Science.gov

Sample records for administered radioactive dose

  1. [Pharmacokinetics of cefatrizine administered in repeated doses].

    PubMed

    Couet, W; Reigner, B G; Lefebvre, M A; Bizouard, J; Fourtillan, J B

    1988-05-01

    Twelve healthy volunteers received cefatrizine orally at doses equal to 500 mg every 12 h for 5 days. Cefatrizine was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in plasma and urines collected after the first and/or the last administration. Cefatrizine absorption was rapid; its peak plasma level was reached at time 1.79 +/- 0.07 h following the first dose, it was equal to 7.37 +/- 0.31 micrograms.ml-1. Its apparent elimination half-life was equal to 1.50 +/- 0.05 h, it explains the lack of accumulation with time during multiple administrations every 12 hours. Comparisons between peak plasma concentration and area under curves following the first and last dosing showed significant (p less than 0.01) but weak (close to 15%) reduction of these 2 parameters with time which could be explained by a slight reduction of cefatrizine absorption with time. In conclusion, cefatrizine does not accumulate when administered repeatedly at a dose equal to 500 mg every 12 h in young adult, and its pharmacokinetics is virtually linear with time. PMID:3043350

  2. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-05-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance.

  3. Radioactive particles in dose assessments.

    PubMed

    Dale, P; Robertson, I; Toner, M

    2008-10-01

    Radioactive particles present a novel exposure pathway for members of the public. For typical assessments of potential doses received by members of the public, habit surveys and environmental monitoring combine to allow the assessment to occur. In these circumstances it is believed that the probability of encounter/consumption is certain. The potential detriment is assessed through sampling the use of environmental monitoring data and dose coefficients such as that in ICRP 60 [ICRP, 1990. 1990 Recommendations of the international commission on radiological protection. Publication 60. Annals of the ICRP 21 (1-3)]. However, radioactive particles often represent a hazard that is difficult to quantify and where the probability of encounter is less than certain as are the potential effects on health. Normal assessment methodologies through sampling and analysis are not appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive particles either prospectively or retrospectively. This paper details many of the issues that should be considered when undertaking an assessment of the risk to health posed by radioactive particles. PMID:18657886

  4. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  5. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  6. Radioactive Dose Assessment and NRC Verification of Licensee Dose Calculation.

    1994-09-16

    Version 00 PCDOSE was developed for the NRC to perform calculations to determine radioactive dose due to the annual averaged offsite release of liquid and gaseous effluent by U.S commercial nuclear power facilities. Using NRC approved dose assessment methodologies, it acts as an inspector's tool for verifying the compliance of the facility's dose assessment software. PCDOSE duplicates the calculations of the GASPAR II mainframe code as well as calculations using the methodologices of Reg. Guidemore » 1.109 Rev. 1 and NUREG-0133 by optional choice.« less

  7. Radioactive Dose Assessment and NRC Verification of Licensee Dose Calculation.

    SciTech Connect

    BOHN, TED S.

    1994-09-16

    Version 00 PCDOSE was developed for the NRC to perform calculations to determine radioactive dose due to the annual averaged offsite release of liquid and gaseous effluent by U.S commercial nuclear power facilities. Using NRC approved dose assessment methodologies, it acts as an inspector's tool for verifying the compliance of the facility's dose assessment software. PCDOSE duplicates the calculations of the GASPAR II mainframe code as well as calculations using the methodologices of Reg. Guide 1.109 Rev. 1 and NUREG-0133 by optional choice.

  8. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  9. Dose distribution to spinal structures from intrathecally administered yttrium-90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardirossian, George; Hall, Michael; Montebello, Joseph; Stevens, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Previous treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) malignancies by intrathecal administration of 131I-radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies has led to the assumption that more healthy tissue will be spared when a pure beta-emitter such as 90Y replaces 131I. The purpose of this study is to compare and quantitatively evaluate the dose distribution from 90Y to the CSF space and its surrounding spinal structures to 131I. A 3D digital phantom of a section of the T-spine was constructed from the visible human project series of images which included the spinal cord, central canal, subarachnoid space, pia mater, arachnoid, dura mater, vertebral bone marrow and intervertebral disc. Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP4C) was used to model the 90Y and 131I radiation distribution. Images of the CSF compartment were convolved with the radiation distribution to determine the dose within the subarachnoid space and surrounding tissues. 90Y appears to be a suitable radionuclide in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) malignancies when attached to mAb's and the dose distribution would be confined largely within the vertebral foramen. This choice may offer favourable dose improvement to the subarachnoid and surface of spinal cord over 131I in such an application.

  10. Radioactive materials in biosolids : dose modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A. B.; Chiu, W. A; Yu, C.; Aiello, K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J. -J.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhartt, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. EPA; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2006-01-01

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible transport of radioactivity from sludge into the local environment and the subsequent exposure of humans. A stochastic environmental pathway model was applied separately to seven hypothetical, generic sludge-release scenarios, leading to the creation of seven tables of Dose-to-Source Ratios (DSR), which can be used in translating from specific activity in sludge into dose to an individual. These DSR values were then combined with the results of an ISCORS survey of sludge and ash at more than 300 publicly owned treatment works, to explore the potential for radiation exposure of sludge workers and members of the public. This paper provides a brief overview of the pathway modeling methodology employed in the exposure and dose assessments and discusses technical aspects of the results obtained.

  11. Dose Dependence of the Anticoagulant Effect of Intravenously Administered Cellulose Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Drozd, N N; Kuznetsova, S A; Kalinina, T B; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2016-04-01

    Experiments on rabbits showed that increasing the dose of intravenously administered cellulose sulfate from wheat straw (dynamic viscosity 3.4 cP, sulfur content 14.1%) increased plasma clotting time in some coagulation tests and plasma anticoagulant activity. When cellulose sulfate was administered in the dose of 1 mg/kg, plasma clotting time in the presence of the anticoagulant (5 min after administration) was ~3-fold higher than after saline administration. PMID:27165079

  12. Dose and elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kearns, David N; Silberberg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The present experiment tested whether the elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats is dose-dependent. Subjects lever pressed for three different doses of intravenous cocaine - 0.11, 0.33, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion - on a demand procedure where the number of lever presses required per infusion increased within a session. The main finding was that demand for the 0.11 mg/kg dose was more elastic than it was for the two larger doses. There was no difference in demand elasticity between the 0.33 and 1.0 mg/kg doses. These results parallel findings previously reported in monkeys. The present study also demonstrated that a within-session procedure can be used to generate reliable demand curves. PMID:26866971

  13. Brachytherapy Application with in situ Dose-painting Administered via Gold-nanoparticle Eluters

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A proposed new strategy for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in-situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigates the intra-tumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials An experimentally determined intra-tumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10 nm nanoparticles was employed to estimate D for other sizes using the Stoke-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then employed to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel using dose-painting by numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation is carried out as a function of GNP size for clinically applicable low dose rate brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Cs-131. Results Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels/sub-volumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the sizes of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using 7 mg/g GNP concentration, significant DEF (> 20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNPs sizes of 2 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm 50 nm, and 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions Analyses show that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. The findings provide a useful reference for further work towards potential development of a new brachytherapy application with in-situ dose-painting administered via gold

  14. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS IN BIOSOLIDS: DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tra...

  15. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions. PMID:26056878

  16. Dose Ranging, Expanded Acute Toxicity and Safety Pharmacology Studies for Intravenously Administered Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticle Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Lee, Stephen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoparticles dispersions show immense potential as multifunctional agents for in vivo biomedical applications. Herein, we follow regulatory guidelines for pharmaceuticals that recommend safety pharmacology assessment at least 10 – 100 times higher than the projected therapeutic dose, and present comprehensive single dose response, expanded acute toxicology, toxicokinetics, and respiratory/cardiovascular safety pharmacology results for intravenously administered dextran-coated graphene oxide nanoplatelet (GNP-Dex) formulations to rats at doses between 1–500 mg/kg. Our results indicate that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of GNP-Dex is between 50 mg/kg ≤ MTD < 125 mg/kg, blood half-life < 30 minutes, and majority of nanoparticles excreted within 24 hours through feces. Histopathology changes were noted at ≥ 250 mg/kg in the heart, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney; we found no changes in the brain and no GNP-Dex related effects in the cardiovascular parameters or hematological factors (blood, lipid, and metabolic panels) at doses < 125 mg/kg. The results open avenues for pivotal preclinical single and repeat dose safety studies following good laboratory practices (GLP) as required by regulatory agencies for investigational new drug (IND) application. PMID:24854092

  17. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  18. Determination of the radiation dose from administered apolipoprotein tracers in humans.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, V; Fisher, W R; Zech, L A

    1997-10-01

    Radioactive tracers are routinely used in investigation of the metabolism of apolipoprotein kinetics. Here, metabolic studies of apolipoprotein tracers labeled with radioiodine were analyzed to determine the absorbed radiation dose received by the subject. This analysis used compartmental modeling techniques to evaluate the radiation dose to various organs and the total body resulting from radioiodinated tracer injection. In this approach, we combined the published kinetic models of iodine and those of specific apolipoproteins. From the solution of the integrated compartmental models, residence times of the radiation in various source organs, in particular the thyroid, whole body, bladder, and red bone marrow, have been determined for the apolipoproteins apoA-I, apoA-II, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-apoB, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB, each labeled with iodine 123, 133, 124, 131, 126, and 125. These tabulated values were used to calculate radiation doses to the different target organs. The thyroid is the organ that receives the largest dose of delivered radiation, and the importance of the duration of administration of iodine salts in blocking radiation to the thyroid is demonstrated. Optimal block times of 28 days for 131I and 42 days for 125I-labeled apolipoprotein tracers are proposed. When such a protocol is followed, the radiation dose to the thyroid and other organs is small by comparison to radiation doses allowed for workers whose occupation exposes them to radiation. The importance of frequent voiding to reduce the radiation dose to the bladder has also been demonstrated. PMID:9322813

  19. The safety of high-dose buprenorphine administered subcutaneously in cats.

    PubMed

    Sramek, M K; Haas, M C; Coleman, G D; Atterson, P R; Hamlin, R L

    2015-10-01

    The safety of a proprietary formulation of buprenorphine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously (SC) to young cats was investigated in a blinded, randomized study. Four cohorts of eight cats aged approximately 4 months were administered saline, 0.24, 0.72 or 1.20 mg/kg/day buprenorphine SC for nine consecutive days, representing 0×, 1×, 3× and 5× of the intended dose. Cats were monitored daily for evidence of clinical reactions, food and water intake and adverse events (AEs). Physical examinations, clinical pathology, vital signs and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were evaluated at protocol-specified time points. Complete necropsy and histopathologic examinations were performed following humane euthanasia. Four buprenorphine-treated cats experienced AEs during the study, two unrelated and two related to study drug administration. The two cats with AEs considered related to drug administration had clinical signs of hyperactivity, difficulty in handling, disorientation, agitation and dilated pupils in one 0.24 mg/kg/day cat and one 0.72 mg/kg/day cat. All of these clinical signs were observed simultaneously. There were no drug-related effects on survival, injection response, injection site inspections, body weight, food or water consumption, bleeding time, urinalysis, respiration rate, heart rate, ECGs, blood pressures, body temperatures, macroscopic examinations or organ weights. Once daily buprenorphine s.c. injections at doses of 0.24, 0.72 and 1.20 mg/kg/day for 9 consecutive days were well tolerated in young domestic cats. PMID:25623082

  20. Dose-response toxicity studies on tributoxyethyl phosphate orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Laham, S.; Szabo, J.; Long, G.; Schrader, K.

    1985-08-01

    The response of the peripheral nervous system to various dose levels of tributoxyethyl phosphate (TBOP) was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of randomized female and male rats (10 rats/gender/dose level) were administered a single oral dose of TBOP (1.0 to 3.2 g/kg for females;1.0 to 9.0 g/kg for males). Physiological parameters were measured in surviving rats three weeks following TBOP administration. A significant reduction (p<0.05) in caudal nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was observed in both female and male rats. Light and electron microscopic examination of sciatic nerve sections showed degenerative changes in both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of female (2.0 g/kg) and male (6.8 g/kg) groups. Advanced degeneration was observed only in the highest dose level of both genders (3.2 g/kg for females; 8.0 and 9.0 g/kg for males). Although similar morphological changes were observed in both genders, females were more susceptible than males to the toxic effects of this compound.

  1. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  3. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  4. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  5. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  6. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  7. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of

  8. Subchronic chloroform priming protects mice from a subsequently administered lethal dose of chloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Binu K.; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Palkar, Prajakta S.; Mumtaz, Moiz M.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-10-01

    Protection offered by pre-exposure priming with a small dose of a toxicant against the toxic and lethal effects of a subsequently administered high dose of the same toxicant is autoprotection. Although autoprotection has been extensively studied with diverse toxicants in acute exposure regimen, not much is known about autoprotection after priming with repeated exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate this concept following repeated exposure to a common water contaminant, chloroform. Swiss Webster (SW) mice, exposed continuously to either vehicle (5% Emulphor, unprimed) or chloroform (150 mg/kg/day po, primed) for 30 days, were challenged with a normally lethal dose of chloroform (750 mg chloroform/kg po) 24 h after the last exposure. As expected, 90% of the unprimed mice died between 48 and 96 h after administration of the lethal dose in contrast to 100% survival of mice primed with chloroform. Time course studies indicated lower hepato- and nephrotoxicity in primed mice as compared to unprimed mice. Hepatic CYP2E1, glutathione levels (GSH), and covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel did not differ between livers of unprimed and primed mice after lethal dose exposure, indicating that protection in liver is neither due to decreased bioactivation nor increased detoxification. Kidney GSH and glutathione reductase activity were upregulated, with a concomitant reduction in oxidized glutathione in the primed mice following lethal dose challenge, leading to decreased renal covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel, in the absence of any change in CYP2E1 levels. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) intervention led to 70% mortality in primed mice challenged with lethal dose. These data suggest that higher detoxification may play a role in the lower initiation of kidney injury observed in primed mice. Exposure of primed mice to a lethal dose of chloroform led to 40% lower chloroform levels (AUC{sub 15-360min}) in the systemic

  9. Alternative low doses and routes of administering a prostaglandin F2α analogue to induce luteolysis in Nelore cows

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Valsair Matos; Ferreira, João Carlos Pinheiro; Araujo, Gustavo Henrique M.; Gioso, Marilu M.; Bicudo, Sony Dimas; Oba, Eunice; Orlandi, Cassia

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to verify the efficacy of lower doses and alternative routes of a prostaglandin F2α analogue, luprostiol (PGF), for the induction of luteolysis and the precipitation of estrus in nonlactating Nelore cows (Bos taurus indicus). A conventional dose (15 mg) of PGF was compared to doses lower than the conventional dose, which ranges from 10 to 50%, that were administered intramuscularly (IM), intravulvosubmucosally (IVSM), or in the Bai-hui acupuncture site located within the lumbosacral area. The cows were administered PGF 8 day after estrus in the presence of a corpus luteum, and randomly assigned to the following groups: G1 (positive control), 15 mg, IM (n = 23); G2, 7.5 mg, IM (n = 23); G3, 3.75 mg, IM (n = 24); G4, 7.5 mg, IVSM (n = 25); G5, 3.75 mg, Bai-hui acupoint (n = 24); and G6, 1.5 mg, Bai-hui acupoint (n = 25). The results indicated that 50% of a conventional dose of PGF (7.5 mg) resulted in a complete luteal regression (plasma progesterone <1 ng/ml) at Hour 48, and hastened estrus, regardless of whether or not PGF was administered IM or IVSM. Comparatively, 10 or 25% of the conventional dose, even when administered to the Bai-hui acupoint, resulted in an initial reduction in the concentration of progesterone at Hour 24, followed by an increase observed at Hour 48. In conclusion, 25% of a conventional PGF dose administered via the Bai-hui acupoint proved inadequate to induce a complete luteal regression, whereas 50% of a conventional dose administered IM or IVSM was found to be the minimal dose required to induce effectively a complete luteal regression, and to precipitate the onset of estrus in nonlactating Nelore cows. PMID:17106232

  10. Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Destroys Thyroid Tissue Left After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Endocrine & Neuroendocrine Neoplasias Research Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Destroys Thyroid Tissue Left after Surgery Adapted from ... NCI Cancer Bulletin . A low dose of radioactive iodine given after surgery for thyroid cancer destroyed (ablated) ...

  11. PCDOSE. Radioactive Dose Assessment and NRC Verification of Licensee Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, T.S.

    1991-05-01

    PCDOSE was developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to perform calculations to determine radioactive dose due to the annual averaged offsite release of liquid and gaseoues effluent by U.S. commercial nuclear power facilities. Using NRC approved dose assessment methodologies, it acts as an inspector`s tool for verifying the compliance of the facility`s dose assessment software. PCDOSE duplicates the calculations of the GASPAR II mainframe code as well as calculations using the methodologies of Reg. Guide 1.109 Rev. 1 and NUREG-0133 by optional choice.

  12. Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Destroys Thyroid Tissue Left after Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    A low dose of radioactive iodine given after surgery for thyroid cancer destroyed (ablated) residual thyroid tissue as effectively as a higher dose, with fewer side effects and less exposure to radiation, according to two randomized controlled trials.

  13. Safety and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of aclidinium bromide administered twice daily in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, K; Dilzer, S; Jansat, J M; Garcia Gil, E; Caracta, C F; Ortiz, S

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airway obstruction and increased cholinergic tone. The global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) guidelines recommend long-acting anticholinergics for COPD maintenance treatment. Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist developed for the treatment of COPD. A phase I, randomized, single-blind, multiple-dose clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of multiple doses of twice-daily (BID) aclidinium in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male and female subjects received aclidinium 200 μg, 400 μg, 800 μg, or placebo twice daily for 7 days. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 cohorts and 10 subjects in each cohort were randomized (8:2) to either aclidinium or placebo groups. Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs), laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and ECGs. Plasma samples were obtained at multiple time points throughout the study and analyzed for aclidinium and its inactive acid and alcohol metabolites using a fully validated method of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 9 treatment-emergent AEs were reported (1, placebo; 3, aclidinium 400 μg; 5, aclidinium 800 μg), all of which were mild in severity. No serious AEs were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. PK parameters on Day 7 following BID dosing of aclidinium showed that steady state was achieved for aclidinium and its metabolites. On Days 1 and 7, maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of aclidinium were generally observed at the first PK time point (5 min postdose) and rapidly declined, with plasma concentrations generally less than 10% of Cmax by 6 h postdose in all aclidinium groups. Mean effective t(½) after the evening dose on Day 7 ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 h for aclidinium 400 μg and 800 μg, similar to the terminal t(½) observed on Day 1 (4.5-5.9 h

  14. Low-dose cyclophosphamide administered as daily or single dose enhances the antitumor effects of a therapeutic HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shiwen; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Akpeng, Belinda; Wu, Annie; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2013-01-01

    Although therapeutic HPV vaccines are able to elicit systemic HPV-specific immunity, clinical responses have not always correlated with levels of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells in human clinical trials. This observed discrepancy may be attributable to an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in which the CD8(+) T cells are recruited. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are cells that can dampen cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell function. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a systemic chemotherapeutic agent, which can eradicate immune cells, including inhibitory Tregs. The optimal dose and schedule of CTX administration in combination with immunotherapy to eliminate the Treg population without adversely affecting vaccine-induced T-cell responses is unknown. Therefore, we investigated various dosing and administration schedules of CTX in combination with a therapeutic HPV vaccine in a preclinical tumor model. HPV tumor-bearing mice received either a single preconditioning dose or a daily dose of CTX in combination with the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Both single and daily dosing of CTX in combination with vaccine had a synergistic antitumor effect as compared to monotherapy alone. The potent antitumor responses were attributed to the reduction in Treg frequency and increased infiltration of HPV16 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells, which led to higher ratios of CD8(+)/Treg and CD8(+)/CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). There was an observed trend toward decreased vaccine-induced CD8(+) T-cell frequency with daily dosing of CTX. We recommend a single, preconditioning dose of CTX prior to vaccination due to its efficacy, ease of administration, and reduced cumulative adverse effect on vaccine-induced T cells. PMID:23011589

  15. Radioactivity of Tobacco Leaves and Radiation Dose Induced from Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Papastefanou, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece and before cigarette production was studied in order to find out any association between the root uptake of radionuclides from soil ground by the tobacco plants and the effective dose induced to smokers from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as 226Ra and 210Pb of the uranium series and 228Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made radionuclides, such as 137Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the activities of the radioisotopes of radium, 226Ra and 228Ra in the tobacco leaves reflected their origin from the soil by root uptake rather than fertilizers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Lead-210 originated from the air and was deposited onto the tobacco leaves and trapped by the trichomes. Potassium-40 in the tobacco leaves was due to root uptake either from soil or from fertilizer. The cesium radioisotopes 137Cs and 134Cs in tobacco leaves were due to root uptake and not due to deposition onto the leaf foliage as they still remained in soil four years after the Chernobyl reactor accident, but were absent from the atmosphere because of the rain washout (precipitation) and gravitational settling. The annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv/y (average 79.7 μSv/y), while for 228Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv/y (average 67.1 μSv/y) and for 210Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv/y (average 104.7 μSv/y), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective doses of the three radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv/y (average 251.5 μSv/y). The annual effective dose from 137Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv/y (average 199.3 nSv/y). PMID:19440399

  16. Radioactivity of tobacco leaves and radiation dose induced from smoking.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, Constantin

    2009-02-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece and before cigarette production was studied in order to find out any association between the root uptake of radionuclides from soil ground by the tobacco plants and the effective dose induced to smokers from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides , such as 226Ra and 210Pb of the uranium series and 228Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made radionuclides, such as 137Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the activities of the radioisotopes of radium, 226Ra and 228Ra in the tobacco leaves reflected their origin from the soil by root uptake rather than fertilizers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Lead-210 originated from the air and was deposited onto the tobacco leaves and trapped by the trichomes. Potassium-40 in the tobacco leaves was due to root uptake either from soil or from fertilizer. The cesium radioisotopes 137Cs and 134Cs in tobacco leaves were due to root uptake and not due to deposition onto the leaf foliage as they still remained in soil four years after the Chernobyl reactor accident, but were absent from the atmosphere because of the rain washout (precipitation) and gravitational settling. The annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 microSv/y (average 79.7 microSv/y), while for 228Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 microSv/y (average 67.1 microSv/y) and for 210Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 microSv/y (average 104.7 microSv/y), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective doses of the three radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 microSv/y (average 251.5 microSv/y). The annual effective dose from 137Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv/y (average 199.3 nSv/y). PMID:19440399

  17. Evaluation of the adverse event profile and pharmacodynamics of toceranib phosphate administered to dogs with solid tumors at doses below the maximum tolerated dose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The receptor kinase inhibitor toceranib phosphate (Palladia) was approved for use in dogs in 2009 using a dose of 3.25 mg/kg administered every other day. Preliminary data suggests that lower doses of toeceranib may be associated with a reduced adverse event profile while maintaining sufficient drug exposure to provide biologic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the Cmax of toceranib in dogs with solid tumors receiving 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and to document the adverse events associated with this dose rate. Secondary objectives included determination of plasma VEGF concentrations in treated dogs and response to therapy. Results Dogs with solid tumors were administered toceranib at an intended target dose ranging from 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and plasma samples were obtained for analysis of toceranib and VEGF plasma concentrations on days 0, 7, 14 and 30 of the study at 6 and 8 hours post drug administration. Additionally, plasma samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 6, 8, and 12 hours from dogs on day 30 for confirmation of Cmax. Response to therapy was assessed using standard RECIST criteria and adverse events were characterized using the VCOG-CTCAE. Toceranib administered at doses between 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day resulted in an average 6–8 hr plasma concentration ranging from 100–120 ng/ml, well above the 40 ng/ml concentration associated with target inhibition. Plasma VEGF concentrations increased significantly over the 30 day treatment period indicating that VEGFR2 inhibition was likely achieved in the majority of dogs. The lower doses of toceranib used in this study were associated with a substantially reduced adverse event profile compared to the established label dose of 3.25 mg/kg EOD. Conclusions Doses of toceranib ranging from 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day provide drug exposure considered sufficient for target inhibition while resulting in an adverse event profile substantially reduced from that

  18. [Dose-dependent effects of intracisternally administered insulin on rat's behavior and glucose level].

    PubMed

    Shestakova, S A; Stepanov, I I; Eliseeva, A P; Shatik, S V; Fedorova, N V; Klimenko, V M

    2007-03-01

    Rat behavior in the open field and elevated plus-maze as well as glycaemia level were analyzed in rats after intracisternal administration of 2.5, 25, 50 and 200 ng of insulin. Dose-dependent changes were found in both behavioral tests: insulin in low doses (2.5 and 25 ng) increased probability of locomotion and investigative activity in open field, while insulin in high doses (50 and 200 ng) did not alter locomotor activity and showed tendency to weakening of the investigative behavior (especially in the dose of 50 ng). Significant decrease of rat anxiety level during the first 5 minutes of testing was found after administration of 2.5 and 200 ng of insulin and during the next 5 minutes after administration of 2.5 and 25 ng of insulin in elevated plus-maze. The glucose level in rats was increased in 1-2 hours after insulin administration, though glycaemia level did not exceed normal values. Thus revealed alterations of behavior are supposed to be the result of direct insulin influence on central mechanisms of activation and/or suppression of underlying behavioral characteristics of animals. PMID:17598469

  19. Doses to railroad workers from shipments of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fissile and high-level radioactive wastes are currently transported over long distances by truck and by rail transportation systems. The primary form of fissile material is spent reactor fuel. Transportation operations within DOE are controlled through the Transportation Operations and Management System. DOE projected increases in the rate of shipments have generated concern by railroad companies that railroad workers may be exposed to levels of radiation sufficiently high that a radiation protection program may need to be implemented. To address railroad company concerns, the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has estimated doses to railroad workers for two exposure scenarios that were constructed using worker activity data obtained from CSX Transportation for crew and maintenance workers. This characterization of railroad worker activity patterns includes a quantitative evaluation of the duration and rate of exposure. These duration and exposure rate values were evaluated using each of three exposure rate vs. distance models to generate exposure estimates. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Plasma Epinephrine Levels and Cardiovascular Response to High Administered Doses of Epinephrine in Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Troullos, Emanuel S.; Goldstein, David S.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Dionne, Raymond A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of administering an epinephrine-containing local anesthetic on plasma catecholamine levels and cardiovascular parameters were evaluated. Significant elevations were observed following administration of 8 dental cartridges of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:100,000 (144 μg) throughout the 20 minute observation period, while minimal changes were observed in the patients who received 6 cartridges of 3% mepivicaine. One minute after injection, the mean plasma epinephrine level in the group receiving epinephrine was 27.5 times higher than baseline. Concurrent elevations in systolic pressure (15%), heart rate (33%), and the rate-pressure product (52%) were also observed. These results indicate that significant amounts of epinephrine can be systemically absorbed following intraoral injection and the absorbed epinephrine can alter the cardiovascular status of the patient. PMID:3472472

  1. Pharmacokinetics of a low dose and FDA-labeled dose of diclazuril administered orally as a pelleted topdressing in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Hunyadi, L; Papich, M G; Pusterla, N

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of the FDA-approved labeled dose of diclazuril and compare it to a low dose in plasma and CSF in adult horses. During each research period, six healthy adult horses received 0.5 mg/kg of 1.56% diclazuril pellets (Protazil(TM) , Merck Animal Health) compared to the approved labeled dose of 1 mg/kg orally once in two separate phases. A dose of 0.5 mg/kg was calculated to each horse's weight. Blood was then collected immediately before diclazuril administration and then at regular intervals up to a 168 h. After the last blood collection following the single dose at hour 168, a once daily oral dose was administered for the next 10 days to ensure the drug's concentration reached steady-state. To determine the CSF concentration at steady-state, CSF samples were collected after the 9th oral dose. Blood was then collected after the 10th dose and then at regular intervals up to 168 h. A washout period of 4 weeks was allowed before repeating this protocol for the FDA-labeled dose at 1 mg/kg. Plasma and CSF samples were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order oral absorption was fitted to the single administration data. Steady-state pharmacokinetics was performed using noncompartmental analysis for steady-state analysis. The mean (standard deviation) concentration of diclazuril in CSF following the low dose was 26 ng/mL (5 ng/mL), while CSF in the FDA-labeled dose was 25 ng/mL (4 ng/mL), P = 0.3750. Substantial accumulation in plasma occurred at steady-state after the 10th dose for both doses. The results of this study show that diclazuril pellets given at the approved label dose and a lower dose both produce similar plasma drug concentrations at steady-state and attain plasma and CSF concentrations known to inhibit Sarcocystis neurona in cell culture. PMID:25329774

  2. Use of a hand-held, metered-dose aerosol delivery device to administer pirbuterol acetate to horses with 'heaves'.

    PubMed

    Derksen, F J; Olszewski, M; Robinson, N E; Berney, C; Lloyd, J W; Hakala, J; Matson, C; Ruth, D

    1996-07-01

    Aerosol administration of bronchodilators to horses is recommended for treatment of certain airway diseases such as 'heaves'. We have developed a novel, hand-held, metered-dose inhaler and we sought to determine the bronchodilator efficacy of the beta 2 adrenoceptor agonist pirbuterol delivered by this device to horses affected with 'heaves'. To induce airway obstruction, 6 heaves-susceptible horses were stabled, bedded on straw and fed hay. When the maximum change in pleural pressure during tidal breathing (delta Pplmax) was greater than 20 cmH2O on 2 consecutive days, pulmonary function was measured before and 5, 10 and 30 min, as well as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 h after administration of aerosol pirbuterol. Pirbuterol was administered using a metered canister and the hand-held delivery device that was inserted into the left nostril. Either vehicle or pirbuterol acetate (400, 600, 800, 1200 or 1600 micrograms) was administered to each horse. Relief of airway obstruction indicated by changes in pulmonary function was observed within 5 min after administration of both vehicle and pirbuterol. Significant decreases in delta Pplmax and pulmonary resistance (RL) and an increase in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) persisted for the 7 h duration of the experiment. Comparison of the effect of vehicle and pirbuterol at each time period showed that pirbuterol decreased RL and delta Pplmax significantly for up to 1 h. The optimal dose was determined to be 600 micrograms. Immediate response to treatment, magnitude of drug effect and lack of side effects indicated that aerosol pirbuterol is an effective and safe bronchodilator in horses with 'heaves'. The hand-held, metered-dose aerosol delivery device was very convenient and extremely effective and is, therefore, recommended for delivery of therapeutic aerosols to horses. PMID:8818596

  3. HIGH DOSE HYDROXOCOBALAMIN ADMINISTERED AFTER H2S EXPOSURE COUNTERACTS SULFIDE POISONING INDUCED CARDIAC DEPRESSION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Sonobe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Context Severe H2S poisoning leads to death by rapid respiratory and cardiac arrest, the latter can occur within seconds or minutes in severe forms of intoxication. Objectives Determine the time course and the nature of H2S induced cardiac arrest and the effects of high dose Hydroxocobalamin administered after the end of sulfide exposure. Materials and methods In 16 sedated mechanically ventilated sheep, NaHS was infused to reach concentrations of H2S in the blood we previously found to lead to cardiac arrest within minutes following the cessation of H2S exposure. High dose Hydroxocobalamin (5 g) or saline solution was administered intravenously, one minute after the cessation of NaHS infusion. Results All animals were still alive at the cessation of H2S exposure. Three animals (18%) presented a cardiac arrest within 90 seconds and were unable to receive any antidote or vehicle. In the animals that survived long enough to receive either Hydroxocobalamin or saline, 71% (5/7) died in the control group by cardiac arrest within 10 minutes. In all instances, cardiac arrest was the result of a pulseless electrical activity (PEA). In the group that received the antidote, intravenous injection of 5 g Hydroxocobalamin provoked an abrupt increase in blood pressure and blood flow; PEA was prevented in all instances. However, we could not find any evidence for a recovery in oxidative metabolism in the group receiving Hydroxocobalamin, as blood lactate remained elevated and even continued to rise after one hour, despite restored hemodynamics. This, along with an unaltered recovery of H2S kinetics, suggests that Hydroxocobalamin did not act through a mechanism of H2S trapping. Conclusion In this sheep model, there was a high risk for cardiac arrest, by PEA, persisting up to 10 minutes after H2S exposure. Very high dose of Hydroxocobalamin (5 g), injected very early after the cessation of H2S exposure, improved cardiac contractility and prevented PEA. PMID:25546714

  4. Histopathology of myocardium of copper-deficient rats administered a toxic dose a cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, W.; Bielenberg, U.; Seung, S.K.; Reddy, P.P.; Dulin, A.M.; Smith, J.C. )

    1989-02-15

    The present study examined the effects of a single dose of cocaine (Coc) on cardiac ultrastructure in rats fed copper sufficient (Cus) compared to copper deficient (CuD) diets. Weanling males were fed either CuS (n-13) or CuD (n-12) for 7 wk. Ten in each group, (paired for Cu status), were injected (ip) with Coc-HCl (80-90mg/kg bw) 5 served as controls. Rats which survived for >15 min, (CuD 40% CuS (80%) controls), were killed and tissues obtained for histology and Cu analysis. Lower Cu concentrations in heart, liver and serum confirmed the CuD. The hearts were examined by light (Lm) and transmission electron microscopy. Myocardial foci showed necrosis, fibrosis, and inflammation in all given Coc but were more severe in the CuD group. CuS controls (no Coc) showed no similar lesions. Ultrastructural observations supported Lm findings. There was an apparent increase in number of mitochondria (Mito) of variable sizes and shapes. Foci of molding Mito and some with crystalline configuration of cristae were also observed. This was most pronounced in the CuD rats given Coc but absent in CuS animals (no Coc). The data support previous findings of myocardial lesionsin CuD rats the effect of Coc in exacerbation these lesions requires further elucidation.

  5. [Estimation of the committed effective dose of radioactive cesium and potassium by the market basket method].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster after the Great East Japan Earthquake has caused radioactive contamination in food. Using the market basket method, total diet samples in Tokyo, Miyagi prefecture and Fukushima prefecture were analyzed for cesium-134 and -137 (radioactive cesium) and naturally occurring potassium-40 (radioactive potassium) in order to estimate the committed effective doses of these radioactive materials from food. Doses were calculated on the assumption that "not detected" corresponded to zero or to half the limit of detection (values in brackets). The estimated doses of radioactive cesium in Tokyo, Miyagi and Fukushima were 0.0021 (0.0024), 0.017 (0.018) and 0.019 (0.019) mSv/year, respectively. Although the doses in Miyagi and Fukushima were more than 8 times the dose in Tokyo, they were significantly lower than the maximum permissible dose (1 mSv/year) determined by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. The estimated doses of naturally occurring radioactive potassium in these areas were in the range of 0.17-0.20 (0.18-0.20) mSv/year, and there were no significant differences between the areas. PMID:23470869

  6. Code System for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting from an Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material.

    1982-06-15

    WRAITH calculates the atmospheric transport of radioactive material to each of a number of downwind receptor points and the external and internal doses to a reference man at each of the receptor points.

  7. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors. PMID:26276695

  8. Radioactive materials in biosolids : national survey, dose modeling, and publicly owned treatment works (POTW) guidance.

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, R. K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Schmidt, D. W.; Salomon, S. N.; Jones, A.; Chiu, W. A.; Setlow, L. W.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Yu, C.; Goodman, J.; Lenhart, T.; Environmental Assessment; U.S. EPA; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NJ Dept of Environmental Radiation; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication March 1, 2004. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) announced the availability of three new documents concerning radioactive materials in sewage sludge and ash from publicly owned treatment works (POTW). One of the documents is a report presenting the results of a volunteer survey of sewage sludge and ash samples provided by 313 POTWs. The second document is a dose modeling document, using multiple exposure pathway modeling focused on a series of generic scenarios, to track possible exposure of POTW workers and members of the general public to radioactivity from the sewage sludge or ash. The third document is a guidance report providing recommendations on the management of radioactivity in sewage sludge and ash for POTW owners and operators. This paper explains how radioactive materials enter POTWs, provides criteria for evaluating levels of radioactive material in sludge and ash, and gives a summary of the results of the survey and dose modeling efforts.

  9. A Computer Code to Estimate Environmental Concentration and Dose Due to Airborne Release of Radioactive Material.

    1991-03-15

    Version 00 ORION-II was developed to estimate environmental concentration and dose due to airborne release of radioactive material from multiple sources of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. ORION-II is an updated version of ORION and is applicable to the sensitivity study of dose assessment at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  10. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  11. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12-13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9-10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0-6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99-100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88-98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93-99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4-1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses. PMID:25714044

  12. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12–13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9–10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0–6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99–100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88–98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93–99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4–1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses. PMID:25714044

  13. Immunogenicity and safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a 2-dose schedule compared with the licensed 3-dose schedule

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda M; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Schulze, Karin; Ramjattan, Brian; Hillemanns, Peter; Catteau, Grégory; Dobbelaere, Kurt; Schuind, Anne; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS 04-adjuvanted vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) administered according to its licensed vaccination schedule (3-dose, 3D) and formulation (20 µg of each HPV antigen; 20/20F) has previously been demonstrated. This partially-blind, controlled, randomized trial (NCT00541970) evaluated 2-dose (2D) schedules using the licensed 20/20F or an alternative formulation containing 40 µg of each antigen (40/40F), compared with the licensed 3D schedule. Healthy females stratified by age (9–14, 15–19, 20–25 y) were randomized to receive 2 doses of 20/20F at Months (M) 0,6 (n = 240), 40/40F at M0,6 (n = 241) or 40/40F at M0,2 (n = 240), or 3 doses of 20/20F at M0,1,6 (licensed schedule/formulation, n = 239). One month after the last dose, the 3D schedule was not immunologically superior to 2D schedules except in the 40/40F M0,2 group for HPV-16 (lower limit of 95% CI geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) ratio [2D/3D] <0.5). For both HPV-16 and HPV-18, the 2D schedules in girls 9–14 y were immunologically non-inferior to the 3D schedule in women 15–25 y (the age group in which efficacy has been demonstrated) (upper limit of 95% CI for GMT ratio [3D/2D] <2) one month after the last dose. At Month 24, non-inferiority was maintained for the 2D M0,6 schedules in girls 9–14 y vs. the 3D schedule in women 15–25 y. All formulations had acceptable reactogenicity and safety profiles. These results indicate that the HPV-16/18 vaccine on a 2D M0,6 schedule is immunogenic and generally well tolerated in girls 9–14 y and that the 2D schedule is likely adequate for younger females. PMID:22048171

  14. Modeling multicellular response to nonuniform distributions of radioactivity: differences in cellular response to self-dose and cross-dose.

    PubMed

    Howell, Roger W; Neti, Prasad V S V

    2005-02-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are distributed nonuniformly in tissue. While distributions of radioactivity often appear uniform at the organ level, in fact, microscopic examination reveals that only a fraction of the cells in tissue are labeled. Labeled cells and unlabeled cells often receive different absorbed doses depending on the extent of the nonuniformity and the characteristics of the emitted radiations. The labeled cells receive an absorbed dose from radioactivity within the cell (self-dose) as well as an absorbed dose from radioactivity in surrounding labeled cells (cross-dose). Unlabeled cells receive only a cross-dose. In recent communications, a multicellular cluster model was used to investigate the lethality of microscopic nonuniform distributions of 131I iododeoxyuridine (131IdU). For a given mean absorbed dose to the tissue, the dose response depended on the percentage of cells that were labeled. Specifically, when 1, 10 and 100% of the cells were labeled, a D37 of 6.4, 5.7 and 4.5 Gy, respectively, was observed. The reason for these differences was recently traced to differences in the cellular response to the self- and cross-doses delivered by 131IdU. Systematic isolation of the effects of self-dose resulted in a D37 of 1.2 +/- 0.3 Gy. The cross-dose component yielded a D37 of 6.4 +/- 0.5 Gy. In the present work, the overall survival of multicellular clusters containing 1, 10 and 100% labeled cells is modeled using a semi-empirical approach that uses the mean lethal self- and cross-doses and the fraction of cells labeled. There is excellent agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental data when the surviving fraction is greater than 1%. Therefore, when the distribution of 131I in tissue is nonuniform at the microscopic level, and the cellular response to self- and cross-doses differs, multicellular dosimetry can be used successfully to predict biological response, whereas the mean absorbed dose fails in this regard. PMID:15658898

  15. Efficacy of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a low dose for the treatment of porcine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Salichs, M; Sabaté, D; Homedes, J

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral solution of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a lower dose as a complement to antimicrobial therapy in a mild outbreak of porcine respiratory disease complex. The study was performed with 120 pigs with rectal temperature between 39.9 and 41°C and at least 1 sign indicating porcine respiratory disease complex (dyspnea, cough, nasal discharge, or depression). Animals were randomly allocated in 2 groups (treated and control group). Animals in both groups received etiological therapy with doxycycline at 10 mg · kg(-1) in drinking water for 5 d. The animals in the treated group also received 1.5 mg · kg(-1) of ketoprofen during the first 3 d. The reduction in rectal temperature in the treated group was significantly greater during the days of ketoprofen administration and up to 1 d after the end of treatment (P < 0.05). The percentage of dyspneic animals was significantly less (P < 0.05) in the treated group from d 2 to 5 of the study. Also, a significant improvement regarding depression and cough was seen in the animals of the treated group. No statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences were evidenced in productive variables. In conclusion, oral treatment with ketoprofen at 1.5 mg · kg(-1) in combination with antimicrobial therapy was found to be a clinically effective approach in outbreaks of mild porcine respiratory disease complex. PMID:23825328

  16. Internal dose to active marrow and endosteum from radioactive iodine.

    PubMed

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E; Rafat-Motavalli, L; Miri-Hakimabad, H

    2015-04-01

    This study analyses the active marrow and endosteum dose differences between the new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) male and female reference computational phantoms and the stylised phantom for two thyroid agents. The active marrow and endosteum doses from (131)I and (123)I were calculated for 0-55 % maximum thyroid uptakes using the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code. The biokinetic models were taken from ICRP Publication 53. To evaluate the absorbed doses to red marrow and endosteum, the deposited energy was determined for the 19 spongiosa regions and 6 medullary cavities and was mass weighted using the mass fractions available in ICRP Publication 116. The results were then compared with the published values given in ICRP Publication 53. The poor anatomic realism of the stylised phantom used in ICRP Publication 53 leads to important dose differences between the ICRP voxel phantoms and the stylised phantom. The influence of the use of different bone material was also investigated. Underestimations of ∼60% were observed for active marrow doses of the stylised phantom compared with reference voxel phantoms. The results highlight the importance of the accuracy of the shape and inter-organ distances of the anthropomorphic model used. PMID:25157198

  17. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  18. Orally administered betaine has an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine and plasma homocysteine concentrations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ursula; Törrönen, Anneli; Meririnne, Esa; Saarinen, Markku; Alfthan, Georg; Aro, Antti; Uusitupa, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Betaine, i.e., trimethylglycine, is linked to homocysteine metabolism. A 3-mo daily betaine supplementation decreased even normal plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in humans. The pharmacokinetic characteristics and metabolism of betaine in humans have not been investigated in detail. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of orally administered betaine and its acute effect on plasma tHcy concentrations. Healthy volunteers (n = 10; 3 men, 7 women) with normal body weight (mean +/- SD, 69.5 +/- 17.0 kg), 40.8 +/- 12.4 y old, participated in the study. The betaine doses were 1, 3, and 6 g. The doses were mixed with 150 mL of orange juice and ingested after a 12-h overnight fast by each volunteer according to a randomized double-blind crossover design. Blood samples were drawn for 24 h and a 24-h urine collection was performed. Orally administered betaine had an immediate and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration. Single doses of 3 and 6 g lowered plasma tHcy concentrations (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001, respectively), unlike the 1-g dose. After the highest dose, the concentrations remained low during the 24 h of monitoring. The change in plasma tHcy concentration was linearly associated with betaine dose (P = 0.006) and serum betaine concentration (R2 = 0.17, P = 0.025). The absorption and elimination of betaine were dose dependent. The urinary excretion of betaine seemed to increase with an increasing betaine dose, although a very small proportion of ingested betaine was excreted via urine. In conclusion, a single dose of orally administered betaine had an acute and dose-dependent effect on serum betaine concentration and resulted in lowered plasma tHcy concentrations within 2 h in healthy subjects. PMID:16365055

  19. Immune response to the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule up to 4 years after vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda M; Ferguson, Murdo; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Schulze, Karin; Ramjattan, Brian; Hillemanns, Peter; Behre, Ulrich; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, partially-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT00541970) evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of 2-dose (2D) schedules of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Results to month (M) 24 have been reported previously and we now report data to M48 focusing on the licensed vaccine formulation (20 μg each of HPV-16 and -18 antigens) administered at M0,6 compared with the standard 3-dose (3D) schedule (M0,1,6). Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 years) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (n = 240) or 3D at M0,1,6 (n = 239). In the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort, all initially seronegative subjects seroconverted for HPV-16 and -18 antibodies and remained seropositive up to M48. For both HPV-16 and -18, geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) ratios (3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years divided by 2D schedule in girls aged 9–14 years) at M36 and M48 were close to 1, as they were at M7 when non-inferiority was demonstrated. The kinetics of HPV-16, -18, -31, and -45 antibody responses were similar for both groups and HPV-16 and -18 GMTs were substantially higher than natural infection titers. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In summary, antibody responses to a 2D M0,6 schedule of the licensed vaccine formulation in girls aged 9–14 years appeared comparable to the standard 3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years up to 4 years after first vaccination. A 2D schedule could facilitate implementation of HPV vaccination programs and improve vaccine coverage and series completion rates. PMID:24576907

  20. Calculation of the effective dose from natural radioactivity in soil using MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2010-01-01

    Effective dose delivered by photon emitted from natural radioactivity in soil was calculated in this work. Calculations have been done for the most common natural radionuclides in soil (238)U, (232)Th series and (40)K. A ORNL human phantoms and the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B were employed to calculate the energy deposited in all organs. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 74 recommendations. Conversion factors of effective dose per air kerma were determined. Results obtained here were compared with other authors. PMID:20045343

  1. Dose Calculation For Accidental Release Of Radioactive Cloud Passing Over Jeddah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, N. D.; Mayhoub, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    For the evaluation of doses after the reactor accident, in particular for the inhalation dose, a thorough knowledge of the concentration of the various radionuclide in air during the passage of the plume is required. In this paper we present an application of the Gaussian Plume Model (GPM) to calculate the atmospheric dispersion and airborne radionuclide concentration resulting from radioactive cloud over the city of Jeddah (KSA). The radioactive cloud is assumed to be emitted from a reactor of 10 MW power in postulated accidental release. Committed effective doses (CEDs) to the public at different distance from the source to the receptor are calculated. The calculations were based on meteorological condition and data of the Jeddah site. These data are: pasquill atmospheric stability is the class B and the wind speed is 2.4m/s at 10m height in the N direction. The residence time of some radionuclides considered in this study were calculated. The results indicate that, the values of doses first increase with distance, reach a maximum value and then gradually decrease. The total dose received by human is estimated by using the estimated values of residence time of each radioactive pollutant at different distances.

  2. Dose Calculation For Accidental Release Of Radioactive Cloud Passing Over Jeddah

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, N. D.; Mayhoub, A. B.

    2011-12-26

    For the evaluation of doses after the reactor accident, in particular for the inhalation dose, a thorough knowledge of the concentration of the various radionuclide in air during the passage of the plume is required. In this paper we present an application of the Gaussian Plume Model (GPM) to calculate the atmospheric dispersion and airborne radionuclide concentration resulting from radioactive cloud over the city of Jeddah (KSA). The radioactive cloud is assumed to be emitted from a reactor of 10 MW power in postulated accidental release. Committed effective doses (CEDs) to the public at different distance from the source to the receptor are calculated. The calculations were based on meteorological condition and data of the Jeddah site. These data are: pasquill atmospheric stability is the class B and the wind speed is 2.4m/s at 10m height in the N direction. The residence time of some radionuclides considered in this study were calculated. The results indicate that, the values of doses first increase with distance, reach a maximum value and then gradually decrease. The total dose received by human is estimated by using the estimated values of residence time of each radioactive pollutant at different distances.

  3. Simulation of radioactive plume gamma dose over a complex terrain using Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, P T; Venkatesan, R; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    FLEXPART-WRF is a versatile model for the simulation of plume dispersion over a complex terrain in a mesoscale region. This study deals with its application to the dispersion of a hypothetical air borne gaseous radioactivity over a topographically complex nuclear site in southeastern France. A computational method for calculating plume gamma dose to the ground level receptor is introduced in FLEXPART using the point kernel method. Comparison with another similar dose computing code SPEEDI is carried out. In SPEEDI the dose is calculated for specific grid sizes, the lowest available being 250 m, whereas in FLEXPART it is grid independent. Spatial distribution of dose by both the models is analyzed. Due to the ability of FLEXPART to utilize the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological variables as input, particularly the height of the PBL, the simulated dose values were higher than SPEEDI estimates. The FLEXPART-WRF in combination with point kernel dose module gives a more realistic picture of plume gamma dose distribution in a complex terrain, a situation likely under accidental release of radioactivity in a mesoscale range. PMID:25863323

  4. A simplified model to estimate radiological doses from incineration of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, L.E.; Ma, C.W.; Wheeler, T.; Nimmagadda, M.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Owens, K.W.

    1995-06-01

    A simplified calculational model permits a rapid yet realistic estimate of small, but potential radiological doses to onsite workers and the offsite public as a result of transportation, handling, storage, incineration, and maintenance of waste containing trace amount of radioactive materials which is to be processed at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility. The model was developed on the basis of previous detailed studies of eight TSD facilities and builds in the essential features of a TSD facility. The model would provide an understanding of the potential human exposure associated with the radioactive contents in the chemical wastes.

  5. Radionuclide sources and radioactive decay figures pertinent to the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1991-03-01

    The origin and radioactive decay schemes of radionuclides currently expected to be the major contributors to potential radiation doses that populations might have received as a result of nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944 are identified and illustrated in this report. The reactions considered include actinide neutron capture and decay sequences, fission product decays, and neutron activation reactions. It is important to note that the radioactive half-life of a given nuclide does not, by itself, fully determine the significance of a given radionuclide as a potential source term. This report does not address environmental transport mechanisms, behavior in the environment, or radiological dose impact of any of the radionuclides shown. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  6. XG-102 administered to healthy male volunteers as a single intravenous infusion: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study

    PubMed Central

    Deloche, Catherine; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Mouz, Sébastien; Perino, Julien; Abadie, Claire; Combette, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the JNK inhibitor XG-102 in a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, sequential ascending dose parallel group Phase 1 Study. Three groups of male subjects received as randomly assigned ascending single XG-102 doses (10, 40, and 80 μg/kg; 6 subjects per dose) or placebo (2 subjects per dose) as an intravenous (IV) infusion over 60 min. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiography, eye examination, clinical laboratory tests and adverse events (AEs). PK was analyzed using noncompartmental methods. All reported AEs were mild to moderate and neither their number nor their distribution by System Organ Class suggest a dose relationship. Only headache and fatigue were considered probably or possibly study drug related. Headache frequency was similar for active and placebo, consequently this was not considered to be drug related but probably to study conditions. The other examinations did not show clinically relevant deviations or trends suggesting a XG-102 relationship. Geometric mean half-life was similar among doses, ranging from 0.36 to 0.65 h. Geometric mean XG-102 AUC0–last increased more than linearly with dose, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) did not overlap for the two highest doses. Geometric mean dose normalized Cmax values suggest a more than linear increase with dose but 90% CIs overlap. It may be concluded that XG-102 single IV doses of 10–80 μg/kg administered over 1 h to healthy male subjects were safe and well tolerated. PMID:25505576

  7. Radioactivity and gamma-dose rates observed at the Morungaba granites, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Fabio de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha

    2013-07-01

    A ground gamma-ray survey was conducted over part of a large granitic body located near the city of Campinas, eastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The dominant rock types are K-feldspar porphyries-rich granites, porphyritic biotite and hornblend-bearing granites, fine to medium-grained monzogranites and medium to gross grained, biotite and muscovite-bearing monzogranites. The radioactive element distribution reflects local geology, in part re-worked by weathering, and the most radioactive rocks are the K-feldspar-rich granites. The rate of the absorbed dose by the air reflects the integrated effects of the radioactive elements distribution. Most of the observed values vary between 67 and 130 nGy h(-1) and with localised spots with the absorbed dose rate values up to 193 nGy h(-1) and low values of ∼25 nGy h(-1). The mean air absorbed dose rate for the studied area is 77 nGy h(-1). PMID:23222823

  8. Dosing and Safety Implications for Oncologists When Administering Everolimus to Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway are common abnormalities in breast cancer and are associated with the development of resistance to endocrine- and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2-targeted therapies. Because of the significant improvement in progression-free survival for everolimus plus exemestane compared with exemestane plus placebo, everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, was approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), HER-negative, advanced breast cancer whose disease had progressed while receiving letrozole or anastrozole. To provide optimal prevention and management strategies, it is crucial that clinicians are aware of the adverse events (AEs) associated with mTOR inhibition. Understanding the appropriate dose modifications will help reduce toxicity and improve drug tolerance, thus achieving the optimal benefit from everolimus. Analyses of data from the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus 2 trial have shown that, despite a greater frequency of AEs in the everolimus plus exemestane treatment arm, the AEs were effectively managed with temporary dose reductions or interruptions. In some cases, the full dose of everolimus could be resumed. Despite a lower mean dose and duration of exposure in patients aged ≥ 70 versus < 70 years, everolimus plus exemestane was similarly efficacious, suggesting that appropriate dose reductions for toxicity will not adversely impact efficacy. Appropriate modification of the everolimus dose and dose delay according to the severity of AEs, with resumption of the optimal dose of everolimus when toxicity has improved, will positively affect patient outcomes in HR+ advanced breast cancer. PMID:26507507

  9. Estimating the intake of abused methamphetamines using experimenter-administered deuterium labeled R-methamphetamine: selection of the R-methamphetamine dose.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghui; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Galloway, Gantt P; Baggott, Matthew J; Everhart, Tom; Mendelson, John

    2010-08-01

    All addictive drugs produce tolerance and addicts compensate by increasing drug exposure. Thus, the quantity of illicit drug ingested is related to the severity of addiction. Unfortunately, there are no objective methods to estimate intake for most addictive drugs. Using experimenter-administered doses of deuterium-labeled R-methamphetamine (R-[-]-MA-d3), we have developed a method to estimate the amount of abused methamphetamine intake in addicts enrolled in clinical trials. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of single oral doses of R-MA in healthy adults to select a dose of R-MA-d3 to be used as a biomarker for estimation the amount of methamphetamine abuse. This was a five-session randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study in eight subjects. Oral R-(-)-MA was dosed at 0 mg, 1 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg; bioavailability was estimated by slow intravenous dosing (30 minutes) of 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 given with the 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA oral dose condition. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures were obtained. No serious adverse events occurred during the study and all doses of R-MA were well tolerated. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed within our oral dose range of 1 to 10 mg. Complete bioavailability and pharmacologic inactivity were found for all oral doses. These characteristics indicate the advantage of using a small oral R-(-)-MA-d3 dose as a biomarker to estimate exposure to abused methamphetamine. Based on these results, 5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 has been selected as the biomarker dose in future studies. Preliminary findings from our study indicate that experimenter-administered oral R-(-)-MA-d3 may allow estimation of abused methamphetamine intake and exposure. Knowledge of the quantity of methamphetamine intake may allow better estimation of disease severity and treatment efficacy. Experience gained from this study also can be applied to the management of other drug dependence problems such as

  10. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Prescribing and Administering Opioid Doses Based Solely on Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    Pasero, Chris; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Rae, Diana; Broglio, Kathleen; Drew, Debra

    2016-06-01

    The foundation of safe and effective pain management is an individualized, comprehensive pain assessment, which includes, but is not limited to, determining the intensity of pain if the patient is able to report it. An unforeseen consequence of the widespread use of pain intensity rating scales is the practice of prescribing specific doses of opioid analgesics based solely on specific pain intensity. Many factors in addition to pain intensity influence opioid requirements, and there is no research showing that a specific opioid dose will relieve pain of a specific intensity in all patients. The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) holds the position that the practice of prescribing doses of opioid analgesics based solely on a patient's pain intensity should be prohibited because it disregards the relevance of other essential elements of assessment and may contribute to untoward patient outcomes. PMID:27108082

  11. Experimental and Monte Carlo measurements of dose perturbation around a non-radioactive brachytherapy seed in external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, James P.

    I-125 seeds used in permanent prostate brachytherapy are composed of high-Z metals and may number from 40 to over 100 in a typical implant. If any supplemental external beam treatment is administered afterward (as for salvaging failed brachytherapy treatment), it is possible that the seeds may cause substantial dose perturbation which will depend on numerous factors (photon energy, depth, field size, number of seeds, etc.) and this effect needs to be thoroughly investigated. Film measurements were primarily done using Kodak XV2 layered above and below a non-radioactive I-125 seed placed in a groove on a Lucite plate with 5 cm buildup and 10 cm backscatter added at 95 cm SSD. The phantom was irradiated with and without seed with 6 MV photons for a 1 x 1 cm2 field size. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using DOSXYZnrc using the same parameters and compared with Gafchromic EBT2 film. Other comparisons looked at changing energy, depth, and field size in both with and without seeds configuration. This study was further extended to include metals of various Z of the seed's dimensions and also looked into effect of 3 seeds spaced 0.5 cm vertically. Another measurement was done using two opposing fields using single as well as 3 seed configuration to see whether the dose enhancement and attenuation cancel out in multi-field treatments which is the norm clinically in a prostate treatment. For a single I-125 seed, on XV film a localized dose enhancement of 6.3% upstream and -10.9% downstream was noticed. With three seeds, this effect did not change. With two opposing fields, a cold spot around the seed of ~3% was noticed from film measurements. Increasing energy and field size decreased the effect while increase in Z of material greatly increased the effect. Increasing depth appeared to have no effect. DOSXYZnrc and EBT2 film verified maximum dose enhancement of +15% upstream and -20% downstream of the I-125 seed surface. In general, the range of the effect was

  12. Dose- (and time-) dependent blockade of pregnancy in Sprague-Dawley rats administered ammonium dinitramide in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, E R; Wolfe, R E; Feldmann, M L

    1996-01-01

    Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) is a class 1.1 explosive oxidizer that can be used in solid rocket propellant mixtures and explosives. A 90-day general toxicity/ reproductive screen performed on this compound at doses of 162, 103, 29, and 0.0 mg ADN/kg/day resulted in a treatment-related adverse effect on litter production. Incidences of animals producing litters (1/11, 3/12, 12/12, and 11/12, respectively) and mean numbers of pups per litter (7, 7, 16, and 15, respectively) both were statistically significantly less than controls. In a follow-up study, mated dams treated with ADN at the same doses and examined at gestation days (GDs) 10 and 20 showed an effect in fetus loss similar to that seen in the reproductive screen. A pre- versus postimplantation dosing regimen indicated that implantation is vulnerable to ADN effects during the preimplantation period (GDs 1-3). No implantation sites were found in the rats treated with 2000 mg ADN/L drinking water (target dose of 160 mg ADN/kg/day) during GDs 1-3. Numbers of implantation sites found in the rats treated during GDs 4-8 were similar to those found in the control group. The pituitary was not identified specifically in this study as the site of primary action, but serum progesterone was reduced by 27%, which may have resulted in reduced fertility. PMID:8713714

  13. Bronchodilator effect of single-dose formoterol administered by pressurized metered-dose inhaler in children with asthma aged 6 to <12 years receiving budesonide.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E; Gillen, Michael; Eckerwall, Göran; Uryniak, Tom; Trudo, Frank J; Lampl, Kathy L

    2014-01-01

    Dose-response of formoterol via pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) has not been determined in asthmatic pediatric patients aged 6 to <12 years. This study was designed to assess the bronchodilating dose-response of three formoterol pMDI doses in children with stable asthma aged 6 to <12 years receiving twice-daily (b.i.d.) budesonide 160 micrograms. A U.S., multicenter, five-way crossover study compared single doses of formoterol, a long-acting beta-agonist, via pMDI (2.25, 4.5, and 9 micrograms) or dry powder inhaler (12 micrograms; active comparator) and placebo, with a 3- to 14-day washout period between doses. Budesonide pMDI 160 micrograms, an inhaled corticosteroid, was given b.i.d. throughout the study. Fifty-four pediatric patients (mean age, 9.2 years; mean asthma history, 6.1 years) were randomized. All formoterol doses showed significantly higher average 12-hour forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; area under the curve) versus placebo (primary efficacy). Formoterol pMDI 4.5 and 9 micrograms showed significantly greater average 12-hour FEV1 than formoterol 2.25 micrograms (p = 0.0007 and p = 0.0001, respectively). Formoterol also resulted in significant improvement in maximum FEV1 during the 12-hour treatment period (secondary efficacy) with formoterol 4.5-, 9-, and 12-microgram doses versus placebo and the formoterol 2.25-microgram dose. Bronchodilation was not maintained during the 12-hour dosing interval with formoterol 2.25 micrograms. No serious adverse events were reported. Formoterol pMDI showed generally dose-proportional pharmacokinetics to 9 micrograms, as determined by urinary excretion. Single doses of formoterol pMDI showed a dose-response, with formoterol 9 micrograms exhibiting a maximum response, in pediatric patients aged 6 to <12 years with persistent stable asthma maintained on b.i.d. budesonide pMDI 160 micrograms. Clinical trial NCT01136655, www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:24717790

  14. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species. PMID:26352950

  15. [Antiradiation and toxic effect of ATP, AET and serotonin administered in combination to mice. Optimal relations between component doses].

    PubMed

    Benova, D K

    1983-01-01

    It was established that the optimal dose ratio (high effectiveness and minimum toxicity) between the components in the combination: serotonin/AET/ATP was 1/3/45. It was shown that the radioprotective effect was conditioned by AET and serotonin the latter being more significant. ATP played a minor role in the total protective effect decreasing however, the toxicity of the combination. PMID:6611880

  16. Natural radioactivity and associated dose rates in soil samples from Kalpakkam, South India.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, M; Senthilkumar, B; Seshan, B R R; Hariharan, G; Purvaja, R; Ramkumar, S; Ramesh, R

    2010-10-01

    The activity concentration of naturally occurring radioactive elements such as 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured for 46 soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Madras atomic power station, Kalpakkam, South India using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were found to be 22.6 ± 12.6, 92.8 ± 44.3 and 434.1 ± 131.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity concentration of natural radionuclides is higher than the world average except for (226)Ra. The external absorbed gamma dose rates due to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are observed to be 74.6 ± 30.8 nGy h(-1) with a corresponding annual effective dose of 91.5 ± 37.8 µSv y(-1), which are also above the world average. The values of radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are less than the world average. Whereas, the values of the radioactivity level index (I(γ)) and the total gamma dose rate were found to be above the required criterion. PMID:20522563

  17. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Compliance with Recommendation for Sulfonylurea Dose Co-Administered with DPP-4 Inhibitors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomomi; Shiosakai, Kazuhito; Takeda, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Shinji; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Motonobu

    2012-01-01

    After the launch of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), a new oral hypoglycemic drug (OHD), in December 2009, severe hypoglycemia cases were reported in Japan. Although the definite cause was unknown, co-administration with sulfonylureas (SU) was suspected as one of the potential risk factors. The Japan Association for Diabetes Education and Care (JADEC) released a recommendation in April 2010 to lower the dose of three major SUs (glimepiride, glibenclamide, and gliclazide) when adding a DPP-4 inhibitor. To evaluate the effectiveness of this risk minimization action along with labeling changes, dispensing records for 114,263 patients prescribed OHDs between December 2008 and December 2010 were identified in the Nihon-Chouzai pharmacy claims database. The adherence to the recommended dosing of SU co-prescribed with DPP-4 inhibitors increased from 46.3% before to 63.8% after the JADEC recommendation (p < 0.01 by time-series analysis), while no change was found in those for SU monotherapy and SU with other OHD co-prescriptions. The adherence was significantly worse for those receiving a glibenclamide prescription. The JADEC recommendation, along with labeling changes, appeared to have a favorable effect on the risk minimization action in Japan. In these instances, a pharmacy claims database can be a useful tool to evaluate risk minimization actions. PMID:24300302

  19. Radioactivity concentrations in soil and dose assessment for Samsun city centre, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Mustafa Çağatay; Bostancı, Selma

    2012-09-01

    In this study, natural gamma radioactivity levels were determined in the soil samples of the Samsun city centre by using the gamma ray spectrometry method. The analysis carried out with the high-purity germanium gamma spectrometry system has shown that average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were 19±2, 22±4, 521±23 and 15±1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From the gamma analysis of soil samples, the average value of the absorbed gamma dose rates in air and the average value of the external annual effective dose rates were calculated as 45±4 nGy h(-1) and 55±5 µSv y(-1), respectively. The external hazard index has also been calculated and it has been found that the radiation hazard in Samsun is insignificant. PMID:22456989

  20. Hypocholesterolaemic effect of rat-administered oral doses of the isolated 7S globulins from cowpeas and adzuki beans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ederlan S; Amaral, Ana Lucia S; Demonte, Aureluce; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Capraro, Jessica; Duranti, Marcello; Neves, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The role of seed proteins, especially soyabean 7S globulins, in controlling dyslipidaemia is widely acknowledged. Amino acid sequence homology among the proteins of this family could reflect similar biological functions in other species. The aim of the present study was to unveil a hypolipidaemic effect of the 7S globulins from cowpeas (7S-C) and adzuki beans (7S-A), administered orally to rats fed a hypercholesterolaemic (HC; high cholesterol and TAG) diet for 28 d. A total of forty-five rats were divided into five groups (nine rats per group): (1) standard (STD) diet; (2) HC diet; (3) HC diet + 7S-C (300 mg/kg per d); (4) HC diet + 7S-A (300 mg/kg per d); and (5) HC diet + simvastatin (SVT; 50 mg/kg per d), as a control. Significant decreases in food intake and final body weight of rats receiving HC + 7S-C and HC + 7S-A diets compared with groups fed the HC and STD diets were observed. Significant decreases in serum total and non-HDL-cholesterol of 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups were also observed. HDL-cholesterol levels increased in the 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups, while hepatic cholesterol and TAG concentrations were significantly lower than in the HC diet group for the 7S-C-supplemented group only. Faecal excretions of fat and cholesterol in HC diet groups were considerably higher in animals consuming the 7S globulins. The results show that cowpea and adzuki bean 7S globulins promote cholesterol-decreasing effects in hypercholesterolaemic rats even at low dosages, as already observed for other legume seed storage proteins of this family. This main effect is discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26090103

  1. The effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or combined, on the dose and quality of anaesthetic induction with alfaxalone in goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T Brighton; Zeiler, Gareth E; Dzikiti, Loveness N; Garcia, Eva R

    2014-01-01

    Goats are rarely anaesthetised; consequently, scant information is available on the efficacy of anaesthetic drugs in this species. Alfaxalone is a relatively new anaesthetic agent, of which the efficacy in goats has not yet been studied. In this study, the sedative and alfaxalone sparing effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or concomitantly, in goats were assessed. Eight clinically healthy goats, four does and four wethers, were enlisted in a randomised crossover manner to receive intramuscular sedative treatments consisting of saline 0.05 mL/kg, or midazolam 0.30 mg/kg, or butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg, or a combination of midazolam 0.30 mg/kg with butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg before intravenous induction of general anaesthesia with alfaxalone. Following induction, the goats were immediately intubated and the quality of anaesthesia and basic physiological cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were assessed until the goats had recovered from anaesthesia. The degree of sedation, quality of induction and recovery were scored. When compared with saline (3.00 mg/kg), midazolam,administered alone or with butorphanol, caused a statistically significant increased level of sedation and a reduction in the amount of alfaxalone required for induction (2.00 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg, respectively). Butorphanol alone (2.30 mg/kg) did not cause significant changes in level of sedation or alfaxalone-induction dose. During induction and recovery, the goats were calm following all treatments, including the control group. Cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were maintained within clinically acceptable limits. The present study showed that midazolam, administered alone or combined with butorphanol, produces a degree of sedation that significantly reduces the dose of alfaxalone required for induction of general anaesthesia in goats, without causing any major adverse cardiorespiratory effects. PMID:25686277

  2. Derivation of Geometry Factors for Internal Gamma Dose Calculations for a Cylindrical Radioactive Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brent J.; Husain, Aamir

    2002-12-15

    A general methodology was developed to estimate geometry factors for internal gamma dose rate calculations within a cylindrical radioactive waste container. In particular, an average geometry factor is needed to calculate the average energy deposition rate within the container for determination of the internal gas generation rate. Such a calculation is required in order to assess the potential for radioactive waste packages to radiolytically generate combustible gases.This work therefore provides a method for estimating the point and average geometry factors for internal dose assessment for a cylindrical geometry. This analysis is compared to other results where it is shown that the classical work of Hine and Brownell do not correspond to the average geometry factors for a cylindrical body but rather to values at the center of its top or bottom end. The current treatment was further developed into a prototype computer code (PC-CAGE) that calculates the geometry factors numerically for a cylindrical body of any size and material, accounting both for gamma absorption and buildup effects.

  3. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered cefoperazone and sulbactam when given in combination to infected, seriously ill, elderly patients.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J I; Jauregui, L E; Bachmann, K A; Martin, M E; Reitberg, D P

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone and sulbactam in combination were evaluated in six, elderly, seriously ill patients treated with the drug combination for intra-abdominal infections. After giving informed consent, three males and three females aged 63.5 to 77.5 (mean 67.9) years and weighing 54.5 to 86.8 (mean, 67.6) kg were treated with cefoperazone (2.0 g) and sulbactam (1.0 g) infused intravenously every 12 h for at least 5 days. Cefoperazone and sulbactam pharmacokinetics were characterized on both days 1 and 5 of treatment. Eleven serial blood samples were obtained just prior to and following dose 1 on days 1 and 5 of treatment. Mean estimates of cefoperazone maximal concentration in plasma (Cmax), area under the curve of drug concentration in plasma versus time (AUC), half-life (t 1/2), apparent volume of distribution by the area method (Varea), apparent volume of distribution at steady state (Vss), and total body clearance (CL) for day 1 (day 5) were 297.5 237.5) micrograms/ml, 1,247 (1,063) micrograms.h/ml, 7.0 (4.9) h, 16.1 (13.4) liter, 13.1 (14.4) liter, and 28.9 (34.2) ml/min, respectively. Day 1 (day 5) mean values for sulbactam Cmax, AUC, t 1/2, Varea, Vss, and CL were 110.3 (78.0) micrograms/ml, 228 (217) micrograms.h/ml, 3.4 (2.5) h, 26.1 (18.5) liter, 18.9 (15.4) liter, and 97 (94) ml/min, respectively. Both drugs evidenced slower elimination and greater pharmacokinetic variability in these patients compared with values previously reported for normal volunteers. As patients improved during the course of therapy, the only pharmacokinetic parameter significantly changed between days 1 and 5 was a shortened sulbactam t 1/2. Our inability to find substantial evidence of pharmacokinetic normalization may have been related to sample size and study duration. Both drugs were present in potentially therapeutic concentrations for the entire 12-h dosing interval, but without undue accumulation from days 1 to 5. PMID:3395103

  4. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  5. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-03-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

  6. Neoadjuvant Sequential Docetaxel Followed by High-Dose Epirubicin in Combination With Cyclophosphamide Administered Concurrently With Trastuzumab. The DECT Trial.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, Laura; Barba, Maddalena; Giannarelli, Diana; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Marchetti, Paolo; Anzà, Michele; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Natoli, Clara; Di Filippo, Simona; Catenaro, Teresa; Tomao, Federica; Amodio, Antonella; Carpano, Silvia; Perracchio, Letizia; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Anna; Giordano, Antonio; Vici, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    To report the results of the DECT trial, a phase II study of locally advanced or operable HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) treated with taxanes and concurrent anthracyclines and trastuzumab. Eligible patients (stage IIA-IIIB HER2-positive BC, 18-75 years, normal organ functions, ECOG ≤1, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥55%) received four cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel, 100 mg/m(2) intravenously, plus trastuzumab 6 mg/kg (loading dose 8 mg/kg) every 3 weeks, followed by four 3-weekly cycles of epirubicin 120 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m(2) , plus trastuzumab. Primary objective was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, defined as ypT0/is ypN0 at definitive surgery. We enrolled 45 consecutive patients. All but six patients (13.3%) completed chemotherapy and all underwent surgery. pCR was observed in 28 patients (62.2%) overall and in 6 (66.7%) from the inflammatory subgroup. The classification and regression tree analysis showed a 100% pCR rate in patients with BMI ≥25 and with hormone negative disease. The median follow up was 46 months (8-78). Four-year recurrence-free survival was 74.7% (95%CI, 58.2-91.2). Seven patients (15.6%) recurred and one died. Treatment was well tolerated, with limiting toxicity being neutropenia. No clinical cardiotoxicity was observed. Six patients (13.4%) showed a transient LVEF decrease (<10%). In one patient we observed a ≥10% asymptomatic LVEF decrease persisting after surgery. Notwithstanding their limited applicability due to the current guidelines, our findings support the efficacy of the regimen of interest in the neoadjuvant setting along with a fairly acceptable toxicity profile, including cardiotoxicity. Results on BMI may invite further assessment in future studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2541-2547, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187274

  7. Measurement of natural radioactivity in bottled drinking water in Pakistan and consequent dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Fatima, I; Zaidi, J H; Arif, M; Tahir, S N A

    2007-01-01

    Natural radioactivity was determined in 11 different brands of commonly sold bottled drinking water in the federal capital Islamabad and Rawalpindi city of Pakistan using gamma spectrometry technique. Mean concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and (40)K were found to be 11.3 +/- 2.3, 5.2 +/- 0.4 and 140.9 +/- 30.6 mBq l(-1), respectively. The annual cumulative effective doses due to all three natural radionuclides for different age groups of 1-5 y, 5-10 y, 10-15 y and adults (>or=18 y) were estimated to be 4.0, 3.4, 3.1 and 4.1 microSv y(-1), respectively. Among the three natural radionuclides, annual effective doses for all age groups from 226Ra were significant. Children in the age group of 1-5 y appeared to be at risk with respect to the annual effective doses from 226Ra as compared to the other age groups. Results obtained in this study are compared with the reported values from other countries of the world and it was observed that measured activity concentrations of three natural radionuclides in the bottled drinking water were lower than these values. Annual estimated effective doses for all four age groups from the intake of natural radionuclides in bottled drinking water were also found below the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended limit of 0.1 mSv y(-1) as well as the average radiation dose of 0.29 mSv y(-1) received per head worldwide due to ingestion of natural radionuclides assessed by UNSCEAR (2000). PMID:16877468

  8. Multicenter Study of Decitabine Administered Daily for 5 Days Every 4 Weeks to Adults With Myelodysplastic Syndromes: The Alternative Dosing for Outpatient Treatment (ADOPT) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Baer, Maria R.; Slack, James L.; Buckstein, Rena; Godley, Lucy A.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Albitar, Maher; Larsen, Julie S.; Arora, Sujata; Cullen, Michael T.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Decitabine, a DNA-targeted hypomethylating agent, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) on a schedule of 15 mg/m2 administered via intravenous (IV) infusion every 8 hours for 3 days. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of an alternative dosing regimen administered on an outpatient basis in academic and community-based practices. Patients and Methods Patients were treated with decitabine 20 mg/m2 by IV infusion daily for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks. Eligible patients were ≥ 18 years of age and had MDS (de novo or secondary) of any French-American-British (FAB) subtype and an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score ≥ 0.5. The primary end point was the overall response rate (ORR) by International Working Group (IWG 2006) criteria; secondary end points included cytogenetic responses, hematologic improvement (HI), response duration, survival, and safety. Results Ninety-nine patients were enrolled; the ORR was 32% (17 complete responses [CR] plus 15 marrow CRs [mCRs]), and the overall improvement rate was 51%, which included 18% HI. Similar response rates were observed in all FAB subtypes and IPSS risk categories. Among patients who improved, 82% demonstrated responses by the end of cycle 2. Among 33 patients assessable for a cytogenetic response, 17 (52%) experienced cytogenetic CR (n = 11) or partial response (n = 6). Conclusion Decitabine given on a 5-day schedule provided meaningful clinical benefit for patients with MDS, with more than half demonstrating improvement. This suggests that decitabine can be administered in an outpatient setting with comparable efficacy and safety to the United States Food and Drug Administration–approved inpatient regimen. PMID:19528372

  9. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe. PMID:26319734

  10. Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples around nuclear power plant IV in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2008-09-01

    Activity concentrations and distributions of natural and man-made radionuclides in soil samples collected around nuclear power plant IV, Taiwan, were investigated for five years to assess the environmental radioactivity and characterisation of radiological hazard prior to commercial operation. The activity concentrations of radionuclides were determined via gamma-ray spectrometry using an HPGe detector. Data obtained show that the average concentrations of the (238)U and (232)Th series, and (40)K, were within world median ranges in the UNSCEAR report. The (137)Cs ranged from 2.46 +/- 0.55 to 12.13 +/- 1.31 Bq kg(-1). The terrestrial absorbed dose rate estimated by soil activity and directly measured with a thermoluminescence dosemeter (excluding cosmic rays), and the annual effective doses, were 45.63, 57.34 nGy h(-1) and 57.19 microSv, respectively. Experimental results were compared with international recommended values. Since the soil in this area is an important building material, the mean radium equivalent activity, external and inhalation hazard indices and the representative level index using various models given in the literature for the study area were 98.18 Bq kg(-1), 0.27, 0.34 and 0.73, respectively, which were below the recommended limits. Analytical results demonstrate that no radiological anomaly exists. The baseline data will prove useful and important in estimating the collective dose near the new nuclear power plant under construction in Taiwan. PMID:18714131

  11. Natural radioactivity, dose assessment and uranium uptake by agricultural crops at Khan Al-Zabeeb, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Kharouf, Samer J; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F; Dababneh, Munir

    2008-07-01

    Khan Al-Zabeeb, an irrigated cultivated area lies above a superficial uranium deposits, is regularly used to produce vegetables and fruits consumed by the public. Both soil and plant samples collected from the study area were investigated for their natural radioactivity to determine the uranium uptake by crops and hence to estimate the effective dose equivalent to human consumption. Concentrations of (238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (137)Cs and (40)K in nine soil profiles were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry whereas watermelon and zucchini crops were analyzed for their uranium content by means of alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation. Correlations between measured radionuclides were made and their activity ratios were determined to evaluate their geochemical behavior in the soil profiles. Calculated soil-plant transfer factors indicate that the green parts (leaves, stems and roots) of the studied crops tend to accumulate uranium about two orders of magnitude higher than the fruits. The maximum dose from ingestion of 1 kg of watermelon pulp was estimated to be 3.1 and 4.7 nSv y(-1) for (238)U and (234)U, respectively. Estimations of the annual effective dose equivalent due to external exposure showed extremely low values. Radium equivalent activity and external hazard index were seen to exceed the permissible limits of 370 Bq kg(-1) and 1, respectively. PMID:18359539

  12. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  13. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

  14. SIMPLIFIED PRACTICAL TEST METHOD FOR PORTABLE DOSE METERS USING SEVERAL SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES.

    PubMed

    Mikamoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kurosawa, Tadahiro

    2016-09-01

    Sealed radioactive sources which have small activity were employed for the determination of response and tests for non-linearity and energy dependence of detector responses. Close source-to-detector geometry (at 0.3 m or less) was employed to practical tests for portable dose meters to accumulate statistically sufficient ionizing currents. Difference between response in the present experimentally studied field and in the reference field complied with ISO 4037 due to non-uniformity of radiation fluence at close geometry was corrected by use of Monte Carlo simulation. As a consequence, corrected results were consistent with the results obtained in the ISO 4037 reference field within their uncertainties. PMID:27521204

  15. Residual radioactive contamination from decommissioning: Technical basis for translating contamination levels to annual dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the generic modeling of the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to an individual in a population from a unit concentration of residual radioactive contamination. Radioactive contamination inside buildings and soil contamination are considered. Unit concentration TEDE factors by radionuclide, exposure pathway, and exposure scenario are calculated. Reference radiation exposure scenarios are used to derive unit concentration TEDE factors for about 200 individual radionuclides and parent-daughter mixtures. For buildings, these unit concentration factors list the annual TEDE for volume and surface contamination situations. For soil, annual TEDE factors are presented for unit concentrations of radionuclides in soil during residential use of contaminated land and the TEDE per unit total inventory for potential use of drinking water from a ground-water source. Because of the generic treatment of potentially complex ground-water systems, the annual TEDE factors for drinking water for a given inventory may only indicate when additional site data or modeling sophistication are warranted. Descriptions are provided of the models, exposure pathways, exposure scenarios, parameter values, and assumptions used. An analysis of the potential annual TEDE resulting from reference mixtures of residual radionuclides is provided to demonstrate application of the TEDE factors. 62 refs., 5 figs., 66 tabs.

  16. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  17. Natural radioactivity and external dose assessment of surface soils in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huy, N Q; Hien, P D; Luyen, T V; Hoang, D V; Hiep, H T; Quang, N H; Long, N Q; Nhan, D D; Binh, N T; Hai, P S; Ngo, N T

    2012-09-01

    In this study, natural radioactivity in surface soils of Vietnam and external dose assessment to human population, deduced from activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K nuclides, were determined. From 528 soil samples collected in 63 provinces of Vietnam, including five centrally governed cities, the average activities were obtained and equal to 42.77 ± 18.15 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 59.84 ± 19.81 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and 411.93 ± 230.69 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. The outdoor absorbed dose rates (OADRs) in air at 1 m above the ground level for 63 provinces were calculated, and their average value was 71.72 ± 24.72 nGy h(-1), with a range from 17.45 to 149.40 nGy h(-1). The population-weighted OADR of Vietnam was 66.70 nGy h(-1), which lies in the range of 18-93 nGy h(-1) found in the World. From the OADRs obtained, it was estimated that the outdoor annual effective dose and indoor annual effective dose to the population were 0.082  and 0.458 mSv, which are higher than the corresponding values 0.07 and 0.41 mSv, respectively, of the World. The radium equivalent activity Ra(eq) and the external hazard index H(ex) of surface soils of Vietnam are lower than the corresponding permissible limits of 370 Bq kg(-1) and 1, respectively. Therefore, soil from Vietnam is safe for the human population when it is used as a building material. PMID:22434923

  18. Patient biodistribution of intraperitoneally administered yttrium-90-labeled antibody.

    PubMed

    Hnatowich, D J; Chinol, M; Siebecker, D A; Gionet, M; Griffin, T; Doherty, P W; Hunter, R; Kase, K R

    1988-08-01

    Although 90Y is one of the best radionuclides for radioimmunotherapeutic applications, the lack of gamma rays in its decay complicates the estimation of radiation dose since its biodistribution cannot be accurately determined by external imaging. A limited clinical trial has been conducted with tracer doses (1 mCi) of 90Y in five patients who then received second-look surgery such that tissue samples were obtained for accurate radioactivity quantitation by in vitro counting. The anti-ovarian antibody OC-125 as the F(ab')2 fragment was coupled with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, radiolabeled with 90Y and administered intraperitoneally to patients with suspected or documented ovarian cancer. Size exclusion and ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography analysis of patient ascitic fluid and serum samples showed no evidence of radiolabel instability although a high molecular weight species (presumably immune complex) was observed in three patients. Total urinary excretion of radioactivity prior to surgery averaged 7% of the administered radioactivity while at surgery the mean organ accumulation was 8% of the administered radioactivity in serum, 10% in liver, 7% in bone marrow, and 19% in bone with large patient to patient variation. The mean tumor/normal tissue radioactivity ratio varied between 3 and 25. On the assumption that the above radioactivity levels were achieved immediately following administration, that the radioactivity remained in situ until decayed and that the dimensions of tumor were sufficient to completely attenuate the emissions of 90Y, the dose to tumor for a 1-mCi administration would be approximately 50 rad with normal tissues receiving approximately 8 rad. PMID:3404257

  19. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Katherine A.; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, noninvasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50 mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat. PMID:23500335

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of two doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine or one dose of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine, both administered concomitantly with routine immunization to 12- to 18-month-old children

    PubMed Central

    Noya, Francisco; McCormack, Deirdre; Reynolds, Donna L; Neame, Dion; Oster, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the immunogenicity and safety of a two-dose series of a quadrivalent meningococcal (serogroups A, C, Y and W) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACYW-D) administered to toddlers. METHODS: Children were randomly assigned (1:1) at study entry to receive MenACYW-D at 12 and 18 months of age (group 1; n=61) or meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MCC) at 12 months of age (group 2; n=62). All received routine childhood immunizations. A, C, Y and W antibody titres were measured in group 1 before and one month after the 18-month MenACYW-D vaccination and were measured in group 2 at one and seven months post-MCC vaccination. Antibodies elicited by diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed combined with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine coadministered at the 18-month vaccination were measured one month later. Safety data were collected. RESULTS: At 19 months of age, ≥96% in group 1 achieved protective titres for the four meningococcal serogroups after dose 2; 67% in group 2 exhibited protective titres against serogroup C 28 days after MCC vaccination at 12 months of age, declining to 27% seven months later. DTaP-IPV-Hib elicited high antibody concentrations/titres in groups 1 and 2, consistent with historical values. The safety profiles after each dose generated no unexpected safety signals; no serious adverse events were related to vaccination. DISCUSSION: A two-dose series of MenACYW-D given concomitantly with a DTaP-IPV-Hib booster dose at 18 months of age demonstrated a good immunogenicity and safety profile. A two-dose series of MenACYW-D can be used as an alternative to one dose of MCC and provides protection against additional serogroups (NCT ID: NCT01359449). PMID:25285126

  1. Natural radioactivity content in Bulgarian drinking waters and consequent dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kamenova-Totzeva, R M; Kotova, R M; Tenev, J G; Totzev, A V; Badulin, V M

    2015-04-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water from Bulgaria was determined in 994 samples. Nine hundred and seventeen of them are from the Southwestern part of the country. The measured activity of natural uranium, (226)Ra, gross alpha and gross beta activity varied from 20 (5) ng l(-1) to 0.11 (3) mg l(-1), MDA to 0.39 (6) Bq l(-1), MDA to 6.23 (39) Bq l(-1) and 0.030 (7) Bq l(-1) to 0.98 (22) Bq l(-1), respectively. Approximately 33% of the investigated waters exceeded a gross alpha activity of 0.1 Bq l(-1), 1.8% a natural uranium concentration of 0.03 mg l(-1) and 1% an (226)Ra concentration of 0.15 Bq l(-1). Annual effective dose from natural radionuclides ranges from 0.0175 (43) µSv to 95.5 (2.6) µSv. Median values of the contribution of the (226)Ra and uranium to the indicative dose are 10.22 and 0.21 µSv y(-1), respectively. Poor relationships between (226)Ra/nat.U (r, 0.12) and for gross beta activity/natural uranium (nat.U) (r, 0.29) were observed. The relationships between nat.U/gross alpha activity (r, 0.50) and for gross alpha activity/gross beta activity (r, 0.52) concentration distributions were stronger. PMID:25227438

  2. A critical review of measures to reduce radioactive doses from drinking water and consumption of freshwater foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Smith, J T; Voitsekhovitch, O V; Håkanson, L; Hilton, J

    2001-01-01

    Following a radioactive fallout event, there are a number of possible intervention measures to reduce radioactive doses to the public via the surface water pathway. We have critically reviewed the options available to decision-makers in the event of radioactive contamination of surface waters. We believe that the most effective and viable measures to reduce radioactivity in drinking water are those which operate at the water treatment and distribution stage. Intervention measures to reduce concentrations of radioactivity in rivers and reservoirs are expected to be much less viable and efficient at reducing doses via the drinking water pathway. Bans on consumption of freshwater fish can be effective, but there are few viable measures to reduce radioactivity in fish prior to the preparation stage. Lake liming and biomanipulation have been found to be ineffective for radiocaesium, although the addition of potassium to lakewaters appears promising in some situations. Lake liming may be effective in reducing radiostrontium in fish, though this has not, to our knowledge, been tested. De-boning fish contaminated by strontium is probably the most effective food preparation measure, but salting and freezing can also reduce radiocaesium concentrations in fish. The provision of accurate information to the public is highlighted as a key element of countermeasure implementation. PMID:11446114

  3. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies. PMID:26897581

  4. Natural radioactivity contents in tobacco and radiation dose induced from smoking.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Hany A; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2012-06-01

    One of the causative factors for cancer-inducing mechanisms in humans is radioactive elements present in tobacco leaves used in the manufacture of cigarettes. Smoking of tobacco and its products increases the internal intake and radiation dose due to naturally occurring radionuclides that are considered to be one of the most significant causes of lung cancer. In this work, different commercial types of cigarettes, cigar and moassel were collected from market. Naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra and (214)Bi ((238)U series), (228)Ac and (228)Ra ((232)Th series), (40)K  and man-made (137)Cs were measured in tobacco using gamma-ray spectrometer. Results show that the average concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were 4.564, 3.940 and 1289.53 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This reflects their origin from the soil by root uptake and fertilisers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Concentration of (137)Cs was 0.348 Bq kg(-1) due to root uptake or deposition onto the leaf foliage. For smokers, the annual effective dose due to inhalation of (238)U varied from 49.35 to 139.40 μSv(-1) (average 104.27 μSv y(-1)), while of (232)Th from 23.86 to 111.06 μSv y(-1) (average 65.52 μSv y(-1)). The annual effective dose resulting from (137)Cs was varied from 10.96 to 24.01 nSv y(-1) (average 19.41 nSv y(-1)). PMID:21926418

  5. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  6. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  7. Measurements of radioactivity and dose assessments in some building materials in Bitlis, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kayakökü, Halime; Karatepe, Şule; Doğru, Mahmut

    2016-09-01

    In this study, samples of perlite, pumice and Ahlat stones (Ignimbrite) extracted from mines in Bitlis and samples of other building materials produced in facilities in Bitlis were collected and analyzed. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of building materials were measured using NaI detector (NaI(Tl)) with an efficiency of 24%. The radon measurements of building material samples were determined using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radioactivity concentrations ranged from (29.6±5.9 to 228.2±38.1Bq/kg), (10.8±5.4 to 95.5±26.1Bq/kg) and (249.3±124.7 to 2580.1±266.9Bq/kg), respectively. Radon concentration, radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate, excess lifetime cancer risk and the values of hazard indices were calculated for the measured samples to assess the radiation hazards arising from using those materials in the construction of dwellings. Radon concentration ranged between 89.2±12.0Bq/m(3) and 1141.0±225.0Bq/m(3). It was determined that Raeq values of samples conformed to world standards except for perlite and single samples of brick and Ahlat stone. Calculated values of absorbed dose rate ranged from 81.3±20.5 to 420.6±42.8nGy/h. ELCR values ranged from (1.8±0.3)×10(-3) to (9.0±1.0)×10(-3). All samples had ELCR values higher than the world average. The values of Hin and Hex varied from 0.35±0.11 to 1.78±0.18 and from 0.37±0.09 to 1.17±0.13, respectively. The results were compared with standard radioactivity values determined by international organizations and with similar studies. There would be a radiation risk for people living in buildings made of perlite, Ahlat-1 and Brick-3. PMID:27389882

  8. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  9. A kinematic model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive isotopes in the human body for radiological protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure becomes a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplified the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed an exact model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that the above method accord too much with the actual mechanism of metabolism in human bodies, it becomes rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional hydrological tank model. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of this method is to estimate the energy radiated from the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of E. Fermi of beta decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this study are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no intentional and operational parameters of coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to observation of ICRP. Figure.1 compares time

  10. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modeling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modeling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rates above flat, undisturbed fields in Fukushima Prefecture are consistent with decrement by radioactive decay and downward migration of cesium into soil. Analysis of remediation strategies for farmland soils confirmed that topsoil removal and interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer result in similar reductions in the air dose rate. These two strategies are more effective than reverse tillage to invert and mix the topsoil. PMID:26408835

  11. Relating Doses of Contrast Agent Administered to TIC and Semi-Quantitative Parameters on DCE-MRI: Based on a Murine Breast Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Guo, Qi; Zhao, Feixiang; Li, Tongwei; Zhang, Xuening

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes in the time-signal intensity curve(TIC) type and semi-quantitative parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced(DCE)imaging in relation to variations in the contrast agent(CA) dosage in the Walker 256 murine breast tumor model, and to determine the appropriate parameters for the evaluation ofneoadjuvantchemotherapy(NAC)response. Materials and Methods Walker 256 breast tumor models were established in 21 rats, which were randomly divided into three groups of7rats each. Routine scanning and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the rats were performed using a 7T MR scanner. The three groups of rats were administered different dosages of the CA0.2mmol/kg, 0.3mmol/kg, and 0.5mmol/kg, respectively; and the corresponding TICs the semi-quantitative parameters were calculated and compared among the three groups. Results The TICs were not influenced by the CA dosage and presented a washout pattern in all of the tumors evaluated and weren’t influenced by the CA dose. The values of the initial enhancement percentage(Efirst), initial enhancement velocity(Vfirst), maximum signal(Smax), maximum enhancement percentage(Emax), washout percentage(Ewash), and signal enhancement ratio(SER) showed statistically significant differences among the three groups (F = 16.952, p = 0.001; F = 69.483, p<0.001; F = 54.838, p<0.001; F = 12.510, p = 0.003; F = 5.248, p = 0.031; F = 9.733, p = 0.006, respectively). However, the values of the time to peak(Tpeak), maximum enhancement velocity(Vmax), and washout velocity(Vwash)did not differ significantly among the three dosage groups (F = 0.065, p = 0.937; F = 1.505, p = 0.273; χ2 = 1.423, p = 0.319, respectively); the washout slope(Slopewash), too, was uninfluenced by the dosage(F = 1.654, p = 0.244). Conclusion The CA dosage didn’t affect the TIC type, Tpeak, Vmax, Vwash or Slopewash. These dose-independent parameters as well as the TIC type might be more useful for monitoring the NAC response because they allow

  12. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular tumors was investigated with histological, histochemical, and morphometrical methods in male Sprague-Dawley rats continuously administered N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) or N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM) in the drinking water at low doses (0.5 mg DEN/100 ml; 1 mg NNM/100 ml). Groups of control, DEN-, and NNM-treated rats were investigated at 5-week intervals. Similar results were obtained in DEN- and NNM-treated rats. Two types of areas composed of basophilic or glycogenotic hepatocytes were observed preceding the appearance of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas. Besides their cytologic differences, the basophilic and glycogenotic areas induced displayed distinct histochemical features. Both types of areas were detected simultaneously and increased in parallel with time to a similar incidence, but basophilic areas reached larger sizes than the glycogenotic ones. Furthermore, each type of area, which clustered around and along efferent veins, was differently linked to tumorigenesis. Basophilic areas frequently developed into basophilic adenomas and trabecular carcinomas through a characteristic sequence. Early basophilic areas consisted of hepatocytes with lamellar cytoplasmic hyperbasophilia and exhibited the normal laminar liver structure. With time, an increasing number of basophilic areas also contained hepatocytes with powdered diffuse hyperbasophilia, which frequently were arranged in thick trabeculae, showed abundant mitotic figures, and invaded efferent veins. Neither such signs of malignancy nor conversion into basophilic areas or tumors could be established for areas of clear and acidophilic glycogenotic hepatocytes. However, a few small glycogenotic adenomas probably developed from glycogenotic areas. Our data thus underline the central role of basophilic areas for hepatocarcinogenesis. Moreover, taking into account the data from other experiments, it seems likely that although glycogenotic areas may be associated with the

  13. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the oral cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AZD5438 when administered at intermittent and continuous dosing schedules in patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Boss, D. S.; Schwartz, G. K.; Middleton, M. R.; Amakye, D. D.; Swaisland, H.; Midgley, R. S.; Ranson, M.; Danson, S.; Calvert, H.; Plummer, R.; Morris, C.; Carvajal, R. D.; Chirieac, L. R.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Shapiro, G. I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: AZD5438 is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin E-cdk2, cyclin A-cdk2 and cyclin B-cdk1 complexes. Three phase I studies assessed the clinical safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AZD5438 when administered in different dosing schedules. Patients and methods: AZD5438 was administered four times daily, once every 7 days (study 1), for 14 consecutive days followed by 7 days of rest (study 2), or continuously (study 3), to patients with advanced solid tumours. Dose escalation proceeded until the emergence of dose-limiting toxic effects. Results: Sixty-four patients were included across the three studies (19, 17 and 28, respectively). Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. When dosed continuously, 40 mg four times daily was considered intolerable, and due to safety issues, all studies were terminated prematurely. Consequently, no intolerable dose was identified during the weekly schedule. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated dose-proportional exposure, high interpatient variability and accumulation after multiple doses. Skin biopsies indicated reduced retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation at cdk2 phospho-sites; other pharmacodynamic assessments did not reveal consistent trends. Conclusions: AZD5438 was generally well tolerated in a weekly dosing schedule, but not in continuous schedules. The clinical development programme for AZD5438 was discontinued owing to tolerability and exposure data from these studies. PMID:19825886

  14. Radioactive Waste Characterization Strategies; Comparisons Between AK/PK, Dose to Curie Modeling, Gamma Spectroscopy, and Laboratory Analysis Methods- 12194

    SciTech Connect

    Singledecker, Steven J.; Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Henckel, George; Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M.

    2012-07-01

    In the coming fiscal years of potentially declining budgets, Department of Energy facilities such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will be looking to reduce the cost of radioactive waste characterization, management, and disposal processes. At the core of this cost reduction process will be choosing the most cost effective, efficient, and accurate methods of radioactive waste characterization. Central to every radioactive waste management program is an effective and accurate waste characterization program. Choosing between methods can determine what is classified as low level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste (TRU), waste that can be disposed of under an Authorized Release Limit (ARL), industrial waste, and waste that can be disposed of in municipal landfills. The cost benefits of an accurate radioactive waste characterization program cannot be overstated. In addition, inaccurate radioactive waste characterization of radioactive waste can result in the incorrect classification of radioactive waste leading to higher disposal costs, Department of Transportation (DOT) violations, Notice of Violations (NOVs) from Federal and State regulatory agencies, waste rejection from disposal facilities, loss of operational capabilities, and loss of disposal options. Any one of these events could result in the program that mischaracterized the waste losing its ability to perform it primary operational mission. Generators that produce radioactive waste have four characterization strategies at their disposal: - Acceptable Knowledge/Process Knowledge (AK/PK); - Indirect characterization using a software application or other dose to curie methodologies; - Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) tools such as gamma spectroscopy; - Direct sampling (e.g. grab samples or Surface Contaminated Object smears) and laboratory analytical; Each method has specific advantages and disadvantages. This paper will evaluate each method detailing those advantages and disadvantages

  15. Induced radioactivity in CU targets produced by high-energy heavy ions and the corresponding estimated photon dose rates.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Uwamino, Y; Sugita, H; Ito, S; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation experiments were performed at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility, National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The radioactive spallation products in a thick Cu target were obtained for Ar(230, 400 MeV per nucleon), Si(800 MeV per nucleon), Ne(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), C(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), He(100, 230 MeV per nucleon), p(100, 230 MeV) ions. The gamma-ray spectra from irradiated Cu samples inserted into the composite Cu target were measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. From the gamma-ray spectra, we obtained the spatial distribution of radioactive yields of spallation products of 40 nuclides in the Cu sample in the Cu target. From the spatial distribution of radioactive yields, we estimated the residual activity and photon dose induced in the Cu target. The residual activity and photon dose become larger with the increase in projectile energy per nucleon and the range of the projectile beam for the same projectile energy per nucleon. PMID:15280565

  16. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: Biological doses and treatment efficiency for vascularized tumors with or without a central hypoxic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Michiels, C.; and others

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Radioactive atoms attached to monoclonal antibodies are used in radioimmunotherapy to treat cancer while limiting radiation to healthy tissues. One limitation of this method is that only one radioactive atom is linked to each antibody and the deposited dose is often insufficient to eradicate solid and radioresistant tumors. In a previous study, simulations with the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code showed that physical doses up to 50 Gy can be delivered inside tumors by replacing the single radionuclide by a radioactive nanoparticle of 5 nm diameter containing hundreds of radioactive atoms. However, tumoral and normal tissues are not equally sensitive to radiation, and previous works did not take account the biological effects such as cellular repair processes or the presence of less radiosensitive cells such as hypoxic cells. Methods: The idea is to adapt the linear-quadratic expression to the tumor model and to determine biological effective doses (BEDs) delivered through and around a tumor. This BED is then incorporated into a Poisson formula to determine the shell control probability (SCP) which predicts the cell cluster-killing efficiency at different distances ''r'' from the center of the tumor. BED and SCP models are used to analyze the advantages of injecting radioactive nanoparticles instead of a single radionuclide per vector in radioimmunotherapy. Results: Calculations of BED and SCP for different distances r from the center of a solid tumor, using the non-small-cell lung cancer as an example, were investigated for {sup 90}Y{sub 2} O{sub 3} nanoparticles. With a total activity of about 3.5 and 20 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, results show that a very high BED is deposited in the well oxygenated part of the spherical carcinoma. Conclusions: For either small or large solid tumors, BED and SCP calculations highlight the important benefit in replacing the single {beta}-emitter {sup 90}Y attached to each antibody by a {sup

  17. Radioactive labeling of proteins in cultured postimplantation mouse embryos. II. Dose and time dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Klose, J. )

    1989-07-01

    The conditions for optimum incorporation of radioactive amino acids into proteins of cultured postimplantation mouse embryos were investigated under the aspect of using these proteins for two-dimensional electrophoretic separations and fluorography. The aim was to obtain highly radioactively labeled proteins under conditions as physiological as possible. Mouse embryos of Days 8, 10, and 11 of gestation were cultured in Tyrode's solution. Incubation time and concentration of ({sup 3}H (or {sup 14}C))amino acids in the culture medium were varied over a broad range. Embryos were prepared with placenta and yolk sac or without any embryonic envelopes. After culturing, the physiologic-morphologic state of the embryos was registered on the basis of several criteria. The radioactivity taken up by the total protein of each embryo was determined and calculated in disintegrations per minute per milligram protein per embryo. To approach our aim, embryos of different developmental stages had to be cultured under different conditions. A good compromise for Day-8, Day-10, and Day-11 embryos was: embryos prepared with yolk sac (opened) and placenta, 150 microCi radioactive amino acids added per milliliter medium, incubation for 4 to 5 h. For maximum labeling of proteins it is advisable to culture Day-10 embryos without embryonic envelopes under particular conditions.

  18. ISCORS ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVITY IN SEWAGE SLUDGE: MODELING TO ASSESS RADIATION DOSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tran...

  19. Serum thyroxine concentrations following fixed-dose radioactive iodine treatment in hyperthyroid cats: 62 cases (1986-1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, S.M.; Rubin, S.I. )

    1990-09-01

    The medical records of 62 hyperthyroid cats treated with a fixed dose of 4 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) were reviewed. In 60 cats, serum thyroxine concentrations were determined after treatment, allowing evaluation of treatment success. Eighty-four percent of the cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations after treatment. Five of the 60 cats (8%) remained hyperthyroxinemic after treatment. Five cats (8%) were hypothyroxinemic when evaluated within 60 days of treatment. Three of these cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations 6 months after treatment, and none had clinical signs of hypothyroidism. The administration of a fixed dose of 4 mCi of 131I was determined to be an effective treatment for feline hyperthyroidism.

  20. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1987. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 70 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for reach of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mrem to a high of 0.009 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year). 2 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear-power-plant sites in 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Peloquin, R.A.; Schwab, J.D.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1978. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 200 person-rem to a low of 0.0004 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 14 person-rem. The total population dose for allsites was estimated at 660 person-rem for the 93 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 3 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.08 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  2. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from Nuclear-Power-Plant Sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1979. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 1300 person-rem to a low of 0.0002 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 38 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 1800 person-rem for the 94 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.7 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  3. Population Dose Commitments Due to Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plant Sites in 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. A.

    1980-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1977. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ, Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 220 person-rem to a low of 0.003 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 16 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 700 person-rem for the 92 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10{sup -5} mrem to a high of 0.1 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  4. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commericial power reactors operating during 1985. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 61 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 73 person-rem to a low of 0.011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 200 person-rem for the 110 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  5. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1986. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 66 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 31 person-rem to a low of 0.0007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.7 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 110 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup -6} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. 12 refs.

  6. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1984. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 56 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 110 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 5 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 280 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.04 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  7. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1982. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1982. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 51 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 30 person-rem to a low of 0.007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 130 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -7/ mrem to a high of 0.06 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  8. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children

    PubMed Central

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P.; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Innis, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1–4 waned during the 1–3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response. PMID:27022153

  9. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response. PMID:27022153

  10. Comparing radiation dose rates in soils and riverine sediment to track the dispersion of radioactive contamination in Fukushima coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident that occurred in March 2011 led to the formation of a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume on soils located up to 70 km to the northwest of the damaged site. Forests and paddy fields are the dominant land uses in this mountainous region drained to the Pacific Ocean by several rivers that flow across densely inhabited coastal plains. It is then crucial to track the dispersion of radioactive material conveyed by those rivers to estimate the continental supply of radionuclides to the Ocean and to assess redistribution of radioactive sediment in those catchments. Radiations emitted by this contaminated material may indeed lead to an external exposure threat for local populations. As river discharge and sediment concentration data were not available during the first two years that followed the accident, alternative methods had to be developed to track this dispersion. We therefore organized field campaigns every six months and conducted local ground dose rate measurements to estimate whether fresh sediment drape deposits were more or less contaminated compared to local soils. Overall, our results showed that, in those regions exposed to violent typhoons and spring snowmelt, transfers of sediment are massive and episodic, and that they followed a seasonal cycle in 2011-2012. Then, in May 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. This could have indicated a drying-up of the upstream sources of contamination. However, after the violent typhoons that occurred during summer in 2013, dose rates measured in fresh sediment deposits in November 2013 increased again systematically across the region. We thereby suggest that remobilization of contaminated sediment by typhoons and their storage in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the

  11. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1992. Volume 14

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1992. Fifty-year dose commitments for a 1-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager, and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses, which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I, design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 3.7 person-rem to a low of 0.0015 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 0.66 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 47 person-rem for the 130-million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the 10 CFR 50, Appendix I, design objectives.

  12. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  13. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1991. Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1995-04-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1991. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 22 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 88 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives.

  14. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  15. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1980. In addition doses derived from the shutdown reactors at the Three Mile Island site were included. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 40 person-rem to a low of 0.02 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 4 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 180 person-rem for the 96 million people considered at risk.

  16. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

  17. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988. Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

  18. Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch radioactivity monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, Paul H.; Pebesma, Edzer J.; Twenhöfel, Chris J. W.; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.

    2009-08-01

    Detection of radiological accidents and monitoring the spread of the contamination is of great importance. Following the Chernobyl accident many European countries have installed monitoring networks to perform this task. Real-time availability of automatically interpolated maps showing the spread of radioactivity during and after an accident would improve the capability of decision makers to accurately respond to a radiological accident. The objective of this paper is to present a real-time automatic interpolation system suited for natural background radioactivity. Interpolating natural background radiation allows us to better understand the natural variability, thus improving our ability to detect accidents. A real-time automatic interpolation system suited for natural background radioactivity presents a first step towards a system that can deal with radiological accidents. The interpolated maps are produced using a combination of universal kriging and an automatic variogram fitting procedure. The system provides a map of (1) the kriging prediction, (2) the kriging standard error and (3) the position of approximate prediction intervals relative to a threshold. The maps are presented through a Web Map Service (WMS) to ensure interoperability with existing Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

  19. MAXINE: An improved methodology for estimating maximum individual dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-02-01

    An EXCEL{reg_sign} spreadsheet has been developed that, when combined with the PC version of XOQDOQ, will generate estimates of maximum individual dose from routine atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The spreadsheet, MAXINE, utilizes a variety of atmospheric dispersion factors to calculate radiation dose as recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Regulatory Guide 1.109 [USNRC 1977a]. The methodology suggested herein includes use of both the MAXINE spreadsheet and the PC version of XOQDOQ.

  20. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1981. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1981. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways from 48 sites ranged from a high of 20 person-rem to a low of 0.008 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 160 person-rem for the 98 million people considered at risk.

  1. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1983. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 52 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 45 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 170 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk.

  2. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor, administered on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day schedule in patients with no prior treatment for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Henry L; Philco, Manuel; Pimentel, Patricia; Kiyan, Miriam; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Conlan, Maureen G; Saikali, Khalil G; Chen, Michael M; Seroogy, Joseph J; Wolff, Andrew A; Escandon, Rafael D

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had received only prior neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy were treated with escalating doses of ispinesib administered as a 1-h infusion on days 1 and 15 every 28 days until toxicity or progression of disease. Doses were escalated until dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two out of six patients during cycle 1. A total of 16 patients were treated at three dose levels: 10 mg/m (n=3), 12 mg/m (n=6), and 14 mg/m (n=7). Forty-four percent of the patients had locally advanced disease and 56% had metastatic disease; 50% were estrogen receptor positive, 44% were progesterone receptor positive, 25% human epidermal growth factor 2 were positive, and 31% triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2) negative. Sixty-nine percent of patients were chemo-naive. The maximum tolerated dose was 12 mg/m and dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3 increased aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. The most common toxicities included neutropenia (88%; 38% grade 3 and 44% grade 4), increased alanine aminotransferase (56%), anemia (38%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (31%), and diarrhea (31%). No neuropathy, mucositis, or alopecia was reported. Among the 15 patients evaluable for antitumor activity, there were three partial responses, one confirmed by the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (7% response rate). Nine patients (60%) had stable disease lasting at least 42 days, with four (27%) lasting for at least 90 days. Disease stabilization (partial responses+stable disease) was observed in 11 (73.3%) patients. In conclusion, ispinesib was well tolerated when administered on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Limited activity was observed with this schedule in patients with previously untreated advanced breast cancer

  3. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rixe, Olivier; Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M; Cohen, Roger B; Morris, John C; Olowokure, Olugbenga O; Yin, Jian Y; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J

    2015-08-01

    Taxane-gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15-20 mg/m) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700-1000 mg/m) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3-4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  4. Radionuclides and radioactivity in soils within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1974 through 1994: Concentrations, trends, and dose comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Ferenbaugh, J.K.; Perona, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    A soil sampling and analysis program is the most direct means of determining the concentration, inventory, and distribution of radionuclides and radioactivity in the environment within and around nuclear facilities. This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, total uranium, and gross alpha, beta, and gamma activity in soils collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), perimeter, and regional (background) areas over a 21-year period (1974 through 1994). Also, trends in radionuclide concentrations and radioactivity over time and the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) were determined for each site. The upper-limit regional background concentration (95% upper-confidence level) for each radionuclide and level of radioactivity were as follows: {sup 3}H (6.34 pCi mL{sup {minus}1}), {sup 137}Cs (1.13 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 238}Pu (0.008 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 239,240}Pu (0.028 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 241}Am (0.208 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 90}Sr (0.82 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), total uranium (4.05 {micro}g dry g{sup {minus}1}); and gross alpha (35.24 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), beta (13.62 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), and gamma (7.33 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}) activity. Based on the average over the years, most LANL and perimeter soils contained three or more radionuclides and/or gross radioactive that were significantly higher in concentration (p < 0.05) than regional background. The net dose (TEDE minus background) for residents living on-site at LANL or along its perimeter ranged from {minus}0.3 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (east of TA-54) to 3.8 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (east of Ta-53) and from {minus}0.4 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (White Rock) to 3.6 mrem yy{sup {minus}1} (west of LANL on Forest Service land across from TA-8GT site).

  5. The Dose-response of Intrathecal Ropivacaine Co-administered with Sufentanil for Cesarean Delivery under Combined Spinal-epidural Anesthesia in Patients with Scarred Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fei; Xu, Wen-Ping; Zhang, Yin-Fa; Liu, Lin; Liu, Xia; Wang, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal anesthesia is considered as a reasonable anesthetic option in lower abdominal and lower limb surgery. This study was to determine the dose-response of intrathecal ropivacaine in patients with scarred uterus undergoing cesarean delivery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Methods: Seventy-five patients with scarred uterus undergoing elective cesarean delivery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized, double-blinded, dose-ranging study. Patients received 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 mg intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine with 5 μg sufentanil. Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as a T4 sensory level achieved with no need for epidural supplementation. The 50% effective dose (ED50) and 95% effective dose (ED95) were calculated with a logistic regression model. Results: ED50 and ED95 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine for patients with scarred uterus undergoing cesarean delivery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) were 8.28 mg (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.28–9.83 mg) and 12.24 mg (95% CI: 10.53–21.88 mg), respectively. Conclusion: When a CSEA technique is to use in patients with scarred uterus for an elective cesarean delivery, the ED50 and ED95 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine along with 5 μg sufentanil were 8.28 mg and 12.24 mg, respectively. In addition, this local anesthetic is unsuitable for emergent cesarean delivery, but it has advantages for ambulatory patients. PMID:26415793

  6. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children. PMID:24647992

  7. High-flux hemodialysis after administering high-dose methotrexate in a patient with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease and impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnik, Alexander; Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; van der Giet, Markus; Tölle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A young patient develops cerebral posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Despite concurrent significantly impaired transplant kidney function use of add-on high-flux hemodialysis for additional clearance made the administration of high-dose methotrexate feasible in this patient without occurence of acute chronic kidney failure and significant hematological toxicity. PMID:26576275

  8. Evaluation of total effective dose due to certain environmentally placed naturally occurring radioactive materials using a procedural adaptation of RESRAD code.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Z S; Thompson, K H; Kearfott, K J

    2009-07-01

    Due to a recent upward trend in the price of uranium and subsequent increased interest in uranium mining, accurate modeling of baseline dose from environmental sources of radioactivity is of increasing interest. Residual radioactivity model and code (RESRAD) is a program used to model environmental movement and calculate the dose due to the inhalation, ingestion, and exposure to radioactive materials following a placement. This paper presents a novel use of RESRAD for the calculation of dose from non-enhanced, or ancient, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). In order to use RESRAD to calculate the total effective dose (TED) due to ancient NORM, a procedural adaptation was developed to negate the effects of time progressive distribution of radioactive materials. A dose due to United States' average concentrations of uranium, actinium, and thorium series radionuclides was then calculated. For adults exposed in a residential setting and assumed to eat significant amounts of food grown in NORM concentrated areas, the annual dose due to national average NORM concentrations was 0.935 mSv y(-1). A set of environmental dose factors were calculated for simple estimation of dose from uranium, thorium, and actinium series radionuclides for various age groups and exposure scenarios as a function of elemental uranium and thorium activity concentrations in groundwater and soil. The values of these factors for uranium were lowest for an adult exposed in an industrial setting: 0.00476 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) for soil and 0.00596 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) for water (assuming a 1:1 234U:238U activity ratio in water). The uranium factors were highest for infants exposed in a residential setting and assumed to ingest food grown onsite: 34.8 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) in soil and 13.0 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) in water. PMID:19509509

  9. Environmental radioactivity in the UK: the airborne geophysical view of dose rate estimates.

    PubMed

    Beamish, David

    2014-12-01

    This study considers UK airborne gamma-ray data obtained through a series of high spatial resolution, low altitude surveys over the past decade. The ground concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides Potassium, Thorium and Uranium are converted to air absorbed dose rates and these are used to assess terrestrial exposure levels from both natural and technologically enhanced sources. The high resolution airborne information is also assessed alongside existing knowledge from soil sampling and ground-based measurements of exposure levels. The surveys have sampled an extensive number of the UK lithological bedrock formations and the statistical information provides examples of low dose rate lithologies (the formations that characterise much of southern England) to the highest sustained values associated with granitic terrains. The maximum dose rates (e.g. >300 nGy h(-1)) encountered across the sampled granitic terrains are found to vary by a factor of 2. Excluding granitic terrains, the most spatially extensive dose rates (>50 nGy h(-1)) are found in association with the Mercia Mudstone Group (Triassic argillaceous mudstones) of eastern England. Geological associations between high dose rate and high radon values are also noted. Recent studies of the datasets have revealed the extent of source rock (i.e. bedrock) flux attenuation by soil moisture in conjunction with the density and porosity of the temperate latitude soils found in the UK. The presence or absence of soil cover (and associated presence or absence of attenuation) appears to account for a range of localised variations in the exposure levels encountered. The hypothesis is supported by a study of an extensive combined data set of dose rates obtained from soil sampling and by airborne geophysical survey. With no attenuation factors applied, except those intrinsic to the airborne estimates, a bias to high values of between 10 and 15 nGy h(-1) is observed in the soil data. A wide range of

  10. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm(3) (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  11. Synthesis and dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity evaluation of intravenously administered polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Balan; Sathish, Shanmugam; Balakumar, Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are being used in medical imaging, drug delivery, cancer therapy, and so on. However, there is a direct need to identify any nanotoxicity associated with these nanoparticles. However uncommon, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major health concern that challenges pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory agencies alike. In this study we have synthesized and evaluated the dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity of polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PUSPIOs). To assess the hepatotoxicity of intravenously injected PUSPIOs, alterations in basic clinical parameters, hematological parameters, hemolysis assay, serum levels of liver marker enzymes, serum and liver lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, enzymatic antioxidant levels, and finally histology of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain, and heart tissues were studied in control and experimental Wistar rat groups over a 30-day period. The results of our study showed a significant increase in the aspartate transaminase (AST) enzyme activity at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week. Besides, alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) enzyme activity showed a slender increase when compared with control experimental groups. A significant increase in the serum and liver LPO levels at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week was also observed. Histological analyses of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart tissue samples showed no obvious uncharacteristic changes. In conclusion, PUSPIOs were found to posses excellent biocompatibility and Wistar rats showed much better drug tolerance to the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. per week than the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. twice a week for the period of 30 days. PMID:25721486

  12. Methods for estimating doses to organisms from radioactive materials released into the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy recently published an interim dose limit of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} for controlling the radiation exposure of nature aquatic organisms. A computer program named CRITR, developed previously for calculating radiation doses to aquatic organisms and their predators, has been updated as an activity of the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project to facilitate demonstration of compliance with this limit. This report presents the revised models and the updated computer program, CRITR2, for the assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and their predators; tables of the required input parameters are also provided. Both internal and external doses to fish, crustacea, mollusks, and algae, as well as organisms that subsist on them, such as muskrats, raccoons, and ducks, may be estimated using CRITR2. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water to which the organisms are exposed may be entered directly into the user-input file or may be calculated from a source term and standard dilution models developed for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of mefloquine, administered as a fixed-dose combination of artesunate-mefloquine in Indian patients for the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fixed-dose combinations of artemisinin combination therapy are strongly recommended to facilitate drug administration and compliance. New fixed-dose combinations must nevertheless be evaluated in relevant populations in terms of efficacy and pharmacokinetics. Methods A single-arm, open-label, clinical trial was performed in Indian patients with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria to investigate the efficacy and the pharmacokinetics of mefloquine when combined with artesunate in a fixed-dose combination (400/200 mg of mefloquine base/artesunate). The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a population approach. Results Seventy-seven patients were included in the study. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics obeys a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Mean parameter estimates (% inter-individual variability) were as follows: 0.16 h-1 (75%) for the absorption rate constant, 1.13 L/h (30%) for the apparent plasma clearance, 271 L (21%) for the apparent central distribution volume, 344 L (54%) for the apparent peripheral distribution volume, and 1.43 L/h for the apparent distribution clearance. These values were consistent with the pharmacokinetic results described in Thai patients. No significant covariate was found for clearance. Body weight explained the inter-individual variability of the apparent central and peripheral distribution volumes. The PCR-adjusted efficacy of the treatment was 100%. Conclusions The lack of significant covariate explaining the inter-individual variability of mefloquine clearance, combined with the excellent efficacy, supports the use of the standard 200/400 mg of artesunate-mefloquine fixed-dose combination in Indian patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Registration: ISRCTN70618692 PMID:24886117

  14. Letter report: References for radioactive releases to the atmosphere from Hanford operations, 1944--1957. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.

    1991-11-01

    A search was made for published documents related to discharges of radioactive material from Hanford Site facilities to the atmosphere from 1944--1957. The purpose was to list documents that contain data that might be useful in developing a source term for airborne releases. The source term for the radionuclide that contributes most to dose, ioidine-131, is a separate effort. Other source terms will be developed later. This tabulation of published summaries of atmospheric release data shows the type of measurements that were being made from 1944--1957 and the magnitude of the discharges to the atmosphere. In the early years, very little data were collected that related to specific radionuclides. However, most of the key radionuclides were known to be present in effluents from occasional specific radionuclide analyses. 2 refs.

  15. Serum Insulin Aspart Concentrations Following High-Dose Insulin Aspart Administered Directly into the Duodenum of Healthy Subjects: An Open-Labeled, Single-Blinded, and Uncontrolled Exploratory Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ihlo, Charlotte A.; Aksglæde, Karin Bak; Laursen, Torben; Lauritzen, Torsten; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine the bioavailability of high-dose insulin aspart administered directly into the duodenum of healthy subjects. Methods In a pilot study, four subjects each received four escalating doses of a 1-ml solution of insulin aspart (100, 300, 600, and 1000 IU, respectively) directly into the duodenum. In the following main study, eight subjects each received two identical doses of insulin aspart of 1000 IU, in 4- and 8-ml solutions, respectively, directly into the duodenum. Subjects in the main study also received an intravenous and a subcutaneous injection of 4 to 6 IU of insulin aspart. Results A considerable number of samples and, in some cases, consecutive samples revealed significantly increased concentrations of serum insulin aspart. Despite the significant serum insulin aspart concentrations, no significant changes of plasma glucose were measured. Moreover, no significant suppression of endogenous insulin secretion was detected, as assessed by the levels of serum human insulin. Conclusions Administration of high-dose insulin aspart directly into the duodenum of healthy subjects resulted in significantly increased serum insulin aspart concentrations in a high number of consecutive samples using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. However, no significant changes in the levels of plasma glucose or serum human insulin were observed. Thus, the study did not provide any evidence of biological activity of the original insulin aspart molecule after high-dose administration directly into the duodenum. PMID:20144435

  16. Two doses of parenterally administered split influenza virus vaccine elicited high serum IgG concentrations which effectively limited viral shedding upon challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Hovden, A-O; Cox, R J; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2005-10-01

    We have previously found that whole influenza virus vaccine induced a more rapid and stronger humoral response, particularly after the first dose of vaccine, than split virus vaccine in mice. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of whole and split influenza virus vaccines in mice using a nonlethal upper respiratory tract challenge model. We have also investigated the immunological correlates associated with no or very little viral shedding after viral challenge. Vaccination resulted in reduced viral shedding and shortened the duration of infection by at least 2 days. After one dose of vaccine, whole virus vaccine generally resulted in less viral shedding than split virus vaccine. In contrast, two doses of split virus vaccine, particularly the highest vaccine strengths of 15 and 30 microg HA, most effectively limited viral replication and these mice had high concentrations of prechallenge influenza-specific serum IgG. The vaccine formulation influenced the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, and this IgG subclass profile was maintained upon challenge to some extent, although it did not influence the level of viral shedding. The concentration of postvaccination serum IgG showed an inverse relationship with the level of viral shedding after viral challenge. Therefore, serum IgG is an important factor in limiting viral replication in the upper respiratory tract upon challenge of an antigenically similar virus. PMID:16253121

  17. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general. PMID:24179028

  18. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-01

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4"X4" NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  19. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  20. A biosphere modeling methodology for dose assessments of the potential Yucca Mountain deep geological high level radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B M; Smith, G M; Little, R H; Kessler, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent developments in performance standards for proposed high level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain suggest that health risk or dose rate limits will likely be part of future standards. Approaches to the development of biosphere modeling and dose assessments for Yucca Mountain have been relatively lacking in previous performance assessments due to the absence of such a requirement. This paper describes a practical methodology used to develop a biosphere model appropriate for calculating doses from use of well water by hypothetical individuals due to discharges of contaminated groundwater into a deep well. The biosphere model methodology, developed in parallel with the BIOMOVS II international study, allows a transparent recording of the decisions at each step, from the specification of the biosphere assessment context through to model development and analysis of results. A list of features, events, and processes relevant to Yucca Mountain was recorded and an interaction matrix developed to help identify relationships between them. Special consideration was given to critical/potential exposure group issues and approaches. The conceptual model of the biosphere system was then developed, based on the interaction matrix, to show how radionuclides migrate and accumulate in the biosphere media and result in potential exposure pathways. A mathematical dose assessment model was specified using the flexible AMBER software application, which allows users to construct their own compartment models. The starting point for the biosphere calculations was a unit flux of each radionuclide from the groundwater in the geosphere into the drinking water in the well. For each of the 26 radionuclides considered, the most significant exposure pathways for hypothetical individuals were identified. For 14 of the radionuclides, the primary exposure pathways were identified as consumption of various crops and animal products following assumed agricultural use of the contaminated

  1. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  2. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Jung, Seongmoon; Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s-1 Bq-1), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10-5 cGy s-1 and 2.259×10-5 cGy s-1, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1 and 1.071×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Evaluation of Radioactivity Concentration in Tilapia Nilotica and Radiation Dose to Egyptian Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Hannan H.; El-Khawas, Enas H.

    2013-03-01

    One of the three goals of the United Nations for sustainable food security is to ensure that all people have access to sufficient, nutritionally adequate, and safe food. The study was carried out to evaluate the Uranium (238U) and thorium (232Th) concentration in the Bolti (Tilapia nilotica) fish collected from Nasser Lake by using two different types of detectors CR-39 SSNTDs and gamma spectroscopy. The annual intake of Bolti fish was estimated on the basis of their average annual consumption. Calculations were also made to determine the effective dose to an individual consuming such diet.

  4. Calculation of absorbed dose around a facility for disposing of low activity natural radioactive waste (C3-dump).

    PubMed

    Jansen, J T M; Zoetelief, J

    2005-01-01

    A C3-dump is a facility for disposing of low activity natural radioactive waste containing the uranium series 238U, the thorium series 232Th and 40K. Only the external radiation owing to gamma rays, X-rays and annihilation photons is considered in this study. For two situations--the semi-infinite slab and the tourist geometry--the conversion coefficients from specific activity to air kerma rate at 1 m above the relevant level are calculated. In the first situation the waste material is in contact with the air but in the tourist geometry it is covered with a 1.35 m thick layer. For the calculations, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is used. The yield and photon energy for each radionuclide are according to the database of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the tourist situation, the depth-dose distribution through the covering layer is calculated and extrapolated to determine the exit dose. PMID:16604673

  5. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    PubMed

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking. PMID:26942842

  6. Effects of two human chorionic gonadotropin doses administered to the ovarian states during the in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer program

    PubMed Central

    MA, MINGXING; WANG, JIALIN; XU, LIJUN; ZHANG, QINXI; DU, BOTAO; JIANG, XIAOYING; SHI, QINGLI; ZHOU, LILI; LI, BAOXIN; SAITO, HIDEKAZU; KURACHI, HIROHISA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) dose on the pulsatility indices (PI) of the intraovarian artery on the day of follicle aspiration and the oocyte quality, intrafollicular oxidative stress and luteinization. PI was also measured on the day of hCG administration. A total of 15 patients were undergoing the in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) program. To estimate whether there was any difference between the intraovarian artery blood flow and oocyte development of the same patients treated with 5,000 or 10,000 IU hCG, the intraovarian artery blood flow was measured by transvaginal color ultrasonography pulsed wave Doppler, and the follicular fluids and the granulosa cells were collected at follicle aspiration. There were statistically significant differences between the same patients undergoing the two different hCG-dose treatments in which the first protocol included 10,000 IU and the second protocol included 5,000 IU hCG treatment. These differences were apparent in the PI of intraovarian artery blood flow on the day of follicle aspiration (P=0.0023), in the incidence of apoptosis in cumulus (ApoC) and mural (ApoM) granulosa cells (ApoC, P=0.0077; ApoM, P=0.0128), in the total oocytes retrieved (P=0.0342) and in the follicle fluid progesterone concentration (P=0.0044). There were no significant differences between the two protocols in the PI of intraovarian artery blood flow on the day of hCG administration (P=0.4326), serum steroid on the day of follicle aspiration [serum P, P>0.9999; serum estradiol (E2), P=0.8589], follicle fluid E2 concentration (P=0.8939), mature oocyte rate (P=0.3743) and total mature oocytes retrieved (P=0.2026). In conclusion, the dose of hCG administration can significantly affect the intraovarian artery blood flow and the development of follicles and oocytes in an IVF-ET program. PMID:26075075

  7. Efficacy and safety of ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate administered in a hydrofluoroalkane metered-dose inhaler for the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Amal; Bhargava, Salil; Singh, Virendra; Talwar, Deepak; Whig, Jagdeep; Rebello, Juliet; Purandare, Shrinivas; Gogtay, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has contributed to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer resulting in serious health concerns. Ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate CFC-pressurized metered-dose inhalers (IB/SAL-CFC pMDI) have been in widespread use for many years without any apparent ill consequences. This combination has now been reformulated using the hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant. This study sought to establish the clinical noninferiority of a new HFA-containing IB/SAL pMDI to the conventional IB/SAL-CFC pMDI in subjects with mild/moderate COPD. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study in two consecutive periods: a 14-day run-in period followed by a 85-day treatment period. Eligible mild-to-moderate stable COPD subjects aged 40−75 years were enrolled into the study and entered the run-in period during which subjects withdrew all the bronchodilators, except for salbutamol as rescue medication. Subjects were randomized to 85 days treatment with either IB/SAL-HFA or IB/SAL-CFC, 20 μg qid. Results Of the 290 randomized patients, 249 completed the study. The primary efficacy variable was the change in forced expiratory volume in one second from predose to 60 minutes after dosing on day 85. At the end of the treatment period, the adjusted mean change in forced expiratory volume in one second at 60 minutes was 123 mL in the IB/SAL-HFA pMDI group and 115 mL in the IB/SAL-CFC pMDI group. Because the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference (−62 mL) was well within the noninferiority margin (−100 mL), the HFA formulation was deemed clinically noninferior to the CFC formulation. This finding was supported by secondary efficacy assessments. Both formulations of IB/SAL were well tolerated during the prolonged multiple dosing. Conclusion It is concluded that IB/SAL-HFA pMDI provides effective bronchodilation of similar degree to that achieved with IB/SAL-CFC p

  8. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

  9. Assessment of natural radioactivity levels and associated dose rates in soil samples from Northern Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Vikas; Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit; Ramola, R C

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) has been carried out in 40 soil samples collected from four districts of the Northern Rajasthan, India using gamma-ray spectrometry with an NaI(Tl) detector. The activity concentrations of the samples range from 38±9 to 65±11 Bq kg(-1) with a mean value of 52 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, from 8±8 to 32±9 Bq kg(-1) with a mean value of 19 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and from 929±185 to 1894±249 Bq kg(-1) with a mean value of 1627 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. The measured activity concentration of (226)Ra and (40)K in soil was higher and for (232)Th was lower than the worldwide range. Radium equivalent activities were calculated for the soil samples to assess the radiation hazards arising due to the use of these soils in the construction of buildings. The calculated average radium equivalent activity was 205±20 Bq kg(-1), which is less than the recommended limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The total absorbed dose rate calculated from the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranges from 77 to 123 nGy h(-1) with an average value of 103 nGy h(-1). The mean external (Hex) and internal hazard indices (Hin) for the area under study were determined to be 0.55 and 0.69, respectively. The corresponding average annual effective dose was found to be 0.63 mSv. PMID:23943368

  10. Radioactive contamination in the Arctic--sources, dose assessment and potential risks.

    PubMed

    Strand, P; Howard, B J; Aarkrog, A; Balonov, M; Tsaturov, Y; Bewers, J M; Salo, A; Sickel, M; Bergman, R; Rissanen, K

    2002-01-01

    Arctic residents, whose diets comprise a large proportion of traditional terrestrial and freshwater foodstuffs, have received the highest radiation exposures to artificial radionuclides in the Arctic. Doses to members of both the average population and selected indigenous population groups in the Arctic depend on the rates of consumption of locally-derived terrestrial and freshwater foodstuffs, including reindeer/caribou meat, freshwater fish, goat cheese, berries, mushrooms and lamb. The vulnerability of arctic populations, especially indigenous peoples, to radiocaesium deposition is much greater than for temperate populations due to the importance of terrestrial, semi-natural exposure pathways where there is high radiocaesium transfer and a long ecological half-life for this radionuclide. In contrast, arctic residents with diets largely comprising marine foodstuffs have received comparatively low radiation exposures because of the lower levels of contamination of marine organisms. Using arctic-specific information, the predicted collective dose is five times higher than that estimated by UNSCEAR for temperate areas. The greatest threats to human health and the environment posed by human and industrial activities in the Arctic are associated with the potential for accidents in the civilian and military nuclear sectors. Of most concern are the consequences of potential accidents in nuclear power plant reactors, during the handling and storage of nuclear weapons, in the decommissioning of nuclear submarines and in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from vessels. It is important to foster a close association between risk assessment and practical programmes for the purposes of improving monitoring, formulating response strategies and implementing action plans. PMID:11936613

  11. Re-suspension of the radioactive fallout after the Fukushima accident: risk of internal dose during the first week and the first two months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 contaminated an area of more than 100 km in diameter by radioactive material with amount of about 10-20% of that by the Chernobyl accident. According to the Chernobyl experience, a part of fallout radionuclide is expected to be re-suspended by wind, causing possible risk of internal dose. However, this re-suspension process and its amounts have not been studied very much due to the difficulty of direct measurement of low-density dusts. To estimate forms and periods of the re-suspension of the radioactive fallout, we used both the radiation dose rate data and vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 km away from the accident site. The data indicates: (1) During 14-15 March, the radioactive dust is most likely suspended in the air near the ground. (2) During 2-7 UT on 16 March, the radioactive dust is most likely blown up from the surface by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) During 16-20 March, the radioactive dust most likely stayed re-suspended. (4) After the wet contamination on 20 March until late April, the radioactive fallout on the ground are re-suspended during daytime by daily convection due to sunshine, and transported to downwind direction. (5) At more than 30 km distance from the accident site, the re-suspension most likely ceased by the end of April. However, no data is available within 20 km distance from the accident site. Yamauchi, et al. (2012): Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement, Ann. Geophys., 30, 49-56, doi:10.5194/angeo-30-49-2012. Yamauchi (2012): Secondary wind transport of radioactive materials after the Fukushima accident, Earth Planet Space, accepted for publication.

  12. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame. PMID:1946186

  13. Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam.

    PubMed

    Stebler, T; Guentert, T W

    1993-08-01

    Bioavailability of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam relative to single oral and relative to intravenous doses was determined in two separate randomized crossover studies. Twelve healthy volunteers (12 males, age 20-30 years) received a rapid intravenous injection and a single intramuscular dose and 12 other subjects (11 males, 1 female, age 21-25 years) a single oral and a single intramuscular dose of 20 mg of tenoxicam on two different occasions. The wash-out period between the two consecutive treatments was 4 weeks. Plasma concentrations after dosing were determined by a specific HPLC method. Differences in tenoxicam concentration-time profiles after the different routes of administration were limited to the first 2 h after dosing. Later, plasma concentrations were almost superimposable within and across the two studies. The extent of absorption of intramuscularly administered tenoxicam was complete (mean +/- CV per cent: F(abs) 0.99 +/- 20 per cent) with no difference between the two extravascular administrations (F(rel) 0.95 +/- 10 per cent, intramuscular vs oral). After intramuscular administration tenoxicam was more rapidly absorbed compared to the oral dose (Tmax 0.71 h +/- 80 per cent vs 1.4 h +/- 62 per cent; p > 0.05). Peak concentrations after oral and intramuscular administration (Cmax 2.5 mg l-1 +/- 19 per cent vs 2.7 mg l-1 +/- 14 per cent; p < 0.05) were very similar. PMID:8218966

  14. High doses of intravenously administered titanium dioxide nanoparticles accumulate in the kidneys of rainbow trout but with no observable impairment of renal function.

    PubMed

    Scown, Tessa M; van Aerle, Ronny; Johnston, Blair D; Cumberland, Susan; Lead, Jamie R; Owen, Richard; Tyler, Charles R

    2009-06-01

    Our recent work suggests limited uptake of unstabilized metal oxide nanoparticles via water into fish, however, some other studies have indicated such exposures can induce oxidative stress. To investigate tissue distribution and toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles that may enter into fish, we conducted a series of injection studies. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were intravenously injected with 100 microg TiO(2) nanoparticles and the content of titanium in blood, brain, gills, liver, and kidney quantified at time points between 6 h and 90 days using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Injected Ti was concentrated in the kidneys and remained there up to 21 days, however, there was evidence of clearance of TiO(2) at 90 days. Ti accumulation in the liver was 15 times lower than in the kidney with no apparent clearance. Using TEM we showed nanoparticles were localized in tissue vesicles surrounding the kidney tubules. In a second injection study, rainbow trout were injected with 100 microg TiO(2) and plasma samples from individual fish analyzed for total protein and creatinine content at time points between 6 h and 21 days to assess for possible effects on kidney function. No effect of TiO(2) on total plasma protein content or creatinine concentrations were found indicating that neither urine production nor glomerular filtration rate were affected. We conclude that in trout upon a single high dose exposure of TiO(2) nanoparticles via the bloodstream, TiO(2) accumulates in the kidneys but has minimal effect on kidney function. PMID:19332650

  15. [How large is the tocopherol accumulation capacity of organs? Long term trials with various high oral alpha-tocopherol doses administered to rats and guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Elmadfa, I; Walter, A

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of Tocopherol in Various Organs. 1. The influence of different doses of vitamin E on the absorption and accumulation of tocopherol in blood and various organs was studied in long time feeding experiments with male guinea pigs (Pirbright White W 58) and male Sprague Dawley rats. The experiment with guinea pigs lasted 32 weeks, that with rats 46 weeks. Three groups of 20 animals of each species were fed semisynthetic diets containing 0.003 g (Gr. I = control), 0.203 g (Gr. II) and 1.009 g (Gr. III) D, L-alpha-tocopherol acetate per 100 g diet. The ratio of tocopherol contents in the diets was 1:100:500. 2. The tocopherol excretion in the faeces increased significantly according to the vitamin E intake; the absorption rate of tocopherol behaves inversely proportional to the level of supply. 3. The tocopherol concentration in blood serum, liver, heart and adrenals of animals of the Groups II and III increased significantly in comparison with the control animals. The tocopherol accumulation in blood and the analysed organs depends on species and is organ specific: Organs of rats of the control group contain higher levels of alpha-tocopherol compared with those of the corresponding group of guinea pigs. According to the relative accumulation capacity of the organs for vitamin E (I:II:III) following sequences can be considered: Guinea pigs: adrenals and heart, liver, blood; rats: liver, heart, blood, adrenals. 4. The tocopherol accumulating organs are of limited capacity. The ratio of the tocopherol intake (1:100:500) could not be found in any of the analysed organs. PMID:7319728

  16. Developmental toxicity of clarified slurry oil, syntower bottoms, and distillate aromatic extract administered as a single oral dose to pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Clarified slurry oil (CSO), syntower bottoms (STB), and distillate aromatic extract (DAE) are refinery streams produced by processing crude oil. Available data indicate that some refinery streams are developmentally toxic by the dermal route of exposure. However, there is no conclusive evidence for their being teratogenic. The present studies were designed to further explore the suspected teratogenic potency of refinery streams while at the same time limiting embryolethality. In general, evidence of maternal toxicity (i.e., decreased body weight gain, decreased thymus weight) was observed at doses greater than or equal to 500 mg/kg. For each refinery stream tested, the incidence of resorption was greatest on GD 11. A common pattern of fetal malformations was observed for all of the refinery streams tested and included cleft palate, diaphragmatic hernia, and paw and tail defects. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations were greatest on GD 11 and 12 for fetuses exposed to CSO; on GD 13 and 14, the incidence of malformation was comparable for CSO- and STB-exposed fetuses. The incidence of visceral anomalies was greatest on GD 11-13 for fetuses exposed to CSO and STB; on Gestation D 14, the incidence was comparable for each of the refinery streams tested. In general, the ability to produce adverse effects on development was greatest for CSO and least for DAE. Effects produced by STB were comparable to or less severe than those observed for CSO. 24 refs., 11 tabs.

  17. Study of natural radioactivity and estimation of radiation dose in the environment of Tumkur, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Jayasheelan, A; Manjunatha, S; Yashodhara, I; Karunakara, N

    2014-01-01

    The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K was measured for soil samples collected from 34 locations of Tumkur District, Karnataka, India, using HPGe detector. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K varied from 9.6 to 71.6, 12.3 to 333.3 and 194.3 to 1527.7 Bq kg(-1) with an average value of 33.15, 123.01 and 877.76 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The absorbed and annual effective outdoor doses were found to be highest at Ponnasamudra with 258.98 nGy h(-1) and 317.62 μSv and lowest at Sira with 36.42 nGy h(-1) and 44.67 μSv, respectively. The external hazard index ranged from 0.21 to 1.58 with an average of 0.75. It was significant in 11 locations as it exceeded unity. PMID:23907323

  18. Treatment of primary Sjögren's syndrome with low-dose natural human interferon-alpha administered by the oral mucosal route: a phase II clinical trial. IFN Protocol Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ship, J A; Fox, P C; Michalek, J E; Cummins, M J; Richards, A B

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the safety and efficacy of four dosages of natural human interferon-alpha (nHuIFN-alpha) delivered over a 12-week period orally in lozenges (150 IU and 450 IU, once [QD] or three times [TID] daily) compared to placebo in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome. This randomized, double-blinded clinical trial demonstrated that nHuIFN-alpha at a dose of 150 IU administered TID by oral lozenge significantly improved stimulated whole saliva output compared to placebo after 12 weeks of treatment. The 150 IU TID dose also was suggestive of benefit for 5 of 7 subjective measures of oral and ocular comfort. IFN lozenges demonstrated a good safety profile, with no serious adverse events found in any treatment group. There were no significant differences between the placebo and the four doses of IFN for adverse events by total number, organ system, severity, dropouts, and number judged to be related to treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the use of 150 IU IFN lozenges TID for 12 weeks in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome improved salivary output and decreased complaints of xerostomia without causing significant adverse medical events. PMID:10476942

  19. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Abacavir (1592U89), Zidovudine, and Lamivudine Administered Alone and in Combination in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laurene H.; Chittick, Gregory E.; McDowell, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Abacavir (1592U89), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), has been evaluated for efficacy and safety in combination regimens with other nucleoside analogs, including zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC). To evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interactions between these agents, 15 HIV-1-infected adults with a median CD4+ cell count of 347 cells/mm3 (range, 238 to 570 cells/mm3) were enrolled in a randomized, seven-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of abacavir (600 mg), ZDV (300 mg), and 3TC (150 mg) were evaluated when each drug was given alone or when any two or three drugs were given concurrently. The concentrations of all drugs in plasma and the concentrations of ZDV and its 5′-glucuronide metabolite, GZDV, in urine were measured for up to 24 h postdosing, and pharmacokinetic parameter values were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The maximum drug concentration (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞), time to Cmax (Tmax), and apparent elimination half-life (t1/2) of abacavir in plasma were unaffected by coadministration with ZDV and/or 3TC. Coadministration of abacavir with ZDV (with or without 3TC) decreased the mean Cmax of ZDV by approximately 20% (from 1.5 to 1.2 μg/ml), delayed the median Tmax for ZDV by 0.5 h, increased the mean AUC0–∞ for GZDV by up to 40% (from 11.8 to 16.5 μg · h/ml), and delayed the median Tmax for GZDV by approximately 0.5 h. Coadministration of abacavir with 3TC (with or without ZDV) decreased the mean AUC0–∞ for 3TC by approximately 15% (from 5.1 to 4.3 μg · h/ml), decreased the mean Cmax by approximately 35% (from 1.4 to 0.9 μg/ml), and delayed the median Tmax by approximately 1 h. While these changes were statistically significant, they are similar to the effect of food intake (for ZDV) or affect an inactive metabolite (for GZDV) or are

  20. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    This document summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. Supplement 1 of NUREG/CR-3620 (1986) summarized modifications and improvements to the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. This document summarizes a modified version of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. This modified version of the computer program operates on a personal computer and permits the user to optionally select radiation dose conversion factors published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication No. 30 (ICRP 1979-1982) in place of those published by the ICRP in their Publication No. 2 (ICRP 1959) (as implemented in the previous versions of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program). The pathway-to-human models used in the computer program have not been changed from those described previously. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program and supporting data bases are included in the appendices of this document.

  1. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  2. Analysis of dose to patient, spouse/caretaker, and staff, from an implanted trackable radioactive fiducial for use in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Barnea, Gideon; Stokar, Saul; Corn, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A fiducial tracking system based on a novel radioactive tracking technology is being developed for real-time target tracking in radiation therapy. In this study, the authors calculate the radiation dose to the patient, the spouse/caretaker, and the medical staff that would result from a 100 {mu}Ci Ir192 radioactive fiducial marker permanently implanted in the prostate of a radiation therapy patient. Methods: Local tissue dose was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The patient's whole body effective dose equivalent was calculated by summing the doses to the sensitive organs. Exposure of the spouse/caretaker was calculated from the NRC guidelines. Exposure of the medical staff was based on estimates of proximity to and time spent with the patient. Results: The local dose is below 40 Gy at 5 mm from the marker and below 10 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. The whole body effective dose equivalent to the patient is 64 mSv. The dose to the spouse/caretaker is 0.25 mSv. The annual exposures of the medical staff are 0.2 mSv for a doctor performing implantations and 0.34 mSv for a radiation therapist positioning patients for therapy. Conclusions: The local dose is not expected to have any clinically significant effect on the surrounding tissue which is irradiated during therapy. The dose to the patient is small in comparison to the whole body dose received from the therapy itself. The exposure of all other people is well below the recommended limits. The authors conclude that there is no radiation exposure related contraindication for use of this technology in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. Distribution of iodine into blood components of the Sprague-Dawley rat differs with the chemical form administered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrall, K. D.; Bull, R. J.; Sauer, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    It has been reported previously that radioactivity derived from iodine distributes differently in the Sprague-Dawley rat depending on the chemical form administered (Thrall and Bull, 1990). In the present communication we report the differential distribution of radioactivity derived from iodine (I2) and iodide (I-) into blood components. Twice as much radioiodine is in the form of I- in the plasma of animals treated with 125I- compared to 125I2-treated rats. No I2 could be detected in the plasma. With an increase in dose, increasing amounts of radioactivity derived from 125I2-treated animals distribute to whole blood compared to equivalent doses of 125I-, reaching a maxima at a dose of 15.8 mumol I/kg body weight. Most of the radioactivity derived from I2 associates with serum proteins and lipids, in particular with albumin and cholesteryl iodide. These data indicate a differential distribution of radioactivity depending on whether it is administered as iodide or iodine. This is inconsistent with the commonly held view that iodine (I2) is reduced to iodide (I-) before it is absorbed systemically from the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Measurement of natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in various metal ores used as industrial raw materials in Japan and estimation of dose received by workers handling them.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tagami, Keiko; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2009-11-01

    Natural resources such as ores and rocks contain natural radioactive nuclides at various concentrations. If these resources contain high concentrations of natural radioactive nuclides, workers handling them might be exposed to significant levels of radiation. Therefore, it is important to investigate the radioactive activity in these resources. In this study, concentrations of radioactive nuclides in Th, Zr, Ti, Mo, Mn, Al, W, Zn, V, and Cr ores used as industrial raw materials in Japan were investigated. The concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), while those of (226)Ra, (228)Ra, and (40)K were determined by gamma-ray spectrum. We found the concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series, and (40)K in Ti, Mo, Mn, Al, W, Zn, V, and Cr ores to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide. The doses received by workers handling these materials were estimated by using methods for dose assessment given in a report by the European Commission. In transport, indoor storage, and outdoor storage scenarios, an effective dose due to the use of Th ore was above 4.3 x 10(-2)Sv y(-1), which was higher than that of the other ores. The maximum value of effective doses for other ores was estimated to be about 4.5 x 10(-4)Sv y(-1), which was lower than intervention exemption levels (1.0 x 10(-3)Sv y(-1)) given in International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 82. PMID:19703725

  5. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  6. Relationships between biomarkers of exposure and toxicokinetics in Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice administered single doses of acrylamide and glycidamide and multiple doses of acrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Tareke, Eden; Twaddle, Nathan C.; McDaniel, L. Patrice; Churchwell, Mona I.; Young, John F.; Doerge, Daniel R. . E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov

    2006-11-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells and carcinogenic in rodents. AA is also formed in many commonly consumed starchy foods during cooking. Our previous toxicokinetic investigations of AA and its important genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide (GA), in rodents showed that AA is highly bioavailable from oral routes of administration, is widely distributed to tissues and that the dietary route, in particular, favors metabolism to GA. Measurements of DNA adducts in many tissues supported the hypothesis that AA is carcinogenic in rodent bioassays through metabolism to GA. The current investigation describes the development and validation of methodology for measuring hemoglobin (Hb) adducts with AA and GA in the same rodents previously used for toxicokinetic and DNA adduct measurements. The goal was to investigate possible relationships between these circulating biomarkers of exposure and serum toxicokinetic parameters for AA and GA and tissue GA-DNA adducts in rodents from both single and repeated dosing with AA. Significant correlations were observed between GA-Hb and liver GA-DNA adducts for either single or multiple dosing regimens with AA. Using available GA-Hb adduct data, empirical and allometric relationships permitted estimation of liver DNA adducts in humans in the range of 0.06-0.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides. This approach may prove useful in extrapolating human cancer risks from findings in rodent bioassays.

  7. A gradient of radioactive contamination in Dolon village near the SNTS and comparison of computed dose values with instrumental estimates for the 29 August, 1949 nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Hoshi, Masaharu; Dubasov, Yuriy V; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Orlov, Mark Y; Bailiff, Ian K; Ivannikov, Alexander I; Skvortsov, Valeriy G; Iaskova, Elena K; Kryukova, Irina G; Zhumadilov, Kassym S; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Apsalikov, Kazbek N; Gusev, Boris I

    2006-02-01

    Spatial distributions of soil contamination by 137Cs (89 sampling points) and 239+240Pu (76 points) near and within Dolon village were analyzed. An essential exponential decrease of contamination was found in Dolon village: the distance of a half reduction in contamination is about 0.87-1.25 km (in a northwest-southeast direction from the supposed centerline of the radioactive trace). This fact is in agreement with the available exposure rate measurements near Dolon (September 1949 archive data): on the basis of a few measurements the pattern of the trace was estimated to comprise a narrow 2 km corridor of maximum exposure rate. To compare computed external doses in air with local dose estimates by retrospective luminescence dosimetry (RLD) the gradient of radioactive soil contamination within the village was accounted for. The computed dose associated with the central axis of the trace was found to be equal to 2260 mGy (calculations based on archive exposure rate data). Local doses near the RLD sampling points (southeast of the village) were calculated to be in the range 466-780 mGy (averaged value: 645+/-70 mGy), which is comparable with RLD data (averaged value 460+/-92 mGy with range 380-618 mGy). A comparison of the computed mean dose in the settlement with dose estimates by ESR tooth enamel dosimetry makes it possible to estimate the "upper level" of the "shielding and behavior" factor in dose reduction for inhabitants of Dolon village which was found to be 0.28+/-0.068. PMID:16571930

  8. Uranium and thorium series radionuclides in drinking water from drilled bedrock wells: correlation to geology and bedrock radioactivity and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Isam Salih, M M; Pettersson, H B L; Lund, E

    2002-01-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water from 328 drilled wells was studied in correlation to source parameters. Poor correlation to both aquifer geology and bedrock radioactivity was observed. Concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 222Rn and 210Po in groundwater samples was in the ranges <0.027-5.3, <0.016-4.9, <0.014-1.24, 5-8105 and <0.05-0.947 Bq.l(-1) respectively. In about 80% of the sites the radon concentration exceeds the Nordic recommended exemption level for radon in drinking water and 15% of the sites exceed the action limit. The effective doses from ingestion were calculated and presented in association with geology. Doses due to ingestion ranged between 0.05 and 20.4 mSv.y(-1), where the average contribution from 222Rn amounted to 75%. In comparison, the effective doses from inhalation of indoor 222Rn ranged between 0.2 and 20 mSv.y(-1). The average contribution from inhalation of 222Rn in air to the total effective dose (ingestion+inhalation) was 58 +/- 22%, 73 +/- 18% and 77 +/- 16% (1 SD) for the age categories 1 y, 10 y and adults respectively. PMID:12430963

  9. Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection (EROS): an open-label, prospective, multicenter, single-arm study to investigate erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y S; Lee, S W; Park, K; Chung, W S; Kim, S W; Hyun, J S; Moon, D G; Yang, S-K; Ryu, J K; Yang, D Y; Moon, K H; Min, K S; Park, J K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the change of erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction (ED). Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection was an open-label, prospective, multicenter and single-arm study designed to measure the duration of erection in men with ED receiving a flexible dose of vardenafil over an 8-week treatment period. Patients were instructed to take vardenafil 10 mg 60 min before attempting the intercourse. Vardenfil could be increased to 20 mg or decreased to 5 mg concerning patients' efficacy and safety. Following the initial screening, patients entered a 4-week treatment-free run-in phase and 8-week treatment period, during which they were instructed to attempt intercourse at least four times on four separate days. A total of 95 men were enrolled in 10 centers. After the 8 weeks treatment, the mean duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was statistically superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. After an 8-week treatment, the duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was 9.39 min. There were significant benefits with vardenafil in all domains of International Index of Erectile Function. Secondary efficacy end points included success rate of penetration, maintaining erection, ejaculation and satisfaction were superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. There was a significant correlation between duration of erection with other sexual factors. Also partner's sexual satisfaction was increased with vardenafil. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Vardenafil was safe and well tolerated. Vardenafil therapy provided a statistically superior duration of erection leading to successful intercourse in men with ED with female partner. PMID:25471318

  10. Semi-micro column high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection for quantification of aspirin and salicylic acid and its application to patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Yuichi; Yamane, Tomoko; Ishimatsu, Takashi; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    A simultaneous determination of aspirin (ASA) and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), in human serum by a semi-micro column HPLC-UV was developed. A relatively small size of serum sample (100 microL) containing ASA and SA was cleaned up by a simple solid phase extraction. A good separation of ASA and SA could be achieved within 25 min using a semi-micro ODS column with an eluent of MeOH/0.7 mm phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.5) = 50:50 (v/v). The calibration curves for ASA and SA showed good linearity (r = 0.999) with the detection limits 114 and 38 ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. ASA and SA in patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin were determined, and the concentration ranges obtained for ASA and SA were 1.2-2.2 and 0.5-57.3 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:17221906

  11. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. Supplement No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

    1986-05-01

    The document entitled Intruder Dose Pathway Analysis of the Onsite Disposal of Radioactive Wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 Computer Program (1984) summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrustion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. This document is a supplement to that document and summarizes efforts to further modify and improve the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. To facilitate cross-referencing, it follows the same format. Notable improvements to the software package include the capability to account for shielding conditions that represent noncompacted trash wastes and the option to indicate alternative land-use condition;s. This supplement contains a description of the implementation of these modifications. In addition, a series of discussions are included in an attempt to increase the user's understanding of the scenarios and dose calculation methods. These discussions respond to frequently asked questions about the mathematical models and use of the software. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program are included as Appendices A and B of this document. Appendix C lists external exposure dose-rate factor libraries.

  12. Review and evaluation of principles used in the estimation of radiation doses associated with the practice of deepsea disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Templeton, W.L.; Soldat, J.K.

    1985-09-01

    The relevant national and international guidance concerning the estimation of radiological doses from the practice of deepsea disposal of radioactive waste was reviewed. The review includes the dose limitation guidance of the various national and international bodies, especially that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Pathway modeling is discussed as well as the oceanographic models of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Included in the discussion are the recommendations for the definition of high-level waste by the IAEA for use by the London Dumping Convention (LDC) in setting limits for ocean disposal of waste. An assessment of the ICRP's radiological protection system using the effective whole-body dose methodology is made. Present models, which should continue to be improved as the research data becomes available, do provide an adequate basis for regulatory authorities to decide whether authorization for a proposed disposal can be granted, since they provide a means of indicating whether maximum individual (critical groups) exposure limits are likely to be exceeded. However, new models and information are continuously being developed by the international community to assess ocean disposal of radioactive waste in comparison to land disposal and to compare one site against another. 47 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. [Dynamic analysis of pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs using positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful and noninvasive technology for molecular imaging in living systems. Its high sensitivity and high spatial-temporal resolution make this technology particularly useful to analyze the disposition of drugs in the body. PET technology could be applied to analyze the process of distribution of orally administered drugs on the basis of time-profiles of radioactivity in vivo. Kinetic analysis of radioactivity derived from 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose administered orally to rats under several conditions indicated that not only gastric emptying and intestinal transit but also the rate constant of intestinal absorption and limited process of oral absorption could be evaluated quantitatively. After oral administration of 11C-labeled telmisartan with or without non-radiolabeled telmisartan, systemic bioavailability and hepatic distribution of radioactivity significantly increased non-linearly with dose. In the intestinal lumen, telmisartan and its glucuronide, converted by UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), were detected and the ratio of telmisartan decreased at a high dose of telmisartan. In vitro permeation study revealed that telmisartan is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). It was reported that hepatic uptake of telmisartan is mediated by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) and most of the hepatic radioactivity in the liver is derived from telmisartan. These results indicated that P-gp for intestinal absorption, OATP1B3 for hepatic uptake and UGT for glucuronidation could be considered as limiting steps of orally administered telmisartan. Therefore, PET study is highly anticipated to be a potent tool for better understanding of gastrointestinal absorption and the subsequent tissue distribution of various drugs and candidates. PMID:22864349

  14. Sustained immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a two-dose schedule in adolescent girls: Five-year clinical data and modeling predictions from a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Behre, Ulrich; Schulze, Karin; Hillemanns, Peter; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized, partially-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00541970), the licensed formulation of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (20 μg each of HPV-16/18 antigens) was found highly immunogenic up to 4 y after first vaccination, whether administered as a 2-dose (2D) schedule in girls 9–14 y or 3-dose (3D) schedule in women 15–25 y. This end-of-study analysis extends immunogenicity and safety data until Month (M) 60, and presents antibody persistence predictions estimated by piecewise and modified power law models. Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 y) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (N = 240 ) or 3D at M0,1,6 (N = 239). Here, results are reported for girls 9–14 y (2D) and women 15–25 y (3D). Seropositivity rates, geometric mean titers (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and geometric mean titer ratios (GMRs; 3D/2D; post-hoc exploratory analysis) were calculated. All subjects seronegative pre-vaccination in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort were seropositive for anti-HPV-16 and −18 at M60. Antibody responses elicited by the 2D and 3D schedules were comparable at M60, with GMRs close to 1 (anti-HPV-16: 1.13 [95% confidence interval: 0.82–1.54]; anti-HPV-18: 1.06 [0.74–1.51]). Statistical modeling predicted that in 95% of subjects, antibodies induced by 2D and 3D schedules could persist above natural infection levels for ≥ 21 y post-vaccination. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In conclusion, a 2D M0,6 schedule of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine was immunogenic for up to 5 y in 9–14 y-old girls. Statistical modeling predicted that 2D-induced antibodies could persist for longer than 20 y. PMID:26176261

  15. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate Extended-Release Multiple Layer Beads Administered as Intact Capsule or Sprinkles Versus Methylphenidate Immediate-Release Tablets (Ritalin®) in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Nathan S.; Kupper, Robert J.; Chang, Wei-Wei; Greenhill, Laurence; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Connor, Daniel F.; Wigal, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative bioavailability and safety of a multilayer extended-release bead methylphenidate (MPH) hydrochloride 80 mg (MPH-MLR) capsule or sprinkles (37% immediate-release [IR]) versus MPH hydrochloride IR(Ritalin®) tablets, and to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model simulating MPH concentration-time data for different MPH-MLR dosage strengths. Methods: This was a single-center, randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study conducted in 26 fasted healthy adults (mean weight±standard deviation, 70.4±11.7 kg) assigned to single-dose oral MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule or sprinkles with applesauce, or Ritalin IR 25 mg (1×5 mg and 1×20 mg tablet) administered at 0, 4, and 8 hours. Results: MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule and sprinkles were bioequivalent; ratios for maximum concentration (Cmax), area under plasma drug concentration versus time curve (AUC)0-t, and AUC0-inf were 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.3–112.4), 0.99 (95% CI, 95.3–102.8), and 0.99 (95% CI, 95.4–103.0), respectively. MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles produced highly comparable, biphasic profiles of plasma MPH concentrations characterized by rapid initial peak, followed by moderate decline until 5 hours postdose, and gradual increase until 7 hours postdose, culminating in an attenuated second peak. Based on 90% CIs, total systemic exposure to MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule/sprinkles was similar to that for Ritalin IR 25 mg three times daily, but marked differences in Cmax values indicated that MPH-MLR regimens were not bioequivalent to Ritalin. MPH Cmax and total systemic exposure over the first 4 hours postdose with MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles was markedly higher than that associated with the first dose of Ritalin. All study drugs were safe and well tolerated. The PK modeling in adults suggested that differences in MPH pharmacokinetics between MPH-MLR and Ritalin are the result of dosage form design attributes and the associated

  16. Pre-therapeutic 124I PET(/CT) dosimetry confirms low average absorbed doses per administered 131I activity to the salivary glands in radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Stahl, Alexander; Knust, Jochen; Sgouros, George; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland impairment following high activity radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a severe side effect. Dosimetric calculations using planar gamma camera scintigraphy (GCS) with 131I and ultrasonography (US) provided evidence that the average organ dose per administered 131I activity (ODpA) is too low to account for observed radiation damages to the salivary glands. The objective of this work was to re-estimate the ODpA using 124I PET(/CT) as a more reliable approach than 131I GCS/US. Methods Ten DTC patients underwent a series of six (or seven) PET scans and one PET/CT scan after administration of ~23 MBq 124I-iodide. Volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on the CT and serial PET images were used to determine the glandular volumes and the imaged 124I activities. To enable identical VOIs to be drawn on serial PET images, each PET was co-registered with the CT image. To correct for partial volume effect and for the artificial bias in the activity concentration due to cascading gamma coincidences occurring in 124I decay, the imaged activity was effectively corrected using isovolume recovery coefficients (RCs) based on recovery phantom measurements. A head-neck phantom, which contained 124I-filled spheres, was manufactured to validate the isovolume recovery correction method with a realistic patient-based phantom geometry and for a range of activity concentration regimes. The mean±standard deviation (range) ODpA projected for 131I was calculated using the absorbed dose fraction method. Results The ODpAs (in Gy/GBq) for the submandibular and parotid glands were 0.32±0.13 (0.18–0.55) and 0.31±0.10 (0.13–0.46), respectively. No significant differences (p>0.2) in the mean ODpA between 124I PET(/CT) and 131I GCS/US dosimetry was found. The validation experiment showed that the percentage deviations between RC-corrected and true activity concentrations were <10%. Conclusion 124I PET(/CT) dosimetry also corroborates the low ODpAs to

  17. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites: Methodology and data base. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    This manual describes a dose assessment system used to estimate the population or collective dose commitments received via both airborne and waterborne pathways by persons living within a 2- to 80-kilometer region of a commercial operating power reactor for a specific year of effluent releases. Computer programs, data files, and utility routines are included which can be used in conjunction with an IBM or compatible personal computer to produce the required dose commitments and their statistical distributions. In addition, maximum individual airborne and waterborne dose commitments are estimated and compared to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1, design objectives. This supplement is the last report in the NUREG/CR-2850 series.

  18. Calculation of indoor effective dose factors in ORNL phantoms series due to natural radioactivity in building materials.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the effective dose in the age-dependent ORNL phantoms series, due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, was calculated. The absorbed doses for various organs or human tissues have been calculated. The MCNP-4B computer code was used for this purpose. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP Publication 74. The obtained values of dose conversion factors for a standard room are: 1.033, 0.752 and 0.0538 nSv h-1 per Bq kg-1 for elements of the U and Th decay series and for the K isotope, respectively. The values of effective dose agreed generally with those found in the literature, although the values estimated here for elements of the U series were higher in some cases. PMID:19741358

  19. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia 2007 with a Deletion of Virulence-Associated Gene 9GL (B119L), when Administered at Low Doses, Leads to Virus Attenuation in Swine and Induces an Effective Protection against Homologous Challenge

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Carlson, Jolene; Sanford, Brenton; Alfano, Marialexia; Kramer, Edward; Lu, Zhiqiang; Arzt, Jonathan; Reese, Bo; Carrillo, Consuelo; Risatti, Guillermo R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of an often lethal disease of domestic pigs. Disease control strategies have been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines against ASFV. Since its introduction in the Republic of Georgia, a highly virulent virus, ASFV Georgia 2007 (ASFV-G), has caused an epizootic that spread rapidly into Eastern European countries. Currently no vaccines are available or under development to control ASFV-G. In the past, genetically modified ASFVs harboring deletions of virulence-associated genes have proven attenuated in swine, inducing protective immunity against challenge with homologous parental viruses. Deletion of the gene 9GL (open reading frame [ORF] B119L) in highly virulent ASFV Malawi-Lil-20/1 produced an attenuated phenotype even when administered to pigs at 106 50% hemadsorption doses (HAD50). Here we report the construction of a genetically modified ASFV-G strain (ASFV-G-Δ9GLv) harboring a deletion of the 9GL (B119L) gene. Like Malawi-Lil-20/1-Δ9GL, ASFV-G-Δ9GL showed limited replication in primary swine macrophages. However, intramuscular inoculation of swine with 104 HAD50 of ASFV-G-Δ9GL produced a virulent phenotype that, unlike Malawi-Lil-20/1-Δ9GL, induced a lethal disease in swine like parental ASFV-G. Interestingly, lower doses (102 to 103 HAD50) of ASFV-G-Δ9GL did not induce a virulent phenotype in swine and when challenged protected pigs against disease. A dose of 102 HAD50 of ASFV-G-Δ9GLv conferred partial protection when pigs were challenged at either 21 or 28 days postinfection (dpi). An ASFV-G-Δ9GL HAD50 of 103 conferred partial and complete protection at 21 and 28 dpi, respectively. The information provided here adds to our recent report on the first attempts toward experimental vaccines against ASFV-G. IMPORTANCE The main problem for controlling ASF is the lack of vaccines. Studies on ASFV virulence lead to the production of genetically modified attenuated viruses that induce

  20. NTP Toxicity Studies of Sodium Cyanide (CAS No. 143-33-9) Administered by Dosed Water to F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    1993-11-01

    Cyanide and its salts are used extensively in industry and manufacturing and are found in water and food consumed by humans. Chronic exposure to low levels of cyanide is suspected to be responsible for various neuropathic and thyrotoxic conditions in humans. Data in the literature indicate that long-term exposure to near-lethal concentrations of cyanide may produce lesions in rodents similar to those linked to chronic cyanide exposure in humans. However, few data are available on the effects of subchronic exposure to cyanide concentrations that are not acutely toxic. To address this lack of data, 13-week toxicity studies on cyanide were conducted with male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice administered low doses of sodium cyanide in drinking water. Animals were evaluated for histopathology, clinical chemistry, hematology, urine chemistry, and reproductive toxicity. In addition, the mutagenicity of sodium cyanide was assessed in Salmonella typhimurium. Groups of 10 rats and 10 mice per sex were administered sodium cyanide in drinking water at concentrations of 0, 3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 ppm for 13 weeks. No deaths attributed to sodium cyanide administration occurred in either species. In animals exposed to 300 ppm, male rats had slightly lower final mean body weights and mean body weight gains and female mice had slightly lower final mean body weights than the respective controls. Water consumption by rats and mice in the 100 and 300 ppm groups was 10% to 30% lower than that by the controls; however, no clinical signs attributable to sodium cyanide administration or to dehydration were observed. No gross or microscopic changes specifically related to cyanide toxicity occurred at any site in males or females of either species. In particular, no lesions were found in the brain or thyroid gland. Differences between absolute and relative organ weights of exposed and control animals were minor and sporadic and were not exposure concentration dependent; these

  1. Radioactivity concentrations in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of Turkish Sea coast and contribution of ²¹⁰Po to the radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Önder; Belivermiş, Murat; Cotuk, Yavuz; Topçuoğlu, Sayhan

    2014-03-15

    Radionuclides levels were determined in indigenous and transplanted mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Turkish marine environment. Radioactivity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb were determined in the soft tissues of the mussel samples collected in Bosphorus Strait, Coasts of Black Sea, Marmara Sea and Aegean Sea. Mussel transplantation was carried out by using mussel cages in Levantine Sea coast since M. galloprovincialis did not naturally adapt along the coast. The average activity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb in the coastline of Turkey were found to be 0.7±0.1, 469±24, 0.9±0.1, 1.0±0.1, 122±4 and 10.9±0.9 Bq kg⁻¹ in dry weight (dw), respectively. The average of ²¹⁰Po/²¹⁰Pb ratio was found to be ∼14. Total annual effective ²¹⁰Po dose was calculated to be in the range of 0.25-3.30 μSv due to mussel consumption. Radioactivity and dose levels were compared with those of similar studies carried out in Mediterranean countries. PMID:24398417

  2. Study of Natural Radioactivity, Radon Exhalation Rate and Radiation Doses in Coal and Flyash Samples from Thermal Power Plants, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Mukesh; Sahoo, B. K.; Sapra, B. K.; Kumar, Rajesh

    Coal is one of the most important source used for electrical power generation. Its combustion part known as fly ash is used in the manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. Coal and its by-products have significant amounts of radionuclide's including uranium, thorium which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas radon and thoron respectively. Radiation hazard from airborne emissions of coal-fired power plants have been cited as possible causes of health in environmental. Assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the concentration of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash. In the present study, samples of coal and flyash were collected from Rajghat Power Plant and Badarpur Thermal Power Plant, New Delhi, India. Radon exhalation is important parameter for the estimation of radiation risk from various materials. Solis State Nuclear Track Detector based sealed Can Technique (using LR-115 type II) has been used for measurement radon exhalation rate. Also accumulation chamber based Continuous Radon Monitor and Continuous Thoron Monitor have been used for radon masss exhalation and thoron surface exhalation rate respectively. Natural radioactivity has been measured using a low level NaI(Tl) detector based on gamma ray spectrometry.

  3. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  4. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m−2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  5. Studies on radiation dose due to radioactive elements present in ground water and soil samples around Mysore city, India.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekara, M S; Veda, S M; Paramesh, L

    2012-04-01

    A systematic study of the ground water and soil samples collected from different locations around Mysore city (12(°)N and 76(°)E) has been carried out. (226)Ra activity concentration in water samples varies from 0.28 to 189 mBq l(-1) with a geometric mean (GM) of 4.75 mBq l(-1) and (222)Rn concentration in ground water varies from 4.25 to 435 Bq l(-1) with a GM of 25.9 Bq l(-1). The GM of inhalation and ingestion doses due to (222)Rn in water is 65.2 and 5.43, µSv y(-1), respectively. The measured GM gamma dose rate in air is 85.4 nGy h(-1) and absorbed dose rate estimated from the measured activity of radionuclides is 92.6 nGy h(-1). PMID:21764808

  6. Alternative Dose for Choroidal Melanoma Treated With an Iodine-125 Radioactive Plaque: A Single-Institution Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saconn, Paul A.; Gee, Christopher J.; Greven, Craig M.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Greven, Kathryn M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) established iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy as an accepted standard treatment for medium-size choroidal melanoma. In the COMS, the prescription dose was 85 Gy. This is a retrospective review of our outcomes in patients treated with lower doses than those used in the COMS. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2004, 62 patients were treated with iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma. COMS eye plaques were used with dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor. The median and average dose rates at the tumor apex were 63.5 cGy/h and 62.7 cGy/h, respectively. The median and average total doses were 63.0 Gy and 62.5 Gy (range, 56-69 Gy), respectively. The median and mean durations of implant were 100.0 hours and 101.1 hours (range, 71-165 hours). Results: Median follow-up time was 58.2 months. The 5-year outcomes including overall survival, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, local failure, secondary enucleation rate, and visual acuity (VA) <20/200 were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, there were 7 local failures, 4 distant failures, and 10 secondary enucleations (6 due to local failure and 4 due to treatment complications). Univariate analysis was performed to identify significant prognostic factors associated with disease-free survival (baseline VA in tumor eye, tumor shape), cause-specific survival (diabetic retinopathy), local failure (none found), secondary enucleation rate (diabetic retinopathy, basal tumor dimension) and VA <20/200 (diabetic retinopathy, tumor shape, age, retinal detachment, treatment depth, and history of vision-limiting condition). Conclusions: Our survival and local control outcomes are comparable to those of the COMS. However, VA at 5 years seems to be better. Lower doses of radiation could potentially lead to better visual outcomes.

  7. Natural radioactivity and effective dose due to the bottom sea and estuaries marine animals in the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M U; Olatunji, M A; Shuib, K S K; Hakimi, N A; Nasir, N L M; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Amin, Y M; Kassim, H A

    2015-11-01

    Malaysia is among the countries with the highest fish consumption in the world and relies on seafood as a main source of animal protein. Thus, the radioactivity in the mostly consumed marine animals such as fishes, crustaceans and molluscs collected from the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia has been determined to monitor the level of human exposure by natural radiation via seafood consumption. The mean activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra ((238)U), (228)Ra ((232)Th) and (40)K ranged from 0.67 ± 0.19 Bq kg(-1) (Perna viridis) to 1.20 ± 0.70 Bq kg(-1) (Rastrelliger), from 0.19 ± 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida) to 0.82 ± 0.67 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) and from 34 ± 13 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) to 48 ± 24 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida), respectively. The mean annual committed effective dose due to the individual radionuclides shows an order of (228)Ra > (226)Ra > (40)K in all marine samples. The obtained doses are less than the global internal dose of 290 µSv y(-1) set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, discarding any significant radiological risks to the populace of Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:25956784

  8. Illustration of sampling-based approaches to the calculation of expected dose in performance assessments for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD.

    2007-04-01

    A deep geologic repository for high level radioactive waste is under development by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. As mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated public health and safety standards (i.e., 40 CFR Part 197) for the YM repository, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has promulgated licensing standards (i.e., 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc.) consistent with 40 CFR Part 197 that the DOE must establish are met in order for the YM repository to be licensed for operation. Important requirements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. relate to the determination of expected (i.e., mean) dose to a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) and the incorporation of uncertainty into this determination. This presentation describes and illustrates how general and typically nonquantitive statements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. can be given a formal mathematical structure that facilitates both the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI and the appropriate separation in this calculation of aleatory uncertainty (i.e., randomness in the properties of future occurrences such as igneous and seismic events) and epistemic uncertainty (i.e., lack of knowledge about quantities that are poorly known but assumed to have constant values in the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI).

  9. Whole-body autoradiographic distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Iwao, H; Nakamura, N; Ikemoto, F; Yamamoto, K

    1987-05-01

    We studied, by whole-body autoradiography, the distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rat. Rat renal renin was completely purified and labeled with 125I ([125I]-renin) and was then injected into the tail veins of conscious rats at a dose of 30 microCi, 430 ng. After various intervals, rats were killed by an overdose of ether, the whole body rapidly frozen in acetone-dry ice, and autoradiography performed on sagittal whole-body sections. To remove breakdown products ([125I]-tyrosine and free 125I) from [125I]-renin, sections were treated with perchloric acid solution. The main accumulation of [125I]-renin acid-insoluble radioactivity was observed in liver and renal cortex. The accumulation in these organs was already evident 2 min after the injection, reached a maximum level by 15 min, then gradually decreased. A small amount of [125I]-renin was also evident in spleen, bone marrow, and adrenal gland. Thirty min after the injection, radioactivity began to appear in the thyroid gland, stomach, and small intestine, but disappeared with acid treatment, except in the thyroid. Radioactivity was negligible in other organs including brain, submaxillary gland, lung, heart, and testis. These autoradiographs clearly demonstrate that exogenously administered renal renin is distributed mainly in the liver and renal cortex. PMID:3549890

  10. Whole-body autoradiographic distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Iwao, H.; Nakamura, N.; Ikemoto, F.; Yamamoto, K.

    1987-05-01

    We studied, by whole-body autoradiography, the distribution of exogenously administered renal renin in rat. Rat renal renin was completely purified and labeled with /sup 125/I ((/sup 125/I)-renin) and was then injected into the tail veins of conscious rats at a dose of 30 microCi, 430 ng. After various intervals, rats were killed by an overdose of ether, the whole body rapidly frozen in acetone-dry ice, and autoradiography performed on sagittal whole-body sections. To remove breakdown products ((/sup 125/I)-tyrosine and free /sup 125/I) from (/sup 125/I)-renin, sections were treated with perchloric acid solution. The main accumulation of (/sup 125/I)-renin acid-insoluble radioactivity was observed in liver and renal cortex. The accumulation in these organs was already evident 2 min after the injection, reached a maximum level by 15 min, then gradually decreased. A small amount of (/sup 125/I)-renin was also evident in spleen, bone marrow, and adrenal gland. Thirty min after the injection, radioactivity began to appear in the thyroid gland, stomach, and small intestine, but disappeared with acid treatment, except in the thyroid. Radioactivity was negligible in other organs including brain, submaxillary gland, lung, heart, and testis. These autoradiographs clearly demonstrate that exogenously administered renal renin is distributed mainly in the liver and renal cortex.

  11. Measurements of radioactivity in Jamaican building materials and gamma dose equivalents in a prototype red mud house

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnock, W.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K measured in bauxite waste, local building materials, and soils are presented and used in model equations to estimate the effective gamma dose-equivalent increments over background in the center of a standard-sized room in a prototype house. Calculated and measured values compare reasonably well.

  12. Naturally occurring radioactivity in some Swedish concretes and their constituents - Assessment by using I-index and dose-model.

    PubMed

    Döse, M; Silfwerbrand, J; Jelinek, C; Trägårdh, J; Isaksson, M

    2016-05-01

    The reference level for effective dose due to gamma radiation from building materials and construction products used for dwellings is set to 1 mSv per year (EC, 1996, 1999), (CE, 2014). Given the specific conditions presented by the EC in report 112 (1999) considering building and construction materials, an I-index of 1 may generate an effective dose of 1 mSv per year. This paper presents a comparison of the activity concentrations of (4)(0)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th of aggregates and when these aggregates constitute a part of concrete. The activity concentration assessment tool for building and construction materials, the I-index, introduced by the EC in 1996, is used in the comparison. A comparison of the I-indices values are also made with a recently presented dose model by Hoffman (2014), where density variations of the construction material and thickness of the construction walls within the building are considered. There was a ∼16-19% lower activity index in concretes than in the corresponding aggregates. The model by Hoffman further implies that the differences between the I-indices of aggregates and the concretes' final effective doses are even larger. The difference is due, mainly to a dilution effect of the added cement with low levels of natural radioisotopes, but also to a different and slightly higher subtracted background value (terrestrial value) used in the modeled calculation of the revised I-index by Hoffman (2014). Only very minimal contributions to the annual dose could be related to the water and additives used, due to their very low content of radionuclides reported. PMID:26942843

  13. Terrestrial gamma dose rate, radioactivity and radiological hazards in the rocks of an elevated radiation background in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien; Alnhary, Anees; Fadhl, Shadi

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate natural radiation and radioactivity in the rock and to assess the corresponding health risk in a region of elevated background radiation in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The mean external gamma dose rate was 374 nGy h(-1) which is approximately six times the world average. The measured results were used to compute annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk, which are 2.298 mSv, 61.95 man Sv y(-1) and 8.043  ×  10(-3), respectively. Rocks samples from different geological formations were analyzed for quantitative determination of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The specific activity of the rocks samples ranges from 7  ±  1 Bq Kg(-1) to 12 513  ±  329 Bq Kg(-1) for (232)Th, from 6  ±  1 Bq kg(-1) to 3089  ±  74 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 702  ±  69 Bq kg(-1) to 2954  ±  285 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. (232)Th is the main contributor to gamma dose rate from the rock samples. Indicators of radiological health impact, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are 3738 Bq kg(-1) and 10.10, respectively. The mean external hazard index was ten times unity in the studied locations in Juban District, which is higher than the recommended value. PMID:26909670

  14. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  15. Radioactivity measurement of primordial radionuclides in and dose evaluation from marble and glazed tiles used as covering building materials in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ş; Varinlioğlu, A

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the natural radioactivity arising from primordial radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) in marble and glazed tile samples used covering building materials in Turkey were carried out by gamma-ray spectrometer with a high purity germanium detector. The mean activity concentrations of the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in marble and glazed tile samples were found as 8.2, 5.5 and 58.1 Bq kg(-1) and 81.2, 65.4 and 450.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radiation doses received by occupants of buildings in which the sample marble and glazed tiles might be used are estimated using measured activity concentrations of constituent primordial radionuclides and dose conversion factors evaluated by the European Commission from models of tile use. Results obtained are presented for each radionuclide, analysed and compared with relevant national and international legislation, guidance and report, and with the results obtained from other studies. Results show that the use of such decorative building materials in the construction of domestic homes or workplaces in Turkey is unlikely to lead to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants. PMID:22492819

  16. Derivation of the critical effect size/benchmark response for the dose-response analysis of the uptake of radioactive iodine in the human thyroid.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Peter J J M; Loftus, Christine; Lewandowski, Thomas A

    2016-08-22

    Potential adverse effects of chemical substances on thyroid function are usually examined by measuring serum levels of thyroid-related hormones. Instead, recent risk assessments for thyroid-active chemicals have focussed on iodine uptake inhibition, an upstream event that by itself is not necessarily adverse. Establishing the extent of uptake inhibition that can be considered de minimis, the chosen benchmark response (BMR), is therefore critical. The BMR values selected by two international advisory bodies were 5% and 50%, a difference that had correspondingly large impacts on the estimated risks and health-based guidance values that were established. Potential treatment-related inhibition of thyroidal iodine uptake is usually determined by comparing thyroidal uptake of radioactive iodine (RAIU) during treatment with a single pre-treatment RAIU value. In the present study it is demonstrated that the physiological intra-individual variation in iodine uptake is much larger than 5%. Consequently, in-treatment RAIU values, expressed as a percentage of the pre-treatment value, have an inherent variation, that needs to be considered when conducting dose-response analyses. Based on statistical and biological considerations, a BMR of 20% is proposed for benchmark dose analysis of human thyroidal iodine uptake data, to take the inherent variation in relative RAIU data into account. Implications for the tolerated daily intakes for perchlorate and chlorate, recently established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), are discussed. PMID:27268963

  17. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  18. Radioactivity Levels and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil Samples from Kohistan (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Khan; Ismail, M.; K., Khan; Akhter, P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and an anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs is carried out in some soil samples collected from Kohistan district of N.W.F.P. (Pakistan), using gamma-ray spectrometry. The gamma spectrometry is operated using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a computer based high resolution multi channel analyzer. The specific activity in soil ranges from 24.72 to 78.48Bq·kg-1 for 226Ra, 21.73 to 75.28Bq·kg-1 for 232Th, 7.06 to 14.9Bq·kg-1 for 137Cs and 298.46 to 570.77Bq·kg-1 for 40K with the mean values of 42.11, 43.27, 9.5 and 418.27Bq·kg-1, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370Bq·kg-1). Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this remote area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The internal and external hazard indices have the mean values of 0.48 and 0.37 respectively. Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study is nominal and does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of FV-100, a Novel Oral Anti-Herpes Zoster Nucleoside Analogue, Administered in Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Young Adult and Elderly Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Pentikis, Helen S.; Matson, Mark; Atiee, George; Boehlecke, Brian; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey W.; Morris, Amy

    2011-01-01

    FV-100 is the prodrug of the highly potent anti-varicella zoster virus bicyclic nucleoside analogue CF-1743. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral FV-100, 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were conducted: (i) a single-ascending-dose study in 32 healthy subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100-, 200-, 400-, and 800-mg doses) with an evaluation of the food effect in the 400-mg group; (ii) a multiple-ascending-dose study in 48 subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100 mg once daily [QD], 200 mg QD, 400 mg QD, 400 mg twice a day, and 800 mg QD for 7 days); and (iii) a 2-part study in subjects aged 65 years and older with a single 400-mg dose in 15 subjects and a 400-mg QD dosing regimen for 7 days in 12 subjects. FV-100 was rapidly and extensively converted to CF-1743, the concentration of which remained above that required to reduce viral activity by 50% for the 24-hour dosing period. Renal excretion of CF-1743 was very low. A high-fat meal reduced exposure to CF-1743; a low-fat meal did not. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly subjects were comparable to those for the younger subjects. FV-100 was well tolerated by all subjects. The pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of FV-100 support its continued investigation for the treatment of herpes zoster and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with once-daily dosing and without dose modifications for elderly or renally impaired patients. PMID:21444712

  20. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides. PMID:25627942

  1. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-03-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine (/sup 131/I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of /sup 131/I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of /sup 131/I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that /sup 131/I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined.

  2. The bioavailability of an orally administered medroxyprogesterone acetate suspension.

    PubMed

    Antal, E J; Gillespie, W R; Albert, K S

    1983-05-01

    The relative bioavailability of an orally administered aqueous suspension of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) intended for intramuscular injection (Depo-Provera) was determined in relation to orally administered tablets. Serum levels of MPA were determined by radioimmunoassay following the administration of 400-mg doses to 19 adult male volunteers in a crossover design after an overnight fast. The two treatments were judged bioequivalent based upon a comparison of the resultant MPA serum levels and the derived bioavailability parameters. Hence, the intramuscular suspension administered orally offers an alternative means of achieving optimal serum levels of MPA in patients requiring high dose therapy. PMID:6222996

  3. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. RECONSTRUCTION OF EXTERNAL DOSES TO OZYORSK RESIDENTS DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF INERT RADIOACTIVE GASES FROM THE STACKS OF THE “MAYAK” PA REACTOR PLANT FROM 1948 TO 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Glagolenko, Y. V.; Drozhko, Evgeniy G.; Mokrov, Y.; Rovny, Sergey I.; Beregich, D. A.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Ivanov, I. A.; Alexakhin, A. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    The article provides the results of reconstruction of external doses to population due to atmospheric releases of inert radioactive gases of activation (41Ar) and fission origin (xenon and krypton isotopes) from the stacks of the “Mayak” PA industrial reactors from 1948 to 1989. Calculation of surface volumetric activities was performed using the RATCHET code. Dose estimate was obtained in a semi-infinite cloud approximation. It is demonstrated that more than 90% of external dose was accumulated from 1948 to 1956. It is established that, generally, the calculation results are in good agreement with archive instrument monitoring data on exposure dose rate and thermoluminescence dosimetry data. External effective doses to the residents of Ozyorsk obtained for different age groups of population with consideration of shielding properties of buildings and duration of time spent outdoors were estimated in the range from 16 to 23 mSv.

  5. Metabolism of T-2 toxin in rats and rabbits: effects of dose, route, and time

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Male, Sprague-Dawley rats and male New Zealand White rabbits were administered tritium-labeled T-2 toxin at 0.15 mg/kg and 0.60 mg/kg of body weight by i.v., oral and dermal routes of administration. The excretion of total radioactivity was determined for six days and the metabolic profiles were determined using HPLC for days 1, 2 and 3. The excretion of radioactivity in the excreta of both species was rapid and nearly complete after 6 days (>95%) in i.v. and orally dosed animals, but only 70 to 80 percent of the administered radioactivity was excreted in dermally dosed rats and rabbits. The major metabolites in the excreta of rats and rabbits were 3'OH HT-2, HT-2, T-2 tetraol, deepoxy T-2 tetraol and several unknowns. In urine and fecal extracts from rats, these metabolites accounted for 59 and 25% of the extracted radioactivity, respectively. An unknown metabolite, tentatively identified as deepoxy 3'OH HT-2 accounted for another 47% of the extracted radioactivity in fecal extracts from rats. In urine and fecal extracts from rabbits, these major metabolites accounted for 71 and 60% of the extracted radioactivity, respectively. An unknown metabolite, tentatively identified as deepoxy 3'OH HT-2 accounted for an additional 26% of the extracted radioactivity in fecal extracts.

  6. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  7. The urinary excretion of orally administered pteroyl-l-glutamic acid by the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blair, J. A.; Dransfield, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The urinary excretion of folates after oral administration of [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was studied by assaying the radioactivity in the urine and in materials purified and characterized by t.l.c. 2. Radioactivity excreted was 6.8, 5.9 and 30.7% of the oral dose in the first 24h after doses of 3.1, 32 and 320μg/kg respectively. 3. Extensive decomposition of urinary folates to pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was prevented by antioxidants or collection of urine frozen. 4. At the three dosages, two major and one minor radioactive compounds were isolated. One of the major metabolites was 5-methyltetrahydropteroylglutamic acid. The others were unidentified but were not pteroylglutamic acid, 7,8-dihydro-, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-, 5- or 10-formyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylidyne-tetrahydro-, 5-formimidoyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylene-tetrahydro-, 5-methyltetrahydro-pteroylglutamic acid, nor any decomposition products of these compounds formed during isolation. Labelled unconjugated pteridines were absent. 5. Labelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was displaced by oral administration of unlabelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid (1.6mg/kg) when given 3.5h after, but not when given 24h after the labelled dose. 6. The results show that orally administered [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid is absorbed without metabolism and is then metabolized into naturally occurring tetrahydro-folates. 7. These findings are discussed with reference to previous work. PMID:5124394

  8. Pharmacokinetic profile of rizatriptan 10-mg tablet and 10-mg orally disintegrating tablet administered with or without water in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomized, single-dose, 3-period crossover study.

    PubMed

    Swan, Suzanne K; Alcorn, Harry; Rodgers, Anthony; Hustad, Carolyn M; Ramsey, Karen E; Woll, Susan; Skobieranda, Franck

    2006-02-01

    This open-label, 3-period crossover study compared the plasma concentration profiles of rizatriptan tablet, orally disintegrating tablet with water (ODTc), and ODT without water (ODTs) in 24 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. At each period, subjects received a single dose of either 10-mg rizatriptan tablet, 10-mg rizatriptan ODTs, or 10-mg rizatriptan ODTc. The authors hypothesized that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) than ODTs and that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) than tablet. A secondary end point was to compare the time of occurrence of the maximum rizatriptan plasma concentration (t(max)) of each dosing method. ODTc had a statistically significantly greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) compared with ODTs (33.84 h x ng/mL vs 18.83 h x ng/mL; P < .001). ODTc had a slightly, but not statistically significantly, greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) compared with rizatriptan tablet (17.07 h x ng/mL vs 13.32 h x ng/mL). The median t(max) was 0.67 hours for ODTc and tablet and 1.33 hours for ODTs. ODTc showed a slightly, but not significantly, faster rate of absorption compared with tablet. ODTs with water had a faster rate of absorption than ODTc. Future studies are needed to determine whether this pharmacokinetic difference produces differential efficacy in a clinical setting. PMID:16432269

  9. Disposition of decabromobiphenyl ether in rats dosed intravenously or by feeding

    SciTech Connect

    El Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The disposition of /sup 14/C-labeled decabromobiphenyl ether (DBBE) in male Fischer rats dosed by feeding (0.025-5.0% of the diet) or intravenously (1 mg/kg) was determined. For rats dosed by feeding, intestinal absorption of DBBE was evident in that the intact compound was present in extracts of liver. For these rats, the size of the liver increased with increasing concentration of DBBE in the diet. Liver contained a maximum of 0.449% of the administered radioactivity at 24 h after feeding rats a diet containing 0.0277% (/sup 14/C)DBBE; no other organ or tissue contained more than 0.26%. The total amount of radioactivity found in tissues was less than 1% of the dose. Of the radioactivity recovered in the feeding experiments, more than 99% was in the feces and gut contents at 72 h; a maximum of 0.012% of the dose was in the urine. In the feces of rats fed (/sup 14/C)DBBE, there were three metabolites, which together comprised 1.5-27.9% of the radioactivity. Since absorption was minimal, most of the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE apparently took place in the gastrointestinal tract. The metabolites increased in percent of total radioactivity with the content of DBBE in the diet, an indication that enzyme induction in intestinal bacteria may have occurred at the higher doses. More extensive metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE occurred after intravenous administration; only 37% of the radioactivity in the feces was unchanged DBBE. At 72 h after dosing, fecal excretion accounted for 70% of the dose; only 0.129% appeared in the urine. Muscle retained 12.9% and skin 7.25% of the radioactivity administered. In 4 h, rats with biliary cannulas excreted in the bile 7.17% of the intravenously administered radioactivity; less than 1% was excreted as intact DBBE. Biliary excretion was apparently the major route for elimination of the intravenously administered compound.

  10. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  11. Radiation absorbed dose from technetium-99m DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.; Zanelli, G.D.; Veall, N.

    1987-02-01

    The whole-body retention of intravenously administered (99mTc)DTPA was measured by urine analysis and whole-body counting in eight normal subjects. On average, the elimination of (99mTc)DTPA was faster in these subjects than in 11 patients under study for hypertension whose whole-body retention data were used in MIRD Dose Estimate Report No. 12. The average residence time for (99mTc)DTPA in total body, less bladder contents, was only 65% of the MIRD value. However, despite this difference, the dosimetry is similar in both cases largely owing to the influence of radioactivity in bladder contents. Approximately 2-3% of the administered radioactivity was retained in the body for a time that was long relative to the physical half-life of 99mTc, and probably reflects a small amount of protein binding of the DTPA preparation.

  12. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide in rats dosed intravenously, orally, and topically and in guinea pigs dosed topically

    SciTech Connect

    el Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.; Barnett, J.W. Jr. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine the metabolic disposition of (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide (MBTS), male and female rats were dosed topically. Topical doses were 36.1 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBT and 33.6 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBTS. Although more MBT passed through the skin than MBTS and although, relative to rats, guinea pigs absorbed a greater percentage of the dose (33.4% compared to 16.1-17.5% of the MBT and 12.2% compared to 5.94-7.87% for MBTS), the disposition of radioactivity derived from the two compounds was similar. Washing of the skin removed more of the radioactivity from guinea pigs than from rats. For both sexes of rats dosed intravenously with (14C)MBT or (14C)MBTS, disposition of the compounds was similar. In 72 h, 90.9-101% of the dose appeared in the urine and 3.79-15.1% in the feces. At this time, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes. Oral dosing of rats for 14 d with unlabeled MBT prior to a single dose of (14C)MBT or with unlabeled MBTS prior to a single dose of (14C)MBTS (0.730 mg/kg). For both sexes, disposition of the compounds was similar. At 96 h after dosing, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes, most of which was bound to the membranes. For both compounds and sexes, 60.8-101% of the radioactivity administered appeared in the urine and 3.46-9.99% in the feces in 96 h. At the time, only trace amounts of radioactivity remained in tissues other than blood. Of these tissues, thyroid contained the highest concentration. In the urine, there was a detectable MBT or MBTS, but there were two metabolites, one of which was identified as a thioglucuronide derivative of MBT. The other was possibly a sulfonic acid derivative of MBT.

  13. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-01-01

    The reported investigation provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. L-histidine (His) was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol GSH and Cys chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of a chelator. The intravenous GSH or Cys were most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. Oral administration of ReadiSorb reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted.

  14. Aminothiol receptors for decorporation of intravenously administered (60)Co in the rat.

    PubMed

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Morris, James E; Creim, Jeffrey A; Woodstock, Angela D; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L; Thrall, Karla D

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic (60)Co to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. Aminoacid L-histidine (His) containing no thiol functionality was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol (GSH, Cys) chelators with that of the aminoimidazole (His) chelator. In these studies, (60)Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24-h intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for (60)Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on the systemic availability of the chelator. The intravenous route of administration of GSH or Cys was most effective in reducing tissue (60)Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. The oral administration of liposomal GSH reduced (60)Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted. PMID:19959951

  15. Aminothiol Receptors for Decorporation of Intravenously Administered 60Co in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Morris, James E.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Woodstock, Angela D.; Luders, Teresa; Curry, Terry L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a comparison of the oral decorporation efficacy of L-glutathione (GSH), L-cysteine (Cys), and a liposomal GSH formulation (ReadiSorb) toward systemic cobalt-60 (60Co) to that observed following intravenous administration of GSH and Cys in F344 rats. Aminoacid L-histidine (His) containing no thiol functionality was tested intravenously to compare in vivo efficacy of the aminothiol (GSH, Cys) chelators with that of aminoimidazole (His) chelator. In these studies, 60Co was administered to animals by intravenous injection, followed by intravenous or oral gavage doses of a chelator repeated at 24 hour intervals for a total of 5 doses. The results suggest that GSH and Cys are potent decorporation agents for 60Co in the rat model, although the efficacy of treatment depends largely on systemic availability of the chelator. The intravenous route of administration of GSH or Cys was most effective in reducing tissue 60Co levels and in increasing excretion of radioactivity compared to control animals. Liposomal encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the oral bioavailability of GSH compared to non-formulated GSH. The oral administration of liposomal GSH reduced 60Co levels in nearly all tissues by 12-43% compared to that observed for non-formulated GSH. Efficacy of oral Cys was only slightly reduced in comparison with intravenous Cys. Further studies to optimize the dosing regimen in order to maximize decorporation efficiency are warranted. PMID:19959951

  16. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  17. Radioactivity in municipal sewage and sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J E; Fenner, F D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the environmental consequences of discharges of radioactivity from a large medical research facility into municipal sewage, specifically 131I activity in sewage sludge, and the radiation exposures to workers and the public when sludges are incinerated. METHODS: The authors measured radioactivity levels in the sludge at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, Waste Water Treatment Plant following radioiodine treatments of two patients at the University of Michigan hospital complex and performed a series of calculations to estimate potential radiation doses due to releases of 131I from incineration of sewage sludge. RESULTS: Approximately 1.1% of the radioactive 131I administered therapeutically to patients was measured in the primary sludge. Radiation doses from incineration of sludge were calculated to be 0.048 millirem (mrem) for a worker during a period in which the incinerator filtration system failed, a condition that could be considered to represent maximum exposure conditions, for two nine-hour days. Calculated results for a more typically exposed worker (with the filtration system in operation and a 22-week period of incineration) yielded a committed effective dose equivalent of 0.066 mrem. If a worker were exposed to both conditions during the period of incineration, the dose was calculated to be 0.11 mrem. For a member of the public, the committed effective dose equivalent was calculated as 0.003 mrem for a 22-week incineration period. Exposures to both workers and the public were a very small fraction of a typical annual dose (about 100 mrem excluding radon, or 300 mrem with radon) due to natural background radiation. Transport time to the treatment plant for radioiodine was found to be much longer than that of a normal sewage, possibly due to absorption of iodine by organic material in the sewer lines. The residence time of radioiodine in the sewer also appears to be longer than expected. CONCLUSION: 131I in land-applied sludge presents few

  18. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  19. Accounting for shared and unshared dosimetric uncertainties in the dose response for ultrasound-detected thyroid nodules after exposure to radioactive fallout.

    PubMed

    Land, Charles E; Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Beck, Harold; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Weinstock, Robert M; Simon, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetic uncertainties, particularly those that are shared among subgroups of a study population, can bias, distort or reduce the slope or significance of a dose response. Exposure estimates in studies of health risks from environmental radiation exposures are generally highly uncertain and thus, susceptible to these methodological limitations. An analysis was published in 2008 concerning radiation-related thyroid nodule prevalence in a study population of 2,994 villagers under the age of 21 years old between August 1949 and September 1962 and who lived downwind from the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan. This dose-response analysis identified a statistically significant association between thyroid nodule prevalence and reconstructed doses of fallout-related internal and external radiation to the thyroid gland; however, the effects of dosimetric uncertainty were not evaluated since the doses were simple point "best estimates". In this work, we revised the 2008 study by a comprehensive treatment of dosimetric uncertainties. Our present analysis improves upon the previous study, specifically by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainties in dose estimation and risk analysis, and differs from the 2008 analysis in the following ways: 1. The study population size was reduced from 2,994 to 2,376 subjects, removing 618 persons with uncertain residence histories; 2. Simulation of multiple population dose sets (vectors) was performed using a two-dimensional Monte Carlo dose estimation method; and 3. A Bayesian model averaging approach was employed for evaluating the dose response, explicitly accounting for large and complex uncertainty in dose estimation. The results were compared against conventional regression techniques. The Bayesian approach utilizes 5,000 independent realizations of population dose vectors, each of which corresponds to a set of conditional individual median internal and external doses for the 2,376 subjects. These 5,000 population

  20. Accounting for Shared and Unshared Dosimetric Uncertainties in the Dose Response for Ultrasound-Detected Thyroid Nodules after Exposure to Radioactive Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, F. Owen; Moroz, Brian; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Beck, Harold; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Weinstock, Robert M.; Simon, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetic uncertainties, particularly those that are shared among subgroups of a study population, can bias, distort or reduce the slope or significance of a dose response. Exposure estimates in studies of health risks from environmental radiation exposures are generally highly uncertain and thus, susceptible to these methodological limitations. An analysis was published in 2008 concerning radiation-related thyroid nodule prevalence in a study population of 2,994 villagers under the age of 21 years old between August 1949 and September 1962 and who lived downwind from the Semi-palatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan. This dose-response analysis identified a statistically significant association between thyroid nodule prevalence and reconstructed doses of fallout-related internal and external radiation to the thyroid gland; however, the effects of dosimetric uncertainty were not evaluated since the doses were simple point “best estimates”. In this work, we revised the 2008 study by a comprehensive treatment of dosimetric uncertainties. Our present analysis improves upon the previous study, specifically by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainties in dose estimation and risk analysis, and differs from the 2008 analysis in the following ways: 1. The study population size was reduced from 2,994 to 2,376 subjects, removing 618 persons with uncertain residence histories; 2. Simulation of multiple population dose sets (vectors) was performed using a two-dimensional Monte Carlo dose estimation method; and 3. A Bayesian model averaging approach was employed for evaluating the dose response, explicitly accounting for large and complex uncertainty in dose estimation. The results were compared against conventional regression techniques. The Bayesian approach utilizes 5,000 independent realizations of population dose vectors, each of which corresponds to a set of conditional individual median internal and external doses for the 2,376 subjects. These 5

  1. Rapid and complete urinary elimination of (/sup 14/C)-5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde administered orally or intravenously to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Germond, J.E.; Philippossian, G.; Richli, U.; Bracco, I.; Arnaud, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), is a major product of sugar degradation found in food and solutions used in parenteral nutrition. Labeled (/sup 14/C)HMF was synthesized by dehydration of (/sup 14/C)fructose on ion-exchange resin and administered per os (po) and intravenously (iv) to rats. Metabolic balance of radioactivity demonstrated that HMF or its metabolites are rapidly eliminated in the urine with a recovery of 95-100% after 24 h. Literature reported, in some cases, 50% retention in the body. HMF was completely converted to two metabolites, which have been identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid and N-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoyl)glycine. Administration of high doses of HMF showed a similar rapid elimination, but a proportional reduction of the amount of the glycine conjugate produced. Whole-animal-body autoradiography confirm that shortly after administration radioactive material was present in the liver but was mostly in the kidney and the bladder. The only significant difference between po and iv administration was the presence of a higher level of radioactive material in the brain of iv-treated rats.

  2. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  3. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  4. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  5. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  6. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  7. References for radioactive releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1957. Letter report: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.

    1991-11-01

    A search was made for published documents related to discharges of radioactive material from Hanford Site facilities to the Columbia River from 1944--1957. The purpose was to list documents that contain data that might be useful in developing a source term for waterborne releases. Source term development work will take place in FY 1992, and FY 1993. This tabulation of published summaries of release data shows the type of measurements that were being made from 1944--1957 and the magnitude of discharges to the Columbia River. In the early years, very little data were collected that related to specific radionuclides. However, most of the key radionuclides were known to be present in effluents from occasional specific radionuclide analyses.

  8. The FDG dose uptake ratio corrected for blood radioactivity (cDUR) is a more robust index of glucose metabolic rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.J.; Hamberg, L.M.; Alpert, N.M.

    1994-05-01

    The dose uptake ratio (DUR) is a widely used index of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) metabolism in a variety of tumors. However, the reliability of this parameter depends on the time of measurement relative to the plateau of FDG uptake, the plasma glucose concentration and the rate of FDG removal from the circulation. These effects are of particular importance when DUR`s are compared in pre and post treatment studies.

  9. Radioactive iodine therapy: Effect on functioning metastases of adenocarcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Seidlin, S.M.; Marinelli, L.D.; Oshry, E. )

    1990-09-01

    A case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the thyroid is reported in which treatment by means of radioactive iodine has been successful. The patient was completely thyroidectomized for malignant adenoma in 1923, with neither thyrotoxicosis then nor hypothyroidism postoperatively; 15 years later there developed classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism and severe pain in the lower back. In October 1939 a pulsating tumor removed from the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra proved to be metastatic thyroid adenocarcinoma (histologically well differentiated, with small follicles and colloid). In the next two years hyperthyroidism increased and roentgenograms revealed new metastases in the lungs, upper part of the right femur, second rib on the left side, left ilium, and skull. Roentgenologic irradiation of the metastases proved ineffectual. In March 1943 a tracer dose of radioactive iodine revealed iodine retention by all the known lesions and no evidence of residual thyroid tissue in the neck. Therapeutic amounts of radioactive iodine were administered orally between May and October 1943. Definite and lasting clinical improvement followed. In April 1944 and March 1945 additional I* was administered with a resultant disappearance of pain, increase in weight, and progressive change in all clinical criteria in the direction of hypothyroidism. Roentgenographic evidence pointed to an arrest if not a regression of the disease. No untoward effects followed this therapy. Radioactive iodine seems to be an effective therapeutic agent in the control of this type of tumor.

  10. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  11. Natural radioactivity in tap waters from the private wells in the surroundings of the former Žirovski Vrh uranium mine and the age-dependent dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Ljudmila; Rovan, Leja; Klemenčič, Hiacinta; Gantar, Ivan; Prosen, Helena

    2015-08-01

    Activity concentration of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po in tap water from selected springs and private wells in the area of the former uranium mine at Žirovski Vrh were determined. A total of 22 tap water samples were collected at consumer's houses. The results show that the activity concentrations of uranium in water samples are in range (0.17-372) and (0.22-362) mBq L(-1) for (238)U and (234)U, respectively. Radium activity concentrations are in range (0.14-16.7) and (0.9-11.7) mBq L(-1) for (226)Ra and (228)Ra, respectively. (210)Po activity concentration is in range (0.28-8.0) mBq L(-1) and can be regarded as the lowest amongst all analysed radionuclides. The range for (210)Pb is (0.5-24.6) mBq L(-1). Based on the results obtained for activity concentrations of six radionuclides, the committed effective dose for three different age groups of population were estimated. It was found that the committed effective dose was well below the recommended value of 100 μSv year(-1), ranging from 2.3 to 34.3 μSv year(-1) for adults, from 3.5 to 32.0 μSv year(-1) for children (7-12 years) and from 3.0 to 23.3 μSv year(-1) for infants. PMID:25874436

  12. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  13. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  14. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  15. 16 CFR 0.4 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 0.4 Section 0.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.4 Laws administered. The Commission exercises enforcement and administrative authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C....

  16. 16 CFR 0.4 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 0.4 Section 0.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.4 Laws administered. The Commission exercises enforcement and administrative authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C....

  17. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administering agencies. 247.3 Section 247.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies....

  18. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  19. Safety of florfenicol administered in feed to tilapia (Oreochromis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Schleis, Susan M.; Tuomari, Darrell; Endris, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of Aquaflor® (50% w/w florfenicol [FFC]) incorporated in feed then administered to tilapia for 20 days (2x the recommended duration) at 0, 15, 45, or 75 mg/kg body weight/day (0, 1, 3, or 5x the recommended dose of 15 mg FFC/kg BW/d) was investigated. Mortality, behavioral change, feed consumption, body size, and gross and microscopic lesions were determined. Estimated delivered doses were >96.9% of target. Three unscheduled mortalities occurred but were considered incidental since FFC-related findings were not identified. Feed consumption was only affected during the last 10 dosing days when the 45 and 75 mg/kg groups consumed only 62.5% and 55.3% of the feed offered, respectively. There were significant, dose-dependent reductions in body size in the FFC-dose groups relative to the controls. Treatment-related histopathological findings included increased severity of lamellar epithelial hyperplasia, increased incidence of lamellar adhesions, decreased incidence of lamellar telangiectasis in the gills, increased glycogen-type and lipid-type hepatocellular vacuolation in the liver, decreased lymphocytes, increased blast cells, and increased individual cell necrosis in the anterior kidney, and tubular epithelial degeneration and mineralization in the posterior kidney. These changes are likely to be of minimal clinical relevance, given the lack of mortality or morbidity observed. This study has shown that FFC, when administered in feed to tilapia at the recommended dose (15 mg FFC/kg BW/day) for 10 days would be well tolerated.

  20. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  1. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  2. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  3. Biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous administration of (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in man

    SciTech Connect

    Ledger, J.E.; Watson, G.J.; Compston, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    The biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was studied in nine patients with T-tube bile drainage. The mean +/- SD 24-hr radioactivity excretion in T-tube bile expressed as a percentage of the administered dose was 6.7 +/- 2.9%; after correction for incomplete bile collection, the value obtained was 16.0 +/- 11.1%. Chloroform solubility of biliary radioactivity increased from 27.4 +/- 8.9% to 72.9 +/- 10.1% following incubation with beta-glucuronidase. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of chloroform extracts of bile revealed that most of the eluted radioactivity was more polar than (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3. No free (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was demonstrated. Thus in man, most of the biliary radioactivity excreted following (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is in the form of water-soluble compounds, mainly glucuronides. However, our results suggest that glucuronides of metabolites other than 25-OHD3 are predominantly formed.

  4. MARE: Mars Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lellis, A. M.; Capria, M. T.; Espinasse, S.; Magni, G.; Orosei, R.; Piccioni, G.; Federico, C.; Minelli, G.; Pauselli, C.; Scarpa, G.

    1999-09-01

    MARE is an experiment for the measurement of the beta and gamma radioactivity in space and in the Martian soil, both at the surface and in the subsurface. This will be accomplished by means of a dosimeter and a spectrometer. The radiation dose rate to which crews will be exposed is one of the hazards that has to be quantified before the human exploration of Mars may begin. Data for evaluating radioactivity levels at Martian surface are of great interest for environmental studies related to life in general. The dosimeter will be able to measure the beta and gamma radiation dose received, with a responsivity which is very close to that of a living organism. The dosimeter is based on thermo-luminescence pills which emit an optical signal proportional to the absorbed dose when heated. Radioactive elements ((40) K, (235) U, (238) U and (232) Th) can be used as a mean of tracing the evolution of a terrestrial planet. These radioactive elements are the source of the internal heat, which drives convection in the mantle. They have been redistributed in this process and they are now concentrated in the crust where they are accessible for study. Their different behavior during the fractionation process can be used as a mean to investigate the geochemical characteristic of Mars. The spectrometer, a scintillation radiation absorber system for single event counting, is capable of detecting gamma photons with energies between 200 KeV and 10 MeV. The detected events will be processed in such a way to allow the recognition of the spectral signature of different decay processes, and thus the identification and the measurement of the concentrations of different radionuclides in the Martian soil.

  5. Comparison and Equating of Paper-Administered, Computer-Administered and Computerized Adaptive Tests of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, James B.; And Others

    Student achievement test scores were compared and equated, using three different testing methods: paper-administered, computer-administered, and computerized adaptive testing. The tests were developed from third and sixth grade mathematics item banks of the California Assessment Program. The paper and the computer-administered tests were identical…

  6. Dose esclation in radioimmunotherapy based on projected whole body dose

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Kaminski, M.S.; Regan, D.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of approaches have been utilized in conducting phase I radioimmunotherapy dose-escalation trials. Escalation of dose has been based on graded increases in administered mCi; mCi/kg; or mCi/m2. It is also possible to escalate dose based on tracer-projected marrow, blood or whole body radiation dose. We describe our results in performing a dose-escalation trial in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma based on escalating administered whole-body radiation dose. The mCi dose administered was based on a patient-individualized tracer projected whole-body dose. 25 patients were entered on the study. RIT with 131 I anti-B-1 was administered to 19 patients. The administered dose was prescribed based on the projected whole body dose, determined from patient-individualized tracer studies performed prior to RIT. Whole body dose estimates were based on the assumption that the patient was an ellipsoid, with 131 antibody kinetics determined using a whole-body probe device acquiring daily conjugate views of 1 minute duration/view. Dose escalation levels proceeded with 10 cGy increments from 25 cGy whole-body and continues, now at 75 cGy. The correlation among potential methods of dose escalation and toxicity was assessed. Whole body radiation dose by probe was strongly correlated with the blood radiation dose determined from sequential blood sampling during tracer studies (r=.87). Blood radiation dose was very weakly correlated with mCi dose (r=.4) and mCi/kg (r=.45). Whole body radiation dose appeared less well-correlated with injected dose in mCi (r=.6), or mCi/kg (r=.64). Toxicity has been infrequent in these patients, but appears related to increasing whole body dose. Non-invasive determination of whole-body radiation dose by gamma probe represents a non-invasive method of estimating blood radiation dose, and thus of estimating bone marrow radiation dose.

  7. Disposition of disodium cromoglycate administered in three particle sizes.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, S H; Taylor, A J; Evans, S; Godfrey, S; Zeidifard, E

    1975-01-01

    1 Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) was administered in three particle sizes to five human subjects. 2 Urinary excretion of DSCG, as a proportion of the dose, was highest following small particles; the lower values recorded following intermediate-sized and large particles were similar. 3 DSCG deposited in the mouth was highest following large particles; the lower values recorded following intermediate-sized and small particles were similar. 4 The data were examined in relation to the recent observation that the protective effect of small particles of DSCG is dramatically superior to that of large particles. PMID:825134

  8. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  9. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  10. Computer Model Buildings Contaminated with Radioactive Material

    1998-05-19

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material.

  11. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  12. Radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.S.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1985-12-01

    Potential radiation doses from several scenarios involving nuclear attack on an unsheltered United States population are calculated for local, intermediate time scale and long-term fallout. Dose estimates are made for both a normal atmosphere and an atmosphere perturbed by smoke produced by massive fires. A separate section discusses the additional doses from nuclear fuel facilities, were they to be targeted in an attack. Finally, in an appendix the direct effects of fallout on humans are considered. These include effects of sheltering and biological repair of damage from chronic doses. 21 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. , yellow No. 11) in rats dosed orally or intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    El Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. yellow No. 11, DCY) in male Fischer rats dosed intravenously or by feeding was determined. For rats given (/sup 14/C)DCY in the feed (0.00044-0.41% of the diet), recovery of radioactivity during the 24-h dosing period and the 72-h period thereafter ranged from 89.1 to 93.9% for feces and from 4.98 to 6.25 for urine. Tissues contained only trace amounts. Following intravenous dosing with (/sup 14/C)DCY (0.93 mg/kg), radioactivity distributed readily into most tissues; maximum amounts were present at 5 min, the earliest time of assay. Maximum amounts of radioactivity in fat, skin, and gut tissue, however, were present at 30 min after dosing. These three tissues also had relatively long alpha phases for the elimination of radioactivity. In 24 h after intravenous dosing, rats excreted 81.1% of the dose in the feces and 16.0% of the dose in the urine. For rats fitted with biliary cannulas, 54.5% of the dose, all of which was metabolites of (/sup 14/C), was recovered in the bile in 4 h. Associated with the rapid and extensive biliary excretion of metabolites of intravenously administered (/sup 14/C)DCY was the appearance of large amounts of radioactivity in the feces and also, at intermediate time points, in the liver, gut contents, and gut tissue. In conclusion, rats rapidly distribute, metabolize, and excrete (/sup 14/C)DCY.

  14. Disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. yellow number11) in rats dosed orally or intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    el Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. yellow number11, DCY) in male Fischer rats dosed intravenously or by feeding was determined. For rats given (/sup 14/C)DCY in the feed (0.00044-0.41% of the diet), recovery of radioactivity during the 24-h dosing period and the 72-h period thereafter ranged from 89.1 to 93.9% for feces and from 4.98 to 6.25 for urine. Tissues contained only trace amounts. Following intravenous dosing with (/sup 14/C)DCY (0.93 mg/kg), radioactivity distributed readily into most tissues; maximum amounts were present at 5 min, the earliest time of assay. Maximum amounts of radioactivity in fat, skin, and gut tissue, however, were present at 30 min after dosing. These three tissues also had relatively long alpha phases for the elimination of radioactivity. In 24 h after intravenous dosing, rats excreted 81.1% of the dose in the feces and 16.0% of the dose in the urine. For rats fitted with biliary cannulas, 54.5% of the dose, all of which was metabolites of (/sup 14/C)DCY, was recovered in the bile in 4 h. Associated with the rapid and extensive biliary excretion of metabolites of intravenously administered (/sup 14/C)DCY was the appearance of large amounts of radioactivity in the feces and also, at intermediate time points, in the liver, gut contents, and gut tissue. In conclusion, rats rapidly distribute, metabolize, and excrete (/sup 14/C)DCY.

  15. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  16. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Self-administered treatment for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Curry, Susan J; Ludman, Evette J; McClure, Jennifer

    2003-03-01

    Self-administered treatment for smoking cessation has the potential to reach a broad spectrum of the population of smokers. This article focuses on self-administration of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for smoking cessation. Evidence for the effectiveness of written manuals to self-administer behavioral treatment is mixed. There is no evidence that self-help manuals alone are effective. However, they do increase quit rates when combined with personalized adjuncts such as written feedback and outreach telephone counseling. Efficacy trials of first-line pharmacotherapies (nicotine gum, nicotine patch, and bupropion) result in doubling of cessation rates compared to placebo. It is difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacotherapies when self-administered under real-world conditions. The general consensus is that they improve quit rates, although poor compliance and early discontinuation reduce their effectiveness. Areas for further research include randomized trials of the use of new technologies (e.g., hand-held computers and the Internet) to disseminate self-administered treatments as well as improved surveillance of the use of self-administered treatment in population-based health surveys. PMID:12579547

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  19. Determination of 14C residue in eggs of laying hens administered orally with [14C] sulfaquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B; Rummel, N; Smith, D

    2004-06-01

    Ten layer hens were dosed for 5 consecutive days with 6.2 mg kg(-1) [14C] sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). Eggs were collected from the hens during the 5-day dosing period and during a 10-day post-dose withdrawal period. Egg yolk and albumen were separated and assayed for total radioactive residues (TRR) using a combustion oxidizer and liquid scintillation counting techniques. Significant amounts of radioactivity were detected on the second day of dosing (greater than 24h after the initial dose) in both egg yolk and albumen. First eggs were collected about 8 h after dosing; the second-day eggs were collected during 8-h period after the second dose. Radioactive residues reached a maximum on the fifth day of dosing in albumen, whereas on the second day of withdrawal in egg yolk, the peak TRR levels in albumen were about threefold higher than in yolk. Thereafter, the TRR levels declined rapidly in albumen and were detectable up to withdrawal day 6, whereas the TRR levels in egg yolk declined more slowly and were detectable up to withdrawal day 10. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the parent drug sulfaquinoxaline was the major component in both the egg albumen and yolk. Additionally, this work suggests that egg yolk is the appropriate matrix for monitoring SQX residues PMID:15204532

  20. Distribution and metabolism of intravenously administered choline[methyl- 3-H] and synthesis in vivo of acetylcholine in various tissues of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, D R; Wang, P F; Wedeking, P W

    1975-04-01

    The biosynthesis of acetylcholine and the fate of intravenously administered choline [methyl- 3-H] were studied in guinea pigs anesthetized with pentobarbital. Choline and acetylcholine were isolated by paper electrophoresis and estimated by use of a specific enzymatic (choline kinase) - radioisotopic assay. The concentration of acetylcholine ranged from 25.5 to 1.1 nmol/g in the following tissues (in order of decreasing concentration): duodenum, corpus striatum, stomach, cerebral cortex, spinal cord, abdominal fat, submaxillary gland, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen, liver, lung, heart and diaphragm. Choline [methyl- 3-H] was converted in the tissues to acetylcholine within 3 minutes after intravenous administration of the precursor. Virtually all the radioactivity in plasma at that time was present as free choline, suggesting that free choline from plasma is the immediate precursor for acetylcholine synthesized in the tissues cited. The concentration of free choline in tissues ranged from 344 nmol/g in adrenals to 40 nmol/g in heart, while that in plasma was 15 nmol/g. The initial half-life of choline in plasma, estimated from the rate of disappearance of choline after intravenous administration of either a tracer dose of choline [methyl- 3-H] (0.031 mumol/kg) or a high dose of choline chloride (200 mumol/kg), was less than 1 minute. This rapid removal of choline from plasma resulted from uptake (or binding) by tissues, with kidney and liver removing about 50% of the administered dose of choline [methyl- 3-H] within 3 minutes after its administration. Uptake of choline occurred in all tissues cited above, but there was a 20-fold difference in the uptake by the most active tissues (kidney and adrenals), as compared to that of the least active (central nervous system). Within 60 minutes after administration of choline [methyl- 3-H], most of the radioactive choline taken up by tissues had been converted to organic-soluble metabolites and to water-soluble metabolites

  1. The Model 9977 Radioactive Material Packaging Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.

    2015-10-09

    The Model 9977 Packaging is a single containment drum style radioactive material (RAM) shipping container designed, tested and analyzed to meet the performance requirements of Title 10 the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A radioactive material shipping package, in combination with its contents, must perform three functions (please note that the performance criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations have alternate limits for normal operations and after accident conditions): Containment, the package must “contain” the radioactive material within it; Shielding, the packaging must limit its users and the public to radiation doses within specified limits; and Subcriticality, the package must maintain its radioactive material as subcritical

  2. Changes in Medications Administered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Johnson, Shella; Roman, Jaclyn; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to determine if there have been changes in the type and number of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) medications administered in schools since the introduction of long-acting stimulants. A survey was sent to 1,000 school nurses randomly selected from the National Association…

  3. Teaching Students to Administer the WISC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Yost

    1977-01-01

    A college level psychology course is described in which students were trained by both traditional and experimental methods to administer individual intelligence tests. Comparative analysis of performance by each group indicates that student motivation and performance is not greatly influenced by teaching method and that videotape demonstrations…

  4. Phase I trial of intramuscularly administered tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, A A; Casper, E S; Gabrilove, J L; Templeton, M A; Sherwin, S A; Oettgen, H F

    1989-03-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscularly administered recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was conducted in 19 adult patients with advanced solid tumors. The agent was administered daily for up to five consecutive days every other week for two to four courses. Doses of rTNF ranged from 5 to 200 micrograms/m2/d. Dose-limiting toxicities were encountered at doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d. Toxicities included tenderness, erythema and induration at the site of injection, fatigue, fever, chills, headache, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Moderate to marked reductions in WBC and platelet counts were observed regularly at the highest dose levels, but none were clinically significant. Hepatic enzyme elevation was seen frequently, and two patients developed hyperbilirubinemia. Only one of seven patients treated with doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d completed the planned course of therapy. Even at the highest dose levels, serum concentrations of rTNF could only rarely be detected in the serum. No therapeutic responses were observed. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of rTNF in this trial was 150 micrograms/m2/d, administered for two courses. PMID:2918329

  5. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest

  6. Administering social security: challenges yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, the Social Security Administration (SSA) celebrates the 75th anniversary of the passage of the Social Security Act. In those 75 years, SSA has been responsible for programs providing unemployment insurance, child welfare, and supervision of credit unions, among other duties. This article focuses on the administration of the Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program, although it also covers some of the other major programs SSA has been tasked with administering over the years-in particular, Medicare, Black Lung benefits, and Supplemental Security Income. The article depicts some of the challenges that have accompanied administering these programs and the steps that SSA has taken to meet those challenges. Whether implementing complex legislation in short timeframes or coping with natural disasters, SSA has found innovative ways to overcome problems and has evolved to meet society's changing needs. PMID:20737858

  7. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the

  8. Multidose pharmacokineetecs of orally administered florfenicol in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma disposition of florfenicol in channel catfish was investigated after an oral dose (10mg/kg for 10 days) administered in freshwater at water temperatures ranging from 24.7 to 25.9°C. Florfenicol concentrations in plasma were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography with MS/MS detection. Af...

  9. Radiation dose to the respiratory airway linings from inhalation of (/sup 15/O)-carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bigler, R.E.; Sgouros, G.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Cosma, M.; Leonard, R.W.; Dahl, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estimates of the radiation dose to the upper airways including the trachea, oropharnyx, and nasal linings from inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled CO/sub 2/ studies are provided. Three air administration procedures were examined; inhalation by nose, by mouth and by mouth through a mouthpiece. Attention is given to the inhaled radioactive gas absorbed and retained in the mucus and saliva layers lining the respiratory passages. The authors estimates from direct measurements in saliva and mucus of the highest total radiation dose is to the oropharnyx (5.2 rads, mouth; 2.8 rads, nose). The dose to the trachea was estimated to be 3.5 rads from mucus measurements from dogs. The comparative dose to lungs is 1.2 rads (Bigler and Sgouros, JNM 24:431, 1983). These doses are for steady-state measurements involving the breathing of 1 mCi/1-air for 1 hr. Single breath estimates can be obtained by dividing by the number of breaths per hr (720). Although this procedure leads to a 10% reduction in the radiation dose to the lung, the radiation dose to the lining of the vein infused is high, ranging from 70 to 430 rads for equal activity administered. The authors recommend considering the lung as the tissue at highest risk for both inhalation and IV administration procedures.

  10. Chemical Dosing and First-Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladky, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    College students encounter a variety of first-order phenomena in their mathematics and science courses. Introductory chemistry textbooks that discuss first-order processes, usually in conjunction with chemical kinetics or radioactive decay, stop at single, discrete dose events. Although single-dose situations are important, multiple-dose events,…

  11. Ocular toxicity from systemically administered xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The eye is considered as the most privileged organ because of the blood–ocular barrier that acts as a barrier to systemically administered xenobiotics. However, there has been a significant increase in the number of reports on systemic drug-induced ocular complications. If such complications are left untreated, then it may cause permanent damage to vision. Hence, knowledge of most recent updates on ever-increasing reports of such toxicities has become imperative to develop better therapy while minimizing toxicities. Areas covered The article is mainly divided into anterior and posterior segment manifestations caused by systemically administered drugs. The anterior segment is further elaborated on corneal complications where as the posterior segment is focused on optic nerve, retinal and vitreous complications. Furthermore, this article includes recent updates on acute and chronic ocular predicaments, in addition to discussing various associated symptoms caused by drugs. Expert opinion Direct correlation of ocular toxicities due to systemic drug therapy is evident from current literature. Therefore, it is necessary to have detailed documentation of these complications to improve understanding and predict toxicities. We made an attempt to ensure that the reader is aware of the characteristic ocular complications, the potential for irreversible drug toxicity and indications for cessation. PMID:22803583

  12. Dose-dependent elimination of 8-methoxypsoralen in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, P.; Pacula, C.M.; Gerber, N.; Mays, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a photoactive linear furocoumarin, is effective in the treatment of several diseases, including psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and T-cell leukemia. Recently, a specific extraction procedure for /sup 14/C-8-MOP showed that the elimination of 8-MOP in the rat was dose-dependent. Similar pharmacokinetic studies were undertaken in mice. Purity of /sup 14/C-8-MOP, verified by a four-tube countercurrent distribution using hexane (8 ml) and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer (0.1 M 15 ml) as described by Bush, was >98% and distributed with a partition coefficient of 3.86. Male CD-1 mice were each given an i.p. dose of 10 or 50 mg/kg of /sup 14/C-8-MOP (3.4 ..mu..Ci/mg) sacrificed at timed intervals, homogenized in 150 ml of 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and a portion (0.8 ml) of the homogenate used to quantify 8-MOP as described above. The elimination half-life measured in the first 45 min was 7.4 min at 10 mg/kg and 95 min at 50 mg/kg. A similar half-life of 9.2 min was measured in mice given an i.v. dose 10 mg/kg of 8-MOP. Explanations of dose-dependent elimination include enzyme saturation, product inhibition or both. Between 58-80% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. Nine peaks of radioactivity were observed in the urine by HPLC, two of which coeluted with 5,8-dihydroxypsoralen and 6-(7-hydroxy-8-methoxycoumaryl)-acetic acid.

  13. Systemic Absorption of Rifamycin SV MMX Administered as Modified-Release Tablets in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, A. F. D.; Rusca, A.; Loprete, L.; Dröge, M. J.; Moro, L.; Assandri, A.

    2011-01-01

    The new oral 200-mg rifamycin SV MMX modified-release tablets, designed to deliver rifamycin SV directly into the colonic lumen, offer considerable advantages over the existing immediate-release antidiarrheic formulations. In two pharmacokinetics studies of healthy volunteers, the absorption, urinary excretion, and fecal elimination of rifamycin SV after single- and multiple-dose regimens of the new formulation were investigated. Concentrations in plasma of >2 ng/ml were infrequently and randomly quantifiable after single and multiple oral doses. The systemic exposure to rifamycin SV after single and multiple oral doses of MMX tablets under fasting and fed conditions or following a four-times-a-day (q.i.d.) or a twice-a-day (b.i.d.) regimen could be considered negligible. With both oral regimens, the drug was confirmed to be very poorly absorbable systemically. The amount of systemically absorbed antibiotic excreted by the renal route is far lower than 0.01% of the administered dose after both the single- and multiple-dose regimens. The absolute bioavailability, calculated as the mean percent ratio between total urinary excretion amounts (ΣXu) after a single intravenous injection and after a single oral dose under fasting conditions, was 0.0410 ± 0.0617. The total elimination of the unchanged rifamycin SV with feces was 87% of the administered oral dose. No significant effect of rifamycin SV on vital signs, electrocardiograms, or laboratory parameters was observed. PMID:21402860

  14. Radioactive iodide (131 I-) excretion profiles in response to potassium iodide (KI) and ammonium perchlorate (NH4ClO4) prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Curtis; Dallas, Cham; Rollor, Edward; White, Catherine; Blount, Benjamin; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    Radioactive iodide ((131)I-) protection studies have focused primarily on the thyroid gland and disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. The objective of the current study was to establish (131)I- urinary excretion profiles for saline, and the thyroid protectants, potassium iodide (KI) and ammonium perchlorate over a 75 hour time-course. Rats were administered (131)I- and 3 hours later dosed with either saline, 30 mg/kg of NH(4)ClO(4) or 30 mg/kg of KI. Urinalysis of the first 36 hours of the time-course revealed that NH(4)ClO(4) treated animals excreted significantly more (131)I- compared with KI and saline treatments. A second study followed the same protocol, but thyroxine (T(4)) was administered daily over a 3 day period. During the first 6-12 hour after (131)I- dosing, rats administered NH(4)ClO(4) excreted significantly more (131)I- than the other treatment groups. T(4) treatment resulted in increased retention of radioiodide in the thyroid gland 75 hour after (131)I- administration. We speculate that the T(4) treatment related reduction in serum TSH caused a decrease synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones resulting in greater residual radioiodide in the thyroid gland. Our findings suggest that ammonium perchlorate treatment accelerates the elimination rate of radioiodide within the first 24 to 36 hours and thus may be more effective at reducing harmful exposure to (131)I- compared to KI treatment for repeated dosing situations. Repeated dosing studies are needed to compare the effectiveness of these treatments to reduce the radioactive iodide burden of the thyroid gland. PMID:23066407

  15. Phase 1 Study of VEGF Trap (Aflibercept) Administered Subcutaneously to Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tew, William P.; Gordon, Michael; Murren, John; Dupont, Jakob; Pezzulli, Sandra; Aghajanian, Carol; Sabbatini, Paul; Mendelson, David; Schwartz, Lawrence; Gettinger, Scott; Psyrri, Amanda; Cedarbaum, Jesse M.; Spriggs, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximal administered dose (MAD) and pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of subcutaneously administered VEGF Trap (aflibercept), a novel anti-angiogenic agent. Experimental Design In this open-label, dose-escalation study, patients with advanced solid tumors were treated with subcutaneous doses of aflibercept at seven dose levels. Patients received a single dose of aflibercept and then underwent safety and pharmacokinetic assessments over the next 4 weeks. Patients then received weekly or bi-weekly treatment over the subsequent 6 weeks. Patients tolerating and benefiting could continue on aflibercept at the same dose and schedule until progression of disease. Results Thirty-eight patients received at least one dose of aflibercept. MTD was not reached. Due to solubility/dosing limits with the subcutaneous formulation, 1600mcg/kg/week was the MAD. The most common toxicities were proteinuria (37%), fatigue (32%), injection site reactions (18%), nausea (17%), myalgia and anorexia (16% each), hypertension (13%), and voice hoarseness (11%). Drug-related grade 3–4 toxicity was uncommon (7%) and reversible: dehydration, cerebral ischemia, proteinuria, hypertension, leukopenia, and pulmonary embolism. We identified dose-proportional increases in plasma concentrations of aflibercept bound to VEGF with a t1/2 of 18 days. No anti-aflibercept antibodies were detected. Stable disease was maintained for at least 10 weeks in 18 patients (47%), and 2 patients maintained on study for more than 1 year. Conclusion Subcutaneous aflibercept was well-tolerated and had manageable side effects. Its favorable pharmacokinetic profile and potential antitumor activity warrants further evaluation. PMID:20028764

  16. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9-14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9-14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49-1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97-5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54-1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82-3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9-14 years

  17. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9–14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9–14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49–1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97–5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54–1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82–3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9–14

  18. Transplacental and mammary passage of radioactivity in rats treated vaginally and orally with (/sup 14/C)propranolol

    SciTech Connect

    Buttar, H.S.; Moffatt, J.H.; Bura, C.

    1988-01-01

    Single doses (10 mg/kg) of an aqueous solution of (14C)propranolol were administered either orally (po) or intravaginally (ivg) on gestational d 15, or on postpartum d 7-10. Upon ivg administration, (14C)propranolol was quickly transferred to systemic circulation and the mean blood (14C) concentrations were significantly greater during the first 0.25-2 h than in po dosed counterparts. About 98% of the ivg applied dose was absorbed after 6 h in gravid rats, and the combined 6-h excretions of radioactivity in the urine (ivg = 24.6%; po = 22.9%) and feces (ivg = 16.8%; po = 14.6%) were equivalent in both groups. At the end of 6 h, the levels of (14C) in the urinary bladder, adrenal, uterus, ovary, spleen, skeletal muscle, brain, heart, lung and fat were significantly higher in ivg treated rats than po dosed animals. Compared with the maternal plasma (ivg = 0.76; po = 0.88 microgram/ml), the mean concentrations of (14C) in the placentas were similar in both groups, while the amounts of (14C) were three to five times lower in the amniotic fluids and the fetuses of both po and ivg treated dams. In lactating rats, over 99% of the administered radioactivity was absorbed from the vagina within 6 h. The blood concentrations of (14C) were significantly elevated at 0.5 and 1 h in the per vaginam treated animals, and afterward the disappearance rate of (14C) followed a similar course in both groups. Following ivg application, the milk radioactivity peaked at 0.5 h and declined rapidly. However, the appearance of (14C) in milk was rather slow after oral dosing: the milk (14C) peaked between 2 and 3 h posttreatment and remained steady thereafter. The milk to blood (M/B) (14C) concentration ratios were markedly greater during 0.5 to 1 h in the ivg group than in their po dosed counterparts.

  19. Evaluation of Terrorist Interest in Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.N.; Langsted, J.M.; Young, M.E.; Day, J.E.

    2006-07-01

    Since September 11, 2001, intelligence gathered from Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan, and the ensuing terrorist activities, indicates nuclear material security concerns are valid. This paper reviews available information on sealed radioactive sources thought to be of interest to terrorists, and then examines typical wastes generated during environmental management activities to compare their comparative 'attractiveness' for terrorist diversion. Sealed radioactive sources have been evaluated in numerous studies to assess their security and attractiveness for use as a terrorist weapon. The studies conclude that tens of thousands of curies in sealed radioactive sources are available for potential use in a terrorist attack. This risk is mitigated by international efforts to find lost and abandoned sources and bring them under adequate security. However, radioactive waste has not received the same level of scrutiny to ensure security. This paper summarizes the activity and nature of radioactive sources potentially available to international terrorists. The paper then estimates radiation doses from use of radioactive sources as well as typical environmental restoration or decontamination and decommissioning wastes in a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) attack. These calculated doses indicate that radioactive wastes are, as expected, much less of a health risk than radioactive sources. The difference in radiation doses from wastes used in an RDD are four to nine orders of magnitude less than from sealed sources. We then review the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) definition of 'dangerous source' in an adjusted comparison to common radioactive waste shipments generated in environmental management activities. The highest waste dispersion was found to meet only category 1-3.2 of the five step IAEA scale. A category '3' source by the IAEA standard 'is extremely unlikely, to cause injury to a person in the immediate vicinity'. The obvious conclusion of the

  20. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-01

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  1. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Usang, M. D. Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-29

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  2. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1700 Section 147.1700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS North Carolina § 147.1700 State-administered program. The...

  3. 40 CFR 147.2500 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2500 Section 147.2500 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Wisconsin § 147.2500 State-administered program. The...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1450 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1450 Section 147.1450 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Nevada § 147.1450 State-administered program. The UIC...

  5. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  6. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  7. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York § 147.1651 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of New York, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York § 147.1651 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of New York, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  15. 40 CFR 147.2751 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2751... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS American Samoa §...

  16. 40 CFR 147.2701 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2701... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virgin Islands §...

  17. 40 CFR 147.601 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.601... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Hawaii § 147.601...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1151... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Michigan §...

  19. 40 CFR 147.801 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.801... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Iowa § 147.801...

  20. 40 CFR 147.901 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.901... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Kentucky § 147.901...

  1. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  3. 40 CFR 147.2151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee § 147.2151 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Tennessee, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  4. Dose fractionation and single subject studies in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Karthikayan

    Conventional positron emission tomography (PET) for cognitive brain studies typically relies on information collected from the distribution of decays following an injection of 15O-labeled water. The number of injections that can be administered to the subject are constrained by radiation dose to the subject and total length of the PET scan. The standard protocol involves 8--10 injections of H152O separated by approximately 5--7 half-lives of 15O. The number of activation conditions that can be realistically studied in a standard PET session is between 8 and 10. This work investigates the physiological response of a simulated subject to H152O injections that are administered in small doses (1--5 mCi) with short inter-injection intervals (40--180 seconds). A larger number of activation conditions are presented to the subject with a wider variation in the activation paradigm. Repeat conditions are studies. Signal averaging methods are feasible with this method of dose administration. Sinograms from scans with similar activation conditions are summed together before reconstruction. The signal in the primary activation region of the brain is shown to increase while suppressing the contribution of secondary activation regions in the brain. The contrast of the final image is similarly increased which leads to easier identification of the primary activation region. An automated H152O -production unit controlled by a PC running LabView software was developed to produce the dose required for the injection sequence by controlling the flow of H152O -vapor that diffuses across a semi-permeable membrane into saline. The unit is capable of producing H152O rapidly for both the standard and the proposed dose administration methods. The system also detects the bolus arrival time at the subject's lungs using a small external plastic detector. Activation sequence commences with the rise in radioactivity observed by the detector. The simulations indicate that inter-injection intervals

  5. Comparison of Four Commercial One-Dose Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccines Administered to Pigs Challenged with PCV2 and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus at 17 Weeks Postvaccination To Control Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex under Korean Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changhoon; Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Under Korean field conditions, coinfection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is most commonly observed in porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Despite the wide use of PCV2 vaccination, PRDC remains a serious respiratory problem. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of 4 one-dose PCV2 vaccines on 3-week-old pigs with an experimental PCV2-PRRSV challenge at 17 weeks postvaccination. Regardless of which commercial PCV2 vaccine was used, the vaccination of piglets at 3 weeks of age was efficacious against cochallenge of PCV2 and PRRSV, on the basis of growth performance and PCV2-associated lesions. However, the inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 and the PCV2 vaccines induced higher PCV2-specific neutralizing antibody (NA) titers and PCV2-specific gamma interferon-secreting cells and lower PCV2 viremia levels than the two PCV2 subunit vaccines. The vaccination of piglets against PCV2 at 3 weeks of age was effective in reducing PCV2 viremia and PCV2-associated lesions during the finishing period, which is an age at which pigs are frequently affected by PRDC caused by coinfection with PCV2 and PRRSV under Korean field conditions. PMID:24403524

  6. Safety of Intravitreally Administered Recombinant Erythropoietin (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the safety and potential retinal toxicity of intravitreally administered erythropoietin (EPO) in a rodent animal model. Methods Forty-two healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into one of 7 groups (N = 6 per group): control, sham injection, vehicle injection, and EPO injections of 50 ng (5 U), 100 ng (10 U), 250 ng (25 U), and 625 ng (62.5 U). Only the right eye was treated in each animal. Standard full-field dark- and light-adapted electroretinography (ERG) was obtained at 1 day prior to injection and then on postinjection days 3, 7, 14, and 21. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured at the conclusion of each ERG recording. Animals were sacrificed and the eyes underwent histologic examination with light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results Rod peak, scotopic, and photopic responses (amplitude and latency) were not statistically different in the animals receiving 50 to 100 ng EPO. In the 250-ng group, the photopic b-wave amplitude at day 21 was elevated (P <.05), whereas in the 625-ng group, the scotopic OP3 latency ratio was higher at baseline (P <.05). No significant histologic abnormalities were noted except for one animal (625-ng group) with qualitative differences in retinal layer thickness and cellular density. Conclusions Intravitreal administration of EPO (at doses up to 625 ng) does not cause adverse effects on retinal function as assessed by ERG. Moreover, single intravitreal dosing does not appear to elicit retinal neovascularization. Further investigation is warranted to assess fully the potential of this neuroprotective cytokine as a treatment for glaucoma. PMID:19277250

  7. Who Should Administer Energy-Efficiency Programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen L.

    2003-05-01

    The restructuring of the electric utility industry in the US created a crisis in the administration of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. Before restructuring, nearly all energy-efficiency programs in the US were administered by utilities and funded from utility rates. Restructuring called these arrangements into question in two ways. First, the separation of generation from transmission and distribution undermined a key rationale for utility administration. This was the Integrated Resource Planning approach in which the vertically integrated utility was given incentives to provide energy services at least cost. Second, questions were raised as to whether funding through utility rates could be sustained in a competitive environment and most states that restructured their electricity industry adopted a system benefits charge. The crisis in administration of energy-efficiency programs produced a variety of responses in the eight years since restructuring in the US began in earn est. These responses have included new rationales for energy-efficiency programs, new mechanisms for funding programs, and new mechanisms for program administration and governance. This paper focuses on issues related to program administration. It describes the administrative functions and some of the options for accomplishing them. Then it discusses criteria for choosing among the options. Examples are given that highlight some of the states that have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved. The conclusion attempts to summarize lessons learned.

  8. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  9. Effects of Systemically Administered Hydrocortisone on the Human Immunome.

    PubMed

    Olnes, Matthew J; Kotliarov, Yuri; Biancotto, Angélique; Cheung, Foo; Chen, Jinguo; Shi, Rongye; Zhou, Huizhi; Wang, Ena; Tsang, John S; Nussenblatt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for decades to modulate inflammation therapeutically, yet there is a paucity of data on their effects in humans. We examined the changes in cellular and molecular immune system parameters, or "immunome", in healthy humans after systemic corticosteroid administration. We used multiplexed techniques to query the immunome in 20 volunteers at baseline, and after intravenous hydrocortisone (HC) administered at moderate (250 mg) and low (50 mg) doses, to provide insight into how corticosteroids exert their effects. We performed comprehensive phenotyping of 120 lymphocyte subsets by high dimensional flow cytometry, and observed a decline in circulating specific B and T cell subsets, which reached their nadir 4-8 hours after administration of HC. However, B and T cells rebounded above baseline 24 hours after HC infusion, while NK cell numbers remained stable. Whole transcriptome profiling revealed down regulation of NF-κB signaling, apoptosis, and cell death signaling transcripts that preceded lymphocyte population changes, with activation of NK cell and glucocorticoid receptor signaling transcripts. Our study is the first to systematically characterize the effects of corticosteroids on the human immunome, and we demonstrate that HC exerts differential effects on B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells in humans. PMID:26972611

  10. Inducing and Administering Tregs to Treat Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control unwanted immune responses, including those that mediate tolerance to self as well as to foreign antigens. Their mechanisms of action include direct and indirect effects on effector T cells and important functions in tissue repair and homeostasis. Tregs express a number of cell surface markers and transcriptional factors that have been instrumental in defining their origins and potentially their function. A number of immune therapies, such as rapamycin, IL-2, and anti-T cell antibodies, are able to induce Tregs and are being tested for their efficacy in diverse clinical settings with exciting preliminary results. However, a balance exists with the use of some, such as IL-2, that may have effects on unwanted populations as well as promoting expansion and survival of Tregs requiring careful selection of dose for clinical use. The use of cell surface markers has enabled investigators to isolate and expand ex vivo Tregs more than 500-fold routinely. Clinical trials have begun, administering these expanded Tregs to patients as a means of suppressing autoimmune and alloimmune responses and potentially inducing immune tolerance. Studies in the future are likely to build on these initial technical achievements and use combinations of agents to improve the survival and functional capacity of Tregs. PMID:26834735

  11. Effects of Systemically Administered Hydrocortisone on the Human Immunome

    PubMed Central

    Olnes, Matthew J.; Kotliarov, Yuri; Biancotto, Angélique; Cheung, Foo; Chen, Jinguo; Shi, Rongye; Zhou, Huizhi; Wang, Ena; Tsang, John S.; Nussenblatt, Robert; Dickler, Howard B.; Hourigan, Christopher S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; McCoy, J. Phillip; Perl, Shira; Schum, Paula; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Valdez, Janet; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for decades to modulate inflammation therapeutically, yet there is a paucity of data on their effects in humans. We examined the changes in cellular and molecular immune system parameters, or “immunome”, in healthy humans after systemic corticosteroid administration. We used multiplexed techniques to query the immunome in 20 volunteers at baseline, and after intravenous hydrocortisone (HC) administered at moderate (250 mg) and low (50 mg) doses, to provide insight into how corticosteroids exert their effects. We performed comprehensive phenotyping of 120 lymphocyte subsets by high dimensional flow cytometry, and observed a decline in circulating specific B and T cell subsets, which reached their nadir 4–8 hours after administration of HC. However, B and T cells rebounded above baseline 24 hours after HC infusion, while NK cell numbers remained stable. Whole transcriptome profiling revealed down regulation of NF-κB signaling, apoptosis, and cell death signaling transcripts that preceded lymphocyte population changes, with activation of NK cell and glucocorticoid receptor signaling transcripts. Our study is the first to systematically characterize the effects of corticosteroids on the human immunome, and we demonstrate that HC exerts differential effects on B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells in humans. PMID:26972611

  12. Pharmacokinetics of dolutegravir when administered with mineral supplements in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Ivy; Borland, Julie; Arya, Niki; Wynne, Brian; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    All commercially available integrase inhibitors are 2-metal binders and may be affected by co-administration with metal cations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium and iron supplements on dolutegravir pharmacokinetics and strategies (dose separation and food) to attenuate the effects if significant reductions in dolutegravir exposure were observed. This was an open-label, crossover study that randomized 24 healthy subjects into 1 of 2 cohorts to receive 4 treatments: (1) dolutegravir alone, fasting; (2) dolutegravir with calcium carbonate or ferrous fumarate, fasting; (3) dolutegravir with calcium carbonate or ferrous fumarate with a moderate-fat meal; (4) dolutegravir administered 2 hours before calcium carbonate or ferrous fumarate, fasting. Plasma dolutegravir AUC(0-∞), Cmax , and C24 were reduced by 39%, 37%, and 39%, respectively, when co-administered with calcium carbonate while fasting and were reduced by 54%, 57%, and 56%, respectively, when co-administered with ferrous fumarate while fasting. Dolutegravir administration 2 hours before calcium or iron supplement administration (fasted), as well as administration with a meal, counteracted the effect. Dolutegravir and calcium or iron supplements can be co-administered if taken with a meal. Under fasted conditions, dolutegravir should be administered 2 hours before or 6 hours after calcium or iron supplements. PMID:25449994

  13. Effect of centrally administered losartan on gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Merai, Ankitkumar Harshadrai; Asad, Mohammed; Prasad, V Satya

    2009-01-01

    The effect of centrally administered losartan, an AT(1) receptor antagonist, on gastric acid secretion and gastric cytoprotection was studied using different models of gastric ulcers, such as acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers, pylorus ligation, ethanol-induced and stress-induced acute gastric ulcers and cysteamine hydrochloride-induced duodenal ulcer. Losartan was administered intracerebroventrically (i.c.v.) at 2 different doses (125 and 250 microg/kg). Both doses of losartan increased the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers. In pylorus-ligated rats, a significant reduction in free acidity, total acidity and ulcer index was observed with high dose (250 microg/kg, i.c.v.), while low dose (125 microg/kg, i.c.v.) produced reduction only in free acidity and ulcer index. Both doses also produced a significant antiulcer effect in ethanol-induced and stress-induced gastric ulcers. Losartan also reduced ulcer area in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer. We conclude that AT(1) receptor antagonism in the brain increases healing of gastric ulcers and reduces gastric acid secretion and increases gastric mucin content. PMID:19602912

  14. Pharmacodynamics of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2012-09-15

    The pharmacodynamics (PD) of oxytetracycline was investigated against a strain of Mannheimia haemolytica. In vitro measurements, comprising minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration and time-kill curves, were conducted in five matrices; Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB), cation-adjusted MHB (CAMHB) and calf serum, exudate and transudate. MICs were much higher in the biological fluids than in MHB and CAMHB. Ratios of MIC were, serum: CAMHB 19 : 1; exudate:CAMHB 16.1; transudate:CAMHB 14 : 1. Ex vivo data, generated in the tissue cage model of inflammation, demonstrated that oxytetracycline, administered to calves intramuscularly at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg, did not inhibit the growth of M haemolytica in serum, exudate and transudate, even at peak concentration. However, using in vitro susceptibility in CAMHB and in vivo-determined pharmacokinetic (PK) variables, average and minimum oxytetracycline concentrations relative to MIC (C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC) predicted achievement of efficacy for approximately 48 hours after dosing. Similar C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC data were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen. PK-PD integration of data for oxytetracycline, based on MICs determined in the three biological fluids, suggests that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against M haemolytica. These data raise questions concerning the mechanism(s) of action of oxytetracycline, when administered at clinically recommended dose rates. PMID:22843613

  15. Evaluation of the prenatal developmental toxicity of orally administered arsenic trioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Holson, J F; Stump, D G; Clevidence, K J; Knapp, J F; Farr, C H

    2000-05-01

    A thorough review of the literature revealed no published repeated-dose oral developmental toxicity studies of inorganic arsenic in rats. In the present study, which was conducted according to modern regulatory guidelines, arsenic trioxide was administered orally beginning 14 days prior to mating and continuing through mating and gestation until gestational day 19. Exposures began prior to mating in an attempt to achieve a steady state of arsenic in the bloodstream of dams prior to embryo-foetal development. Groups of 25 Crl:CD(SD)BR female rats received doses of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10mg/kg/day by gavage. The selection of these dose levels was based on a preliminary range-finding study, in which excessive post-implantation loss and markedly decreased foetal weight occurred at doses of 15 mg/kg/day and maternal deaths occurred at higher doses. Maternal toxicity in the 10mg/kg/day group was evidenced by decreased food consumption and decreased net body weight gain during gestation, increased liver and kidney weights, and stomach abnormalities (adhesions and eroded areas). Transient decreases in food consumption in the 5mg/kg/day group caused the maternal no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) to be determined as 2. 5mg/kg/day. Intrauterine parameters were unaffected by arsenic trioxide. No treatment-related foetal malformations were noted in any dose group. Increased skeletal variations at 10mg/kg/day were attributed to reduced foetal weight at that dose level. The developmental NOAEL was thus 5mg/kg/day. Based on this study, orally administered arsenic trioxide cannot be considered to be a selective developmental toxicant (i.e. it is not more toxic to the conceptus than to the maternal organism), nor does it exhibit any propensity to cause neural tube defects, even at maternally toxic dose levels. PMID:10762732

  16. Issues of natural radioactivity in phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schnug, E.; Haneklaus, S.; Schnier, C.; Scholten, L.C.

    1996-12-31

    The fertilization of phosphorus (P) fertilizers is essential in agricultural production, but phosphates contain in dependence on their origin different amounts of trace elements. The problem of cadmium (Cd) loads and other heavy metals is well known. However, only a limited number of investigations examined the contamination of phosphates with the two heaviest metals, uranium (U) and thorium (Th), which are radioactive. Also potassium (K) is lightly radioactive. Measurements are done n the radioactivity content of phosphates, P fertilizers and soils. The radiation doses to workers and public as well as possible contamination of soils from phosphate rock or fertilizer caused by these elements or their daughter products is of interest with regard to radiation protection. The use of P fertilizers is necessary for a sustainable agriculture, but it involves radioactive contamination of soils. The consequences of the use of P fertilizers is discussed, also with regard to existing and proposed legislation. 11 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  18. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... the testing center so that the amount of radioactivity in the thyroid gland can be measured. This ... The amount of radioactivity is very small, and there have been no documented side effects. The amount of iodine used is less than ...

  19. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  20. Systemic absorption of endotracheally administered aminoglycosides in seriously ill patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, S S; Edwards, W A; Brennan, C; Dellinger, E P; Bauer, L A

    1987-01-01

    A study was performed with 10 hospitalized patients to determine the percentage of an aminoglycoside dose (tobramycin or gentamicin) that is absorbed systemically after being instilled into the endotracheal tube at steady state. All patients were on respirators, had indwelling urinary catheters, and had creatinine clearances estimated to be greater than or equal to 40 ml/min. Tobramycin or gentamicin (40 mg) was instilled every 4 h directly into the endotracheal tube. Nine patients also received systemically a different aminoglycoside from that administered through the endotracheal tube. Urine was collected over a 4-h dosing interval at steady state (after at least 5 doses of the drug). The amount of aminoglycoside excreted over the 4-h interval was measured and expressed as percentage of the dose administered over that period. The range of percentage of dose absorbed was 1.5 to 34%, with a mean of 16.7 +/- 11.4% standard deviation and a median of 16.5%. The coefficient of variation was 68%. Levels of the endotracheally administered aminoglycoside in serum were measured, and all were less than 1.0 microgram/ml. While a large degree of variability in absorption was observed in this study, significant amounts of aminoglycosides could be absorbed in some patients. However, levels apparently did not accumulate in sera of patients with adequate renal function, and an empirical dosage reduction in intravenous aminoglycoside should not be necessary with the addition of endotracheally instilled aminoglycoside in patients with creatinine clearances greater than 40 ml/min. PMID:3619417

  1. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    -99% pure population of leukocytes. Viability was assessed using Trypan blue histological analysis. We successfully isolated and labeled ~25-30 x 10{sup 7} CD34+ lymphocytes in cytokine mobilized progenitor cell apharesis harvests. Cells were also subjected to a stat gram stain to look for bacterial contamination, stat endotoxin LAL to look for endotoxin contamination, flow cytometry for evaluation of the purity of the cells and 14-day sterility culture. Colony forming assays confirm the capacity of these cells to proliferate and function ex-vivo with CFU-GM values of 26 colonies/ 1 x 10{sup 4} cells plated and 97% viability in cytokine augmented methylcellulose at 10-14 days in CO{sub 2} incubation. We developed a closed-processing system for the product labeling prior to infusion to maintain autologous cell integrity and sterility. Release criteria for the labeled product were documented for viability, cell count and differential, and measured radiolabel. We were successful in labeling the cells with up to 500 uCi/10{sup 8} cells, with viability of >98%. However, due to delays in getting the protocol approved by the FDA, the cells were not infused in humans in this location (although we did successfully use CD34+ cells in humans in a study in Australia). The approach developed should permit labeling of progenitor cells that can be administered to human subjects for tracking. The labeling approach should be useful for all progenitor cell types, although this would need to be verified since different cell lines may have differential radiosensitivity.

  2. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  3. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  4. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  5. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  6. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  7. Safe Handling of Radioactive Materials. Recommendations of the National Committee on Radiation Protection. Handbook 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook is designed to help users of radioactive materials to handle the radioactive material without exposing themselves or others to radiation doses in excess of maximum permissible limits. The discussion of radiation levels is in terms of readings from dosimeters and survey instruments. Safety in the handling of radioactive materials in…

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-04-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates for radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. These estimates will be based on historical measurements and production information. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  10. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  11. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  12. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  13. The use of dexamethasone administered to mares at breeding time in the modulation of persistent mating induced endometritis.

    PubMed

    Bucca, S; Carli, A; Buckley, T; Dolci, G; Fogarty, U

    2008-10-15

    The present study describes the effect of a single dose of dexamethasone administered to mares at time of breeding. In an initial experiment, the authors investigated safety of treatment. In a second experiment the effect of treatment on the uterine environment, fetal development and pregnancy outcome was examined. In the final part of the study, mares susceptible to persistent mating induced endometritis were identified, by means of a risk factor score system and the effect of treatment evaluated. Results indicated that dexamethasone administered at breeding time did not negatively impact on mares medical and reproductive traits. A reduced inflammatory response was observed post-mating in treated versus control mares and mares with multiple risk factors for susceptibility to persistent mating induced endometritis showed improved pregnancy rates following treatment. The authors concluded that a single dose of dexamethasone administered at the time of breeding is safe and can be used to modulate the uterine inflammatory response to breeding in susceptible mares. PMID:18649933

  14. DELAYED PREPUTIAL SEPARATION (PPS) AND SP22 MEASUREMENT IN RATS ADMINISTERED BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (BCA) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproductive effects of BCA were determined in a dose range finding study (DRFS) and definitive two-generational study. Adult male and female CD� (SD) rats were administered BCA in drinking water for two weeks in the DRFS (10/sex/group) and ten weeks in the definitive study (25/s...

  15. Centrally administered naloxone blocks reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Humphreys, M H

    1985-09-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) leads to a natriuresis and kaliuresis by the remaining kidney through reflex mechanisms involving opiate receptors. To determine whether the opiate receptors mediating these responses are located in the central nervous system, we carried out AUN in anesthetized rats undergoing continuous ventriculocisternal perfusion (VCP) with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). AUN caused large increases in both Na (UNaV) and K (UKV) excretion without changes in glomerular filtration rate or arterial blood pressure. When the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone was added to the perfusate to achieve a perfusion rate of 32 micrograms X kg-1 X h-1, AUN failed to increase either UNaV or UKV by the remaining kidney. This dose of naloxone, however, was without effect when infused intravenously. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) to the artificial CSF to achieve a VCP rate of 50 micrograms X kg-1 X h-1 also blocked the expected increase in UNaV and UKV by the remaining kidney after AUN. Infusion of TRH intravenously at the same rate did not interfere with the postnephrectomy natriuresis or kaliuresis. Higher intravenous infusion rates of TRH (1 and 2 mg X kg-1h-1) prevented the postnephrectomy natriuresis without affecting the kaliuresis. These results indicate that the effect of naloxone to block the reflex natriuresis and kaliuresis after AUN resides largely in the central nervous system. The blockade by naloxone of the postnephrectomy natriuresis is duplicated by centrally administered TRH, providing another example of the interaction of this hormone with the endogenous opioid system. Large intravenous infusions of TRH also block the postnephrectomy natriuresis but not the kaliuresis. PMID:3929623

  16. Absorption, Distribution, and Excretion of the Investigational Agent Orteronel (TAK-700) in Healthy Male Subjects: A Phase 1, Open-Label, Single-Dose Study.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ajit; Pusalkar, Sandeepraj; Li, Yuexian; Prakash, Shimoga

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the absorption, distribution, and excretion of orteronel, an investigational, nonsteroidal, reversible, selective 17,20-lyase inhibitor. Six healthy male subjects received a single 400-mg dose of radiolabeled [(14) C]-orteronel (18.5 kBq). The pharmacokinetics of [(14) C]-radioactivity, orteronel, and the primary metabolite M-I were characterized by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and mass balance recovery of [(14) C]-radioactivity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and accelerator mass spectrometry. Median time to maximum observed concentration of [(14) C]-radioactivity was 2.5 hours (plasma/whole blood) and of orteronel was 1 hour (plasma). Mean terminal half-life for [(14) C]-radioactivity in plasma and whole blood was 9.46 and 7.39 hours, respectively. For [(14) C]-radioactivity, the geometric mean whole blood-to-plasma ratios for maximum observed plasma/whole-blood concentration, area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to last quantifiable concentration (AUC0-last ), and AUC0-inf (AUC from time 0 to infinity) were 1.04, 0.92, and 0.93, respectively. Dose recovery accounted for 95.9% of the administered orteronel dose; the majority of excretion occurred by 96 hours postdose. The principal excretion route was via urine (mean, 77.5%; including 49.7% unchanged drug and 16.3% M-I) compared with 18.4% via feces. Three mild adverse events were reported; none were considered serious or related to orteronel. PMID:27163496

  17. Comparative efficacy of terbutaline administered by Nebuhaler and by nebulizer in young children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, J; Hopkins, J; Timms, B; Van Asperen, P P

    1989-10-01

    We compared the use of terbutaline sulphate that was delivered by a nebulizer with its delivery by a Nebuhaler at two dose levels in 27 children (nine children per group) of between three and six years of age with acute asthma. No significant difference was found in the mean baseline clinical score among the three groups, and a significant decline occurred in the mean clinical scores in all groups by 15 minutes which was maintained to 60 minutes after the dose was administered. The decline that was achieved with delivery of the drug by way of a Nebuhaler (at either dose level) was not significantly different from that with a nebulizer, although cooperation with Nebuhaler usage was not universal in the age-group. PMID:2677624

  18. The relative reinforcing strength of methamphetamine and D-amphetamine in monkeys self-administering cocaine.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Charnigo, Richard J; Nader, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of D-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of D-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A range of doses of methamphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), D-amphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), and cocaine (0.003-0.3 mg/kg/injection) was tested to capture the ascending and descending limbs of the dose-effect functions. Each drug functioned as a reinforcer, but the peak number of self-administered D-amphetamine injections was significantly lower compared with methamphetamine and cocaine; the peak number of self-administered injections of cocaine and methamphetamine did not differ. Although differences in availability and other social factors likely impact relative rates of abuse, the present data suggest that the greater reinforcing strength of methamphetamine contributes to its increased use compared with D-amphetamine. PMID:23907377

  19. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered Program. 282.56 Section 282.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.56 Connecticut State-Administered Program. (a) The...

  20. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered Program. 282.56 Section 282.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.56 Connecticut State-Administered Program. (a) The...

  1. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  2. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  3. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  4. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  5. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. (a) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... person who holds an amateur operator license of the class specified below: (i) Amateur Extra, Advanced...

  6. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kansas State-Administered Program. 282.66 Section 282.66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.66 Kansas State-Administered Program. (a) The State of...

  7. 40 CFR 282.88 - Pennsylvania State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pennsylvania State-Administered Program. 282.88 Section 282.88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.88 Pennsylvania State-Administered Program. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program. 282.96 Section 282.96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96 Virginia State-Administered Program. (a) The State...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  13. 24 CFR 982.51 - PHA authority to administer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false PHA authority to administer program. 982.51 Section 982.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... PHA Plan for Administration of Program § 982.51 PHA authority to administer program. (a) The PHA...

  14. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents... Mountain Ute lands in Utah and New Mexico), and all wells on other Indian lands in New Mexico is administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in...

  16. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents... Mountain Ute lands in Utah and New Mexico), and all wells on other Indian lands in New Mexico is administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in...

  17. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  18. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  19. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  20. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  1. 39 CFR 222.1 - Authority to administer postal affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority to administer postal affairs. 222.1 Section 222.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 222.1 Authority to administer postal affairs. (a) The Postmaster General. The postmaster...

  2. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  4. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program....

  5. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  10. 40 CFR 147.451 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.451... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS District of...

  11. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.151... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona § 147.151...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1951 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1951... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Pennsylvania §...

  13. 40 CFR 147.101 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.101... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alaska § 147.101...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2851 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2851... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Trust Territory of...

  15. 40 CFR 147.751 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, and 148 and the additional... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.751... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Indiana § 147.751...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1201... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  17. 40 CFR 147.2801 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.2801... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Commonwealth of...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program. 147.1351... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Montana § 147.1351...

  19. 40 CFR 147.2150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2150 Section 147.2150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee §...

  20. 40 CFR 147.2150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2150 Section 147.2150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee §...

  1. 40 CFR 147.2150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2150 Section 147.2150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Tennessee §...

  2. Radioactive substances in tap water.

    PubMed

    Atsuumi, Ryo; Endo, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Kannotou, Yasumitu; Nakada, Masahiro; Yabuuchi, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    A 9.0 magnitude (M) earthquake with an epicenter off the Sanriku coast occurred at 14: 46 on March 11, 2011. TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP) was struck by the earthquake and its resulting tsunami. Consequently a critical nuclear disaster developed, as a large quantity of radioactive materials was released due to a hydrogen blast. On March 16(th), 2011, radioiodine and radioactive cesium were detected at levels of 177 Bq/kg and 58 Bq/kg, respectively, in tap water in Fukushima city (about 62km northwest of TEPCO F-1 NPP). On March 20th, radioiodine was detected in tap water at a level of 965 Bq/kg, which is over the value-index of restrictions on food and drink intake (radioiodine 300 Bq/kg (infant intake 100 Bq/kg)) designated by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Therefore, intake restriction measures were taken regarding drinking water. After that, although the all intake restrictions were lifted, in order to confirm the safety of tap water, an inspection system was established to monitor all tap water in the prefecture. This system has confirmed that there has been no detection of radioiodine or radioactive cesium in tap water in the prefecture since May 5(th), 2011. Furthermore, radioactive strontium ((89) Sr, (90)Sr) and plutonium ((238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu) in tap water and the raw water supply were measured. As a result, (89) Sr, (238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu were undetectable and although (90)Sr was detected, its committed effective dose of 0.00017 mSv was much lower than the yearly 0.1 mSv of the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality. In addition, the results did not show any deviations from past inspection results. PMID:25030724

  3. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  4. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  5. Analgesic and thermic responses to intravenously administered morphine in 8- and 24-week-old rats.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, H N; Villar, V M

    1991-01-01

    The analgesic and thermic responses to morphine (5 and 10 mg/kg) injected intravenously to 8- and 24-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were determined. Greater analgesic and lower hyperthermic responses to morphine in 24-week-old rats in comparison to 8-week-old rats were observed. The pharmacokinetic parameters of morphine administered intravenously were also determined. Cmax for 5 and 10 mg/kg doses of morphine were smaller in 24-week-old rats in comparison to 8-week-old rats; however, AUC0----infinity was smaller only for 5 mg/kg dose. For 10 mg/kg dose, mean residence time (MRT) and the apparent steady state volume of distribution (Vss) for the older rats were higher than for the younger ones, but for 5 mg/kg dose the values did not differ. The enhanced responses to morphine in older age group of rats for 5 mg/kg dose cannot be explained solely on the basis of pharmacokinetics. However, for 10 mg/kg dose of morphine, the greater responses in 24-week-old rats could probably be related to increases in MRT and Vss. Factors other than serum kinetics, like kinetics of morphine in the brain as well as the brain opiate receptors, may also be involved in the differential effects of morphine in rats of different ages. PMID:1784625

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  7. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  8. Safety and efficacy of self-administered subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Hans D; Gupta, Sudhir; Kiessling, Peter; Nicolay, Uwe; Berger, Melvin

    2006-05-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) infusions at 3-4 week intervals are currently standard therapy in the United States for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDD). To evaluate alternative modes of immunoglobulin administration we have designed an open-label study to investigate the efficacy and safety of a subcutaneously administered immunoglobulin preparation (16% IgG) in patients with PIDD. After their final IVIg infusion, 65 patients entered a 3-month, wash-in/wash-out phase, designed to bring patients to steady-state with subcutaneously administered immunoglobulin. This was followed by 12 months of weekly SCIg infusions, at a dose determined in a pharmacokinetic substudy to provide noninferior intravascular exposure. This resulted in a mean weekly dose of 158 mg/kg, calculated to equal 137% of the previous intravenous dose. Two patients (4%) each reported 1 serious bacterial infection (pneumonia), an annual rate of 0.04 per patient-year. There were 4.43 infections of any type per patient-year. Mean trough serum IgG levels increased from 786 to 1040 mg/dL during the study, a mean increase of 39%. The most frequent treatment-related adverse event was infusion-site reaction, reported by 91% of patients; this was predominantly mild or moderate, and the incidence decreased over time. No treatment-related serious adverse events were reported. We conclude that subcutaneous administration of 16% SCIg is a safe and effective alternative to IVIg for replacement therapy of PIDD. PMID:16783465

  9. Atrial selective effects of intravenously administered vernakalant in conscious beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Jeff; Pourrier, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Vernakalant is a relatively atrial-selective antiarrhythmic drug approved for the conversion of recent onset atrial fibrillation in Europe and is under regulatory review in the United States. In this study, we examined the effects of intravenously administered vernakalant (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) on blood pressure, heart rate, and the electrocardiogram in conscious male beagle dogs and compared them with those of orally administered dl-sotalol (32 mg/kg). Vernakalant had no consistent dose-dependent effects on the heart rate or mean arterial pressure. Although vernakalant inhibits I(Kr), it tended to decrease the QTc interval but only at the top dose and later time points. The most striking effect of vernakalant on the electrocardiogram was a dose-dependent and selective slowing of atrial conduction (P-wave duration), with no effect on ventricular conduction (QRS duration). In contrast, treatment with dl-sotalol resulted in a marked and statistically significant prolongation of PR and QTc intervals with no effect on QRS or P-wave duration, consistent with its known class II and III antiarrhythmic actions. These results provide further evidence that vernakalant is unlikely to alter ventricular refractoriness or conduction at plasma concentrations in excess of those necessary for conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm in patients. PMID:21753258

  10. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of morphine administered centrally.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1985-12-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered systemically to rats. In order to determine if stress-induced potentiation of these effects of morphine are mediated within the central nervous system, restrained and unstressed groups of rats were injected in the lateral ventricle (i.c.v.) with graded doses of morphine, and their analgesic and body temperature responses were measured. Compared to unstressed animals, restrained rats had a greater analgesic response at each dose of morphine, characterized by an increase in both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect. The unstressed group of rats responded consistently to 1.0-100 micrograms of morphine with a 1.5-2.0 degrees C increase in core temperature. Restrained rats had either a smaller increase in body temperature or a hypothermia at these doses of morphine. Thus, restraint stress can modify the effects of morphine administered i.c.v. on analgesia and body temperature in a manner similar to that seen after systemic administration of morphine, indicating that this phenomenon is mediated centrally. PMID:4075121

  11. A proposed dosing algorithm for the individualized dosing of human immunoglobulin in chronic inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Michael P; Ellis, Lauren; Hadden, Robert D; Rajabally, Yusuf A; Winer, John B; Reilly, Mary M

    2016-03-01

    Dosing guidelines for immunoglobulin (Ig) treatment in neurological disorders do not consider variations in Ig half-life or between patients. Individualization of therapy could optimize clinical outcomes and help control costs. We developed an algorithm to optimize Ig dose based on patient's response and present this here as an example of how dosing might be individualized in a pharmacokinetically rational way and how this achieves potential dose and cost savings. Patients are "normalized" with no more than two initial doses of 2 g/kg, identifying responders. A third dose is not administered until the patient's condition deteriorates, allowing a "dose interval" to be set. The dose is then reduced until relapse allowing dose optimization. Using this algorithm, we have individualized Ig doses for 71 chronic inflammatory neuropathy patients. The majority of patients had chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 39) or multifocal motor neuropathy (n = 24). The mean (standard deviation) dose of Ig administered was 1.4 (0.6) g/kg, with a mean dosing interval of 4.3 weeks (median 4 weeks, range 0.5-10). Use of our standardized algorithm has allowed us to quickly optimize Ig dosing. PMID:26757367

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Intranasal Insulin Spray (Nasulin™) Administered to Healthy Male Volunteers:

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Andrew C.; Dowling, Muiris; Cussen, Kathleen; O'Brien, Jackie; Stote, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a Bentley Pharmaceuticals proprietary intranasal (IN) insulin formulation (Nasulin™) were studied in healthy volunteers. Methods Thirteen fasting healthy male volunteers received five doses of medication (one dose of 4 international units [IU] subcutaneous (SC) regular insulin and four doses of 25 IU IN insulin) at least 48 h apart. Serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose were measured in the 4 h after dosing. Profiles were compared for IN insulin spray following administration into the dominant nostril (more open at time of dosing) and into the nondominant nostril (less open at time of dosing). Results The formulation was generally well tolerated. A rise in serum insulin levels accompanied by a decrease in plasma glucose was seen following all doses. For IN doses, peak insulin levels were generally attained in 10–20 min and remained elevated for approximately 40–50 min; the resultant effect on glucose peaked at 40 min and waned approximately 2 h postdosing. As reported in other studies, the interindividual response to insulin was variable. The comparative absorption of IN insulin relative to SC insulin was 12.0% (dominant nostril) or 15.4% (nondominant nostril) over 2 h. This increased somewhat if sneezers and volunteers with moderately blocked nostrils were removed from the analysis. Conclusions This IN formulation was generally well tolerated and relatively well absorbed. While both insulin data (maximal plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration time curve) and glucose data (% fall) support a trend toward better absorption from the nondominant nostril, this did not reach statistical significance. Nasulin can be administered without reference to the nasal cycle. PMID:19885293

  13. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  14. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  15. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  16. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-11-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances.

  17. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Findings from Survey Administered to Weatherization Training Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian; Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes results of a survey administered to directors of weatherization training centers that receive funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The survey presents results related to questions on training offered and future plans.

  20. Effect of alpha-chloralose on disposition and pharmacological action of orally administered chlorzoxazone in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, I; Takeuchi, Y; Fukumori, Y; Fukuda, T

    1991-08-01

    The pharmacodynamic behavior of orally administered chlorzoxazone (CZX) was studied in rats. From the time course of CZX plasma concentration data under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg, i.p.) anesthesia, it was found that CZX obeyed a one-compartment model with first-order absorption. The pharmacological response intensity of CZX on the crossed extensor reflex was closely related to the plasma concentration data via Hill's equation under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg) anesthesia, but not at a 150 mg/kg dose. The influence of alpha-chloralose at the latter dose on CZX pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics appeared to be due to the pharmacodynamic interaction of alpha-chloralose and CZX, thus suggesting that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic concept proposed by Smolen was not applicable to CZX's behavior at such a dose in rats. Under alpha-chloralose (80 mg/kg) anesthesia, the biophase compartment was determined to be identical to the central compartment using our proposed model. On the basis of the effect of anesthetics on drug behavior, one may select an appropriate anesthetic dose to evaluate the relationship between the plasma levels and the onset and duration of the drug action. At the higher dose of alpha-chloralose (150 mg/kg), the free fraction of CZX was increased and a possible enhancement in CZX action was suggested. PMID:1774620

  1. Comparison of quality of induction of anaesthesia between intramuscularly administered ketamine, intravenously administered ketamine and intravenously administered propofol in xylazine premedicated cats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T B; Chanaiwa, S; Mponda, P; Sigauke, C; Dzikiti, L N

    2007-12-01

    The quality of induction of general anesthesia produced by ketamine and propofol, 2 of the most commonly used anaesthetic agents in cats, was assessed. Eighteen cats admitted for elective procedures were randomly assigned to 3 groups and then premedicated with xylazine 0.75 mg/kg intramuscularly before anaesthesia was induced with ketamine 15 mg/kg intramuscularly (KetIM group), ketamine 10 mg/kg intravenously (KetIV group) or propofol 4 mg/kg intravenously (PropIV group). Quality of induction of general anaesthesia was determined by scoring ease of intubation, degree of struggling, and vocalisation during the induction period. The quality of induction of anaesthesia of intramuscularly administered ketamine was inferior to that of intravenously administered ketamine, while intravenously administered propofol showed little difference in quality of induction from ketamine administered by both the intramuscular and intravenous routes. There were no significant differences between groups in the ease of intubation scores, while vocalisation and struggling were more common in cats that received ketamine intramuscularly than in those that received intravenously administered ketamine or propofol for induction of anaesthesia. Laryngospasms occurred in 2 cats that received propofol. The heart rates and respiratory rates decreased after xylazine premedication and either remained the same or decreased further after induction for all 3 groups, but remained within normal acceptable limits. This study indicates that the 3 regimens are associated with acceptable induction characteristics, but administration of ketamine intravenously is superior to its administration intramuscularly and laryngeal desensitisation is recommended to avoid laryngospasms. PMID:18507218

  2. Radioactivity in the industrial effluent disposed soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, R. D.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Meenashisundaram, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on radiation and radioactivity distribution in the soils of effluent disposed from the sugar industry in India have been conducted. The external gamma dose rates in air and natural radionuclides activities in the soils were measured using an Environmental Radiation Dosimeter and a Gamma-ray Spectrometer respectively. The soil samples were also subject to various physico-chemical analyses. This study revealed some remarkable results that are discussed in the article.

  3. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Radioactive excretion in human milk following administration of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pittard, W.B.; Merkatz, R.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1982-08-01

    Albumin-tagged sodium pertechnetate (technetium) is routinely used in nuclear medicine for scanning procedures of the lung. The rate of excretion of this radionuclide into breast milk and the resultant potential radiation hazard to the nursing infant have received little attention. Therefore the milk from a nursing mother who required a lung scan because of suspected pulmonary emboli using an intravenous injection of 4 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated human serum albumin was monitored. Albumin tagging severely limited the entrance of technetium into her milk and the radioactivity of the milk returned to base line by 24 hours. A total of 2.02 muCi of technetium was measured in the 24-hour milk collection after technetium injection and 94% of this amount was excreted by 15.5 hours. This amount of technetium administered orally to a newborn would deliver a total body radiation dose of .3 mrad. Therefore, an infant would receive trivial doses of radiation if breast-feeding were resumed 15.5 hours after administration of the radionuclide to the mother and nursing can clearly be resumed safely 24 hours after injection.

  5. Serum thyroxine concentrations after radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, S.M.; Hawkins, E.C.; Washabau, R.J.; Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-one cats with hyperthyroidism were given one dose of radioactive iodine (131I) IV. Serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were measured before treatment in all cats, at 12-hour intervals after treatment in 10 cats, and at 48-hour intervals after treatment in 21 cats. Serum T4 concentrations also were measured one month after /sup 131/I therapy in 29 cats. Activity of 131I administered was 1.5 to 6.13 mCi, resulting in a dose of 20,000 rads to the thyroid. Serum T4 concentrations before /sup 131/I administration were 5.3 to 51.0 micrograms/dl, with a median T4 concentration of 11.0 micrograms/dl. Serum T4 decreased most rapidly during the first 3 to 6 days after treatment. Sixteen cats (55%) had normal serum thyroxine concentrations by day 4 after 131I administration, and 23 cats (74%) were euthyroxinemic by day 8 after treatment. One month after administration of 131I, the 29 cats evaluated were clinically improved, and 24 (83%) of the 29 cats evaluated had normal serum T4 concentrations, 3 cats (10%) remained hyperthyroxinemic, and 2 cats (7%) were hypothyroxinemic. Therefore, administration of 131I was a safe and effective method to quickly decrease serum T4 concentrations in hyperthyroid cats.

  6. In vivo percutaneous absorption of acetochlor in the rhesus monkey: dose-response and exposure risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Melendres, J L; Maibach, H I

    1996-10-01

    Percutaneous absorption of three topical dose levels of [14C]acetochlor in the rhesus monkey were determined for exposure risk assessment. The topical doses were 30.7, 0.43 and 0.03 mg acetochlor in 40 microliters commercial formulation and aqueous dilutions thereof, spread over 10 cm3 skin surface area (lower abdominal). The dosing area was not covered. The skin application time was 24 hr. The dosed skin surface area was washed with 50% soap (Ivory Liquid) and water at the end of the 24-hr dosing period. An intravenous dose of 0.43 mg was also administered to determine the excretory kinetics of acetochlor in the rhesus monkey. The same four monkeys were used for all dose administrations. Bioavailability was determined by radioactivity disposition in blood, urine and faeces. Percutaneous absorption was 23.1 +/- 8.7, 17.3 +/- 5.9 and 4.9 +/- 1.4% for 0.03, 0.43 and 30.7 mg doses, respectively. Assuming a constant state of absorption, the hourly exposure flux (microgram/cm2/hr) was 0.03 +/- 0.01 for the 0.03 mg dose (3 micrograms/cm2). Increasing the dose approximately 15-fold to 0.43 mg (43 micrograms/cm2) resulted in a 10-fold increase in flux to 0.3 microgram/cm2/hr. Increasing the dose a further 70-fold to 30.7 mg (3070 micrograms/cm2) resulted in only another 21-fold increase in flux (6.3 +/- 1.8 micrograms/cm2/hr). Thus, the efficiency of absorption (%) decreased with increased topical dose, but the amount (mass/flux) of acetochlor absorbed always increased with increased dose. Plasma levels of topical acetochlor at the high dose were detectable at 1 hr and continued at a relatively steady level through the 24-hr dosing period. After the skin surface wash (24 hr) plasma levels decreased but were still detectable at the last 168-hr sampling period. Acetochlor, recently EPA approved as an herbicide for corn crops, is carcinogenic; however, farmers will use half as much acetochlor/acre as other herbicides. The percutaneous absorption of acetochlor is equal to that

  7. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of 125I brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Camgöz, B.; Yeğin, G.; Kumru, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 125I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically. PMID:24376927

  8. Effect of afobazole administered to pregnant rats during organogenesis on prenatal development of fetuses.

    PubMed

    Bugayova, L I; Denisova, T D; Morozova, Yu A; Sergeeva, S A; Kharlamov, I V

    2014-11-01

    Experiments on pregnant rats have demonstrated the absence of damaging effect of Afobazole administered during the antenatal period on organogenesis in fetuses. Afobazole in a dose of 5 mg/kg given to pregnant rats on gestation days 6-16 reduced pre- and post-implantation fetal mortality and improved fertility; 20-day-old embryos had no developmental abnormalities and did not differ from controls by craniocaudal size, body weight, and skeleton ossification. Afobazole in a dose of 100 mg/kg reduced pre- and post-implantation fetal mortality, but had no effect on fertility. No congenital malformations were found in the fetuses, but they were characterized by lower craniocaudal size, body weight, and number of ossification foci in the sternum and spine. PMID:25403398

  9. RESRAD: A computer code for evaluating radioactively contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    This document briefly describes the uses of the RESRAD computer code in calculating site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines and radiation dose-risk to an on-site individual (worker or resident) at a radioactively contaminated site. The adoption by the DOE in order 5400.5, pathway analysis methods, computer requirements, data display, the inclusion of chemical contaminants, benchmarking efforts, and supplemental information sources are all described. (GHH)

  10. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  11. Optimising Controlled Human Malaria Infection Studies Using Cryopreserved P. falciparum Parasites Administered by Needle and Syringe

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Susanne H.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Longley, Rhea J.; Edwards, Nick J.; Poulton, Ian D.; Kimani, Domtila; Williams, Andrew R.; Anagnostou, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Rachel; Kerridge, Simon; Voysey, Merryn; James, Eric R.; Billingsley, Peter F.; Gunasekera, Anusha; Lawrie, Alison M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies have become a routine tool to evaluate efficacy of candidate anti-malarial drugs and vaccines. To date, CHMI trials have mostly been conducted using the bite of infected mosquitoes, restricting the number of trial sites that can perform CHMI studies. Aseptic, cryopreserved P. falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZ Challenge) provide a potentially more accurate, reproducible and practical alternative, allowing a known number of sporozoites to be administered simply by injection. Methodology We sought to assess the infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge administered in different dosing regimens to malaria-naive healthy adults (n = 18). Six participants received 2,500 sporozoites intradermally (ID), six received 2,500 sporozoites intramuscularly (IM) and six received 25,000 sporozoites IM. Findings Five out of six participants receiving 2,500 sporozoites ID, 3/6 participants receiving 2,500 sporozoites IM and 6/6 participants receiving 25,000 sporozoites IM were successfully infected. The median time to diagnosis was 13.2, 17.8 and 12.7 days for 2,500 sporozoites ID, 2,500 sporozoites IM and 25,000 sporozoites IM respectively (Kaplan Meier method; p = 0.024 log rank test). Conclusions 2,500 sporozoites ID and 25,000 sporozoites IM have similar infectivities. Given the dose response in infectivity seen with IM administration, further work should evaluate increasing doses of PfSPZ Challenge IM to identify a dosing regimen that reliably infects 100% of participants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01465048 PMID:23823332

  12. Long-lived impurities of 90Y-labeled microspheres, TheraSphere and SIR-spheres, and the impact on patient dose and waste management.

    PubMed

    Metyko, John; Williford, John M; Erwin, William; Poston, John; Jimenez, Sandra

    2012-11-01

    Yittrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy procedures have increased in number due to their efficacy in treating some unresectable metastatic liver tumors. The discovery of long-lived impurities in two microsphere products, first reported between 2006 and 2007, has resulted in some radiation safety concerns. Since then, microsphere production processes have been refined, which reportedly lead to a reduction in detectable by-products. In this study unused vials of TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres, manufactured in early January 2011, were analyzed to identify and quantify the low-level radioactive impurities. Absorbed dose calculations were performed to assess the potential increased dose to the patient due to long-lived impurities. Results showed that while the SIR-Spheres vials contained no detectable impurities (contrary to other published results in the literature), the TheraSphere vials contained 17 radionuclides in one sample and 15 in the other. The dominant impurities were Y and Y, with specific activities ranging from 0.99 ± 3.40 × 10 kBq mg to 6.30 ± 0.40 kBq mg at vendor assay date. Other impurities were on the order of Bq mg. Based on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) liver and lung dose estimates, the long-lived impurities would be expected to increase an administered dose by less than 0.1% from the prescribed dose. PMID:23026974

  13. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled 241Am

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Huckle, James E.; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Jay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [14C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared to a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of 241Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of 241Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  14. [The hypertensive effect of vasopressin administered into the median eminence of the hypothalamus in rats].

    PubMed

    Gindeva, R; Pencheva, T

    1991-01-01

    Data about direct effect of vasopressin (VP) on the central arterial pressure (AP) orientated us to investigate the effect of its local administration in the median eminence (ME) of the hypothalamus in rats. For this purpose VP was administered in ME under micropellet form. AP was measured indirectly on the tail of rats up to 96th hour after operation. After implantation of VP there was an elevation of AP with maximum in the first hour, which was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Identical manipulation (sham operation) was performed to control the lesion effect. Transitory lowering of AP with maximum in the first hour was also established and it was statistically significant (p less than 0.001), For exclusion a nonspecific systemic effect of VP the same dose was administered in the parietal cortex, during which transitory and short-lasting reaction occurred in the first hour after the operation. The data indicate that the peptide, administered in ME under micropellet form, could induce a longlasting hypertensive effect. PMID:1884687

  15. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled (241)Am.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Huckle, James E; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Jay, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [(14) C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared with a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of (241) Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of (241) Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  16. Natural radioactivity contamination problems. Report no. 2. (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides associated with the bauxite, columbium-tantalum, phosphate, tin, pumice, and titanium mineral extraction industries are reported. Data is also presented on radioactivity measurements in ground water, in selected geothermal waters, and in oil production brines. Radiation protection guidance is provided for uranium recovery from wet-process phosphate plants, for soil contamination limits, and for radiological exposure in natural caves. Dose pathways from incidental uses of naturally occurring radioactive materials are presented. Model state regulations for protecting public health and safety from use and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material are outlined.

  17. Radioactive Standards Laboratory ININ as a reference laboratory in Mexico.

    PubMed

    GarcíaDíaz, O; MartínezAyala, L; HerreraValadez, L; TovarM, V; Karam, L

    2016-03-01

    The Radioactive Standards Laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is the National reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in Mexico. It has a gamma-ray spectrometry system with a high-purity Ge-detector for measurements from 50 keV to 2000 keV, and develops standardized radioactive (beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting) sources in different geometries with uncertainties less than or equal to 5% for applications such as the calibration of radionuclide calibrators (clinically used dose calibrators), Ge-detectors and NaI(Tl) detectors. PMID:27358942

  18. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  19. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18–20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent. PMID:26612096

  20. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  1. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  2. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  3. Pharmacokinetics of spinosad and milbemycin oxime administered in combination and separately per os to dogs.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, S D; Totten, M L; Newhall, K B; Qiao, M; Riggs, K L

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies were conducted to determine the potential PK interactions when spinosad and milbemycin oxime (MBO) are administered simultaneously. Investigations used commercial MBO tablets (C-MBO; Interceptor(®) Flavor Tabs, active ingredient MBO, Novartis Animal Health, Greensboro, NC, USA), novel-source (Elanco) MBO (E-MBO) in a gelatin capsule, spinosad API (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient using registered manufacturing process) in a gelatin capsule, spinosad tablets (Comfortis(®) chewable beef flavored tablets, active ingredient spinosad, Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN, USA), and the recently registered spinosad + E-MBO combination tablets (Trifexis™ chewable beef flavored tablets, active ingredients E-MBO and spinosad, Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN, USA). Regardless of the source of MBO, in the presence of spinosad, greater systemic exposure of MBO was obtained as compared to MBO administered alone. Target animal safety studies conducted with dose multiples of spinosad and MBO indicate the increased exposure of MBO does not have implications on adverse clinical reactions. Further research is required to determine whether the higher levels of MBO have any implications for improved effectiveness as compared to C-MBO. Effectiveness studies conducted with 0.5 mg/kg of E-MBO in combination tablets demonstrated noninterference against C-MBO with both products achieving >99% effectiveness against the dose-limiting nematode, Ancylostoma caninum. No statistical differences were detected in the PK of MBO when comparing animals receiving E-MBO (without spinosad) and C-MBO. Also, the PK of spinosad was unaltered when co-administered with MBO. PMID:21895692

  4. Serum pharmacokinetics of clindamycin hydrochloride in normal dogs when administered at two dosage regimens.

    PubMed

    Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Salame, Michel; Chatzis, Manolis K; Katsoudas, Vassilis; Pappas, Ioannis S

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this cross-over study was to compare clindamycin pharmacokinetics in the serum of clinically normal dogs when administered orally at two dosage regimens (5.5 mg/kg, twice daily, and 11 mg/kg, once daily), separated by a 1 week wash-out period. Serum samples were obtained from six clinically normal laboratory beagles before, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h after the first and fifth dose of clindamycin at 5.5 mg/kg, twice daily, and before, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 h after the first and third dose at 11 mg/kg, once daily. Serum clindamycin concentrations were determined by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results were analysed using Student's paired t-test, at a 5% level of significance. Values of pharmacokinetic parameters that differed significantly between the two dosage regimens included the following: maximal concentration and area under the concentration-time curve were higher at 11 mg/kg, once daily, than at 5.5 mg/kg, twice daily; and, more importantly, the ratio of AUC(0-24) to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.5 μg/mL for a 24 h period (AUC(0-24)/MIC) was higher when clindamycin was administered at 11 than at 5.5 mg/kg, at least during the first day of drug administration. Therefore, a better pharmacokinetic profile may be expected when clindamycin is administered at 11 mg/kg, once daily, for the treatment of canine pyoderma caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. PMID:21418348

  5. Radiation Safety of Sealed Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-29

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of occupational settings and under differing regulatory/licensing structures. The definition of a sealed radioactive source varies between US regulatory authorities and standard-setting organizations. Potential problems with sealed sources cover a range of risks and impacts. The loss of control of high activity sealed sources can result in very high or even fatal doses to members of the public who come in contact with them. Sources that are not adequately sealed, and that fail, can cause spread of contamination and potential intake of radioactive material. There is also the possibility that sealed sources may be (or threatened to be) used for terrorist purposes and disruptive opportunities. Until fairly recently, generally-licensed sealed sources and devices received little, if any, regulatory oversight, and were often forgotten, lost or unaccounted for. Nonetheless, generally licensed devices can contain fairly significant quantities of radioactive material and there is some potential for exposure if a device is treated in a way that it was never designed. Industrial radiographers use and handle high activity and/or high-dose rate sealed sources in the field with a high degree of independence and minimal regulatory oversight. Failure to follow operational procedures and properly handle radiography sources can and has resulted in serious injuries and death. Industrial radiographers have experienced a disproportionately large fraction of incidents that result in unintended exposure to radiation. Sources do not have to contain significant quantities of radioactive material to cause problems in the event of their failure. A loss of integrity can cause the spread of contamination and potential exposure to workers and members of the public. The NCRP has previously provided recommendations on select aspects of sealed source programs. Future efforts to provide recommendations for sealed source programs are discussed.

  6. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  7. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex. Roem. & Schult.) DC. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. interactions when administered with diazepam.

    PubMed

    Quílez, A M; Saenz, M T; García, M D

    2012-03-01

    The safety of natural drugs is defined by their side effects and toxicity as well as any interactions that may occur if taken together with other drugs. In particular, it is essential to identify synergies, antagonisms and other types of interference with other drugs so that the correct choice can be made from the range of phytomedicines available. The aim of this work was to investigate changes in the pharmacological effect of diazepam (2 mg/kg) on the CNS when administered together with a medicinal plant: Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (eucalyptus 6 mg/kg and 3.25 mg/kg) or Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roem. & Schult). DC. (cat's claw, 7.14 mg/kg and 3.54 mg/kg). Various different psychopharmacological effects were evaluated through assessing exploratory behavior, muscle relaxation and spontaneous motor activity. Both phytodrugs interacted with the benzodiazepine. Eucalyptus had an inhibitory effect at both doses and could be useful at the highest dose in cases where the desired effect of the depressant is moderate anxiolytic activity without marked muscle relaxation. Cat's claw, at both doses, enhanced the action of diazepam on spontaneous motor activity and, at the lowest dose, exploratory ability. These herbal drugs could be useful for their antiinflammatory activity in musculoskeletal pathologies treated with benzodiazepines. PMID:21928376

  8. Safety evaluation of intravenously administered mono-thioated aptamer against E-selectin in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shin-Ae; Tsolmon, Bilegtsaikhan; Mann, Aman P.; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Lichao; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Volk, David E.; Lokesh, Ganesh L.-R.; Morris, Lynsie; Gupta, Vineet; Razaq, Wajeeha; Rui, Hallgeir; Suh, K. Stephen; Gorenstein, David G.; Tanaka, Takemi

    2015-08-15

    The medical applications of aptamers have recently emerged. We developed an antagonistic thioaptamer (ESTA) against E-selectin. Previously, we showed that a single injection of ESTA at a dose of 100 μg inhibits breast cancer metastasis in mice through the functional blockade of E-selectin. In the present study, we evaluated the safety of different doses of intravenously administered ESTA in single-dose acute and repeat-dose subacute studies in ICR mice. Our data indicated that intravenous administration of up to 500 μg ESTA did not result in hematologic abnormality in either study. Additionally, intravenous injection of ESTA did not affect the levels of plasma cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) or complement split products (C3a and C5a) in either study. However, repeated injections of ESTA slightly increased plasma ALT and AST activities, in accordance with the appearance of small necrotic areas in the liver. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that intravenous administration of ESTA does not cause overt hematologic, organs, and immunologic responses under the experimental conditions. - Highlights: • Intravenous administration of ESTA was well tolerated. • ESTA up to 500 μg does not cause hematologic, organs, and immunologic responses. • ESTA-mediated hepatic abnormality was considered minor.

  9. Self-administered electroconvulsive treatment with a homemade device.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takuya; Masumura, Toshiaki; Arai, Minoru; Adachi, Naoto; Akazawa, Shigeru; Arai, Heii

    2006-09-01

    Two patients with personality disorder and depression attempted to self-administer electroconvulsive therapy with a homemade device. The patients showed no proper psychopathological improvement after these attempts. Both of the patients' temples were seriously burned, and one of them required skin grafting. Both patients rejected to have reasonable psychosocial support, and followed a cult mental health manual in attempting to self-administer electroconvulsive therapy. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of its kind. The intractable psychopathology, poor interpersonal skills, and misleading information seemed to lead to the self-harm behaviors of our 2 patients. PMID:16957542

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates. Included are source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The environmental transport task will reconstruct the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations via the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water. The environmental monitoring task will assemble, evaluate, and report historical environmental monitoring data. The demographics, agriculture, and food habits task will develop the data needed to determine the populations that could have been affected by the releases. Population and demographic information will be developed for the general population within the study area. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water consumption patterns and sources of food and water for these populations must be estimated since these provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The environmental pathways and dose estimates task will use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  11. A Stochastic Problem Arising in the Storage of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2004-07-15

    Nuclear waste drums can contain a collection of radioactive components of uncertain activity and randomly dispersed in position. This implies that the dose-rate at the surface of different drums in a large assembly of similar drums can have significant variations according to the physical makeup and configuration of the waste components. The present paper addresses this problem by treating the drum, and its waste, as a stochastic medium. It is assumed that the sources in the drum contribute a dose-rate to some external point. The strengths and positions are chosen by random numbers, the dose-rate is calculated and, from several thousand realizations, a probability distribution for the dose-rate is obtained. It is shown that a very close approximation to the dose-rate probability function is the log-normal distribution. This allows some useful statistical indicators, which are of environmental importance, to be calculated with little effort.As an example of a practical situation met in the storage of radioactive waste containers, we study the problem of 'hotspots'. These arise in drums in which most of the activity is concentrated on one radioactive component and hence can lead to the possibility of large surface dose-rates. It is shown how the dose-rate, the variance, and some other statistical indicators depend on the relative activities on the sources. The results highlight the importance of such hotspots and the need to quantify their effect.

  12. Radioactivities related to coal mining.

    PubMed

    Seddeek, Mostafa K; Sharshar, Taher; Ragab, Hossam S; Badran, Hussein M

    2005-08-01

    Natural radioactivity concentrations due to the coal mining in Gabal El-Maghara, North Sinai, Egypt, were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Coal, water and soil samples were investigated in this study. The (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in coal before extraction were 18.5 +/- 0.5, 29.5 +/- 1.2 and 149.0 +/- 8.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively. These concentrations were reduced to 18-22% after extraction due to the clay removal of the coal ore. The activity contents of the water and soil samples collected from the surrounding area did not show any evidence of enhancement due to the mining activities. Absorbed dose rate and effective dose equivalent in the mine environment were 29.4 nGy h(-1) and 128.0 microSv a(-1), respectively. The measured activity concentrations in the mine environment and the surrounding areas (5 km away from the mine) are similar to that found in other regions in North and South Sinai. Based on the measurements of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, the mine activity does not lead to any enhancement in the local area nor represents any human risk. PMID:16049576

  13. Implementation of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses for a mathematical absorption model (transit compartment model).

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Boeckmann, Alison; Vick, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical absorption model (e.g. transit compartment model) is useful to describe complex absorption process. However, in such a model, an assumption has to be made to introduce multiple doses that a prior dose has been absorbed nearly completely when the next dose is administered. This is because the drug input cannot be determined from drug depot compartment through integration of the differential equation system and has to be analytically calculated. We propose a method of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses; thereby eliminating the assumption. The code for implementing the dose superimposition in WinNonlin and NONMEM was provided. For implementation in NONMEM, we discussed a special case (SC) and a general case (GC). In a SC, dose superimposition was implemented solely using NM-TRAN abbreviated code and the maximum number of the doses that can be administered for any subject must be pre-defined. In a GC, a user-supplied function (FUNCA) in FORTRAN code was defined to perform dose superimposition to remove the restriction that the maximum number of doses must be pre-defined. PMID:22555854

  14. Activation of postsynaptic D2 dopamine receptors in the rat dorsolateral striatum prevents the amnestic effect of systemically administered neuroleptics.

    PubMed

    Boschen, Suelen Lucio; Andreatini, Roberto; da Cunha, Claudio

    2015-03-15

    Systemically administered antipsychotics bind to dopamine (DA) D2 receptors expressed in both pre- and postsynaptic neurons of different striatal sites and present an amnestic effect on learning and memory of conditioned avoidance responses (CAR). The aim of this study was to test whether blockade of the pre- or post-synaptic D2 receptors of the dorsolateral striatum of rats is the mechanism by which systemically administered antipsychotics present this amnestic effect. CAR learning and memory was evaluated in rats that received i.p. administrations of pre- or postsynaptic doses of the antipsychotic sulpiride combined with intra-DLS infusion of the D2 agonist quinpirole. Intra-DLS quinpirole itself was not amnestic and this effect was prevented by co-administration of presynaptic dose of sulpiride. However, sulpiride was amnestic when administered systemically in a post- but not presynaptic dose. This amnestic effect of sulpiride was prevented by the co-administration of quinpirole into the DLS. These results show that a blockade of postsynaptic D2 receptors in the DLS is necessary and sufficient to produce the amnestic effect of neuroleptics on CARs. PMID:25546724

  15. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....C. 6991c and 40 CFR part 281. EPA approved the Connecticut program on June 27, 1995, and the... stringent, in accordance with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered...

  16. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....C. 6991c and 40 CFR part 281. EPA approved the Connecticut program on June 27, 1995, and the... stringent, in accordance with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered...

  17. 40 CFR 282.56 - Connecticut State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....C. 6991c and 40 CFR part 281. EPA approved the Connecticut program on June 27, 1995, and the... stringent, in accordance with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Connecticut State-Administered...

  18. A Mobile Platform for Administering Questionnaires and Synchronizing Their Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginardi, Maria Germana; Lanzola, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a platform for administering questionnaires on smart-phones and tablets. The project arises from the need of acquiring data for monitoring the outcomes of different homecare interventions. First a model has been defined for representing questionnaires, able to support adaptivity in the dialog with the user and enforce some…

  19. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  20. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  1. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  2. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  3. 40 CFR 147.3100 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Osage Mineral Reserve (found at 40 CFR part 147, Subpart GGG) and the Class II program for the Five Civilized Tribes, consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and... Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3100 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the...

  4. 40 CFR 147.3100 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Osage Mineral Reserve (found at 40 CFR part 147, Subpart GGG) and the Class II program for the Five Civilized Tribes, consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and... Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3100 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the...

  5. 40 CFR 147.3100 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Osage Mineral Reserve (found at 40 CFR part 147, Subpart GGG) and the Class II program for the Five Civilized Tribes, consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and... Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3100 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the...

  6. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  7. Teaching Auction Strategy Using Experiments Administered Via the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asker, John; Grosskopf, Brit; McKinney, C. Nicholas; Niederle, Muriel; Roth, Alvin E.; Weizsacker, Georg

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an experimental design used to teach concepts in the economics of auctions and implications for e-Business procurement. The experiment is easily administered and can be adapted to many different treatments. The chief innovation is that it does not require the use of a lab or class time. Instead, the design can be implemented on…

  8. 40 CFR 147.2500 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... State-administered program: (1) Chapter 144, Water, Sewage, Refuse, Mining and Air Pollution, Wisconsin... Section 147.2500 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2500 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... State-administered program: (1) Chapter 144, Water, Sewage, Refuse, Mining and Air Pollution, Wisconsin... Section 147.2500 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER...

  10. 25 CFR 170.471 - How are projects administered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Construction Monitoring § 170.471 How are projects administered? (a) When a tribe carries out an IRR project under ISDEAA, BIA will monitor performance under the requirements of 25 CFR 900.130 and 900.131(b)(9) or 25 CFR 1000.243 and 1000.249(c) and (e), as appropriate. If BIA discovers a problem during an...

  11. 25 CFR 170.471 - How are projects administered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are projects administered? 170.471 Section 170.471 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Construction and Construction Monitoring § 170.471 How...

  12. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Tennessee obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to... Storage Tanks, 4th Floor, L&C Tower, 401 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee 37243-1541. (1) State... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered...

  13. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60...

  14. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60...

  15. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60...

  16. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60...

  17. 40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60...

  18. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  19. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  20. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  1. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  2. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM...

  3. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM...

  4. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM...

  5. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM...

  6. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM...

  7. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  8. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  9. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  10. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  11. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  12. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... administered by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Underground Storage Tanks... Underground Storage Tanks, signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on July 1, 1998, though not incorporated... Storage Tanks, 4th Floor, L&C Tower, 401 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee 37243-1541. (1)...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...-administered program: (1) N.C. ADMIN. CODE, Title 15, r. 02L.0100 et seq. Groundwater Classification...

  14. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  15. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  16. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  17. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  18. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  19. Baseline Geography Competency Test Administered in Indiana Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bein, Frederick L.

    A baseline geography skills test was administered during 1987 to over 3,000 students who were enrolled in freshmen geography courses at 18 Indiana universities. Known as the National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test, Secondary Level, Form D, this test was used to measure the students' level of geographic ability in:…

  20. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...