Oral absorption and bioavailability of flumequine in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Mevius, D J; Breukink, H J; Jansen, T; Guelen, P J; de Grève, B

    1989-10-01

    The oral absorption and bioavailability of flumequine was studied in 1-, 5- and 18-week-old calves following intravenous and oral administration of different formulations of flumequine (Flumix, Flumix C and pure flumequine). Increasing age had a negative influence on the Cmax after the administration of Flumix, based on a larger VD in the older calves. The Cmax decreased from 5.02 +/- 1.46 micrograms/ml in the first week to 3.28 +/- 0.42 micrograms/ml in the 18th week. Adding colistin sulfate to the flumequine formulation and administring pure flumequine mixed with milk replacer had a negative effect on the Cmax of flumequine after oral administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight. The bioavailability of the orally administered flumequine formulations was 100% in all cases except after the administration of Flumix C, for which it was 75.9 +/- 18.2%. The urinary recovery of flumequine after intravenous injection of a 10% solution varied from 35.2 +/- 2.3% for Group B, to 41.2 +/- 6.3% for Group C. The dosage of 5 mg/kg body weight Flumix twice daily in 1-week-old veal calves is sufficient to reach therapeutic plasma concentrations, based on a MIC value of 0.8 micrograms/ml of the target bacteria. In older calves it is advisable to increase the dosage 7.5 or 10 mg/kg body weight every 12 hours. In combination with colistin sulfate it is also advisable to increase the dosage slightly because of the negative effect of the colistin sulfate on the Cmax of flumequine. PMID:2603356

  17. [Daily difficulties associated with full conventional dentures].

    PubMed

    Machado, Flávia Christiane de Azevedo; da Costa, Anna Paula Serêjo; Pontes, Anna Lepríncia Bezerra; Lima, Kenio Costa; Ferreira, Maria Ângela Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    The effectiveness of health services can be evaluated from the quality of life (QOL) standpoint. Thus, this study evaluated rehabilitation services using full conventional dentures (FCD) of Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC) in Rio Grande do Norte (RN) regarding daily difficulties associated with these dentures made between 2007 and 2009. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 138 users of these FCD, collecting data by clinical examination and a questionnaire based on the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index. The Fisher and chi-square tests were used to test the association between the variables. The result was that 42% of users reported difficulties in executing oral activities due to FCDs. These difficulties were more frequent and intense in the activities of eating, speaking and smiling. In general, 58.7% of users did not have functional teeth. In relation to the clinical evaluation of FCDs, 57.2% of upper and 9.2% of lower FCDs were satisfactory. There was an association between difficulty and the absence of functional teeth, but not with inadequate FCDs. Thus, the SDCCs were effective in upper FCD rehabilitation, since the difficulties encountered are within the standard limitations of this type of rehabilitation. On the other hand, the cost-benefit of rehabilitation of lower FCDs must be evaluated. PMID:24061036

  18. Oral cenesthopathy.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Miura, Anna; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cenesthopathy is characterized by abnormal and strange bodily sensations and is classified as a 'delusional disorder, somatic type' or 'somatoform disorder' according to the DSM 5. The oral cavity is one of the frequent sites of cenesthopathy, thus the term 'oral cenesthopathy.' Patients with oral cenesthopathy complain of unusual sensations without corresponding abnormal findings in the oral area, such as excessive mucus secretion, a slimy sensation, or a feeling of coils or wires being present within the oral region. They usually visit multiple dentists rather than psychiatrists. Without a proper diagnosis, they repeatedly pursue unnecessary surgical procedures to remove their 'foreign body'. This sometimes creates a dilemma between the dentists and patients. The nosography of oral cenesthopathy has been discussed in some case reports and reviews but is overlooked in mainstream medicine. This review focuses on the various aspects of oral cenesthopathy. The estimated prevalence of cenesthopathy was 0.2 to 1.9 % in a study done at a Japanese university psychiatry clinic and 27 % in a study done at a Japanese psychosomatic dentistry clinic. Oral cenesthopathy do not have clear disposition, while some studies reported that elderly women were most commonly affected. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. However, recent studies have suggested a right > left asymmetrical pattern of the cerebral blood flow of patients with oral cenesthopathy. Antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy might be effective in some cases, though it is known to be intractable. To date, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, classification and treatment of oral cenesthopathy are unknown due to the few reports on the disorder, though there are a few case reports. To overcome this difficult medical condition, clinico-statistical and case-control studies done under rigorous criteria and with a large sample size are required. PMID

  19. Cannabinoids and metabolites in expectorated oral fluid after 8 days of controlled around-the-clock oral THC administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Kelly, Deana L.; Gorelick, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly accepted matrix for drug testing programs, but questions remain about its usefulness for monitoring cannabinoids. Expectorated OF specimens (n=360) were obtained from 10 adult daily cannabis smokers before, during, and after 37 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) doses over 9 days to characterize cannabinoid disposition in this matrix. Specimens were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography– mass spectrometry with electron-impact ionization for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC, cannabidiol, and cannabinol, and negative chemical ionization for 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC, and cannabidiol were 0.25–50 ng/mL; cannabinol 1–50 ng/mL; and THCCOOH 5–500 pg/mL. THCCOOH was the most prevalent analyte in 344 specimens (96.9%), with concentrations up to 1,390.3 pg/mL. 11-hydroxy-THC, cannabidiol, and cannabinol were detected in 1, 1, and 3 specimens, respectively. THC was detected in only 13.8% of specimens. The highest THC concentrations were obtained at admission (median 1.4 ng/mL, range 0.3–113.6) from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. A total of 2.5 and 3.7% of specimens were THC-positive at the recommended Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2 ng/mL) and Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines (DRUID) (1 ng/mL) confirmation cutoffs, respectively. THC is currently the only analyte for monitoring cannabis exposure in OF; however, these data indicate chronic therapeutic oral THC administration and illicit oral THC use are unlikely to be identified with current guidelines. Measurement of THCCOOH may improve the detection and interpretation of OF cannabinoid tests and minimize the possibility of OF contamination from passive inhalation of cannabis smoke. PMID:21637933

  20. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  1. Changes in Medications Administered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Johnson, Shella; Roman, Jaclyn; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to determine if there have been changes in the type and number of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) medications administered in schools since the introduction of long-acting stimulants. A survey was sent to 1,000 school nurses randomly selected from the National Association…

  2. Teaching Students to Administer the WISC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Yost

    1977-01-01

    A college level psychology course is described in which students were trained by both traditional and experimental methods to administer individual intelligence tests. Comparative analysis of performance by each group indicates that student motivation and performance is not greatly influenced by teaching method and that videotape demonstrations…

  3. Oral Health Behavior and Lifestyle Factors among Overweight and Non-Overweight Young Adults in Europe: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Study.

    PubMed

    Nihtila, Annamari; West, Nicola; Lussi, Adrian; Bouchard, Philippe; Ottolenghi, Livia; Senekola, Egita; Llodra, Juan Carlos; Viennot, Stephane; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Being overweight is a risk factor for many chronic diseases including oral diseases. Our aim was to study the associations between oral health behavior, lifestyle factors and being overweight among young European adults, 2011-2012. The subjects constituted a representative sample of adult population aged 18-35 years from eight European countries participating in the Escarcel study. The participants completed a self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits, oral health behavior, smoking, exercise, height, and weight. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m² using the World Health Organization criteria. Mean BMI was 23.2 (SD 3.48) and 24.3% of the study population were overweight. Those who were overweight drank more soft drinks (p = 0.005) and energy drinks (p = 0.006) compared with those who were non-overweight. Brushing once a day (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-2.0), emergency treatment as the reason for last dental visit (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-1.9) and having seven or more eating or drinking occasions daily (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.7) were statistically significantly associated with overweight. Associations were found between oral health behavior, lifestyle and overweight. A greater awareness of the detrimental lifestyle factors including inadequate oral health habits among overweight young adults is important for all healthcare providers, including oral health care professionals. PMID:27417609

  4. Oral Health Behavior and Lifestyle Factors among Overweight and Non-Overweight Young Adults in Europe: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Nihtila, Annamari; West, Nicola; Lussi, Adrian; Bouchard, Philippe; Ottolenghi, Livia; Senekola, Egita; Llodra, Juan Carlos; Viennot, Stephane; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Being overweight is a risk factor for many chronic diseases including oral diseases. Our aim was to study the associations between oral health behavior, lifestyle factors and being overweight among young European adults, 2011–2012. The subjects constituted a representative sample of adult population aged 18–35 years from eight European countries participating in the Escarcel study. The participants completed a self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits, oral health behavior, smoking, exercise, height, and weight. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 using the World Health Organization criteria. Mean BMI was 23.2 (SD 3.48) and 24.3% of the study population were overweight. Those who were overweight drank more soft drinks (p = 0.005) and energy drinks (p = 0.006) compared with those who were non-overweight. Brushing once a day (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-2.0), emergency treatment as the reason for last dental visit (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3–1.9) and having seven or more eating or drinking occasions daily (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1–1.7) were statistically significantly associated with overweight. Associations were found between oral health behavior, lifestyle and overweight. A greater awareness of the detrimental lifestyle factors including inadequate oral health habits among overweight young adults is important for all healthcare providers, including oral health care professionals. PMID:27417609

  5. Dietary Geraniol by Oral or Enema Administration Strongly Reduces Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Treated Mice.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Luigia; Spisni, Enzo; Cavazza, Elena; Strillacci, Antonio; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Ricci, Chiara; Rizzello, Fernando; Campieri, Massimo; Valerii, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    (Trans)-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH), is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120 mg kg((-1)) body weight, starting 6 days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg((-1)) dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis. PMID:26973525

  6. Dietary Geraniol by Oral or Enema Administration Strongly Reduces Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Luigia; Spisni, Enzo; Cavazza, Elena; Strillacci, Antonio; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Ricci, Chiara; Rizzello, Fernando; Campieri, Massimo; Valerii, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    (Trans)-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH), is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120 mg kg(−1) body weight, starting 6 days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg(−1) dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis. PMID:26973525

  7. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of an orally available enteric-microencapsulated parathyroid hormone (1-34)-deoxycholic acid nanocomplex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seung Rim; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal 34-amino-acid peptide fragment of human parathyroid hormone PTH (1-34), is used clinically to treat osteoporosis; however, it is currently administered by a once-daily subcutaneous injection, resulting in poor patient compliance. We have developed enteric microcapsules containing an ionic nanocomplex between PTH (1-34) and lysine-linked deoxycholic acid (LysDOCA) for the oral delivery of PTH (1-34). We measured the particle size of the PTH/LysDOCA complex and assessed its biological activity by determining the cAMP content in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also assessed its permeability across a Caco-2 cell monolayer and the bioavailability of the intrajejunally administered PTH/LysDOCA complex compared with PTH (1-34) in rats. In addition, the antiosteoporotic activity of the PTH/LysDOCA complex, encapsulated in an enteric carrier by coaxial ultrasonic atomization, was evaluated after it was orally administered to ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The formation of an ionic complex between PTH (1-34) and LysDOCA produced nanoparticles of diameter 33.0±3.36 nm, and the bioactivity of the complex was comparable with that of PTH (1-34). The Caco-2 cell permeability and AUClast value of the PTH/LysDOCA (1:10) nanocomplex increased by 2.87- and 16.3-fold, respectively, compared with PTH (1-34) alone. Furthermore, the OVX rats treated with oral PTH/LysDOCA-loaded enteric microcapsules showed an increase in bone mineral density (159%), bone volume fraction (175%), and trabecular number (174%) compared with those in the OVX control group. Therefore, the PTH/LysDOCA nanocomplex oral delivery system is a promising treatment modality for osteoporosis because it improves osteogenesis and trabecular connectivity. PMID:27621618

  8. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of an orally available enteric-microencapsulated parathyroid hormone (1-34)-deoxycholic acid nanocomplex.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Rim; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal 34-amino-acid peptide fragment of human parathyroid hormone PTH (1-34), is used clinically to treat osteoporosis; however, it is currently administered by a once-daily subcutaneous injection, resulting in poor patient compliance. We have developed enteric microcapsules containing an ionic nanocomplex between PTH (1-34) and lysine-linked deoxycholic acid (LysDOCA) for the oral delivery of PTH (1-34). We measured the particle size of the PTH/LysDOCA complex and assessed its biological activity by determining the cAMP content in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also assessed its permeability across a Caco-2 cell monolayer and the bioavailability of the intrajejunally administered PTH/LysDOCA complex compared with PTH (1-34) in rats. In addition, the antiosteoporotic activity of the PTH/LysDOCA complex, encapsulated in an enteric carrier by coaxial ultrasonic atomization, was evaluated after it was orally administered to ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The formation of an ionic complex between PTH (1-34) and LysDOCA produced nanoparticles of diameter 33.0±3.36 nm, and the bioactivity of the complex was comparable with that of PTH (1-34). The Caco-2 cell permeability and AUClast value of the PTH/LysDOCA (1:10) nanocomplex increased by 2.87- and 16.3-fold, respectively, compared with PTH (1-34) alone. Furthermore, the OVX rats treated with oral PTH/LysDOCA-loaded enteric microcapsules showed an increase in bone mineral density (159%), bone volume fraction (175%), and trabecular number (174%) compared with those in the OVX control group. Therefore, the PTH/LysDOCA nanocomplex oral delivery system is a promising treatment modality for osteoporosis because it improves osteogenesis and trabecular connectivity. PMID:27621618

  9. Retinal toxicity of chloroquine hydrochloride administered by intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, Bruce Ira; Torczynski, Elise; Varro, Zoltan; Grostern, Richard; Perlman, Jay

    2008-10-01

    Chloroquine is quinolone derivative known to exert dose-related retinal toxicity, albeit in a variable manner. It is thought that variability in the presentation of chloroquine retinopathy may be the result of perturbations in drug bioavailability subsequent to oral ingestion. In order to better understand the ramifications of bioavailability on the development of retinal injury subsequent to chloroquine use, this study investigated the relationship between retinal injury and chloroquine administration via intraperitoneal rather than oral administration. Four-week-old C57/6J mice underwent daily intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg kg(-1) chloroquine hydrochloride for a total of 62 days. Following treatment, tissue was fixed in preparation for analysis by light and transmission electron microscopy. Treated animals demonstrated marked abnormality of the outer retinal layers described as complete loss of the outer plexiform layer as well as photoreceptors and photoreceptor nuclei. The retinal pigmented epithelium demonstrated focal atrophy, loss of nuclei and pigment irregularity. Findings in the inner retina were notable for the loss of Müller cells and the presence of membranous cytoplasmic bodies. Retinae of control animals were entirely normal. In contrast to previous studies in the murine model examining chloroquine retinopathy subsequent to oral administration, this study suggests that intraperitoneal chloroquine administration facilitates retinal toxicity, presumably due to heightened drug absorption and bioavailability. It is posited that an increased rate of drug accumulation within the retina leads to an enhanced lysosomotrophic drug effect due to inability of the lysosome to compensate for chloroquine-induced elevation in pH through re-acidification of the intra-lysosomal content. PMID:18484088

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents ... developmental disabilities and offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam ...

  11. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  12. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... its box has the American Dental Association's (ADA) seal of acceptance, it is good for your oral ... dispensed solutions have the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Other over-the-counter whitening products include whitening ...

  13. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  14. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  15. Methylprednisolone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  16. Dexamethasone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  17. Hydrocortisone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  18. RTOG 0913: A Phase 1 Study of Daily Everolimus (RAD001) in Combination With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Won, Minhee; Wen, Patrick Y.; Wendland, Merideth; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) administered daily with concurrent radiation and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. Methods and Materials: Everolimus was administered daily with concurrent radiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions) and temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2} per day). Everolimus was escalated from 2.5 mg/d (dose level 1) to 5 mg/d (dose level 2) to 10 mg/d (dose level 3). Adjuvant temozolomide was delivered at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 to 5, every 28 days, for up to 12 cycles, with concurrent everolimus at the previously established daily dose of 10 mg/d. Dose escalation continued if a dose level produced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) in fewer than 3 of the first 6 evaluable patients. Results: Between October 28, 2010, and July 2, 2012, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0913 protocol initially registered a total of 35 patients, with 25 patients successfully meeting enrollment criteria receiving the drug and evaluable for toxicity. Everolimus was successfully escalated to the predetermined maximum tolerated dose of 10 mg/d. Two of the first 6 eligible patients had a DLT at each dose level. DLTs included gait disturbance, febrile neutropenia, rash, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, hypoxia, ear pain, headache, and mucositis. Other common toxicities were grade 1 or 2 hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. At the time of analysis, there was 1 death reported, which was attributed to tumor progression. Conclusions: Daily oral everolimus (10 mg) combined with both concurrent radiation and temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide is well tolerated, with an acceptable toxicity profile. A randomized phase 2 clinical trial with mandatory correlative biomarker analysis is currently under way, designed to both determine the efficacy of this regimen and identify molecular determinants of response.

  19. Aqueous Stability and Oral Pharmacokinetics of Meloxicam and Carprofen in Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ingrao, Joelle C; Johnson, Ron; Tor, Elizabeth; Gu, Yu; Litman, Marcus; Turner, Patricia V

    2013-01-01

    We found that carprofen and meloxicam under 3 environmental conditions (ambient dark, ambient light, and 4 °C) remained stable for at least 7 d. We then evaluated the oral pharmacokinetics of meloxicam (20 mg/kg) and carprofen (10 mg/kg) in male C57BL/6 mice after oral gavage or administration in the drinking water. Mice did not drink meloxicam-medicated water but readily consumed carprofen-medicated water, consuming an average of 14.19 mL carprofen-medicated water per 100 g body weight daily; mice drank more during the dark phase than during the light phase. Plasma analyzed by HPLC (meloxicam) and tandem mass spectrometry (carprofen) revealed that the peak meloxicam and carprofen concentrations were 16.7 and 20.3 μg/mL and occurred at 4 and 2 h after oral gavage, respectively. Similar blood levels were achieved after 12 h access to the carprofen-medicated water bottle. At 24 h after oral gavage, the drugs were not detectable in plasma. Meloxicam plasma AUC, elimination half-life, apparent volume of distribution, and apparent oral clearance were 160.4 mg/L × h, 7.4 h, 0.36 L/kg, and 0.125 mL/h × kg, respectively. Carprofen plasma AUC, elimination half-life, apparent volume of distribution, and apparent oral clearance were 160.8 mg/L × h, 7.4 h, 0.42 L/kg, and 0.062 mL/h × kg, respectively. No gross or microscopic evidence of toxicity was seen in any mouse. Our findings indicate that carprofen can be administered in drinking water to mice and that medicated water bottles should be placed 12 to 24 h prior to painful procedures. PMID:24041210

  20. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside 1000 versus oral iron in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease patients with anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Philip A.; Bhandari, Sunil; Saxena, Sanjiv; Agarwal, Dhananjai; Wirtz, Georg; Kletzmayr, Josef; Thomsen, Lars L.; Coyne, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anaemia is common in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) and is often treated with oral or intravenous (IV) iron therapy. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of IV iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer®) and oral iron in NDD-CKD patients with renal-related anaemia. Methods The trial was a Phase III open-label, comparative, multicentre, non-inferiority trial conducted in 351 iron-deficient NDD-CKD patients, randomized 2:1 to either iron isomaltoside 1000 (Group A) or iron sulphate administered as 100 mg elemental oral iron twice daily (200 mg daily) for 8 weeks (Group B). The patients in Group A were randomized into A1 (infusion of max. 1000 mg single doses over 15 min) and A2 (bolus injections of 500 mg over 2 min). A modified Ganzoni formula was used to calculate IV iron need. The primary end point was change in haemoglobin concentrations from baseline to Week 4. Results Iron isomaltoside 1000 was both non-inferior to oral iron at Week 4 (P < 0.001) and sustained a superior increase in haemoglobin from Week 3 until the end of the study at Week 8 (P = 0.009 at Week 3). The haemoglobin response was more pronounced with iron isomaltoside 1000 doses ≥1000 mg (P < 0.05). Serum-ferritin and transferrin saturation concentrations were also significantly increased with IV iron. Adverse drug reactions were observed in 10.5% in the iron isomaltoside 1000 group and 10.3% in the oral iron group. More patients treated with oral iron sulphate withdrew from the study due to adverse events (4.3 versus 0.9%, P = 0.2). Conclusions Iron isomaltoside 1000 was more efficacious than oral iron for increase in haemoglobin and proved to be well tolerated at the tested dose levels in NDD-CKD patients. PMID:26250435

  1. Administering social security: challenges yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, the Social Security Administration (SSA) celebrates the 75th anniversary of the passage of the Social Security Act. In those 75 years, SSA has been responsible for programs providing unemployment insurance, child welfare, and supervision of credit unions, among other duties. This article focuses on the administration of the Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program, although it also covers some of the other major programs SSA has been tasked with administering over the years-in particular, Medicare, Black Lung benefits, and Supplemental Security Income. The article depicts some of the challenges that have accompanied administering these programs and the steps that SSA has taken to meet those challenges. Whether implementing complex legislation in short timeframes or coping with natural disasters, SSA has found innovative ways to overcome problems and has evolved to meet society's changing needs. PMID:20737858

  2. Concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl in healthy volunteers: assessment of pharmacokinetic changes and safety following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Christa F; Kumar, Dinesh; Perdomo, Carlos A; Wason, Suman; Cullen, Edward I; Pratt, Raymond D

    2004-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl when administered separately and in combination. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study. In consecutive dosing periods separated by washout periods of ≥3 weeks, healthy volunteers received either oral donepezil HCI 5 mg once daily for 15 days, oral sertraline HCl 50 mg once daily for 5 days followed by 10 days of once-daily sertraline HCl 100 mg, or the simultaneous administration of oral donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl. Plasma donepezil and sertraline concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Safety was evaluated by physical and laboratory evaluations and the monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 19 volunteers (16 male and three female) were enrolled. Three male subjects withdrew from the study prematurely due to AEs (one case of nausea/stomach cramps and one case of eosinophilia during combination treatment, and one upper respiratory tract infection during treatment with sertraline HCl alone). In subjects who completed all three treatment periods (n = 16), the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl did not alter the steady-state (day 15) PK parameters of donepezil HCl. A small (<12%) but statistically significant (P = 0.02) increase in donepezil Cmax was seen after single doses of sertraline HCl and donepezil HCl on day 1 but this was not thought to be clinically meaningful. No significant differences in the tmax or AUC0–24 h of donepezil were observed between the donepezil HCl only or donepezil HCl plus sertraline HCl groups on day 1. No significant changes in sertraline PK parameters were observed either on day 1 (single dose) or on day 15 (steady state) when sertraline HCl was co-administered with donepezil HCl. Generally, the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl was well tolerated, with no serious AEs reported

  3. Comparative pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous ifosfamide/mesna/methylene blue therapy.

    PubMed

    Aeschlimann, C; Küpfer, A; Schefer, H; Cerny, T

    1998-09-01

    Oral treatment with ifosfamide results in dose-limiting encephalopathy. Methylene blue is effective in reversal and prophylaxis of this side effect. In the present study, the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide after iv and po therapy in combination with prophylactic administration of methylene blue were investigated. Nine patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer were treated by a combination of ifosfamide (3 days), sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (4 days), and etoposide (8 days). Cycles were repeated every 28 days. Ifosfamide was administered orally, with the exception of one of the first two cycles, when it was administered as a short infusion (randomly assigned). The patients received methylene blue in doses of 50 mg po 3 times daily; an initial dose of 50 mg was given the evening before chemotherapy. Urine samples were collected over the entire treatment period, and concentrations of ifosfamide and its major metabolite, 2-chloroethylamine, were measured by gas liquid chromatography. By the same technique, 2- and 3-dechloroethylifosfamide were determined in plasma and urine. Overall alkylating activity in urine was assayed by reaction of the alkylating metabolites with 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)-pyridine. The chemotherapeutic regimen was well-tolerated by all of the patients studied. There was no evidence of a shift in the metabolic pattern dependent on the route of administration. From the data, we conclude that methylene blue has a neuroprotective effect and that the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide are not influenced by its comedication. PMID:9733667

  4. The Revised Observed Tasks of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Manfred; Marsiske, Michael; Horgas, Ann L.; Rosenberg, Adrienne; Saczynski, Jane S.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2007-01-01

    The Revised Observed Tasks of Daily Living (OTDL-R), a performance-based test of everyday problem solving, was administered to a sample of community-dwelling older adults. The OTDL-R included nine tasks, representing medication use, telephone use, and financial management. The OTDL-R had a desirable range of difficulty and satisfactory internal consistency and showed a relatively invariant pattern of relations between measured tasks and the underlying latent dimensions they represent across White and non-White subsamples. The OTDL-R also correlated significantly with age, education, self-rated health, a paper-and-pencil measure of everyday problem solving, and measures of basic cognitive functioning. Thus, the OTDL-R is a reliable and valid objective measure of everyday problem solving that has great practical utility for assessing performance in diverse populations. PMID:18160968

  5. A novel male contraceptive pill-patch combination: oral desogestrel and transdermal testosterone in the suppression of spermatogenesis in normal men.

    PubMed

    Hair, W M; Kitteridge, K; O'Connor, D B; Wu, F C

    2001-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of transdermal T and oral desogestrel on the reproductive axis of healthy men. Twenty-three men were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups and received a daily transdermal T patch plus oral desogestrel at a dose of 75, 150, or 300 microg/d for 24 wk. Baseline blood and semen samples were obtained and then every 4 wk thereafter for 32 wk. The outcome measures were sperm density and plasma levels of FSH, LH, total and free T. The results show a dose-dependent suppression of spermatogenesis and gonadotropins. Seven of the 17 subjects became azoospermic. Desogestrel (300 microg daily) in combination with 5 mg daily transdermal T was the most effective (57% azoospermic), whereas a dose of 75 microg was ineffective (0% azoospermic). Total and free plasma T were reduced by approximately 30%. High density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly reduced. No serious side-effects were encountered. We conclude that daily self-administered desogestrel with transdermal T is capable of suppressing the male reproductive axis, although the efficacy was less marked and less consistent than injectable regimens. The lower efficacy is likely to be due to failure of the transdermal T system to maintain circulating T levels consistently in the required range. PMID:11701677

  6. Does the presence of oral care guidelines affect oral care delivery by intensive care unit nurses? A survey of Saudi intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ahmed K; Alshayiqi, Mohammed; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients rely on nurses for their oral care needs, signifying the importance of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral care guidelines on the oral care delivered to mechanically ventilated patients by ICU nurses. A total of 215 nurses were enrolled. Demographic data and oral care practices were recorded through a self-administered survey. Participants governed by oral care guidelines had significantly higher oral care practice scores than their counterparts from ICUs without similar guidelines (P = .034; t = 2.13). Oral care guidelines in ICUs can contribute to reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:25087146

  7. Quantification of Daily Physical Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Breit, Greg; Quintana, Jason

    1994-01-01

    The influence of physical activity on the maintenance and adaptation of musculoskeletal tissue is difficult to assess. Cumulative musculoskeletal loading is hard to quantify and the attributes of the daily tissue loading history affecting bone metabolism have not been completely identified. By monitoring the vertical component of the daily ground reaction force (GRFz), we have an indirect measure of cumulative daily lower limb musculoskeletal loading to correlate with bone density and structure. The objective of this research is to develop instrumentation and methods of analysis to quantify activity level in terms of the daily history of ground reaction forces.

  8. [The acceptability of different oral contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Fritzsche, H; Hempel, E; Carol, W; Böhme, W; Scholz, B; Grass, M; Chemnitius, K H

    1975-05-01

    Results of a survey of contraceptive acceptability are reported. In formation on oral and depot hormonal contraceptives was distributed to 1064 Ovosiston or Nonovlon users, 110 women using depot contraceptives, and 609 women who had never used hormonal contraception. The women's preferences with regard to administration schedule, and their perceptions of effectiveness and safety were noted. Non-users considered daily, weekly, or monthly administration acceptable, while only 2/3 of those taking oral contraceptives thought daily administration convenient. 90.2% of Deposiston patients did not care for daily administration. Deposiston patients also had the greatest confidence in their method. The authors believe on the basis of this survey that weekly administration may be highly acceptable alternative t o conventional oral contraception. PMID:1140078

  9. Human and Automated Assessment of Oral Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolaños, Daniel; Cole, Ron A.; Ward, Wayne H.; Tindal, Gerald A.; Hasbrouck, Jan; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive approach to fully automated assessment of children's oral reading fluency (ORF), one of the most informative and frequently administered measures of children's reading ability. Speech recognition and machine learning techniques are described that model the 3 components of oral reading fluency: word accuracy,…

  10. Influence of Media in the Choice of Oral Hygiene Products Used Among the Population of Maduravoyal, Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Logaranjani, Anitha; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Narayan, Rajeshree Rangari; Rajendran, Sathish; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims To assess the factors influencing the awareness and practice of oral hygiene among the local population Maduravoyal, Chennai, India. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted to understand the factors influencing the choice and practice of oral hygiene products among the population of Maduravoyal, Chennai, India. Data was collected by means of a self administered structured questionnaire written in English and validated through a pilot survey. One thousand two hundred and nine subjects, with an age range of 15 to 70 years, who visited the Department of Periodontology, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai were selected for investigation. The data obtained was analyzed using the SPSS version 13.0. The frequency of distribution and percentages were calculated. Results The results of the study showed that tooth brush (98.5%) and toothpaste (98%) were the main products used for the maintenance of oral hygiene and around 84.6% of the population brushed once daily. Information from the media (59.4%) and decay prevention (49.7%) were the major factors that influenced the choice of toothpaste among the study population. Conclusion The major factor which influenced the choice of oral hygiene products was based on information obtained from advertisements and other sources. There is a need for the dental professionals to be aware of the ever-increasing development and marketing of oral hygiene products from various databases. Hence, the education of people regarding the importance of oral hygiene maintenance, proper selection of oral hygiene products is essential. PMID:26557606

  11. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous administration of GSK1322322, a peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Jones, Lori S; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Dumont, Etienne

    2013-11-01

    GSK1322322 is the first in a new class of antibiotics that targets peptide deformylase (PDF), an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, eight-cohort phase I trial enrolled 62 healthy volunteers to assess safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles of GSK1322322. GSK1322322 was administered as a single oral or intravenous (IV) dose, escalating from 500 to 3,000 mg or repeat IV doses escalating from 500 to 1,500 mg twice daily. Upon repeat IV administration, GSK1322322 exhibits linear pharmacokinetics over time upon repeat doses as shown by time-invariant pharmacokinetics. A dose-proportional increase in area under concentration-time curve was observed after single or repeat IV dosing, whereas clearance at steady state remained generally unchanged across doses. There was minimal accumulation of GSK1322322 after repeat IV twice-daily administration. After oral tablet doses of GSK1322322 1,000 and 1,500 mg, absolute bioavailability was 69% and 56%, respectively. GSK1322322 administration at single and repeat IV doses and at supratherapeutic single IV doses of 2,000 and 3,000 mg was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability demonstrated in this study, GSK1322322 has the potential to become the first-in-class PDF inhibitor for clinical use. PMID:23907665

  12. 21 CFR 520.2380b - Thiabendazole drench or oral paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., administered as a drench or by stomach tube; or as an oral paste. (i) Amount. 2 grams per 100 pounds of body... in horses to be slaughtered for food purposes. When administered by stomach tube, for use only by or... administered by stomach tube, use only by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. When for use as a...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2380b - Thiabendazole drench or oral paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., administered as a drench or by stomach tube; or as an oral paste. (i) Amount. 2 grams per 100 pounds of body... in horses to be slaughtered for food purposes. When administered by stomach tube, for use only by or... administered by stomach tube, use only by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. When for use as a...

  14. Oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. PMID:27343964

  15. Warmer daily temperatures since 1951

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Days and nights have indeed become warmer over the past 60 years, a new study finds. Although several observation-based studies have shown that daily average temperatures as well as daily maximum and minimum temperatures have increased over the past few decades, controversy has remained as to how the observed trends in extreme and average temperatures are related to each other: Are the warming trends in extreme temperatures a result of a shifting mean climate, or have temperatures become more variable? Using a global observational data set of daily temperatures, Donat and Alexander compared the probability distributions of daily maximum and minimum temperatures over two 30-year periods, 1951-1980 and 1981-2010. The authors show that the maximum and minimum daily temperatures all over the globe have significantly shifted toward higher values during the latter period. They further show that the distributions have become skewed toward the hotter part of the distribution; changes are greater for daily minimum (nighttime) temperatures than for the daily maximum (daytime) temperatures. The authors conclude that the distribution of global daily temperatures has indeed become “more extreme” compared to the middle of the twentieth century. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2012GL052459, 2012)

  16. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs. PMID:25994486

  17. [Cardiac effects and glycoside concentrations in serum and urine after oral administration of beta-methy-digoxin to healthy individuals (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Haasis, R; Larbig, D; Klenk, K O

    1975-06-01

    Six healthy individuals were digitalized orally with beta-methyl-digoxin. The serum glycoside concentration, determined radioimmunologically at the end of the digitalization period was 1.2 +/- 0.22 ng/ml. At this period of time renal excretion attained 55.9% of the daily administered oral dose. The calculated renal clearance of beta-methyl-digoxin was 63 +/- 8.1 ml/min e. g. 57.5 +/- 8.3 ml/min/1.73 m2. After discontinuation of the glycoside the serum half life was 54 h. During the digitalization period the cardiac glycoside effects could be measured by ECG changes, especially a shortening of the QT interval as well as a shortening of the left ventricular ejection time and the pre ejection period, corrected for the heart rate. PMID:1152344

  18. Ocular toxicity from systemically administered xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The eye is considered as the most privileged organ because of the blood–ocular barrier that acts as a barrier to systemically administered xenobiotics. However, there has been a significant increase in the number of reports on systemic drug-induced ocular complications. If such complications are left untreated, then it may cause permanent damage to vision. Hence, knowledge of most recent updates on ever-increasing reports of such toxicities has become imperative to develop better therapy while minimizing toxicities. Areas covered The article is mainly divided into anterior and posterior segment manifestations caused by systemically administered drugs. The anterior segment is further elaborated on corneal complications where as the posterior segment is focused on optic nerve, retinal and vitreous complications. Furthermore, this article includes recent updates on acute and chronic ocular predicaments, in addition to discussing various associated symptoms caused by drugs. Expert opinion Direct correlation of ocular toxicities due to systemic drug therapy is evident from current literature. Therefore, it is necessary to have detailed documentation of these complications to improve understanding and predict toxicities. We made an attempt to ensure that the reader is aware of the characteristic ocular complications, the potential for irreversible drug toxicity and indications for cessation. PMID:22803583

  19. Multiple-dose study of oral pyridostigmine in swine. Interim report, January 1986-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C.E.; Waring, P.P.; Trail, D.S.; Williams, B.F.; Bonner, G.D.

    1987-03-01

    The hemodynamic, metabolic, and hormonal responses to pyridostigmine treatment were evaluated in immature swine(20.7 + or - 0.5 kg). Pyridostigmine bromide was administered orally three times per day at 60 mg per dose. Animals receiving treatment (n=12) were compared to a group with no treatment (n=14). After three days of treatment, plasma and erythrocyte cholinesterase activities were reduced by 31% and 47%, respectively. Blood gases, heart rate, and blood pressure were not different. Pyridostigmine tended to increase blood glucose levels and elevated hematocrits 26 to 29%. Treatment with 60 mg of pyridostigmine three times daily for three days reduced acetylcholinesterase activity as desired in man for prophylactic treatment against possible exposure to nerve agents. In swine this degree of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity was associated with an index of stress, a slight increase in hematocrit. Swine appear to offer an effective animal model in which to evaluate pyridostigmine treatment.

  20. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  1. Oral Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on other parts of the mouth. Credit: NIDCR publication: Mouth Problems + HIV Download: Low-Resolution Image High- ...

  2. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  3. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  4. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  5. Oral insulin delivery: how far are we?

    PubMed

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The mainbarriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  6. The pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin in the horse following oral and intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Papich, M G; Weingarten, A

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and physicochemical characteristics of orbifloxacin in the horse. Six healthy adult horses were administered oral and intravenous orbifloxacin at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Plasma protein binding and lipophilicity were determined in vitro. Following i.v. administration, orbifloxacin had a terminal half-life (t1/2) of 5.08 h and a volume of distribution (V(d(SS))) of 1.58 L/kg. Following oral administration, the average maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) was 1.25 microg/mL with a t1/2 of 3.42 h. Systemic bioavailability was 68.35%. Plasma protein binding was 20.64%. The octanol:water partition coefficient (pH 7.4) was 0.2 +/- 0.11. No adverse reactions were noted during this study. Dosage regimens were determined from the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameters established for fluoroquinolone antibiotics. For susceptible bacteria, an oral dose of approximately 5 mg/kg once daily will produce plasma concentrations within the suggested range. This dose is suggested for further studies on the clinical efficacy of orbifloxacin for treatment of susceptible bacterial infections in the horse. PMID:16669863

  7. Ronidazole pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral immediate-release capsule administration in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Dana N; Papich, Mark G; Gookin, Jody L; Davidson, Gigi S; Davis, Jennifer L; Hayes, Rebecca B

    2011-04-01

    Ronidazole (RDZ) is an effective treatment for feline Tritrichomonas foetus infection, but has produced neurotoxicity in some cats. An understanding of the disposition of RDZ in cats is needed in order to make precise dosing recommendations. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenous (IV) RDZ and immediate-release RDZ capsules were evaluated. A single dose of IV RDZ (mean 9.2mg/kg) and a 95mg immediate-release RDZ capsule (mean 28.2mg/kg) were administered to six healthy cats in a randomized crossover design. Plasma samples were collected for 48 h and assayed for RDZ using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Systemic absorption of oral RDZ was rapid and complete, with detection in the plasma of all cats by 10 min after dosing and a bioavailability of 99.64 (±16.54)%. The clearance of RDZ following IV administration was 0.82 (±0.07) ml/kg/min. The terminal half-life was 9.80 (±0.35) and 10.50 (±0.82) h after IV and oral administration, respectively, with drug detectable in all cats 48h after both administrations. The high oral bioavailability of RDZ and slow elimination may predispose cats to neurotoxicity with twice-daily administration. Less frequent administration should be considered for further study of effective treatment of T foetus-infected cats. PMID:21239199

  8. Effect of oral administration of carprofen on intraocular pressure in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J M; Overton, T L; Rankin, A J; Roush, J K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral administration of carprofen on intraocular pressure in normal dogs. Twelve young adult beagle dogs were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 6) or control (n = 6) groups. After an 11-day acclimation period, the treatment group received approximately 2.2 mg/kg carprofen per os every 12 h for 7 days, and the control group received a placebo gel capsule containing no drug per os every 12 h for 7 days. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured by a rebound tonometer at three time points per day (8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm) during the acclimation (days 1-11) and treatment (days 12-18) phases and for 48 h (days 19-20) after the completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant change in IOP for either eye in the dogs receiving oral carprofen during the treatment phase (days 12-18). After day 4, no significant daily IOP changes were seen in control group dogs. Carprofen administered orally every 12 h for 7 days had no effect on IOP in normal beagle dogs. An acclimation period to frequent IOP measurements of at least 5 days is necessary to establish baseline IOP values and minimize possible anxiety-related effects on IOP measurements. PMID:26923773

  9. Withdrawal times of oxytetracycline and tylosin in eggs of laying hens after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Rubén; Cornejo, Javiera; Maddaleno, Aldo; Araya-Jordán, Carolina; Iragüen, Daniela; Pizarro, Nicolás; San Martín, Betty

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobials administered to laying hens may be distributed into egg white or yolk, indicating the importance of evaluating withdrawal times (WDTs) of the pharmaceutical formulations. In the present study, oxytetracycline and tylosin's WDTs were estimated. The concentration and depletion of these molecules in eggs were linked to their pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties. Twenty-seven Leghorn hens were used: 12 treated with oxytetracycline, 12 treated with tylosin, and 3 remained as an untreated control group. After completion of therapies, eggs were collected daily and drug concentrations in egg white and yolk were assessed. The yolk was used as the target tissue to evaluate the WDT; the results were 9 and 3 days for oxytetracycline and tylosin, respectively. In particular, oxytetracycline has a good oral bioavailability, a moderate apparent volume of distribution, a molecular weight of 460 g/mol, and is lightly liposoluble. Tylosin, a hydrosoluble compound, with a molecular weight of 916 g/mol, has a low oral bioavailability and a low apparent volume of distribution, too. Present results suggest that the WDTs of the studied antimicrobials are strongly influenced by their oral bioavailability, the distribution, and the molecular weight and solubility, and that these properties also influence the distribution between the egg yolk and white. PMID:24853528

  10. Statistical Profiling of Academic Oral English Proficiency Based on an ITA Screening Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Ick Kyu

    2013-01-01

    At the University of California, Los Angeles, the Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP), an internally developed oral proficiency test, is administered to international teaching assistant (ITA) candidates to ensure an appropriate level of academic oral English proficiency. Test taker performances are rated live by two raters according to four subscales.…

  11. Behavioral effects of prenatally administered smokeless tobacco on rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Paulson, R B; Shanfeld, J; Vorhees, C V; Sweazy, A; Gagni, S; Smith, A R; Paulson, J O

    1993-01-01

    Two dosages of Smokeless Tobacco (ST) extract were given to gravid Sprague-Dawley rats by oral gavage on gestational days (GD) 6-20. The low dosage contained ST extract equivalent to 1.33 mg/kg nicotine (STD-1), and the high dosage contained ST extract equivalent to 4.0 mg/kg nicotine (STD-2). Dams were dosed three times daily at 8 a.m., 11 a.m., and 2 p.m., thus providing total daily nicotine equivalent dosages of 4 mg/kg/day and 12 mg/kg/day. Controls received equivalent amounts of distilled water by gavage. Dams were allowed to deliver and all experimental pups were fostered to control mothers. On postnatal day 1 (PND 1) litters were culled to 4 +/- 1 females and 4 +/- 1 males. Weights, physical landmark development, and behavioral performance of pups were monitored during pre- and post-weaning periods. Behavioral tests included: surface righting, negative geotaxis, swimming development, open-field activity, active avoidance in shuttle box, and Cincinnati swimming maze. Our results show that the STD-2 dose resulted in reduced maternal weight gain. Offspring weights were reduced in a dose-related manner, with the most consistent weight deficits seen in the STD-2 group until PND29. Consistent STD-1 weight deficits were seen up to PND 8. The incidence of deaths was increased in the STD-2 dosage group. No significant treatment-related differences were observed in development of physical landmarks. Male STD-2 pups righted faster than controls, and significant differences were noted in swimming development with the STD-1 group of pups performing less effectively than controls. Activity levels, assessed during both pre- and post-weaning periods were not affected. No treatment-related differences were seen in the active avoidance shuttle box or Cincinnati swimming maze tests, which assessed learning. Female brain weights were reduced in the STD-1 treatment group. PMID:8336679

  12. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold H. Epstein, ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  13. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  14. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center

    PubMed Central

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to “wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity” before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of “gum disease”. Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers’ response in relation to their specific job. Conclusion: The special health care workers in the disabled children’s center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices. PMID:25878636

  15. Evaluation of a suspicious oral mucosal lesion.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Michele; Poh, Catherine F; Hovan, Allan J; Ng, Samson; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Dentists who encounter a change in the oral mucosa of a patient must decide whether the abnormality requires further investigation. In this paper, we describe a systematic approach to the assessment of oral mucosal conditions that are thought likely to be premalignant or an early cancer. These steps, which include a comprehensive history, step-by-step clinical examination (including use of adjunctive visual tools), diagnostic testing and formulation of diagnosis, are routinely used in clinics affiliated with the British Columbia Oral Cancer Prevention Program (BC OCPP) and are recommended for consideration by dentists for use in daily practice. PMID:18387268

  16. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  17. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-01-01

    The reported investigation provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. L-histidine (His) was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol GSH and Cys chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of a chelator. The intravenous GSH or Cys were most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. Oral administration of ReadiSorb reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted.

  18. Aminothiol receptors for decorporation of intravenously administered (60)Co in the rat.

    PubMed

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Morris, James E; Creim, Jeffrey A; Woodstock, Angela D; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L; Thrall, Karla D

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic (60)Co to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. Aminoacid L-histidine (His) containing no thiol functionality was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol (GSH, Cys) chelators with that of the aminoimidazole (His) chelator. In these studies, (60)Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24-h intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for (60)Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on the systemic availability of the chelator. The intravenous route of administration of GSH or Cys was most effective in reducing tissue (60)Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. The oral administration of liposomal GSH reduced (60)Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted. PMID:19959951

  19. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. Aminoacid L-histidine (His) containing no thiol functionality was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol (GSH, Cys) chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. In these studies, 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of the chelator. The intravenous route of administration of GSH or Cys was most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. The oral administration of liposomal GSH reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted. PMID:19959951

  20. The patient with daily headaches.

    PubMed

    Maizels, Morris

    2004-12-15

    The term "chronic daily headache" (CDH) describes a variety of headache types, of which chronic migraine is the most common. Daily headaches often are disabling and may be challenging to diagnose and treat. Medication overuse, or drug rebound headache, is the most treatable cause of refractory daily headache. A pathologic underlying cause should be considered in patients with recent-onset daily headache, a change from a previous headache pattern, or associated neurologic or systemic symptoms. Treatment of CDH focuses on reduction of headache triggers and use of preventive medication, most commonly anti-depressants, antiepileptic drugs, and beta blockers. Medication overuse must be treated with discontinuation of symptomatic medicines, a transitional therapy, and long-term prophylaxis. Anxiety and depression are common in patients with CDH and should be identified and treated. Although the condition is challenging, appropriate treatment of patients with CDH can bring about significant improvement in the patient's quality-of-life. PMID:15617293

  1. Publishing Daily on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George

    1997-01-01

    Relates how a 16,000 circulation daily newspaper publishes on the Web. Discusses lessons learned about audience, content, design, interactivity, and making money. Muses about the effect new media will have on print. (PA)

  2. MyPlate Daily Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... what and how much to eat within your calorie allowance. Your food plan is personalized, based on ... Daily Checklists are available below. Cross reference the calorie level and the age group in the table ...

  3. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  4. Efficacy of two low-dose oral tylosin regimens in controlling the relapse of diarrhea in dogs with tylosin-responsive diarrhea: a prospective, single-blinded, two-arm parallel, clinical field trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its wide acceptance as a treatment for canine chronic enteropathies, the macrolide antibiotic tylosin lacks official oral dosage recommendations. Not even textbooks share consensus about the dose; daily recommendations vary from 25 to 80 mg/kg and dosing intervals from one to three times daily. The objective of this prospective, single-blinded, two-arm parallel, clinical field trial was to determine whether doses of 5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg tylosin administered orally once daily for seven days would have a similar effect on fecal consistency in diarrhea relapses to that of a 25 mg/kg dose of tylosin administered once daily for seven days, a dosage that has proved effective in controlling canine tylosin-responsive diarrhea (TRD). A further objective was to compare the efficacy of the 5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg tylosin dosages. Fifteen client-owned dogs diagnosed with TRD that had responded to a dose of 25 mg/kg tylosin once daily for seven days were enrolled in the study. After a relapse of diarrhea the dogs were allocated into two groups receiving tylosin orally in doses of either 5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg once daily for seven days. The owners were blinded to the dosage. The elimination of diarrhea was the main criterion in assessing treatment success. The mean fecal consistency score of the last three treatment days for all dosages, including 25 mg/kg, as evaluated by the owners according to a standardized fecal scoring system, served as the primary outcome measures. Results All eight dogs responded to the 5 mg/kg dose, and six of seven dogs responded to the 15 mg/kg dose. The mean fecal consistency scores at the 25 mg/kg tylosin dosage were no significantly different from scores at the 5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg tylosin dosages (P = 0.672, P = 0.345). Conclusions Interestingly, 14/15 (93%) of the dogs responding to a dose of 25 mg/kg tylosin once daily for seven days also responded to the lower dosages at diarrhea relapse. The data indicate

  5. Estimating time of last oral ingestion of cannabis from plasma THC and THCCOOH concentrations.

    PubMed

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Elsohly, Mahmoud; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Barnes, Allan; Gustafson, Richard A; Smith, Michael L

    2006-08-01

    Estimating the time of last cannabis use is important in assessing possible impairment of drivers involved in accidents, in verifying accuracy of court testimony and in the future, helpful in therapeutic monitoring of cannabis agonists. In 1992, Huestis et al developed model 1, based on plasma Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations, and model 2, on plasma 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol/THC ratios, that predicted 95% confidence intervals for time of last cannabis use. These models seemed to be valuable when applied to the small amount of data from published studies of oral ingestion, a route of administration more popular with the advent of cannabis therapies. A study was designed to further validate the models after oral ingestion of THC, and to determine whether they could predict last usage after multiple oral doses. Eighteen subjects in IRB-approved studies participated after providing informed consent. Each of 12 subjects in one group received a single 10 mg oral dose of dronabinol (synthetic THC). In another protocol, 6 subjects received 4 different oral daily doses, divided into thirds and administered with meals for 5 consecutive days. There was a 10-day washout period between each dosing regimen. Daily doses were 0.39, 0.47, and 14.8 mg THC in hemp oil and 7.5 mg dronabinol. Blood specimens were collected throughout the study and analyzed for plasma THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with limits of quantification (LOQs) of 0.5 and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. Actual times between ingestion of THC and blood collection spanned 0.5 to 16 hours. All plasma specimens with analyte concentrations >LOQ (n=90) were evaluated. Models 1 and 2 correctly predicted time of last THC ingestion for 74.4% and 90.0% of plasma specimens, respectively. 96.7% of predicted times were correct with one overestimate and 2 underestimates using the time interval defined by the lowest and highest 95

  6. Acute and sub-chronic (28 days) oral toxicity evaluation of tincture Baccharis trimera (Less) Backer in male and female rodent animals.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Andreia R H; Reginato, Fernanda Z; Guex, Camille G; Figueredo, Kássia C; da C Araldi, Isabel C; de Freitas, Robson B; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Mazzanti, Cinthia Melazzo de Andrade; Hübscher, Gilberti H; de F Bauermann, Liliane

    2016-02-01

    The infusion of Baccharis trimera (Less) DC, popularly known as "carqueja" (broom), is popularly used in the treatment of hepatic and digestive problems. In this study, we evaluated the acute and sub-chronic oral toxicities of B. trimera tincture on male and female Wistar rats according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, guidelines 423 e 407, respectively). The B. trimera tincture was administered by oral gavage in a single dose (2000 mg/kg) in doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg daily for 28 days. Blood was collected to analyze hematological and biochemical parameters. Kidneys and liver were homogenized to determine lipid peroxidation and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities. In acute treatment, tincture did not induce any signs of toxicity or mortality. Daily oral administration produced no significant changes in the hematological and biochemical parameters, except for the hepatic enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) that showed a reduction in both sexes. Moreover, the B. trimera tincture did not increase lipid peroxidation or affected ALA-D and CAT activities. In conclusion, the tincture of B. trimera may be considered relatively safe in this protocol. PMID:26522812

  7. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zakiah; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Afzan, Adlin; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect. PMID:25530788

  8. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zakiah; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect. PMID:25530788

  9. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1700 Section 147.1700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS North Carolina § 147.1700 State-administered program. The...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2500 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2500 Section 147.2500 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Wisconsin § 147.2500 State-administered program. The...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1450 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1450 Section 147.1450 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Nevada § 147.1450 State-administered program. The UIC...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  13. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  15. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York § 147.1651 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of New York, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York § 147.1651 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of New York, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  20. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2751 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2751... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS American Samoa §...

  3. 40 CFR 147.2701 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2701... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virgin Islands §...

  4. 40 CFR 147.601 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.601... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Hawaii § 147.601...

  5. 40 CFR 147.1151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1151... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Michigan §...

  6. 40 CFR 147.801 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.801... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Iowa § 147.801...

  7. 40 CFR 147.901 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.901... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Kentucky § 147.901...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  11. DOE handbook: Guide to good practices for oral examinations

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide DOE nuclear facilities (and others) with guidance that can be used to incorporate oral examination techniques and processes into their training programs. The handbook was developed on the basis of experience in the nuclear industry and incorporates information from civilian, military, commercial, and DOE nuclear sources. Different types of oral examinations are addressed and discussed, including informal, formal, checkouts, facility walkthroughs, operational examinations, and performance demonstrations. Guidelines for administering and grading oral examinations are provided for conducting consistent and reliable oral examinations. 1 tab.

  12. Design of landfill daily cells.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakopoulos, D; Dokas, I

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the behaviour of the landfill soil-to-refuse (S/R) ratio when size, geometry and operating parameters of the daily cell vary over realistic ranges. A simple procedure is presented (1) for calculating the cell parameters values which minimise the S/R ratio and (2) for studying the sensitivity of this minimum S/R ratio to variations in cell size, final refuse density, working face length, lift height and cover thickness. In countries where daily soil cover is required, savings in landfill space could be realised following this procedure. The sensitivity of minimum S/R to variations in cell dimensions decreases with cell size. Working face length and lift height affect the S/R ratio significantly. This procedure also offers the engineer an additional tool for comparing one large daily cell with two or more smaller ones, at two different working faces within the same landfill. PMID:11720268

  13. Who Should Administer Energy-Efficiency Programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen L.

    2003-05-01

    The restructuring of the electric utility industry in the US created a crisis in the administration of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. Before restructuring, nearly all energy-efficiency programs in the US were administered by utilities and funded from utility rates. Restructuring called these arrangements into question in two ways. First, the separation of generation from transmission and distribution undermined a key rationale for utility administration. This was the Integrated Resource Planning approach in which the vertically integrated utility was given incentives to provide energy services at least cost. Second, questions were raised as to whether funding through utility rates could be sustained in a competitive environment and most states that restructured their electricity industry adopted a system benefits charge. The crisis in administration of energy-efficiency programs produced a variety of responses in the eight years since restructuring in the US began in earn est. These responses have included new rationales for energy-efficiency programs, new mechanisms for funding programs, and new mechanisms for program administration and governance. This paper focuses on issues related to program administration. It describes the administrative functions and some of the options for accomplishing them. Then it discusses criteria for choosing among the options. Examples are given that highlight some of the states that have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved. The conclusion attempts to summarize lessons learned.

  14. Intestinal Microbiota in Pediatric Surgical Cases Administered Bifidobacterium Breve: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Tadaharu; Asahara, Takashi; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Ogasawara, Yuki; Lane, Geoffrey J; Nomoto, Koji; Nagata, Satoru; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of perioperative probiotic administration has been reported in adults. We examined the effects of orally administered Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult (BBG-01) on outcomes in pediatric surgical cases by assessing intestinal and blood microbiota. BBG-01 was well tolerated without adverse effects, and postoperative infectious complications were significantly decreased. Fecal analysis showed increased Bifidobacterium and decreased Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, and Pseudomonas. Concentrations of fecal acetic acid were significantly increased, maintaining fecal pH at <7.0. The incidence of detecting bacteria in blood was significantly reduced. BBG-01 improved the intestinal environment, and may be implicated in suppressing bacterial translocation. PMID:26859092

  15. Compliance with Once-Daily versus Twice or Thrice-Daily Administration of Antibiotic Regimens: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Falagas, Matthew E.; Karagiannis, Apostolos K. A.; Nakouti, Theodora; Tansarli, Giannoula S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether compliance of patients to antibiotic treatment is better when antibiotics are administered once than multiple times daily. Methods We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Scopus databases. Only randomized controlled trials were considered eligible for inclusion. Compliance to antibiotic treatment was the outcome of the meta-analysis. Results Twenty-six studies including 8246 patients with upper respiratory tract infections in the vast majority met the inclusion criteria. In total, higher compliance was found among patients treated with once-daily treatment than those receiving treatment twice, thrice or four times daily [5011 patients, RR=1.22 (95% CI, 1.11, 1.34]. Adults receiving an antibiotic once-daily were more compliant than those receiving the same antibiotic multiple times daily [380 patients, RR=1.09 (95% CI, 1.02, 1.16)]. Likewise, children that received an antibiotic twice-daily were more compliant than those receiving the same antibiotic thrice-daily [2118 patients, RR=1.10 (95% CI, 1.02, 1.19)]. Higher compliance was also found among patients receiving an antibiotic once compared to those receiving an antibiotic of different class thrice or four times daily [395 patients, RR=1.20 (95% CI, 1.12, 1.28)]. The finding of better compliance with lower frequency daily was consistent regardless of the study design, and treatment duration. Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that compliance to antibiotic treatment might be associated with higher when an antibiotic is administered once than multiple times daily for the treatment of specific infections and for specific classes of antibiotics. PMID:25559848

  16. Determination of 14C residue in eggs of laying hens administered orally with [14C] sulfaquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B; Rummel, N; Smith, D

    2004-06-01

    Ten layer hens were dosed for 5 consecutive days with 6.2 mg kg(-1) [14C] sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). Eggs were collected from the hens during the 5-day dosing period and during a 10-day post-dose withdrawal period. Egg yolk and albumen were separated and assayed for total radioactive residues (TRR) using a combustion oxidizer and liquid scintillation counting techniques. Significant amounts of radioactivity were detected on the second day of dosing (greater than 24h after the initial dose) in both egg yolk and albumen. First eggs were collected about 8 h after dosing; the second-day eggs were collected during 8-h period after the second dose. Radioactive residues reached a maximum on the fifth day of dosing in albumen, whereas on the second day of withdrawal in egg yolk, the peak TRR levels in albumen were about threefold higher than in yolk. Thereafter, the TRR levels declined rapidly in albumen and were detectable up to withdrawal day 6, whereas the TRR levels in egg yolk declined more slowly and were detectable up to withdrawal day 10. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the parent drug sulfaquinoxaline was the major component in both the egg albumen and yolk. Additionally, this work suggests that egg yolk is the appropriate matrix for monitoring SQX residues PMID:15204532

  17. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Well Control and... position, years of total oil field experience, and employer's name (e.g., operator, contractor, or...

  18. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid orally administered suppresses P-selectin expression on mouse platelets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caffeic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid are a naturally occurring phenolic acid and its ester found in human diets. In this paper, potential effects of caffeic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid found in coffee and other plant sources on platelet activation were studied via investigating P-selectin expre...

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF 2-METHOXYETHANOL ADMINISTERED DERMALLY OR ORALLY TO FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of rats to 2-methoxyethanol by gavage for 10 consecutive days results in immunotoxicity. o determine whether dermal exposure to ME also induces immunotoxicity, undiluted ME was applied to Fisher 344 male rats at dose levels of 150, 300, 600, 900 or 1200 mg/kg/d on shaved...

  20. Toxicokinetics of norditerpenoid alkaloids from low larkspur (Delphinium andersonii) orally administered in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective- To better assess low larkspur toxicity and manage treatment of poisoned animals, more knowledge is needed about the serum toxicokinetics of toxic low larkspur alkaloids in cattle. Animals- Five black angus steers. Procedures- Low larkspur (Delphinium andersonii) in the flowering stage...

  1. Triple Recycling Processes Impact Systemic and Local Bioavailability of Orally Administered Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peimin; Zhu, Lijun; Luo, Feifei; Lu, Linlin; Li, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xinchun; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-05-01

    Triple recycling (i.e., enterohepatic, enteric and local recycling) plays a central role in governing the disposition of phenolics such as flavonoids, resulting in low systemic bioavailability but higher gut bioavailability and longer than expected apparent half-life. The present study aims to investigate the coexistence of these recycling schemes using model bioactive flavonoid tilianin and a four-site perfused rat intestinal model in the presence or absence of a lactase phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) inhibitor gluconolactone and/or a glucuronidase inhibitor saccharolactone. The result showed that tilianin could be metabolized into tilianin glucuronide, acacetin, and acacetin glucuronide, which are excreted into the bile and luminal perfusate (highest in the duodenum and lowest in the colon). Gluconolactone (20 mM) significantly reduced the absorption of tilianin and the enteric and biliary excretion of acacetin glucuronide. Saccharolactone (0.1 mM) alone or in combination of gluconolactone also remarkably reduced the biliary and intestinal excretion of acacetin glucuronide. Acacetin glucuronides from bile or perfusate were rapidly hydrolyzed by bacterial β-glucuronidases to acacetin, enabling enterohepatic and enteric recycling. Moreover, saccharolactone-sensitive tilianin disposition and glucuronide deconjugation, which was more active in the small intestine than the colon, points to the small intestinal origin of the deconjugation enzyme and supports the presence of local recycling scheme. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated triple recycling of a bioactive phenolic (i.e., a model flavonoid), and this recycling may have an impact on the site and duration of polyphenols pharmacokinetics in vivo. PMID:25762448

  2. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOTOXICITY OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED 2-METHOXYACETIC ACID IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) immunotoxic in the rat. n this study, the immunotoxicity of 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the principal metabolite of ME, was evaluated in adult male Fischer 3 rats. ats were dosed by gavage with MAA on ten cons...

  3. An Orally Administered Opiate Blocker, Naltrexone, Attenuates Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four adults with severe/profound mental retardation and self-injurious behavior (SIB) received naltrexone in a double-blind procedure. All patients exhibited decreased SIB when treated with naltrexone; three patients decreased SIB as naltrexone dose increased. There were no consistent effects of naltrexone on stereotypy, activity, or performance…

  4. The interaction of orally administered iron with levodopa and methyldopa therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, R J; Hall, A D; Hider, R C

    1990-07-01

    The ability of methyldopa and levodopa to interact with both ferrous and ferric iron under a variety of conditions likely to be encountered physiologically has been examined. Spectrophotometric studies of ferrous sulphate in the presence of methyldopa indicate that no complexation occurs below pH2, whilst between pH 4-9, a variety of iron-methyldopa complexes is formed. The formation of these complexes is fast at high pH (pH 9: t1/2 less than 5 s), whilst the rate slows as the pH is lowered (pH 4: t1/2 greater than 30 min). These complexes are characteristic of iron-catecholate species, indicating that in the presence of methyldopa (and levodopa) ferrous iron undergoes autoxidation to the ferric form. The tight binding of ferric iron to methyldopa is predicted to alter the biodistribution characteristics of the complex with respect to the unchelated components. Furthermore, under the acid conditions of the stomach, redox cycling can occur. This will result in both catechol oxidation and production of the toxic hydroxyl radical. The findings suggest that care should be exercised when simultaneous administration of either methyldopa or levodopa with ferrous sulphate is indicated. PMID:1980293

  5. Measurement of the incorporation of orally administered arachidonic acid into tissue lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulmacz, R.J.; Sivarajan, M.; Lands, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of a stable isotope method to monitor the mixing of dietary arachidonic acid with endogenous arachidonic acid in tissue lipids was evaluated. Rats were fed octadeuterated arachidonic acid during a 20-day period, and the entry of the dietary acid into lipid esters of various tissues was examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of their fatty acids. The rats were maintained on a fat-free diet from weaning until 63 days old to enhance the ratio of the dietary acid to endogenous arachidonate. Three separate forms of eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids could be distinguished by GC-MS: octadeuterated arachidonic acid (recent dietary origin), unlabeled arachidonic acid (maternal origin) and unlabeled 4,7,10,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (originating from palmitoleic acid). The total eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids contained about 90% arachidonate from recent dietary origin in lung, kidney, heart and fat, 70% in muscle and liver and 27% in brain. The n-7 isomer of eicosatetraenoic acid was estimated to make up 6% or less of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in lung, kidney, brain, muscle and heart tissue lipids, but it comprised around 15% of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in liver. The unlabeled arachidonic acid of maternal origin thus comprised only about 10% of the eicosatetraenoic acid in all tissues examined except muscle and brain, where it was 24% and 70% of the eicosatetraenoic acid, respectively.

  6. Bioavailability of PBDEs in male rats from orally administered household dust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, household dust has been implicated as a major source of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) exposure in humans. This finding has very important implications especially for young children, who are thought to ingest more dust than adults, and may be more susceptible to some of the reputed ...

  7. [Bioavailability of orally administered iron. Effects of alginate/antacid administration].

    PubMed

    Campo, S; Breda, E

    1992-03-01

    Sideropenia is often encountered in medical practice; the iron preparation that presents the highest bioavailability is unquestionably iron sulphate. This compound, however, frequently provokes numerous side-effects that induce the patient to suspend treatment. Here it is shown that the bioavailability of the drug is not changed after intake of alginic acid, while side-effects are considerably reduced. PMID:1553063

  8. BIOAVAILABILITY OF PBDES IN MALE RATS FROM ORALLY ADMINISTERED HOUSEHOLD DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, household dust has been implicated as a major source of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) exposure in humans. This finding has very important implications especially for young children, who are thought to ingest more dust than adults, and may be more susceptible t...

  9. Tractor Operation and Daily Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, J. M.; And Others

    Written for the tractor operator, the manual describes, with the aid of colored illustrations and diagrams, the tasks involved in the proper operation and daily maintenance of tractors. It offers explanations for the desirability of the various servicing and adjustment operations, as well as guidelines for tractor operation and safety. The…

  10. Digital Daily Cycles of Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Lehmann, Sune; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-10-01

    Humans, like almost all animals, are phase-locked to the diurnal cycle. Most of us sleep at night and are active through the day. Because we have evolved to function with this cycle, the circadian rhythm is deeply ingrained and even detectable at the biochemical level. However, within the broader day-night pattern, there are individual differences: e.g., some of us are intrinsically morning-active, while others prefer evenings. In this article, we look at digital daily cycles: circadian patterns of activity viewed through the lens of auto-recorded data of communication and online activity. We begin at the aggregate level, discuss earlier results, and illustrate differences between population-level daily rhythms in different media. Then we move on to the individual level, and show that there is a strong individual-level variation beyond averages: individuals typically have their distinctive daily pattern that persists in time. We conclude by discussing the driving forces behind these signature daily patterns, from personal traits (morningness/eveningness) to variation in activity level and external constraints, and outline possibilities for future research.

  11. Daily Physical Activity Survey Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The intent of the Daily Physical Activity (DPA) Survey was to gather school-level information from teachers and principals regarding their perceptions of DPA, thus providing a greater understanding of DPA implementation in grades 1 to 9. This study aimed to help identify the many variables that influence the attainment of the DPA outcomes and…

  12. 13-week oral toxicity study of vinyl laurate in rats.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ben A R; Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2015-02-01

    Vinyl laurate (VL) is used as a monomer in the production of polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer, a component of chewing gum base. The safety of VL was examined in a 13-week oral toxicity study in Wistar rats. VL was administered in corn coil by daily gavage (5 ml/kg bw/d) to four main groups (10 rats/sex) at doses of 0 (vehicle only), 50, 250 and 1000 mg/kg bw/d, respectively. The control and high-dose group comprised an additional 5 rats/sex which were kept untreated for a further 4 weeks until sacrifice (recovery groups). In addition to standard parameters, male and female fertility parameters were determined as well. There were no mortalities and treatment-related clinical signs. Neurobehavioral observations and motor activity assessment, ophthalmoscopic examinations, body weights, feed and water intakes, blood cell counts, coagulation time, standard clinical chemical parameters and urinalyses, absolute and relative organ weights at the end of the treatment as well as macroscopic examination at necropsy and microscopic examination of standard organs and tissues did not show any treatment-related changes. Female and male fertility parameters (estrus cyclicity, testicular and epididymal sperm counts, sperm motility and morphology) were not affected by the treatment. Accordingly, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for VL was determined to be 1000 mg/kg bw/d, i.e. the highest dose level tested. PMID:25445296

  13. Preliminary pediatric clinical evaluation of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 in preventing recurrent pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and recurrent acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Donato, Guido; Fomia, Federico; Adami, Teresa; Careddu, Domenico; Cassandro, Claudia; Albera, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Background The oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 has been shown clearly to antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans, by releasing two bacteriocins named salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B. Unpublished observations indicate that it can also antagonize the growth of other bacteria involved in acute otitis media. Because of its ability to colonize the oral cavity and its safety profile, we have tested its efficacy in reducing the incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis and episodes of acute otitis media. Methods We enrolled 82 children, including 65 with and 17 without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology. Of those with recurrent pathology, 45 were treated daily for 90 days with an oral slow-release tablet containing five billion colony-forming units of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 20 served as an untreated control group. The 17 children without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral pathology were used as an additional control group. After 90 days of treatment, a 6-month follow-up period without treatment was included to evaluate a possible persistent protective role for the previously administered product. Results The 41 children who completed the 90-day course of Bactoblis showed a reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (about 90%) and/or acute otitis media (about 40%), calculated by comparing infection rates in the previous year. The 90-day treatment also reduced the reported incidence of pharyngeal and ear infections by about 65% in the 6-month follow-up period during which the product was not administered. Subjects tolerated the product well, with no side effects or dropouts reported. Conclusion Prophylactic administration of S. salivarius K12 to children with a history of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology reduced episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infections and/or tonsillitis as

  14. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies. PMID:24548425

  15. Evaluation of the knowledge and attitude of expectant mothers about infant oral health and their oral hygiene practices

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann; Jacob, Anoop; Kunhambu, Dhanalakshmi; Shetty, Priya; Shetty, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mothers play a crucial role in developing and maintaining their infants’ oral hygiene. Maternal oral health, their knowledge and attitude toward infant oral health are strong indicators of their infant's oral health status. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of expectant mothers about infant oral health and their oral hygiene practices. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey conducted among expectant mothers in Mangalore city, India. Materials and Methods: Three hundred expectant mothers fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly selected based on convenience method over a period of 1 month. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire addressing the various aspects of expectant mothers’ knowledge and attitude about infant oral health and their own oral hygiene practices. The analysis was done using SPSS version 16.0. Results: The overall score revealed that majority of the expectant mothers had poor knowledge and attitude toward infant oral health and followed poor oral hygiene practices. Expectant mothers’ educational qualification, trimester, and the number of pregnancy had a significant role in their knowledge, attitude, and oral hygiene practices. Conclusion: Implementation of educational programs to motivate expectant mothers and bring out awareness about the importance of oral health and their implications must be emphasized. PMID:26539393

  16. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  17. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  18. Oral methylphenidate alleviates the fine motor dysfunction caused by chronic postnatal manganese exposure in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Stéphane A; Strupp, Barbara J; Lasley, Stephen M; Fornal, Casimir A; Mandal, Shyamali; Smith, Donald R

    2015-04-01

    Developmental manganese (Mn) exposure is associated with motor dysfunction in children and animal models, but little is known about the underlying neurochemical mechanisms or the potential for amelioration by pharmacotherapy. We investigated whether methylphenidate (MPH) alleviates fine motor dysfunction due to chronic postnatal Mn exposure, and whether Mn exposure impairs brain extracellular dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum in adult animals. Rats were orally exposed to 0 or 50 mg Mn/kg/day from postnatal day 1 until the end of the study (PND 145). The staircase test was used to assess skilled forelimb function. Oral MPH (2.5 mg/kg/day) was administered daily 1 h before staircase testing for 16 days. DA and NE levels were measured by dual probe microdialysis. Results show that Mn exposure impaired reaching and grasping skills and the evoked release of DA and NE in the PFC and striatum of adult rats. Importantly, oral MPH treatment fully alleviated the fine motor deficits in the Mn-exposed animals, but did not affect forelimb skills of control rats not exposed to Mn. These results suggest that catecholaminergic hypofunctioning in the PFC and striatum may underlie the Mn-induced fine motor dysfunction, and that oral MPH pharmacotherapy is an effective treatment approach for alleviating this dysfunction in adult animals. The therapeutic potential of MPH for the treatment of motor dysfunction in Mn-exposed children and adults appears promising pending further characterization of MPH efficacy in other functional areas (eg, attention) believed to be affected by developmental Mn exposure. PMID:25601986

  19. Oral Methylphenidate Alleviates the Fine Motor Dysfunction Caused by Chronic Postnatal Manganese Exposure in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Barbara J.; Lasley, Stephen M.; Fornal, Casimir A.; Mandal, Shyamali; Smith, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental manganese (Mn) exposure is associated with motor dysfunction in children and animal models, but little is known about the underlying neurochemical mechanisms or the potential for amelioration by pharmacotherapy. We investigated whether methylphenidate (MPH) alleviates fine motor dysfunction due to chronic postnatal Mn exposure, and whether Mn exposure impairs brain extracellular dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum in adult animals. Rats were orally exposed to 0 or 50 mg Mn/kg/day from postnatal day 1 until the end of the study (PND 145). The staircase test was used to assess skilled forelimb function. Oral MPH (2.5 mg/kg/day) was administered daily 1 h before staircase testing for 16 days. DA and NE levels were measured by dual probe microdialysis. Results show that Mn exposure impaired reaching and grasping skills and the evoked release of DA and NE in the PFC and striatum of adult rats. Importantly, oral MPH treatment fully alleviated the fine motor deficits in the Mn-exposed animals, but did not affect forelimb skills of control rats not exposed to Mn. These results suggest that catecholaminergic hypofunctioning in the PFC and striatum may underlie the Mn-induced fine motor dysfunction, and that oral MPH pharmacotherapy is an effective treatment approach for alleviating this dysfunction in adult animals. The therapeutic potential of MPH for the treatment of motor dysfunction in Mn-exposed children and adults appears promising pending further characterization of MPH efficacy in other functional areas (eg, attention) believed to be affected by developmental Mn exposure. PMID:25601986

  20. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  1. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  2. Preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol trimethyl ether in sprague-dawley rats: the impacts of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food and repeated dosing on oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-Shu; Ho, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Resveratrol trimethyl ether (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene, RTE) is a naturally occurring and pharmacologically active resveratrol derivative. To evaluate its suitability as a drug candidate, a pharmacokinetic study was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats with the emphasis to identify the impact of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food, and repeated dosing on its oral bioavailability. Upon single intravenous administration (5 mg/kg), RTE displayed moderate clearance (35.5 ± 5.3 mL/min/kg) and a fairly long terminal elimination half-life (511 ± 136 min); dose escalation (5-20 mg/kg) did not cause nonlinear pharmacokinetics. When given orally in suspension (60 mg/kg), RTE was poorly absorbed with negligible bioavailability (< 1.5%), fasting further decreased its bioavailability (<1%). However, when administered in a solution formulated with randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (15 mg/kg), RTE was rapidly absorbed with good bioavailability (46.5 ± 4.8%). Dose escalation resulted in increased bioavailability (64.6 ± 8.0%) at the dose of 60 mg/kg. Repeated RTE dosing (7 daily oral doses) did not alter the clearance, terminal elimination half-life and bioavailability. In summary, the aqueous solubility of RTE was a barrier to oral absorption; repeated RTE administrations did not alter its pharmacokinetic profiles; as RTE possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic profiles, further investigation on RTE as a drug candidate is warranted. PMID:21520090

  3. “Doing Our Part” (Taking Responsibility): A Grounded Theory of the Process of Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy in Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Wendy; Hughes, Cynthia B.; Calvillo, Evelyn R.; Anderson, Nancy L.R.; Briseño-Toomey, Deborah; Dominguez, Leticia; Martinez, Alex M.; Hanby, Cara; Bhatia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    Children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (A.L.L.) receive treatment that relies on daily self- or parent/caregiver-administered oral chemotherapy for approximately two years. Despite the fact that pediatric A.L.L. is uniformly fatal without adequate treatment, non-adherence to oral chemotherapy has been observed in up to one-third of patients. Little is known about the reasons for non-adherence in these patients. This study employed Straussian grounded theory methodology to develop and validate a model to explain the process of adherence to oral chemotherapy in children and adolescents with A.L.L. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews (with 17 patients and 21 parents/caregivers) and four focused group discussions were conducted. Three stages were identified in the process of adherence: (1) Recognizing the Threat, (2) Taking Control, and (3) Managing for the Duration. Doing Our Part was identified as the core theme explaining the process of adherence, and involves the parent (or patient) taking responsibility for assuring that medications are taken as prescribed. Understanding the association between taking oral chemotherapy and control/cure of leukemia (Making the Connection) appeared to mediate adherence behaviors. PMID:21653911

  4. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm)

    PubMed Central

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions. PMID:25071922

  5. Acute and Subacute Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Crude Antifungal Compounds Produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hee-Kyoung; Chang, Hae-Choon; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and subacute oral toxicity of crude antifungal compounds produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 g/kg) did not produce mortality, significant changes in general behavior, or changes in the gross appearance of the organs. In the subacute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds were administered orally to rats at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg daily for 28 days. There were no test article-related deaths, abnormal clinical signs, or body weight changes. The study also showed no significant differences between the control and treated groups in hematological and serum biochemical parameters, histopathological examination, or any other findings. These results suggest that acute or subacute oral administration of crude antifungal compounds from L. plantarum HD1 is not toxic in rats. PMID:26451356

  6. Validity and reliability of the Korean version of the Speech Handicap Index in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, S S; Choi, S H; Hong, J A; Hong, Y H; Jeong, N G; Lee, S Y; Sung, M-W; Hah, J H

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the cross-cultural adaptation of the Speech Handicap Index (SHI) for Korean subjects and to determine its reliability and utility in patients with oral cavity cancer. The Korean version of the SHI was administered to 50 healthy subjects and 56 patients with speech problems resulting from treatment for oral cavity cancers. The content and construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability were examined. Healthy subject and patient group scores were compared, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to determine discriminatory ability. The Korean version of the SHI had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.99) and test-retest reliability for the total and subscales: total (T) 0.98, speech (S) 0.99, and psychosocial (P) 0.97. Mean scores in the healthy group were 0.5 (T), 0.2 (S), and 0.2 (P), whereas those in the patient group were 34.3 (T), 16.6 (S), and 15.5 (P). The scores differed significantly between the groups (P<0.05). The Korean version of the SHI can be a useful tool to evaluate a patient's self-perception of their speech dysfunction in daily life and to better understand postoperative speech disorders in patients with oral cavity cancer. PMID:26701323

  7. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, MJE; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, JH; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  8. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, Mje; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, J H; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-08-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  9. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  10. What psychosocial factors influence adolescents' oral health?

    PubMed

    Baker, S R; Mat, A; Robinson, P G

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have examined, comprehensively and prospectively, determinants of oral-health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between psychosocial factors and oral health status, health perceptions, and quality of life. Measures of symptom and functional status, health perceptions, quality of life, oral health beliefs, and psychological (sense of coherence, self-esteem, health locus of control) and social factors (parents' income and education) were collected from 439 12- and 13-year-olds at baseline and six-month follow-up, together with a clinical examination at baseline. Structural equation modeling indicated that increased levels of caries and more symptoms predicted more functional limitations, and, cross-sectionally, greater functional impact was associated with worse health perceptions, which were linked to lower quality of life. Sense of coherence was the most important psychosocial predictor. These factors are important in understanding how oral health affects young people's daily lives. PMID:20739689

  11. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    -99% pure population of leukocytes. Viability was assessed using Trypan blue histological analysis. We successfully isolated and labeled ~25-30 x 10{sup 7} CD34+ lymphocytes in cytokine mobilized progenitor cell apharesis harvests. Cells were also subjected to a stat gram stain to look for bacterial contamination, stat endotoxin LAL to look for endotoxin contamination, flow cytometry for evaluation of the purity of the cells and 14-day sterility culture. Colony forming assays confirm the capacity of these cells to proliferate and function ex-vivo with CFU-GM values of 26 colonies/ 1 x 10{sup 4} cells plated and 97% viability in cytokine augmented methylcellulose at 10-14 days in CO{sub 2} incubation. We developed a closed-processing system for the product labeling prior to infusion to maintain autologous cell integrity and sterility. Release criteria for the labeled product were documented for viability, cell count and differential, and measured radiolabel. We were successful in labeling the cells with up to 500 uCi/10{sup 8} cells, with viability of >98%. However, due to delays in getting the protocol approved by the FDA, the cells were not infused in humans in this location (although we did successfully use CD34+ cells in humans in a study in Australia). The approach developed should permit labeling of progenitor cells that can be administered to human subjects for tracking. The labeling approach should be useful for all progenitor cell types, although this would need to be verified since different cell lines may have differential radiosensitivity.

  12. The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

    2011-10-01

    Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P < 0.001) whereby feeding the HP diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily. PMID:22005407

  13. Oral Gentamicin Gut Decontamination for Prevention of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections: Relevance of Concomitant Systemic Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P < 0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P < 0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P < 0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P = 0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  14. Efficacy of low-dose oral metronomic dosing of the prodrug of gemcitabine, LY2334737, in human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Susan E; Durland-Busbice, Sara; Shepard, Robert L; Donoho, Gregory P; Starling, James J; Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J; Dantzig, Anne H

    2013-04-01

    LY2334737, an oral prodrug of gemcitabine, is cleaved in vivo, releasing gemcitabine and valproic acid. Oral dosing of mice results in absorption of intact prodrug with slow systemic hydrolysis yielding higher plasma levels of LY2334737 than gemcitabine and prolonged gemcitabine exposure. Antitumor activity was evaluated in human colon and lung tumor xenograft models. The dose response for efficacy was examined using 3 metronomic schedules, once-a-day dosing for 14 doses, every other day for 7 doses, and once a day for 7 doses, 7 days rest, followed by an additional 7 days of once-a-day dosing. These schedules gave significant antitumor activity and were well tolerated. Oral gavage of 6 mg/kg LY2334737 daily for 21 days gave equivalent activity to i.v. 240 mg/kg gemcitabine. HCl administered once a week for 3 weeks to mice bearing a patient mesothelioma tumor PXF 1118 or a non-small cell lung cancer tumor LXFE 937. The LXFE 397 tumor possessed elevated expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (ENT1) important for gemcitabine uptake but not prodrug uptake and responded significantly better to treatment with LY2334737 than gemcitabine (P ≤ 0.001). In 3 colon xenografts, antitumor activity of LY2334737 plus a maximally tolerated dose of capecitabine, an oral prodrug of 5-fluorouracil, was significantly greater than either monotherapy. During treatment, the expression of carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) and concentrative nucleoside transporter-3 was induced in HCT-116 tumors; both are needed for the activity of the prodrugs. Thus, metronomic oral low-dose LY2334737 is efficacious, well tolerated, and easily combined with capecitabine for improved efficacy. Elevated CES2 or ENT1 expression may enhance LY2334737 tumor response. PMID:23371859

  15. Association of Psychosocial Conditions, Oral Health, and Dietary Variety with Intellectual Activity in Older Community-Dwelling Japanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kurumatani, Norio; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the factors related to intellectual activity in community-dwelling elderly persons. Methods Self-administered questionnaires mailed to all people aged ≥65 years in a dormitory suburb in Japan (n = 15,210). The response rate was 72.2%. Analytical subjects (n = 8,910) were those who lived independently and completely answered questions about independent and dependent variables and covariates. Independent variables included psychosocial conditions (i.e., social activities, hobbies, and a sense that life is worth living (ikigai)), oral health (i.e., dental health behaviors and oral function evaluated by chewing difficulties, swallowing difficulties, and oral dryness), and dietary variety measured using the dietary variety score (DVS). A dependent variable was intellectual activity measured using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence. Covariates included age, gender, family structure, pensions, body mass index, alcohol, smoking, medical history, self-rated health, medications, cognitive function, depression, and falling. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) for poor intellectual activity. Results Poor intellectual activity was reported by 28.9% of the study population. After adjustment for covariates and independent variables, poor intellectual activity was significantly associated with nonparticipation in social activities (OR = 1.90, 95%CI = 1.61–2.24), having neither hobbies nor ikigai (3.13, 2.55–3.84), having neither regular dental visits nor daily brushing (1.70, 1.35–2.14), the poorest oral function (1.61, 1.31–1.98), and the lowest DVS quartile (1.96, 1.70–2.26). Conclusion These results indicate that psychosocial conditions, oral health, and dietary variety are independently associated with intellectual activity in elderly persons. The factors identified in this study may be used in community health programs for maintaining the intellectual activity ability of the

  16. Oral gentamicin gut decontamination for prevention of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections: relevance of concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Menichetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P<0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P<0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P<0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P=0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  17. Pharmacokinetic interaction study between riociguat and the combined oral contraceptives levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol in healthy postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Sigrun; van der Mey, Dorina; Becker, Corina; Saleh, Soundos; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Female patients requiring treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are advised to avoid pregnancy because of the high associated mortality rate. Oral contraception is one of the main methods of preventing pregnancy in this context, mandating pharmacokinetic and safety studies for new agents in this setting. Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for treatment of PAH and inoperable and persistent or recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This single-center, randomized, nonblinded study involving healthy postmenopausal women investigated the effect of riociguat on plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) and ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg) in a combined oral contraceptive. Treatment A was a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. In treatment B, subjects received 2.5 mg riociguat 3 times daily for 12 days. On the eighth day, they also received a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Subjects received both regimens in a crossover design. There was no change in area under the plasma concentration–time curves of levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) of levonorgestrel during combined administration versus levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol alone. A 20% increase in the Cmax of ethinylestradiol was noted during coadministration; this is not anticipated to adversely impact the contraceptive efficacy or to require any dose adjustment for ethinylestradiol. Plasma concentrations and exposures of riociguat were within the expected range and were not influenced by coadministration with levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Combined treatment was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, riociguat did not change the exposure to levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol relative to oral contraceptive administered alone. PMID:27162633

  18. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma--an overview.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Welch, Chris M; Zevallos, Jose P; Patel, Samip N

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled or chewed tobacco is equally addictive and harmful and used daily by over 1 billion people. In addition to increased rates of coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancers, tobacco is the leading preventable cause of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to tobacco, consumption and abuse of alcohol, and betel nut quid significantly contribute to the burden of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Dental visits are excellent opportunities to identify primary lesions in the oral cavity. This review highlights relevant anatomy, epidemiology, pathogenesis, evaluation and treatment options for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25284574

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Nurses toward Oral Health and Oral Health Care of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Suzana; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of medical nurses regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Methods This cross sectional study of 133 nurses in the district of Tumpat, Kelantan (Malaysia) used self-administered questionnaires. Results Most nurses knew that dental plaque is associated with periodontal disease (97.7%). However, most nurses erroneously believed that tooth decay (86.5%) and excessive sugar consumption (87.2%) led to periodontal disease. About half of the nurses knew about the relationship between periodontal disease of pregnant women and low birth weight (43.6%) and preterm birth (48.9%). Many nurses had the misconception that the developing foetus draws calcium from the mothers’ teeth (78.2%). Most nurses had good attitudes toward improving their oral health knowledge (97.0%) and agreed they should help to deliver oral health education to pregnant women (94.0%). Age, length of service as a nurse, and length of service in antenatal care had no effect on the scores for the nurses’ knowledge and attitude regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Conclusion Medical nurses had limited knowledge about oral health of pregnant women and had some misunderstandings about oral health, although they had good attitudes. Age, length of service as a nurse, and length service in antenatal care had no effect on the knowledge and attitude scores of the nurses. PMID:27540327

  20. Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Tommy; Cook, Matt; Playle, John; Hallett, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’ This study aimed to examine the meanings that nurses attached to the ‘treatments’ administered to cure ‘sexual deviation’ (SD) in the UK, 1935–1974. In the UK, homosexuality was considered a classifiable mental illness that could be ‘cured’ until 1992. Nurses were involved in administering painful and distressing treatments. The study is based on oral history interviews with fifteen nurses who had administered treatments to cure individuals of their SD. The interviews were transcribed for historical interpretation. Some nurses believed that their role was to passively follow any orders they had been given. Other nurses limited their culpability concerning administering these treatments by adopting dehumanising and objectifying language and by focussing on administrative tasks, rather than the human beings in need of their care. Meanwhile, some nurses genuinely believed that they were acting beneficently by administering these distinctly unpleasant treatments. It is envisaged that this study might act to reiterate the need for nurses to ensure their interventions have a sound evidence base and that they constantly reflect on the moral and value base of their practice and the influence that science and societal norms can have on changing views of what is considered ‘acceptable practice’. PMID:23876127

  1. Observability of market daily volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  2. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education. PMID:26306367

  3. Tissue, Dosimetry, Metabolism and Excretion of Pentavalent and Trivalent Dimethylated Arsenic in Mice after Oral Administration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) is a rat bladder carcinogen and the major urinary metabolite of administered inorganic arsenic in most mammals. This study examined the disposition of pentavalent and trivalent dimethylated arsenic inmice after acute oral administration. Adult fema...

  4. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Daily Living. Handicap Research Group Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodin, Jane

    The study examined aspects of daily living of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, a mineral deficiency in the skeleton which results in stunted growth and frequent fractures. A questionnaire was administered to 24 families with children under the age of 18 and 3 families were interviewed. The study found the families in great need of…

  5. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  6. Awareness of Daily Life Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Georgios; Metin, Barbaros; Schneider, Jutta; Markopoulos, Panos; De Ruyter, Boris

    The well-publicized aging of Western societies has prompted a growing interest into technologies that support awareness in cross-generational families. The idea of supporting continual and partly automated flow of information between seniors living alone and their social intimates has been gaining ground among researchers but even among industries. It is anticipated that such an information flow can help bridge geographical distance, discrepant lifestyles, and daily routines, potentially providing peace of mind to both parties and feelings of being connected.

  7. 50 CFR 20.24 - Daily limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Daily limit. 20.24 Section 20.24 Wildlife... (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.24 Daily limit. No person shall take in any 1 calendar day, more than the daily bag limit or aggregate daily bag limit, whichever applies....

  8. Tigemonam, an oral monobactam.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, N X; Neu, H C

    1988-01-01

    Tigemonam is an orally administered monobactam. At less than or equal to 1 microgram/ml it inhibited the majority of strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus spp., Providencia spp., Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Serratia marcescens, and Yersinia enterocolitica. At less than or equal to 0.25 microgram/ml it inhibited Haemophilus spp., Neisseria spp., and Branhamella catarrhalis. It did not inhibit Pseudomonas spp. or Acinetobacter spp. Tigemonam was more active than cephalexin and amoxicillin-clavulanate and inhibited many members of the family Enterobacteriaceae resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin. Some Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii strains resistant to aminothiazole iminomethoxy cephalosporins and aztreonam were resistant to tigemonam. The MIC for 90% of hemolytic streptococci of groups A, B, and C and for Streptococcus pneumoniae was 16 micrograms/ml, but the MIC for 90% of enterococci, Listeria spp., Bacteroides spp., and viridans group streptococci was greater than 64 micrograms/ml. Tigemonam was not hydrolyzed by the common plasmid beta-lactamases such as TEM-1 and SHV-1 or by the chromosomal beta-lactamases of Enterobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, and Bacteroides spp. Tigemonam inhibited beta-lactamases of E. cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but did not induce beta-lactamases. The growth medium had a minimal effect on the in vitro activity of tigemonam, and there was a close agreement between the MICs and MBCs. PMID:3279906

  9. Creatine Metabolism and Safety Profiles after Six-Week Oral Guanidinoacetic Acid Administration in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Sergej M.; Niess, Barbara; Stojanovic, Marko; Obrenovic, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives; Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural precursor of creatine, yet the potential use of GAA as a nutritional additive for restoring creatine availability in humans has been limited by unclear efficacy and safety after exogenous GAA administration. The present study evaluated the effects of orally administered GAA on serum and urinary GAA, creatine and creatinine concentration, and on the occurrence of adverse events in healthy humans. Methods and Results; Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomized in a double-blind design to receive either GAA (2.4 grams daily) or placebo (PLA) by oral administration for 6 weeks. Clinical trial registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov, identification number NCT01133899. Serum creatine and creatinine increased significantly from before to after administration in GAA-supplemented participants (P < 0.05). The proportion of participants who reported minor side effects was 58.3% in the GAA group and 45.5% in the placebo group (P = 0.68). A few participants experienced serum creatine levels above 70 µmol/L. Conclusion; Exogenous GAA is metabolized to creatine, resulting in a significant increase of fasting serum creatine after intervention. GAA had an acceptable side-effects profile with a low incidence of biochemical abnormalities. PMID:23329885

  10. Effect of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of oral bosutinib in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Richat; Hug, Bruce A; Leister, Cathie; Burns, Jaime; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2011-12-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606), a dual inhibitor of Src and Abl tyrosine kinases, is being developed for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The effect of coadministration of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of bosutinib was evaluated in an open-label, randomized, 2-period, crossover study. Healthy subjects (fasting) received a single dose of oral bosutinib 100 mg alone and with multiple once-daily doses of oral ketoconazole 400 mg. PK sampling occurred through 96 hours. The least square geometric mean treatment ratios (90% confidence interval [CI]) of C(max(bosutinib+ketoconazole))/C(max(bosutinib alone)), AUC(T(bosutinib+ketoconazole))/AUC(T(bosutinib alone)), and AUC((bosutinib+ketoconazole))/AUC((bosutinib alone)) were assessed. Compared with bosutinib administered alone, coadministration with ketoconazole increased bosutinib C(max) 5.2-fold, AUC(T) 7.6-fold, and AUC 8.6-fold. Ketoconazole coadministration decreased the mean apparent clearance of bosutinib approximately 9-fold and increased the mean (SD) terminal half-life from 46.2 (16.4) hours to 69.0 (29.1) hours. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was comparable between the 2 treatments. The most common AEs were headache, nausea, and increased blood creatinine. No safety-related discontinuations or serious AEs occurred. These PK results indicate that bosutinib is susceptible to interaction with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors. PMID:21148045

  11. Providing vitamin D to confined sheep by oral supplementation vs ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hidiroglou, M.; Karpinski, K.

    1989-03-01

    Serial vitamin D3 (D3) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25 OH D3) concentrations of plasma were measured in confined, shorn sheep that had either been supplemented with vitamin D3 (50 micrograms/d) or exposed daily to ultraviolet irradiation (UVI). In the sheep administered D3 orally, plasma D3 increased continuously until d 35. This was followed by small fluctuations of the plasma D3 concentrations until a plateau was reached after 56 d of supplementation (.94 ng/ml plasma). Plasma 25 OH D3 concentrations increased continuously and plateaued between d 65 to 75 at about 21 ng/ml plasma. In the UVI sheep, plasma D3 and 25 OH D3 concentrations increased continuously for the first 49 d, then plateaued at 2.03 ng D3 and 29.6 ng 25 OH D3/ml. When a plateau was reached in plasma 25 OH D3 concentrations in both treatment groups, a /sup 3/H-labeled tracer dose of 25 OH D3 was given i.v., and disappearance of the /sup 3/H-labeled 25 OH D3 was followed. The UVI group had a faster decline in specific activities during the first exponential phase but a slower decline during the prolonged terminal elimination phase. These differences are reflected in the intercompartmental transfer rates. Our data indicate that UVI is as effective as oral vitamin D3 supplementation for improving vitamin D status of confined sheep.

  12. Oral Clofarabine in the Treatment of Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Estrov, Zeev; Ravandi, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E.; O'Brien, Susan; Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Byrd, Anna; Kwari, Monica; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Efficacy and toxicity profile of orally administered clofarabine were evaluated in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients were treated, of whom 22 had intermediate-2 or high-risk disease (International Prognostic Scoring System). Median age was 70 years (range, 53 to 86), nine patients had secondary MDS, and 20 patients experienced prior therapy failure with hypomethylating agents. Three doses of clofarabine were evaluated: 40 mg/m2, 30 mg/m2, and 20 mg/m2 daily for 5 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 8 weeks. Results Eight patients (25%) achieved complete remission (CR), three had (9%) hematologic improvement (HI), and three had (9%) clinical benefit (CB; overall response rate, 43%). Responses in patients who experience treatment failure with hypomethylating agents included CR in two (10%), HI in two (10%), and CB in two patients (10%). No patients died within 6 weeks of induction. Renal failure occurred in four patients in the context of myelosuppresssion-associated infectious complications. Common adverse events were gastrointestinal and hepatic. Myelosuppression was common, but prolonged myelosuppression (> 42 days) was rare. The toxicity profile was better with lower doses of clofarabine, whereas response rates did not differ significantly. Conclusion Oral clofarabine has achieved a response rate of 43% in patients with higher-risk MDS. The optimal dose and schedule and the appropriate patient population for such therapy remain to be further defined. PMID:20421540

  13. Acute and repeated dose (28 days) oral safety studies of ALIBIRD in rats.

    PubMed

    Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María A; Ares, Irma; Castellano, Victor; Martínez-Larrañaga, Maria R; Corzo, Nieves; Olano, Agustin; Montilla, Antonia; Recio, Isidra; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Miralles, Beatriz; Fornari, Tiziana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Gonzalez, Monserrat; Reglero, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    ALIBIRD, a test substance composed of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, a hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate, and a supercritical extract of rosemary (1:0.5:0.05), was prepared in the laboratory and evaluated for its safety as a multifunctional food additive. In oral toxicity studies (acute and 28 days repeated dose) using Wistar rats, ALIBIRD was administered in a single oral gavage dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight and resulted in no adverse events or mortality; a daily dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight for 28 days by gavage also resulted in no adverse effects or mortality. No abnormal clinical signs, behavioral changes, body weight changes, or changes in food and water consumption occurred in either study. There were no changes in hematological and serum chemistry values, organ weights, or gross or histological characteristics. Based on test results, it is concluded that ALIBIRD is well tolerated in rats at an acute and subchronic (28 days) dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight. PMID:23834798

  14. Oral Interleukin 11 as a Countermeasure to Lethal Total-Body Irradiation in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Alexander F.; Biju, Prabath G.; Lui, Huanli; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Countermeasures against radiation are critically needed. Ideally, these measures would be easy to store, easy to administer and have minimal toxicity. We used oral delivery of interleukin 11 (IL11) in mice exposed to lethal doses of total-body irradiation (TBI). Animals were given IL11 by gavage at various daily doses beginning 24 h after TBI, which continued for 5 days. At a TBI of 9.0 Gy, mice treated with IL11 had a 70% survival at 30 days compared with control group survival of 25% (P = 0.035). At 10.0 Gy, treated animals had 50% survival at 30 days compared with no survivors in the control group. Treated animals had significant improvement in intestinal mucosal surface area and crypt survival. In addition bacterial translocation of coliform bacteria was significantly less in the treated animals. Systemic absorption of IL11 was low in treated animals and effects on the hematopoietic cells were not seen. Serum citrulline levels rebounded significantly faster after irradiation in the IL11 treated animals, indicating quicker recovery of small intestine health. These data suggest that IL11 given orally protects the intestinal mucosa from radiation damage and that this compound is beneficial as a mitigating agent even when started 24 h after radiation exposure. PMID:24219324

  15. Pediatric drugs--a review of commercially available oral formulations.

    PubMed

    Strickley, Robert G; Iwata, Quynh; Wu, Sylvia; Dahl, Terrence C

    2008-05-01

    Pediatric oral formulations can be quite scientifically challenging to develop and the prerequisites for both a measurable dosage form to administer based upon bodyweight, and also taste-masking are two of the challenges unique for pediatric oral formulations. The physicochemical and organoleptic properties of the active drug substance such as solubility, chemical stability, and taste along with the intended dose can determine which formulations are feasible to develop. Oral pediatric formulations are available in 17 different varieties and can be either a ready-to-use formulation such as a solution, syrup, suspension, tablet, scored tablet, chewable tablet, orally disintegrating tablet, or thin strip, or can also be a formulation that requires manipulation such as a powder for constitution to a suspension, tablet for constitution to a suspension, powder for constitution to a solution, drops for reconstitution to a suspension, concentrated solution for dilution, effervescent tablet, bulk oral granules, bulk oral powder, or solid in a capsule to mix with food or drink. Recently there has been an increase in pediatric formulation development inspired by increased regulatory incentives. The intent of this review is to educate the reader on the various types of formulations administered orally to pediatrics, the rationale in deciding which type of formulation to develop, the excipients used, development challenges, the in-use handling of oral pediatric formulations, and the regulatory incentives. PMID:17823956

  16. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  17. Evaluation of the safety of a combination of oral administration of phenylbutazone and firocoxib in horses.

    PubMed

    Kivett, L; Taintor, J; Wright, J

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous administration of a nonselective COX inhibitor and a COX-2 specific NSAID has not been previously reported in horses. The goal of this study was to determine the safety of a 10-day dosage regimen of phenylbutazone and firocoxib, both at their standard dosages, in horses. Six horses were administered 2.2 mg/kg of phenylbutazone and 0.1 mg/kg of firocoxib by mouth, daily for 10 days. Horses were assessed daily for changes in behavior, appetite, fecal consistency, signs of abdominal pain, and oral mucous membrane ulceration. Horses were assessed prior to and on the last day of treatment for changes in serum creatinine, albumin, total protein, and urine-specific gravity. Horses underwent endoscopic examination of the esophagus, stomach, and pylorus prior to and 24 hours after the last treatment. A significant change in serum creatinine and total protein was observed on day 10 of treatment. No other significant findings were noted during the experiment. Results indicated that co-administration of phenylbutazone and firocoxib may cause renal disease. PMID:24354928

  18. Evaluation of changes in serum chemistry in association with feed withdrawal or high dose oral gavage with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) induced gut leakage in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) has been shown to be effective at inducing enteric inflammation in broiler chickens, resulting in increased leakage of orally administered fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran to circulation. In a previous study, two doses of DSS (0.45g/dose) administered as oral gavage re...

  19. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered Program. 282.56 Section 282.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.56 Connecticut State-Administered Program. (a) The...

  20. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered Program. 282.56 Section 282.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.56 Connecticut State-Administered Program. (a) The...

  1. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  2. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  3. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  4. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  5. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  6. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kansas State-Administered Program. 282.66 Section 282.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.66 Kansas State-Administered Program. (a) The State of...

  7. 40 CFR 282.88 - Pennsylvania State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pennsylvania State-Administered Program. 282.88 Section 282.88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.88 Pennsylvania State-Administered Program. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program. 282.96 Section 282.96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96 Virginia State-Administered Program. (a) The State...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  13. 24 CFR 982.51 - PHA authority to administer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false PHA authority to administer program. 982.51 Section 982.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... PHA Plan for Administration of Program § 982.51 PHA authority to administer program. (a) The PHA...

  14. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents... Mountain Ute lands in Utah and New Mexico), and all wells on other Indian lands in New Mexico is administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in...

  16. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents... Mountain Ute lands in Utah and New Mexico), and all wells on other Indian lands in New Mexico is administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in...

  17. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  18. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  19. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  20. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  1. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  2. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  4. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program....

  5. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  10. 40 CFR 147.451 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.451... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS District of...

  11. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.151... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona § 147.151...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1951 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1951... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Pennsylvania §...

  13. 40 CFR 147.101 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.101... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alaska § 147.101...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2851 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2851... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Trust Territory of...

  15. 40 CFR 147.751 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, and 148 and the additional... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.751... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Indiana § 147.751...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  17. 40 CFR 147.2801 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2801... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Commonwealth of...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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