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Sample records for administered radioactive dose

  1. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract.

  2. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-05-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance.

  3. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  4. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  5. Radioactive Dose Assessment and NRC Verification of Licensee Dose Calculation.

    1994-09-16

    Version 00 PCDOSE was developed for the NRC to perform calculations to determine radioactive dose due to the annual averaged offsite release of liquid and gaseous effluent by U.S commercial nuclear power facilities. Using NRC approved dose assessment methodologies, it acts as an inspector's tool for verifying the compliance of the facility's dose assessment software. PCDOSE duplicates the calculations of the GASPAR II mainframe code as well as calculations using the methodologices of Reg. Guidemore » 1.109 Rev. 1 and NUREG-0133 by optional choice.« less

  6. Radioactive materials in biosolids : dose modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A. B.; Chiu, W. A; Yu, C.; Aiello, K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J. -J.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhartt, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. EPA; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2006-01-01

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible transport of radioactivity from sludge into the local environment and the subsequent exposure of humans. A stochastic environmental pathway model was applied separately to seven hypothetical, generic sludge-release scenarios, leading to the creation of seven tables of Dose-to-Source Ratios (DSR), which can be used in translating from specific activity in sludge into dose to an individual. These DSR values were then combined with the results of an ISCORS survey of sludge and ash at more than 300 publicly owned treatment works, to explore the potential for radiation exposure of sludge workers and members of the public. This paper provides a brief overview of the pathway modeling methodology employed in the exposure and dose assessments and discusses technical aspects of the results obtained.

  7. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  8. Brain-Cocaine Concentrations Determine the Dose Self-Administered by Rats on a Novel Behaviorally Dependent Dosing Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Benjamin A; Dobrin, Carson V; Roberts, David C S

    2011-01-01

    A novel behaviorally dependent dosing (BDD) schedule was used to examine the relationship between doses of cocaine self-administered by rats and brain drug levels within a session. The BDD schedule used a hold-down response to activate a syringe pump. The length of time the lever was held down determined the duration that the syringe pump was activated. In the first experiment, rats self-administered cocaine for daily 3 h sessions and brain levels of cocaine were modeled using well-established parameters. Although analysis revealed that rats self-administered doses within a predicted range, one extremely large dose was consistently observed at the beginning of each session when brain levels of cocaine were low. In the second experiment, we introduced a range of timeout periods (10–25 min) in order to produce variability in brain-cocaine concentrations. Animals self-administered larger doses immediately following each timeout period and the dose size was inversely correlated with the length of the timeout. These results show that the dose of cocaine that rats self-administer within a session is inversely related to the amount of drug on board. PMID:21849981

  9. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS IN BIOSOLIDS: DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tra...

  10. Blood methanol concentrations in one-year-old infants administered graded doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1983-08-01

    Blood methanol concentrations were measured in 24 1-year-old infants administered aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester sweetener. The doses studied included a dose projected to be the 99th percentile of daily ingestion for adults (34 mg/kg body weight), a very high use dose (50 mg/kg body weight) and a dose considered to be in the abuse range (100 mg/kg body weight). Blood methanol values in infants were compared to values observed previously in adults administered equivalent doses of aspartame. Methanol concentrations were below the level of detection (0.35 mg/dl) in the blood of 10 infants administered aspartame at 34 mg/kg body weight, but were significantly elevated (P less than or equal to 0.05) after ingestion of aspartame at 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight. At the latter doses, mean peak blood methanol concentrations and the area under the blood methanol concentration-time curve increased in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SEM) peak blood methanol concentration was 0.30 +/- 0.10 mg/100 ml at a 50 mg/kg body weight aspartame dose (n = 6) and 1.02 +/- 0.28 mg/ml at the 100 mg/kg body weight dose (n = 8). Blood methanol values in infants were similar to those observed in normal adults.

  11. Absorbed dose from traversing spherically symmetric, Gaussian radioactive clouds.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J M; Poston, J W

    1999-06-01

    If a large radioactive cloud is produced, sampling may require that an airplane traverse the cloud. A method to predict the absorbed dose to the aircrew from penetrating the radioactive cloud is needed. Dose rates throughout spherically symmetric Gaussian clouds of various sizes, and the absorbed doses from traversing the clouds, were calculated. Cloud size is a dominant parameter causing dose to vary by orders of magnitude for a given dose rate measured at some distance. A method to determine cloud size, based on dose rate readings at two or more distances from the cloud center, was developed. This method, however, failed to resolve the smallest cloud sizes from measurements made at 1,000 m to 2,000 m from the cloud center.

  12. Evaluation of patient's dose during investigations with radioactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, R.; Gobbi, G.; Leogrande, M. P.

    1982-10-01

    The dose received is defined in function of the half life of the radioactive material and the biological half life (transit time in the body). The Loevingen and Berinan equations to compute the activity in a target organ due to the activity in a source organ are reviewed. The biokinetics of radioactive drugs is discussed. The influence of patient age is examined. A radionuclide with a half life of hours, a high percentage of gamma radiation between 100 and 200 KeV and a low emission of non penetrating radiation is suggested. The effect of impurities on the dose absorbed is shown from experimental data.

  13. Dose and elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kearns, David N; Silberberg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The present experiment tested whether the elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats is dose-dependent. Subjects lever pressed for three different doses of intravenous cocaine - 0.11, 0.33, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion - on a demand procedure where the number of lever presses required per infusion increased within a session. The main finding was that demand for the 0.11 mg/kg dose was more elastic than it was for the two larger doses. There was no difference in demand elasticity between the 0.33 and 1.0 mg/kg doses. These results parallel findings previously reported in monkeys. The present study also demonstrated that a within-session procedure can be used to generate reliable demand curves. PMID:26866971

  14. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  15. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  16. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  17. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  18. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  19. Justification of administered dose level in brain perfusion imaging with 99mTc-HMPAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, I.; Geronikola-Trapali, X.; Armeniakos, I.; Prentakis, A.; Soultanis, S.; Chatziioannou, S. N.

    2011-09-01

    Brain perfusion imaging by means of 99mTc-HMPAO is widely used in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The administered dose range recommended by the manufacturer and reported in bibliography is rather wide (~ 9.5 - 27 mCi), necessitating further quantitative analysis. In the framework of this study, a quantitative evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical performance for different values of administered dose was carried out, based on image quality indicators. Evaluation of image quality was based on wavelet-generated contrast, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio indicators, denoted as CI, NI and CNR respectively. Subsequently, a generic image quality index was correlated with the administered dose, to produce an overall performance indicator (denoted as PI). Application of appropriate statistical tests (analysis of variance for normal and Kruskal-Wallis test for non-normal distributions) showed that there is a statistically significant difference in CI (p < 0.01), NI (p < 0.001) and CNR (p < 0.05), but not in PI (p > 0.05) values. Application of Tukey test for CI and NI normal distributions demonstrated that CI (10 mCi) = CI (20 mCi) < CI (15 mCi) and NI (10 mCi) > NI (20 mCi), while NI (15 mCi) could not be characterised. Finally, application of non-parametric multiple comparisons showed that CNR (20 mCi) < CNR (10 mCi), while CNR (15 mCi) could not be characterised. Consequently, brain perfusion imaging, by means of 99mTc-HMPAO utilising an administered dose of 20 mCi, results in improved image quality on the basis of the estimated indicators. Additionally, this image quality improvement is sufficient to justify the increased patient radiation burden.

  20. Radiological Dose Assessment - Nonuniform Skin Dose, Radioactive Skin Contamination, and Multiple Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    W. C. Inkret; M. E. Schillaci

    1999-03-01

    Radioactive skin contamination with {beta}- and {gamma}-emitting radionuclides may result in biologically significant absorbed doses to the skin. A specific exposure scenario of interest is a nonuniform skin dose delivered by {beta}- and {gamma}-emissions from radioactive skin contamination. The United States Department of Energy requires a formal evaluation and reporting of nonuniform skin doses. The United States Department of Energy also requires specific, formal procedures for evaluating the results from the placement or use of multiple dosimeters. Action levels relative to potential absorbed doses for the contamination survey instrumentation in use at Los Alamos and formal procedures for evaluating nonuniform skin doses and multiple dosimeters are developed and presented here.

  1. Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of free amino acids in adult humans administered abuse doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1981-02-01

    Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of amino acids were measured in 18 fasting adult subjects (9 male, 9 female) administered abuse doses of aspartame (100, 150, and 200 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in 500 ml orange juice. Six subjects were studied at each dose. Plasma aspartate concentrations increased significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) over baseline values after ingestion of each dose. However, the increase was small in each case, and maximal levels observed were below those noted postprandially in formula-fed infants. No significant changes (p greater than 0.05) were noted in erythrocyte glutamate, or erythrocyte aspartate concentrations after any dose. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations increased significantly over fasting concentrations (p less than 0.01) from 15 min to 6 h after each dose, and the increase was proportional to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak plasma phenylalanine concentrations were 20.3 +/- 2.03, 35.1 +/- 11.3, and 48.7 +/- 15.5 mumol/dl, respectively, after aspartame doses of 100, 150, and 200 mg/kg. Erythrocyte phenylalanine concentrations showed similar changes. Although these phenylalanine concentrations are considerably above the normal postprandial range (12 +/- 3 mumol/dl), they are below values associated with toxic findings. These data indicate little risk to normal subjects from excessive aspartate or phenylalanine levels after ingestion of single abuse loads of aspartame.

  2. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions. PMID:26056878

  3. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions.

  4. Dose Ranging, Expanded Acute Toxicity and Safety Pharmacology Studies for Intravenously Administered Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticle Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Lee, Stephen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoparticles dispersions show immense potential as multifunctional agents for in vivo biomedical applications. Herein, we follow regulatory guidelines for pharmaceuticals that recommend safety pharmacology assessment at least 10 – 100 times higher than the projected therapeutic dose, and present comprehensive single dose response, expanded acute toxicology, toxicokinetics, and respiratory/cardiovascular safety pharmacology results for intravenously administered dextran-coated graphene oxide nanoplatelet (GNP-Dex) formulations to rats at doses between 1–500 mg/kg. Our results indicate that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of GNP-Dex is between 50 mg/kg ≤ MTD < 125 mg/kg, blood half-life < 30 minutes, and majority of nanoparticles excreted within 24 hours through feces. Histopathology changes were noted at ≥ 250 mg/kg in the heart, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney; we found no changes in the brain and no GNP-Dex related effects in the cardiovascular parameters or hematological factors (blood, lipid, and metabolic panels) at doses < 125 mg/kg. The results open avenues for pivotal preclinical single and repeat dose safety studies following good laboratory practices (GLP) as required by regulatory agencies for investigational new drug (IND) application. PMID:24854092

  5. Blood methanol concentrations in normal adult subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; McMartin, K; Martin-Amat, G; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; Tephly, T R

    1981-02-01

    Blood methanol concentrations were measured in 30 normal adult subjects administered aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester. The doses studied included the 99th percentile of projected daily ingestion (34 mg/kg body weight) and three doses considered to be in the abuse range (100, 150, and 200 mg/kg body weight). Methanol concentrations were below the level of detection (0.4 mg/dl) in the blood of the 12 normal subjects who ingested aspartame at 34 mg/kg. They were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0 .001) after ingestion of each abuse dose, with the mean peak blood methanol concentrations and the areas under the blood methanol concentration-time curve increasing in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak blood methanol concentrations were 1.27 +/- 0.48 mg/dl at the 100 mg/kg dose, 2.14 +/- 0.35 mg/dl at the 150 mg/kg dose, and 2.58 +/- 0.78 mg/dl at the 200 mg/kg dose. Blood methanol concentrations returned to predosing levels by 8 h after administration of the 100 mg/kg dose. Methanol was still detected in the blood 8 h after the subjects had ingested aspartame at 150 or 200 mg/kg. Blood formate analyses were carried out in the 6 subjects who ingested aspartame at 200 mg/kg, since recent studies indicate that the toxic effects of methanol are due to formate accumulation. No significant increase in blood formate concentrations over predosing concentrations was noted. No changes were noted in any of the blood chemistry profile parameters measured 24 h after aspartame ingestion, compared to values noted before administration. Similarly, no differences were noted in ophthalmologic examinations carried out before and after aspartame loading.

  6. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  7. BIOCHANIN A SHOWS NO EFFECT ON SKELETAL SYSTEM IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS, WHEN ADMINISTERED IN MODERATE DOSE.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk-Sedlak, Ilona; Zych, Maria; Wojnar, Weronika; Ozimina-Kamińska, Ewa; Dudek, Sławomir; Chadała, Natalia; Kachel, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Biochanin A is a naturally occurring isoflavone. Its main sources are clover species such as Trifolium pretense, Trifolium subterraneum or Trifolium incarnatum. Phytoestrogens, including isoflavones, are plant-derived substances, which exhibit estrogen-like properties, thus they may be used as an alternative for hormonal replacement therapies and prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis. Therefore, the aim of the presented study, was to investigate the effect of biochanin A on chemistry and mechanical properties of skeletal system in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. The animals were divided into 4 groups--(I) sham-operated rats, (II) ovariectomized rats, (III) ovariectomized rats receiving estradiol at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg p.o., which were a positive control, and (IV) ovariectomized rats receiving biochanin A at a dose of 5 mg/kg p.o. for four weeks. The administered dose of biochanin A is considered as moderate for human, which can be received in the dietary supplements, and was established using ten-fold conversion rate resulting from faster metabolism in rats. Obtained results showed that ovariectomy induced harmful changes in bone tissue, causing worsening in both chemistry and mechanical parameters in bones. Administration of biochanin A to ovariectomized rats did not affect any changes in bone tissue in comparison to the bones of untreated ovariectomized rats. There was neither improvement nor deterioration noted in chemical composition and mechanical properties in all analyzed bones. Basing on the results, it could be concluded, that biochanin A administered in a moderate dose shows no influence on bone tissue of rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

  8. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Subchronic chloroform priming protects mice from a subsequently administered lethal dose of chloroform

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Binu K.; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Palkar, Prajakta S.; Mumtaz, Moiz M.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-10-01

    Protection offered by pre-exposure priming with a small dose of a toxicant against the toxic and lethal effects of a subsequently administered high dose of the same toxicant is autoprotection. Although autoprotection has been extensively studied with diverse toxicants in acute exposure regimen, not much is known about autoprotection after priming with repeated exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate this concept following repeated exposure to a common water contaminant, chloroform. Swiss Webster (SW) mice, exposed continuously to either vehicle (5% Emulphor, unprimed) or chloroform (150 mg/kg/day po, primed) for 30 days, were challenged with a normally lethal dose of chloroform (750 mg chloroform/kg po) 24 h after the last exposure. As expected, 90% of the unprimed mice died between 48 and 96 h after administration of the lethal dose in contrast to 100% survival of mice primed with chloroform. Time course studies indicated lower hepato- and nephrotoxicity in primed mice as compared to unprimed mice. Hepatic CYP2E1, glutathione levels (GSH), and covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel did not differ between livers of unprimed and primed mice after lethal dose exposure, indicating that protection in liver is neither due to decreased bioactivation nor increased detoxification. Kidney GSH and glutathione reductase activity were upregulated, with a concomitant reduction in oxidized glutathione in the primed mice following lethal dose challenge, leading to decreased renal covalent binding of {sup 14}C-chloroform-derived radiolabel, in the absence of any change in CYP2E1 levels. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) intervention led to 70% mortality in primed mice challenged with lethal dose. These data suggest that higher detoxification may play a role in the lower initiation of kidney injury observed in primed mice. Exposure of primed mice to a lethal dose of chloroform led to 40% lower chloroform levels (AUC{sub 15-360min}) in the systemic

  10. Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Destroys Thyroid Tissue Left after Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    A low dose of radioactive iodine given after surgery for thyroid cancer destroyed (ablated) residual thyroid tissue as effectively as a higher dose, with fewer side effects and less exposure to radiation, according to two randomized controlled trials.

  11. Doses to railroad workers from shipments of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fissile and high-level radioactive wastes are currently transported over long distances by truck and by rail transportation systems. The primary form of fissile material is spent reactor fuel. Transportation operations within DOE are controlled through the Transportation Operations and Management System. DOE projected increases in the rate of shipments have generated concern by railroad companies that railroad workers may be exposed to levels of radiation sufficiently high that a radiation protection program may need to be implemented. To address railroad company concerns, the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has estimated doses to railroad workers for two exposure scenarios that were constructed using worker activity data obtained from CSX Transportation for crew and maintenance workers. This characterization of railroad worker activity patterns includes a quantitative evaluation of the duration and rate of exposure. These duration and exposure rate values were evaluated using each of three exposure rate vs. distance models to generate exposure estimates. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Code System for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting from an Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material.

    1982-06-15

    WRAITH calculates the atmospheric transport of radioactive material to each of a number of downwind receptor points and the external and internal doses to a reference man at each of the receptor points.

  13. Radioactive materials in biosolids : national survey, dose modeling, and publicly owned treatment works (POTW) guidance.

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, R. K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Schmidt, D. W.; Salomon, S. N.; Jones, A.; Chiu, W. A.; Setlow, L. W.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Yu, C.; Goodman, J.; Lenhart, T.; Environmental Assessment; U.S. EPA; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NJ Dept of Environmental Radiation; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication March 1, 2004. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) announced the availability of three new documents concerning radioactive materials in sewage sludge and ash from publicly owned treatment works (POTW). One of the documents is a report presenting the results of a volunteer survey of sewage sludge and ash samples provided by 313 POTWs. The second document is a dose modeling document, using multiple exposure pathway modeling focused on a series of generic scenarios, to track possible exposure of POTW workers and members of the general public to radioactivity from the sewage sludge or ash. The third document is a guidance report providing recommendations on the management of radioactivity in sewage sludge and ash for POTW owners and operators. This paper explains how radioactive materials enter POTWs, provides criteria for evaluating levels of radioactive material in sludge and ash, and gives a summary of the results of the survey and dose modeling efforts.

  14. Safety and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of aclidinium bromide administered twice daily in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, K; Dilzer, S; Jansat, J M; Garcia Gil, E; Caracta, C F; Ortiz, S

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airway obstruction and increased cholinergic tone. The global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) guidelines recommend long-acting anticholinergics for COPD maintenance treatment. Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist developed for the treatment of COPD. A phase I, randomized, single-blind, multiple-dose clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of multiple doses of twice-daily (BID) aclidinium in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male and female subjects received aclidinium 200 μg, 400 μg, 800 μg, or placebo twice daily for 7 days. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 cohorts and 10 subjects in each cohort were randomized (8:2) to either aclidinium or placebo groups. Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs), laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and ECGs. Plasma samples were obtained at multiple time points throughout the study and analyzed for aclidinium and its inactive acid and alcohol metabolites using a fully validated method of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 9 treatment-emergent AEs were reported (1, placebo; 3, aclidinium 400 μg; 5, aclidinium 800 μg), all of which were mild in severity. No serious AEs were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. PK parameters on Day 7 following BID dosing of aclidinium showed that steady state was achieved for aclidinium and its metabolites. On Days 1 and 7, maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of aclidinium were generally observed at the first PK time point (5 min postdose) and rapidly declined, with plasma concentrations generally less than 10% of Cmax by 6 h postdose in all aclidinium groups. Mean effective t(½) after the evening dose on Day 7 ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 h for aclidinium 400 μg and 800 μg, similar to the terminal t(½) observed on Day 1 (4.5-5.9 h

  15. A Computer Code to Estimate Environmental Concentration and Dose Due to Airborne Release of Radioactive Material.

    1991-03-15

    Version 00 ORION-II was developed to estimate environmental concentration and dose due to airborne release of radioactive material from multiple sources of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. ORION-II is an updated version of ORION and is applicable to the sensitivity study of dose assessment at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  16. Evaluation of the adverse event profile and pharmacodynamics of toceranib phosphate administered to dogs with solid tumors at doses below the maximum tolerated dose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The receptor kinase inhibitor toceranib phosphate (Palladia) was approved for use in dogs in 2009 using a dose of 3.25 mg/kg administered every other day. Preliminary data suggests that lower doses of toeceranib may be associated with a reduced adverse event profile while maintaining sufficient drug exposure to provide biologic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the Cmax of toceranib in dogs with solid tumors receiving 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and to document the adverse events associated with this dose rate. Secondary objectives included determination of plasma VEGF concentrations in treated dogs and response to therapy. Results Dogs with solid tumors were administered toceranib at an intended target dose ranging from 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and plasma samples were obtained for analysis of toceranib and VEGF plasma concentrations on days 0, 7, 14 and 30 of the study at 6 and 8 hours post drug administration. Additionally, plasma samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 6, 8, and 12 hours from dogs on day 30 for confirmation of Cmax. Response to therapy was assessed using standard RECIST criteria and adverse events were characterized using the VCOG-CTCAE. Toceranib administered at doses between 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day resulted in an average 6–8 hr plasma concentration ranging from 100–120 ng/ml, well above the 40 ng/ml concentration associated with target inhibition. Plasma VEGF concentrations increased significantly over the 30 day treatment period indicating that VEGFR2 inhibition was likely achieved in the majority of dogs. The lower doses of toceranib used in this study were associated with a substantially reduced adverse event profile compared to the established label dose of 3.25 mg/kg EOD. Conclusions Doses of toceranib ranging from 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day provide drug exposure considered sufficient for target inhibition while resulting in an adverse event profile substantially reduced from that

  17. What you think is not what they get: significant discrepancies between prescribed and administered doses of tube feeding.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Paulina W J H; Rasmussen-Conrad, Ellen L; Naber, Anton H J; Wanten, Geert J A

    2009-01-01

    Enteral tube feeding remains an indispensible strategy to treat disease-related malnutrition. In the present study we evaluated in clinical practice whether prescribed feeding volumes correspond with administered quantities and we highlight possible causes for discrepancies. During a 4-month observation period data from all patients fully depending on tube feeding (1.5-2.5 litres/d) were collected in a Dutch 900-bed academic hospital. The range for administered feeds to be adequate was set at 100 +/- 10% of the prescribed dose. Fifty-five patients (mean age 57 (SD 30) years) were included. Tube feeding was given continuously via pump (n 37) or drip (n 3), in portions (n 14) or by combined modes (n 1). Administered tube feeding amounts were significantly lower than prescribed in 40% of all patients (P < or = 0.001). The mean ratio of administered v. prescribed energy was 87 (SD 21) % (all modes), 85 (SD 24) % (pump), 94 (SD 12) % (portions) and 88.3 (SD 18.1) % (drip), respectively. The mean energy deficit amounted to 1089 kJ/d (range -7955 to +795). Only on intensive care unit wards did feeding administration meet the set goal. Feeding interruptions because of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures were the main reason for decreased intakes. Our findings show that many patients relying on tube feeding do not meet their nutritional goals during hospital stay. This problem can be addressed by adapting feeding schedules and the use of formulations with a higher energy density.

  18. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  19. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  20. [Dose-dependent effects of intracisternally administered insulin on rat's behavior and glucose level].

    PubMed

    Shestakova, S A; Stepanov, I I; Eliseeva, A P; Shatik, S V; Fedorova, N V; Klimenko, V M

    2007-03-01

    Rat behavior in the open field and elevated plus-maze as well as glycaemia level were analyzed in rats after intracisternal administration of 2.5, 25, 50 and 200 ng of insulin. Dose-dependent changes were found in both behavioral tests: insulin in low doses (2.5 and 25 ng) increased probability of locomotion and investigative activity in open field, while insulin in high doses (50 and 200 ng) did not alter locomotor activity and showed tendency to weakening of the investigative behavior (especially in the dose of 50 ng). Significant decrease of rat anxiety level during the first 5 minutes of testing was found after administration of 2.5 and 200 ng of insulin and during the next 5 minutes after administration of 2.5 and 25 ng of insulin in elevated plus-maze. The glucose level in rats was increased in 1-2 hours after insulin administration, though glycaemia level did not exceed normal values. Thus revealed alterations of behavior are supposed to be the result of direct insulin influence on central mechanisms of activation and/or suppression of underlying behavioral characteristics of animals. PMID:17598469

  1. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L.L.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50.

  2. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  3. Radioactivity of 210Pb in Japanese cigarettes and radiation dose from smoking inhalation.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, A; Fukao, K; Kawabe, A; Kataoka, T; Hanamoto, K; Yamaoka, K

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that cigarette tobaccos contain naturally occurring radioactive nuclides such as (210)Pb and (210)Po. In many countries, the radioactivity of tobaccos has been measured to estimate the effective dose from smoking inhalation. The present study covered 24 cigarette brands including the top 20 of sales in Japan between April 2008 and March 2009. The activity concentrations of (210)Pb were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry, and then those of its progeny ((210)Po) were evaluated assuming the radioactive equilibrium between the two nuclides. Their concentrations were in the range of 2-14 mBq cigarette(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 8±3 mBq cigarette(-1). The annual committed effective doses were also calculated, based on the scenario that a smoker consumes 20 cigarettes a day. The average doses from (210)Pb and (210)Po inhalations were 22±9 and 68±27 μSv y(-1), respectively.

  4. Distortions induced by radioactive seeds into interstitial brachytherapy dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi; Modrick, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    In a previous article, we presented development and verification of an integral transport equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. Recently, we have included fluorescence radiation physics and parallel computation to the standing algorithms so that we can compute dose distributions for a large set of seeds without resorting to the superposition methods. The introduction of parallel computing capability provided a means to compute the dose distribution for multiple seeds in a simultaneous manner. This provided a way to study strong heterogeneity and shadow effects induced by the presence of multiple seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant. This article presents the algorithm for computing fluorescence radiation, algorithm for parallel computing, and display results for an 81-seed implant that has a perfect and imperfect lattice. The dosimetry data for a single model 6711 seeds is presented for verification and heterogeneity factor computations using simultaneous and superposition techniques are presented.

  5. Spot scanning proton therapy minimizes neutron dose in the setting of radiation therapy administered during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Poenisch, Falk; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ronald X; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michael T; Li, Jing; Grosshans, David

    2016-01-01

    This is a real case study to minimize the neutron dose equivalent (H) to a fetus using spot scanning proton beams with favorable beam energies and angles. Minimum neutron dose exposure to the fetus was achieved with iterative planning under the guidance of neutron H measurement. Two highly conformal treatment plans, each with three spot scanning beams, were planned to treat a 25-year-old pregnant female with aggressive recurrent chordoma of the base of skull who elected not to proceed with termination. Each plan was scheduled for delivery every other day for robust target coverage. Neutron H to the fetus was measured using a REM500 neutron survey meter placed at the fetus position of a patient simulating phantom. 4.1 and 44.1 μSv/fraction were measured for the two initial plans. A vertex beam with higher energy and the fetal position closer to its central axis was the cause for the plan that produced an order higher neutron H. Replacing the vertex beam with a lateral beam reduced neutron H to be comparable with the other plan. For a prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the total neutron H to the fetus was estimated to be 0.35 mSv based on final measurement in single fraction. In comparison, the passive scattering proton plan and photon plan had an estimation of 26 and 70 mSv, respectively, for this case. While radiation therapy in pregnant patients should be avoided if at all possible, our work demonstrated spot scanning beam limited the total neutron H to the fetus an order lower than the suggested 5 mSv regulation threshold. It is far superior than passive scattering beam and careful beam selection with lower energy and keeping fetus further away from beam axis are essential in minimizing the fetus neutron exposure. PMID:27685136

  6. Fixed-dose combination ezetimibe+atorvastatin lowers LDL-C equivalent to co-administered components in randomized trials: use of a dose-response model.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Chen, Erluo; Tomassini, Joanne E; McPeters, Gail; Polis, Adam B; Triscari, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Co-administration of ezetimibe with atorvastatin is a generally well-tolerated treatment option that reduces LDL-C levels and improves other lipids with greater efficacy than doubling the atorvastatin dose. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the equivalent lipid-modifying efficacy of fixed-dose combination (FDC) ezetimibe/atorvastatin compared with the component agents co-administered individually in support of regulatory filing. Two randomized, 6-week, double-blind cross-over trials compared the lipid-modifying efficacy of ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 mg (n = 353) or 10/40 mg (n = 280) vs. separate co-administration of ezetimibe 10 mg plus atorvastatin 20 mg (n = 346) or 40 mg (n = 280), respectively, in hypercholesterolemic patients. Percent changes from baseline in LDL-C (primary endpoint) and other lipids (secondary endpoints) were assessed by analysis of covariance; triglycerides were evaluated by longitudinal-data analysis. Expected differences between FDC and the corresponding co-administered doses were predicted from a dose-response relationship model; sample size was estimated given the expected difference and equivalence margins (±4%). LDL-C-lowering equivalence was based on 97.5% expanded confidence intervals (CI) for the difference contained within the margins; equivalence margins for other lipids were not prespecified. Ezetimibe/atorvastatin FDC 10/20 mg was equivalent to co-administered ezetimibe+atorvastatin 20 mg in reducing LDL-C levels (54.0% vs. 53.8%) as was FDC 10/40 mg and ezetimibe+atorvastatin 40 mg (58.9% vs. 58.7%), as predicted by the model. Changes in other lipids were consistent with equivalence (97.5% expanded CIs <±3%, included 0); triglyceride changes varied more. All treatments were generally well tolerated. Hypercholesterolemic patients administered ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 and 10/40 mg FDC had equivalent LDL-C lowering. This FDC formulation proved to be an efficacious and generally well

  7. Histopathology of myocardium of copper-deficient rats administered a toxic dose a cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, W.; Bielenberg, U.; Seung, S.K.; Reddy, P.P.; Dulin, A.M.; Smith, J.C. )

    1989-02-15

    The present study examined the effects of a single dose of cocaine (Coc) on cardiac ultrastructure in rats fed copper sufficient (Cus) compared to copper deficient (CuD) diets. Weanling males were fed either CuS (n-13) or CuD (n-12) for 7 wk. Ten in each group, (paired for Cu status), were injected (ip) with Coc-HCl (80-90mg/kg bw) 5 served as controls. Rats which survived for >15 min, (CuD 40% CuS (80%) controls), were killed and tissues obtained for histology and Cu analysis. Lower Cu concentrations in heart, liver and serum confirmed the CuD. The hearts were examined by light (Lm) and transmission electron microscopy. Myocardial foci showed necrosis, fibrosis, and inflammation in all given Coc but were more severe in the CuD group. CuS controls (no Coc) showed no similar lesions. Ultrastructural observations supported Lm findings. There was an apparent increase in number of mitochondria (Mito) of variable sizes and shapes. Foci of molding Mito and some with crystalline configuration of cristae were also observed. This was most pronounced in the CuD rats given Coc but absent in CuS animals (no Coc). The data support previous findings of myocardial lesionsin CuD rats the effect of Coc in exacerbation these lesions requires further elucidation.

  8. DEHP (DI-N-ETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE), WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION, INDUCES DOSE DEPENDENT DECREASES IN FETAL TESTIS GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEHP (di-n-ethylhexyl phthalate), when administered during sexual differentiation, induces dose dependent decreases in fetal testis gene expression and steroid hormone synthesis.
    Vickie S. Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Kathy Bobseine, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, and ...

  9. The effects of acutely administered low dose sarin on cognitive behaviour and the electroencephalogram in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Pearce, P C; Crofts, H S; Muggleton, N G; Ridout, D; Scott, E A

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that administration of a clinically sign-free dose of sarin to non-human primates gives rise to subtle changes in brain electrical activity as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) several months following exposure. The functional significances of such changes are unclear. The present study monitored EEG by using implantable radiotelemetry, and also assessed the performance of complex behavioural tasks, in non-human primates for up to 15 months following exposure to a low dose of sarin. Baselines of EEG and behaviour were shown to be stable over several months in control animals. The doses of sarin administered caused erythrocyte cholinesterase inhibitions of 36.4% to 67.1%. Overall, no significant changes in EEG patterns were observed although there were increases in beta 2 amplitude which approached significance (p=0.07). No deleterious effects on performance were seen on the touchscreen mediated discrimination tasks presented from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). This study illustrates the validity of the approach employed and makes an important contribution to the investigation of the long-term effects of organophosphorous compounds.

  10. Short- and long-term hormonal effects of a single dose of 50 mg tamoxifen administered to normal males.

    PubMed

    Fauser, B C; Dony, J M; Doesburg, W H; Thomas, C M; Rolland, R

    1984-01-01

    To five potentially fertile males, a single dose of 50 mg tamoxifen was administered orally to explore the short- and long-term hormonal effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Blood specimens were obtained through an integrated sampling technique for the first two hours after the intake of the drug. Then, samples were taken daily throughout one week, and twice weekly for the next two weeks. Hormone measurements of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone and oestradiol were obtained by specific RIA. All the subjects showed different response patterns. No general characteristic of the hormonal changes in the investigated group could be given. A consistent correlation between the within-individual levels of gonadotrophin and sex steroid changes could not be observed. It is concluded, within the limits of the used experimental design, that in healthy males a single administration of tamoxifen does not result in consistent changes in serum levels of either gonadotrophins or sex steroid hormones.

  11. Relative Bioavailability of a Single Dose of Belimumab Administered Subcutaneously by Prefilled Syringe or Autoinjector in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Thomas; Gilbert, Jane; Barton, Matthew E.; Fire, Joseph; Groark, James; Fox, Norma Lynn; Roth, David; Gordon, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravenous belimumab is approved for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus; subcutaneous self‐administration would enable greater patient access. This study assessed relative bioavailability, tolerability, and safety of 1 subcutaneous dose of self‐administered belimumab by healthy subjects using a single‐use autoinjector or prefilled syringe. Subjects (randomized 1:1:1:1) self‐administered belimumab 200 mg subcutaneously (abdomen or thigh) by prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Pharmacokinetics, adverse events (AEs), injection‐site pain, and administration errors were recorded. Of 81 subjects, 5 experienced administration errors and were excluded from pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean serum belimumab concentration profiles were similar for both devices, with a weak trend toward higher concentrations for thigh injection compared with abdominal injections. Maximum observed serum concentration was slightly higher with the autoinjector (27.0 vs 25.3 µg/mL) and area under the concentration–time curve slightly lower (701 vs 735 day · μg/mL), compared with the prefilled syringe. Incidence of AEs was 51% (41 of 81 subjects; headache was most common), with no serious or severe AEs. Median injection‐site pain scores were low (0 after 1 hour). Device handling was reported as acceptable by ≥95% of autoinjector users and ≥90% of prefilled syringe users for each characteristic assessed. These results support the use of either device for belimumab subcutaneous administration. PMID:27163500

  12. Dose Calculation For Accidental Release Of Radioactive Cloud Passing Over Jeddah

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, N. D.; Mayhoub, A. B.

    2011-12-26

    For the evaluation of doses after the reactor accident, in particular for the inhalation dose, a thorough knowledge of the concentration of the various radionuclide in air during the passage of the plume is required. In this paper we present an application of the Gaussian Plume Model (GPM) to calculate the atmospheric dispersion and airborne radionuclide concentration resulting from radioactive cloud over the city of Jeddah (KSA). The radioactive cloud is assumed to be emitted from a reactor of 10 MW power in postulated accidental release. Committed effective doses (CEDs) to the public at different distance from the source to the receptor are calculated. The calculations were based on meteorological condition and data of the Jeddah site. These data are: pasquill atmospheric stability is the class B and the wind speed is 2.4m/s at 10m height in the N direction. The residence time of some radionuclides considered in this study were calculated. The results indicate that, the values of doses first increase with distance, reach a maximum value and then gradually decrease. The total dose received by human is estimated by using the estimated values of residence time of each radioactive pollutant at different distances.

  13. Calculation of the effective dose from natural radioactivity in soil using MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2010-01-01

    Effective dose delivered by photon emitted from natural radioactivity in soil was calculated in this work. Calculations have been done for the most common natural radionuclides in soil (238)U, (232)Th series and (40)K. A ORNL human phantoms and the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B were employed to calculate the energy deposited in all organs. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 74 recommendations. Conversion factors of effective dose per air kerma were determined. Results obtained here were compared with other authors. PMID:20045343

  14. Simulation of radioactive plume gamma dose over a complex terrain using Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, P T; Venkatesan, R; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    FLEXPART-WRF is a versatile model for the simulation of plume dispersion over a complex terrain in a mesoscale region. This study deals with its application to the dispersion of a hypothetical air borne gaseous radioactivity over a topographically complex nuclear site in southeastern France. A computational method for calculating plume gamma dose to the ground level receptor is introduced in FLEXPART using the point kernel method. Comparison with another similar dose computing code SPEEDI is carried out. In SPEEDI the dose is calculated for specific grid sizes, the lowest available being 250 m, whereas in FLEXPART it is grid independent. Spatial distribution of dose by both the models is analyzed. Due to the ability of FLEXPART to utilize the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological variables as input, particularly the height of the PBL, the simulated dose values were higher than SPEEDI estimates. The FLEXPART-WRF in combination with point kernel dose module gives a more realistic picture of plume gamma dose distribution in a complex terrain, a situation likely under accidental release of radioactivity in a mesoscale range. PMID:25863323

  15. Simulation of radioactive plume gamma dose over a complex terrain using Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, P T; Venkatesan, R; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    FLEXPART-WRF is a versatile model for the simulation of plume dispersion over a complex terrain in a mesoscale region. This study deals with its application to the dispersion of a hypothetical air borne gaseous radioactivity over a topographically complex nuclear site in southeastern France. A computational method for calculating plume gamma dose to the ground level receptor is introduced in FLEXPART using the point kernel method. Comparison with another similar dose computing code SPEEDI is carried out. In SPEEDI the dose is calculated for specific grid sizes, the lowest available being 250 m, whereas in FLEXPART it is grid independent. Spatial distribution of dose by both the models is analyzed. Due to the ability of FLEXPART to utilize the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological variables as input, particularly the height of the PBL, the simulated dose values were higher than SPEEDI estimates. The FLEXPART-WRF in combination with point kernel dose module gives a more realistic picture of plume gamma dose distribution in a complex terrain, a situation likely under accidental release of radioactivity in a mesoscale range.

  16. Population based evaluation of a multi-parametric steroid profiling on administered endogenous steroids in single low dose.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Pieter; Van Eenoo, Peter; Delbeke, Frans T

    2010-12-12

    Steroid profiling provides valuable information to detect doping with endogenous steroids. Apart from the traditionally monitored steroids, minor metabolites can play an important role to increase the specificity and efficiency of current detection methods. The applicability of several minor steroid metabolites was tested on administration studies with low doses of oral testosterone (T), T gel, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) gel and oral dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The collected data for all monitored parameters were evaluated with the respective population based reference ranges. Besides the traditional markers T/E, T and DHT, minor metabolites 4-OH-Adion and 6α-OH-Adion were found as most sensitive metabolites to detect oral T administration. The most sensitive metabolites for the detection of DHEA were identified as 16α-OH-DHEA and 7β-OH-DHEA but longest detection up to three days (after oral administration of 50 mg) was obtained with non-specific 5β-steroids and its ratios. Steroids applied as a gel had longer effects on the metabolism but were generally not detectable with universal decision criteria. It can be concluded that population based reference ranges show limited overall performance in detecting misuse of small doses of natural androgens. Although some minor metabolites provide additional information for the oral testosterone and DHEA formulations, the topical administered steroids could not be detected for all volunteers using universal reference limits. Application of other population based threshold limits did not lead to longer detection times. PMID:20688095

  17. A simplified model to estimate radiological doses from incineration of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, L.E.; Ma, C.W.; Wheeler, T.; Nimmagadda, M.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Owens, K.W.

    1995-06-01

    A simplified calculational model permits a rapid yet realistic estimate of small, but potential radiological doses to onsite workers and the offsite public as a result of transportation, handling, storage, incineration, and maintenance of waste containing trace amount of radioactive materials which is to be processed at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility. The model was developed on the basis of previous detailed studies of eight TSD facilities and builds in the essential features of a TSD facility. The model would provide an understanding of the potential human exposure associated with the radioactive contents in the chemical wastes.

  18. Collective doses to man from dumping of radioactive waste in the Arctic Seas.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S P; Iosjpe, M; Strand, P

    1997-08-25

    A box model for the dispersion of radionuclides in the marine environment covering the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean has been constructed. Collective doses from ingestion pathways have been calculated from unit releases of the radionuclides 3H, 60Co, 63Ni, 90Sr, 129I, 137Cs, 239Pu and 241Am into a fjord on the east coast of NovayaZemlya. The results show that doses for the shorter-lived radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs) are derived mainly from seafood production in the Barents Sea. Doses from the longer-lived radionuclides (e.g. 239Pu) are delivered through marine produce further away from the Arctic Ocean. Collective doses were calculated for two release scenarios, both of which are based on information of the dumping of radioactive waste in the Barents and Kara Seas by the former Soviet Union and on preliminary information from the International Arctic Sea Assessment Programme. A worst-case scenario was assumed according to which all radionuclides in liquid and solid radioactive waste were available for dispersion in the marine environment at the time of dumping. Release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel was assumed to take place by direct corrosion of the fuel ignoring the barriers that prevent direct contact between the fuel and the seawater. The second scenario selected assumed that releases of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel do not occur until after failure of the protective barriers. All other liquid and solid radioactive waste was assumed to be available for dispersion at the time of discharge in both scenarios. The estimated collective dose for the worst-case scenario was about 9 manSv and that for the second scenario was about 3 manSv. In both cases, 137Cs is the radionuclide predicted to dominate the collective doses as well as the peak collective dose rates.

  19. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12-13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9-10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0-6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99-100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88-98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93-99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4-1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses.

  20. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12–13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9–10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0–6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99–100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88–98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93–99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4–1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses. PMID:25714044

  1. Radionuclide sources and radioactive decay figures pertinent to the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1991-03-01

    The origin and radioactive decay schemes of radionuclides currently expected to be the major contributors to potential radiation doses that populations might have received as a result of nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944 are identified and illustrated in this report. The reactions considered include actinide neutron capture and decay sequences, fission product decays, and neutron activation reactions. It is important to note that the radioactive half-life of a given nuclide does not, by itself, fully determine the significance of a given radionuclide as a potential source term. This report does not address environmental transport mechanisms, behavior in the environment, or radiological dose impact of any of the radionuclides shown. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  2. Specific accumulation of orally administered redox nanotherapeutics in the inflamed colon reducing inflammation with dose-response efficacy.

    PubMed

    Vong, Long Binh; Mo, John; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-07-28

    Although current medications for ulcerative colitis (UC) are effective to some extent, there are still some limitation of their use due to the non-specific distribution, drug metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract, and severe adverse effects. In our previous studies, we developed oral redox nanoparticles (RNP(O)) that specifically accumulated and scavenged overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in an inflamed colon. However, the mechanism leading to specific accumulation of RNP(O) in an inflamed colon is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular uptake of RNP(O) into ROS-treated epithelial colonic cells in vitro, and compared to the untreated cells, found a significantly increased uptake in ROS-treated cells. In vivo, we discovered that orally administered RNP(O) were not internalized into the cells of a normal colon. A significant amount of disintegrated RNP(O) was detected in the cells of an inflamed colon of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mice, resulting in scavenging of ROS and suppression of inflammation with low adverse effects. Furthermore, we confirmed a significant reduction of disease activity and a robust dose response efficacy following RNP(O) treatment in acute DSS-induced colitis mice, outperforming the positive control 5-aminosalicylic acid. Oral administration of RNP(O) is a promising approach to develop a new therapy for UC disease. PMID:25998050

  3. Efficacy of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a low dose for the treatment of porcine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Salichs, M; Sabaté, D; Homedes, J

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral solution of ketoprofen administered in drinking water at a lower dose as a complement to antimicrobial therapy in a mild outbreak of porcine respiratory disease complex. The study was performed with 120 pigs with rectal temperature between 39.9 and 41°C and at least 1 sign indicating porcine respiratory disease complex (dyspnea, cough, nasal discharge, or depression). Animals were randomly allocated in 2 groups (treated and control group). Animals in both groups received etiological therapy with doxycycline at 10 mg · kg(-1) in drinking water for 5 d. The animals in the treated group also received 1.5 mg · kg(-1) of ketoprofen during the first 3 d. The reduction in rectal temperature in the treated group was significantly greater during the days of ketoprofen administration and up to 1 d after the end of treatment (P < 0.05). The percentage of dyspneic animals was significantly less (P < 0.05) in the treated group from d 2 to 5 of the study. Also, a significant improvement regarding depression and cough was seen in the animals of the treated group. No statistically significant (P > 0.05) differences were evidenced in productive variables. In conclusion, oral treatment with ketoprofen at 1.5 mg · kg(-1) in combination with antimicrobial therapy was found to be a clinically effective approach in outbreaks of mild porcine respiratory disease complex.

  4. Radioactivity and gamma-dose rates observed at the Morungaba granites, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Fabio de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha

    2013-07-01

    A ground gamma-ray survey was conducted over part of a large granitic body located near the city of Campinas, eastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The dominant rock types are K-feldspar porphyries-rich granites, porphyritic biotite and hornblend-bearing granites, fine to medium-grained monzogranites and medium to gross grained, biotite and muscovite-bearing monzogranites. The radioactive element distribution reflects local geology, in part re-worked by weathering, and the most radioactive rocks are the K-feldspar-rich granites. The rate of the absorbed dose by the air reflects the integrated effects of the radioactive elements distribution. Most of the observed values vary between 67 and 130 nGy h(-1) and with localised spots with the absorbed dose rate values up to 193 nGy h(-1) and low values of ∼25 nGy h(-1). The mean air absorbed dose rate for the studied area is 77 nGy h(-1).

  5. Individual-dose distribution for the population in different regions with radioactive contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Kleshchenko, E.D.; Kushnereva, K.K.

    1995-09-01

    The reconstruction of individual doses as a result of the Chernobyl accident often relied on the method of EPR measurement from the enamel from extracted teeth. This method was used reliably, with individual confirmations of its indications being obtained. In determining the relatively small irradiation dose to the population, doubts arise because of the fact that the measured dose is often greater than the dose calculated by an indirect method---from external radiation fields at the location and the contents of radionuclides in foods. It is necessary, therefore, to perform an independent check of the results. In this paper, we describe one method for checking the reliability---comparing the measurements of the dose from several teeth in the same individual---in determining the dose from tooth enamel for the population of the Kamensk-Ural region of Sverdlovsk province. This group lived in the zone of passage for the eastern Ural radioactive wake in 1957. The error of the dose determination for different samples was different, since it depends on the mass and quality of the enamel obtained. The results presented show that the method of EPR dosimetry using the enamel of extracted teeth makes it possible to determine quite reliably the individual dose of external radiation from the background up to several Gy of the measurements. Our method compares measurements.

  6. Healthy birth weight results in higher vitamin A storage in neonate piglets administered high-dose supplements.

    PubMed

    Heying, Emily K; Hovel, Elizabeth; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2015-10-01

    A proposed intervention for newborn infants in countries with suspected vitamin A (VA) deficiency is to administer 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate at birth to reduce mortality risk. However, no studies have investigated birth weight effects. In this study, low birth weight (LBW; <1 kg, n = 18) and healthy birth weight (HBW) piglets (>1.5 kg, n = 18) from VA-depleted sows were dosed with 25,000 or 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate (26.2 or 52.4 µmol retinol equivalents) at birth to compare VA reserves. Blood was collected at varying times (n = 3-5/time/dose), and piglets were killed at 12 or 24 h for blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, adrenal gland, and intestinal contents. HBW piglets had significantly higher birth, death, and organ weights than LBW (P < 0.0001 for all). HBW and LBW piglets, which received VA, had higher liver and kidney VA concentrations (0.18 ± 0.09, 0.24 ± 0.10 µmol/g liver and 13.4 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.5 nmol/g kidney, respectively) than controls (n = 10) (0.051 ± 0.01 µmol/g liver and 1.01 ± 0.43 nmol/g kidney) (P = 0.0061 and < 0.0001, respectively). Total liver (9.75 ± 5.16 µmol) and kidney retinol (204 ± 79.1 nmol) were higher in HBW than LBW piglets (P < 0.0001). Extrahepatic tissues, except lung, had higher VA concentration than controls (P < 0.0001). Serum retinol and ester concentrations were higher in treated than control piglets (P = 0.0028, P < 0.0001, respectively), and significantly changed during the times sampled (P = 0.022, P = 0.011, respectively). Peak serum retinyl ester concentrations, which occurred at 3 h, were higher in piglets that received 50,000 IU (4.2 ± 4.4 µmol/L) than 25,000 IU (2.7 ± 2.3 µmol/L) (P = 0.031). Regardless of dose amount, HBW piglets stored more supplemental VA than LBW piglets when administered at birth. PMID:25681469

  7. Healthy birth weight results in higher vitamin A storage in neonate piglets administered high-dose supplements

    PubMed Central

    Heying, Emily K; Hovel, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A proposed intervention for newborn infants in countries with suspected vitamin A (VA) deficiency is to administer 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate at birth to reduce mortality risk. However, no studies have investigated birth weight effects. In this study, low birth weight (LBW; <1 kg, n = 18) and healthy birth weight (HBW) piglets (>1.5 kg, n = 18) from VA-depleted sows were dosed with 25,000 or 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate (26.2 or 52.4 µmol retinol equivalents) at birth to compare VA reserves. Blood was collected at varying times (n = 3–5/time/dose), and piglets were killed at 12 or 24 h for blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, adrenal gland, and intestinal contents. HBW piglets had significantly higher birth, death, and organ weights than LBW (P < 0.0001 for all). HBW and LBW piglets, which received VA, had higher liver and kidney VA concentrations (0.18 ± 0.09, 0.24 ± 0.10 µmol/g liver and 13.4 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.5 nmol/g kidney, respectively) than controls (n = 10) (0.051 ± 0.01 µmol/g liver and 1.01 ± 0.43 nmol/g kidney) (P = 0.0061 and < 0.0001, respectively). Total liver (9.75 ± 5.16 µmol) and kidney retinol (204 ± 79.1 nmol) were higher in HBW than LBW piglets (P < 0.0001). Extrahepatic tissues, except lung, had higher VA concentration than controls (P < 0.0001). Serum retinol and ester concentrations were higher in treated than control piglets (P = 0.0028, P < 0.0001, respectively), and significantly changed during the times sampled (P = 0.022, P = 0.011, respectively). Peak serum retinyl ester concentrations, which occurred at 3 h, were higher in piglets that received 50,000 IU (4.2 ± 4.4 µmol/L) than 25,000 IU (2.7 ± 2.3 µmol/L) (P = 0.031). Regardless of dose amount, HBW piglets stored more supplemental VA than LBW piglets when administered at birth. PMID:25681469

  8. Immune response to the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule up to 4 years after vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda M; Ferguson, Murdo; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Schulze, Karin; Ramjattan, Brian; Hillemanns, Peter; Behre, Ulrich; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, partially-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT00541970) evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of 2-dose (2D) schedules of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Results to month (M) 24 have been reported previously and we now report data to M48 focusing on the licensed vaccine formulation (20 μg each of HPV-16 and -18 antigens) administered at M0,6 compared with the standard 3-dose (3D) schedule (M0,1,6). Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 years) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (n = 240) or 3D at M0,1,6 (n = 239). In the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort, all initially seronegative subjects seroconverted for HPV-16 and -18 antibodies and remained seropositive up to M48. For both HPV-16 and -18, geometric mean antibody titer (GMT) ratios (3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years divided by 2D schedule in girls aged 9–14 years) at M36 and M48 were close to 1, as they were at M7 when non-inferiority was demonstrated. The kinetics of HPV-16, -18, -31, and -45 antibody responses were similar for both groups and HPV-16 and -18 GMTs were substantially higher than natural infection titers. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In summary, antibody responses to a 2D M0,6 schedule of the licensed vaccine formulation in girls aged 9–14 years appeared comparable to the standard 3D schedule in women aged 15–25 years up to 4 years after first vaccination. A 2D schedule could facilitate implementation of HPV vaccination programs and improve vaccine coverage and series completion rates. PMID:24576907

  9. Dose assessment of population groups exposed to elevated radon levels in radioactive Italian spas

    SciTech Connect

    Sciocchetti, G.; Tosti, S.; Baldassini, P.G.; Sarao, R.; Soldano, E.

    1992-12-31

    The natural spring waters on the Isle of Ischia are among the most radioactive in the world. Therapeutic application of these waters, which contain very high radon concentrations, increases the radon exposure of people treated with them. People who live and work at radioactive spas may be good subjects for testing to evaluate detectable biological effects, especially because their exposures will be less influenced by synergistic factors than those of underground miners. The aim of our investigation was to characterize radon exposure for population groups exposed to high radon levels. Our approach takes into account some peculiar requirements of our epidemiological investigations. To obtain representative dose values, workers were classified into groups to obtain significant results suitable for epidemiological pilot studies. Investigations were carried out on the geological aspects of radon sources, environmental parameters, physical and dosimetric factors which influence radon levels, and related exposures in therapeutic facilities in order to model patterns of radon exposures for the various population groups. We inventoried hyper-radioactive springs on the island. We identified workers in radon spas who were exposed to radiation from inhaled radon daughters and retrospectively assessed their radon exposures. Results showed that, under some conditions, spa employees may have been exposed to much higher than usual levels of radon, which produced up to about 60 mSv y{sup -1} effective dose equivalent.

  10. Radioactive (131)Iodine Body Burden and Blood Dose Estimates in Treatment for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer by External Probe Counting.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al Balushi, Naima

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive(131) iodine (RAI) body burden is estimated in thyroid cancer patients by a) exposure rate meter and b) external probe counting. A calibration factor of 301 cpm/MBq (d = 16 cm) is used for the probe for estimates of whole body activity. Patients sit in a rotating stool with their center corresponding to the field of view for estimation of whole body RAI. Radioactive counts are obtained for anterio posterior (AP) and postero anterior (PA) geometries. Whole body retention factor is expressed as a ratio against assayed activity administered to the patient on day 1. With exposure rate measurement, for off-thyroxin (hypothyriod) patients, the retention factors were 0.148 ± 0.12 (n = 211) and 0.07 ± 0.08 (n = 68) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. For recombinant TSH (rhTSH) (euthyroid) group, the retention factors were 0.089 ± 0.06 (n = 24) and 0.05 ± 0.05 (n = 19) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. By probe counting method, the obtained retention factors were 0.081 ± 0.013 (range: 0.071-0.096) (off-thyroxine group) and 0.039 ± 0.03 (range: 0.008-0.089) for the rhTSH group at 48 h. The 72 h retentions in the off thyroxine (hypothyriod) group and the rhTSH (euthyroid) group were 0.048 ± 0.024 (range: 0.016-0.076) and 0.005, respectively. The radioactive body burdens at 48 h were in the range of 290-315 MBq (7.8-8.5 mCi) for the off-thyroxine group and 44-286 MBq (1.2-7.7 mCi) for the rhTSH group. The calculated residence times in whole body were 21.97 ± 3.8 h (range: 17.1-27.1) for off-thyroxine group and 14.28 ± 2.75 h (range: 9.97-19.46) showing high statistical significance (P < 0.001). The specific blood doses were 0.118 ± 0.025 mGy/MBq (range: 0.083-0.172) for the off-thyroxine group (females n = 23); 0.87 ± 0.028 mGy/MBq (range: 0.057-0.130) (females n = 13), 0.080 ± 0.013 mGy/MBq (range: 0.069-0.098) (males n = 5) and 0.080 ± 0.028 (range: 0.059-0.118 for rhTSH patients (males n = 4). The mean mGy/MBq for blood was higher in females-about 10% for

  11. Radioactive 131Iodine Body Burden and Blood Dose Estimates in Treatment for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer by External Probe Counting

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al Balushi, Naima

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive131 iodine (RAI) body burden is estimated in thyroid cancer patients by a) exposure rate meter and b) external probe counting. A calibration factor of 301 cpm/MBq (d = 16 cm) is used for the probe for estimates of whole body activity. Patients sit in a rotating stool with their center corresponding to the field of view for estimation of whole body RAI. Radioactive counts are obtained for anterio posterior (AP) and postero anterior (PA) geometries. Whole body retention factor is expressed as a ratio against assayed activity administered to the patient on day 1. With exposure rate measurement, for off-thyroxin (hypothyriod) patients, the retention factors were 0.148 ± 0.12 (n = 211) and 0.07 ± 0.08 (n = 68) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. For recombinant TSH (rhTSH) (euthyroid) group, the retention factors were 0.089 ± 0.06 (n = 24) and 0.05 ± 0.05 (n = 19) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. By probe counting method, the obtained retention factors were 0.081 ± 0.013 (range: 0.071–0.096) (off-thyroxine group) and 0.039 ± 0.03 (range: 0.008–0.089) for the rhTSH group at 48 h. The 72 h retentions in the off thyroxine (hypothyriod) group and the rhTSH (euthyroid) group were 0.048 ± 0.024 (range: 0.016–0.076) and 0.005, respectively. The radioactive body burdens at 48 h were in the range of 290-315 MBq (7.8–8.5 mCi) for the off-thyroxine group and 44–286 MBq (1.2–7.7 mCi) for the rhTSH group. The calculated residence times in whole body were 21.97 ± 3.8 h (range: 17.1–27.1) for off-thyroxine group and 14.28 ± 2.75 h (range: 9.97-19.46) showing high statistical significance (P < 0.001). The specific blood doses were 0.118 ± 0.025 mGy/MBq (range: 0.083–0.172) for the off-thyroxine group (females n = 23); 0.87 ± 0.028 mGy/MBq (range: 0.057–0.130) (females n = 13), 0.080 ± 0.013 mGy/MBq (range: 0.069–0.098) (males n = 5) and 0.080 ± 0.028 (range: 0.059–0.118 for rhTSH patients (males n = 4). The mean mGy/MBq for blood was higher in

  12. Radioactive 131Iodine Body Burden and Blood Dose Estimates in Treatment for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer by External Probe Counting

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al Balushi, Naima

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive131 iodine (RAI) body burden is estimated in thyroid cancer patients by a) exposure rate meter and b) external probe counting. A calibration factor of 301 cpm/MBq (d = 16 cm) is used for the probe for estimates of whole body activity. Patients sit in a rotating stool with their center corresponding to the field of view for estimation of whole body RAI. Radioactive counts are obtained for anterio posterior (AP) and postero anterior (PA) geometries. Whole body retention factor is expressed as a ratio against assayed activity administered to the patient on day 1. With exposure rate measurement, for off-thyroxin (hypothyriod) patients, the retention factors were 0.148 ± 0.12 (n = 211) and 0.07 ± 0.08 (n = 68) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. For recombinant TSH (rhTSH) (euthyroid) group, the retention factors were 0.089 ± 0.06 (n = 24) and 0.05 ± 0.05 (n = 19) at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. By probe counting method, the obtained retention factors were 0.081 ± 0.013 (range: 0.071–0.096) (off-thyroxine group) and 0.039 ± 0.03 (range: 0.008–0.089) for the rhTSH group at 48 h. The 72 h retentions in the off thyroxine (hypothyriod) group and the rhTSH (euthyroid) group were 0.048 ± 0.024 (range: 0.016–0.076) and 0.005, respectively. The radioactive body burdens at 48 h were in the range of 290-315 MBq (7.8–8.5 mCi) for the off-thyroxine group and 44–286 MBq (1.2–7.7 mCi) for the rhTSH group. The calculated residence times in whole body were 21.97 ± 3.8 h (range: 17.1–27.1) for off-thyroxine group and 14.28 ± 2.75 h (range: 9.97-19.46) showing high statistical significance (P < 0.001). The specific blood doses were 0.118 ± 0.025 mGy/MBq (range: 0.083–0.172) for the off-thyroxine group (females n = 23); 0.87 ± 0.028 mGy/MBq (range: 0.057–0.130) (females n = 13), 0.080 ± 0.013 mGy/MBq (range: 0.069–0.098) (males n = 5) and 0.080 ± 0.028 (range: 0.059–0.118 for rhTSH patients (males n = 4). The mean mGy/MBq for blood was higher in

  13. Natural radioactivity and associated dose rates in soil samples from Kalpakkam, South India.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, M; Senthilkumar, B; Seshan, B R R; Hariharan, G; Purvaja, R; Ramkumar, S; Ramesh, R

    2010-10-01

    The activity concentration of naturally occurring radioactive elements such as 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured for 46 soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Madras atomic power station, Kalpakkam, South India using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were found to be 22.6 ± 12.6, 92.8 ± 44.3 and 434.1 ± 131.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity concentration of natural radionuclides is higher than the world average except for (226)Ra. The external absorbed gamma dose rates due to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are observed to be 74.6 ± 30.8 nGy h(-1) with a corresponding annual effective dose of 91.5 ± 37.8 µSv y(-1), which are also above the world average. The values of radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are less than the world average. Whereas, the values of the radioactivity level index (I(γ)) and the total gamma dose rate were found to be above the required criterion. PMID:20522563

  14. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  15. Dose rate measurements from radiopharmaceuticals: implications for nuclear medicine staff and for children with radioactive parents.

    PubMed

    Greaves, C D; Tindale, W B

    1999-02-01

    Following the introduction of a number of radiopharmaceuticals, we assessed the dose received by staff working in the nuclear medicine department and also by children who may be in close contact with a radioactive parent. We measured departure dose rates (microSv.h-1) at distances of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from the skin surface at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder of patients undergoing the following nuclear medicine procedures: MUGA scans using 99Tcm-labelled red blood cells, myocardial perfusion scans using 99Tcm-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, lymphoscintigraphy using colloidal 99Tcm (Re) sulphide, bone scans using 99Tcm-labelled oxidronate, 111In-octreotide scans, 111In-labelled leukocyte studies and cardiac reinjection studies using 201Tl. The maximum dose rates at 0.1 m were those from MUGA studies (167.3 microSv.h-1) and myocardial perfusion studies (one-day protocol = 391.7 microSv.h-1, two-day protocol = 121.8 microSv.h-1). The implications of these dose rates on both technical and nursing staff are assessed. Also, the dose received by an infant in close contact with a parent following a nuclear medicine investigation was estimated.

  16. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option.

  17. Natural radioactivity and gamma dose from Sri Lankan clay bricks used in building construction.

    PubMed

    Hewamanna, R; Sumithrarachchi, C S; Mahawatte, P; Nanayakkara, H L; Ratnayake, H C

    2001-02-01

    The specific radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K have been determined by gamma ray spectrometry with an HPGe detector in clay brick samples from kiln sites located in 17 towns. The average values of the measured activities are 35, 72, and 585 Bq kg(-1), respectively, for the above radionuclides. The average estimated radium equivalent concentration is 183 Bq kg(-1) and is comparable with reported values for many countries in the world. This value and the value obtained from the criteria formula suggest that the use of local clay bricks do not pose a radiological hazard. The calculated average absorbed dose rate in air within buildings was found to be 102 nGy h(-1) while the population weighted indoor annual effective dose was 0.20 mSv.

  18. Natural radioactivity and dose estimation in underground water from the Sudety Mountains in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, B; Walencik, A; Dorda, J

    2008-01-01

    Studies of natural radioactivity in spring water in Swieradów-Czerniawa Health Resort were performed with the use of nuclear and mass spectrometry techniques. The investigated region is situated in the Sudety Mountains, where uranium exploration was conducted in the early 1950s of the last century. Annual effective doses due to radionuclide intake were calculated for 4 out of 20 spring waters used for consumption by spa patients and inhabitants. The summed effective doses without 222Rn were of the range 0.4 microSv to 9.2 microSv, for patient for of a 20-day duration stay and from 1.3 microSv y(-1) to 26.7 microSv y(-1) for an inhabitant. The contribution of radon consumed with water raises these values to 209.4 microSv per 20 days and 608.3 microSv y(-1) for a patient and inhabitant, respectively.

  19. The effect of administered dose of lipid-based formulations on the in vitro and in vivo performance of cinnarizine as a model poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathy Wai Yu; Porter, Christopher J H; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-02-01

    The influence of varying the amount of lipid co-administered with the drug on drug solubilisation and absorption is poorly understood. In the current study, the effect of lipid dose on the in vitro drug distribution is compared with the in vivo absorption of cinnarizine (CZ) when formulated using long-chain triacylglyceride (LCT) and medium-chain triacylglycerides (MCT). At a fixed drug-lipid ratio, in the closed in vitro model, the drug concentrations in the aqueous phase increased and decreased for MCT and LCT, respectively, with increasing lipid dose. However, in vivo, the oral bioavailability (F%) of CZ was independent of the quantity of lipid administered for both MCT and LCT, but was higher for LCT (32.1 ± 2.3%) than for MCT (16.6 ± 2.3%). Increasing the quantity of lipid relative to the dose of CZ resulted in an increase in the oral F% when the lipid mass was increased from 125 to 250 mg, but was no greater at 500 mg lipid dose. The results confirm the limitations of the in vitro model but positively indicate that the use of the rat as a pre-clinical model for studying the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs is not compromised by the mass of formulation administered. PMID:23242691

  20. Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gorur, F Korkmaz; Camgoz, H

    2014-10-01

    The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross α and β activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11 mBq L(-1), 169.44 mBq L(-1) for gross α and β in tap water. For all samples the gross β activity is always higher than the gross α activity. All value of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean (210)Po and (228)Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10(-4) or less.

  1. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  2. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-03-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

  3. Collective dose estimates by the marine food pathway from liquid radioactive wastes dumped in the Sea of Japan.

    PubMed

    Togawa, O; Povinec, P P; Pettersson, H B

    1999-09-30

    IAEA-MEL has been engaged in an assessment programme related to radioactive waste dumping by the former USSR and other countries in the western North Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas. This paper focuses on the Sea of Japan and on estimation of collective doses from liquid radioactive wastes. The results from the Japanese-Korean-Russian joint expeditions are summarized, and collective doses for the Japanese population by the marine food pathway are estimated from liquid radioactive wastes dumped in the Sea of Japan and compared with those from global fallout and natural radionuclides. The collective effective dose equivalents by the annual intake of marine products caught in each year show a maximum a few years after the disposals. The total dose from all radionuclides reaches a maximum of 0.8 man Sv in 1990. Approximately 90% of the dose derives from 137Cs, most of which is due to consumption of fish. The total dose from liquid radioactive wastes is approximately 5% of that from global fallout, the contribution of which is below 0.1% of that of natural 210Po.

  4. XG-102 administered to healthy male volunteers as a single intravenous infusion: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study

    PubMed Central

    Deloche, Catherine; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Mouz, Sébastien; Perino, Julien; Abadie, Claire; Combette, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the JNK inhibitor XG-102 in a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, sequential ascending dose parallel group Phase 1 Study. Three groups of male subjects received as randomly assigned ascending single XG-102 doses (10, 40, and 80 μg/kg; 6 subjects per dose) or placebo (2 subjects per dose) as an intravenous (IV) infusion over 60 min. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiography, eye examination, clinical laboratory tests and adverse events (AEs). PK was analyzed using noncompartmental methods. All reported AEs were mild to moderate and neither their number nor their distribution by System Organ Class suggest a dose relationship. Only headache and fatigue were considered probably or possibly study drug related. Headache frequency was similar for active and placebo, consequently this was not considered to be drug related but probably to study conditions. The other examinations did not show clinically relevant deviations or trends suggesting a XG-102 relationship. Geometric mean half-life was similar among doses, ranging from 0.36 to 0.65 h. Geometric mean XG-102 AUC0–last increased more than linearly with dose, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) did not overlap for the two highest doses. Geometric mean dose normalized Cmax values suggest a more than linear increase with dose but 90% CIs overlap. It may be concluded that XG-102 single IV doses of 10–80 μg/kg administered over 1 h to healthy male subjects were safe and well tolerated. PMID:25505576

  5. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe.

  6. The margin of safety of a single application of transdermal fentanyl solution when administered at multiples of the therapeutic dose to laboratory dogs.

    PubMed

    Savides, M C; Pohland, R C; Wilkie, D A; Abbott, J A; Newbound, G C; Freise, K J; Clark, T P

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a single, topical application of a novel, long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution provides analgesic fentanyl concentrations for at least 4 days. The objective of this study was to describe the margin of safety following application at multiples of the therapeutic dose. Twenty-four laboratory dogs were administered a single placebo or 1×, 3×, or 5× multiple of the dose of 2.6 mg/kg (50 μL/kg) to the ventral abdominal skin and observed for 14 days. Plasma fentanyl concentrations increased in proportion to dose. Adverse reactions in the 1× group were transient and included a low prevalence (≤ 33%) of mild sedation, reduced food intake, modest weight loss, and minimal reductions in heart rate and rectal temperature. Moderate to severe sedation emerged in the 3× and 5× groups, which was associated with a dose-limiting reduction in food and water intake, necessitating maintenance fluid replacement for the first 2 days following application. Also observed in the higher-dose groups were an increased prevalence of abnormal stools and transient lens opacities. All abnormal health observations were completely resolved prior to necropsy on day 14, and there were no histological abnormalities identified. These data support the safe use of the 1× dose and describe the outcome of an overdose of up to 5× dose in the absence of opioid reversal.

  7. Residual radioactive contamination from decommissioning: Technical basis for translating contamination levels to annual dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the generic modeling of the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to an individual in a population from a unit concentration of residual radioactive contamination. Radioactive contamination inside buildings and soil contamination are considered. Unit concentration TEDE factors by radionuclide, exposure pathway, and exposure scenario are calculated. Reference radiation exposure scenarios are used to derive unit concentration TEDE factors for about 200 individual radionuclides and parent-daughter mixtures. For buildings, these unit concentration factors list the annual TEDE for volume and surface contamination situations. For soil, annual TEDE factors are presented for unit concentrations of radionuclides in soil during residential use of contaminated land and the TEDE per unit total inventory for potential use of drinking water from a ground-water source. Because of the generic treatment of potentially complex ground-water systems, the annual TEDE factors for drinking water for a given inventory may only indicate when additional site data or modeling sophistication are warranted. Descriptions are provided of the models, exposure pathways, exposure scenarios, parameter values, and assumptions used. An analysis of the potential annual TEDE resulting from reference mixtures of residual radionuclides is provided to demonstrate application of the TEDE factors. 62 refs., 5 figs., 66 tabs.

  8. SIMPLIFIED PRACTICAL TEST METHOD FOR PORTABLE DOSE METERS USING SEVERAL SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES.

    PubMed

    Mikamoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kurosawa, Tadahiro

    2016-09-01

    Sealed radioactive sources which have small activity were employed for the determination of response and tests for non-linearity and energy dependence of detector responses. Close source-to-detector geometry (at 0.3 m or less) was employed to practical tests for portable dose meters to accumulate statistically sufficient ionizing currents. Difference between response in the present experimentally studied field and in the reference field complied with ISO 4037 due to non-uniformity of radiation fluence at close geometry was corrected by use of Monte Carlo simulation. As a consequence, corrected results were consistent with the results obtained in the ISO 4037 reference field within their uncertainties. PMID:27521204

  9. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-10-29

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.

  10. Estimating the intake of abused methamphetamines using experimenter-administered deuterium labeled R-methamphetamine: selection of the R-methamphetamine dose.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghui; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Galloway, Gantt P; Baggott, Matthew J; Everhart, Tom; Mendelson, John

    2010-08-01

    All addictive drugs produce tolerance and addicts compensate by increasing drug exposure. Thus, the quantity of illicit drug ingested is related to the severity of addiction. Unfortunately, there are no objective methods to estimate intake for most addictive drugs. Using experimenter-administered doses of deuterium-labeled R-methamphetamine (R-[-]-MA-d3), we have developed a method to estimate the amount of abused methamphetamine intake in addicts enrolled in clinical trials. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of single oral doses of R-MA in healthy adults to select a dose of R-MA-d3 to be used as a biomarker for estimation the amount of methamphetamine abuse. This was a five-session randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study in eight subjects. Oral R-(-)-MA was dosed at 0 mg, 1 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg; bioavailability was estimated by slow intravenous dosing (30 minutes) of 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 given with the 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA oral dose condition. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures were obtained. No serious adverse events occurred during the study and all doses of R-MA were well tolerated. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed within our oral dose range of 1 to 10 mg. Complete bioavailability and pharmacologic inactivity were found for all oral doses. These characteristics indicate the advantage of using a small oral R-(-)-MA-d3 dose as a biomarker to estimate exposure to abused methamphetamine. Based on these results, 5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 has been selected as the biomarker dose in future studies. Preliminary findings from our study indicate that experimenter-administered oral R-(-)-MA-d3 may allow estimation of abused methamphetamine intake and exposure. Knowledge of the quantity of methamphetamine intake may allow better estimation of disease severity and treatment efficacy. Experience gained from this study also can be applied to the management of other drug dependence problems such as

  11. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  12. A critical review of measures to reduce radioactive doses from drinking water and consumption of freshwater foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Smith, J T; Voitsekhovitch, O V; Håkanson, L; Hilton, J

    2001-01-01

    Following a radioactive fallout event, there are a number of possible intervention measures to reduce radioactive doses to the public via the surface water pathway. We have critically reviewed the options available to decision-makers in the event of radioactive contamination of surface waters. We believe that the most effective and viable measures to reduce radioactivity in drinking water are those which operate at the water treatment and distribution stage. Intervention measures to reduce concentrations of radioactivity in rivers and reservoirs are expected to be much less viable and efficient at reducing doses via the drinking water pathway. Bans on consumption of freshwater fish can be effective, but there are few viable measures to reduce radioactivity in fish prior to the preparation stage. Lake liming and biomanipulation have been found to be ineffective for radiocaesium, although the addition of potassium to lakewaters appears promising in some situations. Lake liming may be effective in reducing radiostrontium in fish, though this has not, to our knowledge, been tested. De-boning fish contaminated by strontium is probably the most effective food preparation measure, but salting and freezing can also reduce radiocaesium concentrations in fish. The provision of accurate information to the public is highlighted as a key element of countermeasure implementation.

  13. Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples from Kestanbol granite area, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Merdanoğlu, B; Altinsoy, N

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations and distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in soils from around the Kestanbol (Canakkale), Turkey were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity and radiological health hazard. Concentrations of radionuclides in the samples were determined by gamma ray spectrometer using HPGe detector. In the soils in general, the concentration of (232)Th was found to be higher than that of the (238)U and the activities of (232)Th and (238)U in this area are higher than the world average. (137)Cs was observed in all the samples, ranging from 0.37 +/- 0.22 to 36.03 +/- 0.54 Bq kg(-1). The mean radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and terrestrial absorbed dose rate for the area under study are 498 Bq kg(-1), 1.4 and 219 nGy h(-1), respectively. The annual effective dose to the public was found to be 269 muSv. The present data were compared with data obtained from different countries.

  14. Measurements of natural radioactivity and the resulting radiation doses from commercial granites.

    PubMed

    Aydarous, A Sh; Zeghib, Sadek; Al-Dughmah, Mohammed

    2010-12-01

    Saudi Arabia is becoming a relatively large market for local and foreign marble and granite use in dwellings. Due to increasing concern about environmental radiological protection, different types of locally widely used granite tiles were collected from different suppliers in the Jeddah province, Saudi Arabia. The analysis for these granite tiles for gamma radiation was conducted by means of a high-resolution HPGe gamma-spectroscopy system. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and 40K in the selected granite samples ranged from 4.9 to 144, 9.7 to 133 and 168 to 1806 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The data were compared with other granite types and building materials used all over the world. The absorbed dose rates, effective dose rates, radium equivalent activities as well as the radiation hazard indices were estimated. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)) are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) set by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (Exposure to radiation from the natural radioactivity in building materials. Report by a Group of Experts of the OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, OECD, Paris, 1979) except in three samples.

  15. Natural radioactivity content in Bulgarian drinking waters and consequent dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kamenova-Totzeva, R M; Kotova, R M; Tenev, J G; Totzev, A V; Badulin, V M

    2015-04-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water from Bulgaria was determined in 994 samples. Nine hundred and seventeen of them are from the Southwestern part of the country. The measured activity of natural uranium, (226)Ra, gross alpha and gross beta activity varied from 20 (5) ng l(-1) to 0.11 (3) mg l(-1), MDA to 0.39 (6) Bq l(-1), MDA to 6.23 (39) Bq l(-1) and 0.030 (7) Bq l(-1) to 0.98 (22) Bq l(-1), respectively. Approximately 33% of the investigated waters exceeded a gross alpha activity of 0.1 Bq l(-1), 1.8% a natural uranium concentration of 0.03 mg l(-1) and 1% an (226)Ra concentration of 0.15 Bq l(-1). Annual effective dose from natural radionuclides ranges from 0.0175 (43) µSv to 95.5 (2.6) µSv. Median values of the contribution of the (226)Ra and uranium to the indicative dose are 10.22 and 0.21 µSv y(-1), respectively. Poor relationships between (226)Ra/nat.U (r, 0.12) and for gross beta activity/natural uranium (nat.U) (r, 0.29) were observed. The relationships between nat.U/gross alpha activity (r, 0.50) and for gross alpha activity/gross beta activity (r, 0.52) concentration distributions were stronger. PMID:25227438

  16. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species. PMID:26352950

  17. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species.

  18. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies.

  19. Natural radioactivity contents in tobacco and radiation dose induced from smoking.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Hany A; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2012-06-01

    One of the causative factors for cancer-inducing mechanisms in humans is radioactive elements present in tobacco leaves used in the manufacture of cigarettes. Smoking of tobacco and its products increases the internal intake and radiation dose due to naturally occurring radionuclides that are considered to be one of the most significant causes of lung cancer. In this work, different commercial types of cigarettes, cigar and moassel were collected from market. Naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra and (214)Bi ((238)U series), (228)Ac and (228)Ra ((232)Th series), (40)K  and man-made (137)Cs were measured in tobacco using gamma-ray spectrometer. Results show that the average concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were 4.564, 3.940 and 1289.53 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This reflects their origin from the soil by root uptake and fertilisers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Concentration of (137)Cs was 0.348 Bq kg(-1) due to root uptake or deposition onto the leaf foliage. For smokers, the annual effective dose due to inhalation of (238)U varied from 49.35 to 139.40 μSv(-1) (average 104.27 μSv y(-1)), while of (232)Th from 23.86 to 111.06 μSv y(-1) (average 65.52 μSv y(-1)). The annual effective dose resulting from (137)Cs was varied from 10.96 to 24.01 nSv y(-1) (average 19.41 nSv y(-1)).

  20. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies. PMID:26897581

  1. Measurement of the natural radioactivity in building materials used in Ankara and assessment of external doses.

    PubMed

    Turhan, S; Baykan, U N; Sen, K

    2008-03-01

    A total of 183 samples of 20 different commonly used structural and covering building materials were collected from housing and other building construction sites and from suppliers in Ankara to measure the natural radioactivity due to the presence of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectrometry with two HPGe detectors. The specific activities of the different building materials studied varied from 0.5 +/- 0.1 to 144.9 +/- 4.9 Bq kg(-1), 0.6 +/- 0.2 to 169.9 +/- 6.6 Bq kg(-1) and 2.0 +/- 0.1 to 1792.3 +/- 60.8 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The results show that the lowest mean values of the specific activity of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 0.8 +/- 0.5, 0.9 +/- 0.4 and 4.1 +/- 1.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively, measured in travertine tile while the highest mean values of the specific activity of the same radionuclides are 78.5 +/- 18.1 (ceramic wall tile), 77.4 +/- 53.0 (granite tile) and 923.4 +/- 161.0 (white brick), respectively. The radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the gamma-index, the indoor absorbed dose rate and the corresponding annual effective dose were evaluated to assess the potential radiological hazard associated with these building materials. The mean values of the gamma-index and the estimated annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation inside the room for structural building materials ranged from 0.15 to 0.89 and 0.2 to 1.1 mSv, respectively. Applying criteria recently recommended for building materials in the literature, four materials meet the exemption annual dose criterion of 0.3 mSv, five materials meet the annual dose limit of 1 mSv and only one material slightly exceeds this limit. The mean values of the gamma-index for all building materials were lower than the upper limit of 1. PMID:18309197

  2. Measurement of the natural radioactivity in building materials used in Ankara and assessment of external doses.

    PubMed

    Turhan, S; Baykan, U N; Sen, K

    2008-03-01

    A total of 183 samples of 20 different commonly used structural and covering building materials were collected from housing and other building construction sites and from suppliers in Ankara to measure the natural radioactivity due to the presence of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectrometry with two HPGe detectors. The specific activities of the different building materials studied varied from 0.5 +/- 0.1 to 144.9 +/- 4.9 Bq kg(-1), 0.6 +/- 0.2 to 169.9 +/- 6.6 Bq kg(-1) and 2.0 +/- 0.1 to 1792.3 +/- 60.8 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The results show that the lowest mean values of the specific activity of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 0.8 +/- 0.5, 0.9 +/- 0.4 and 4.1 +/- 1.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively, measured in travertine tile while the highest mean values of the specific activity of the same radionuclides are 78.5 +/- 18.1 (ceramic wall tile), 77.4 +/- 53.0 (granite tile) and 923.4 +/- 161.0 (white brick), respectively. The radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the gamma-index, the indoor absorbed dose rate and the corresponding annual effective dose were evaluated to assess the potential radiological hazard associated with these building materials. The mean values of the gamma-index and the estimated annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation inside the room for structural building materials ranged from 0.15 to 0.89 and 0.2 to 1.1 mSv, respectively. Applying criteria recently recommended for building materials in the literature, four materials meet the exemption annual dose criterion of 0.3 mSv, five materials meet the annual dose limit of 1 mSv and only one material slightly exceeds this limit. The mean values of the gamma-index for all building materials were lower than the upper limit of 1.

  3. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  4. Measurements of radioactivity and dose assessments in some building materials in Bitlis, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kayakökü, Halime; Karatepe, Şule; Doğru, Mahmut

    2016-09-01

    In this study, samples of perlite, pumice and Ahlat stones (Ignimbrite) extracted from mines in Bitlis and samples of other building materials produced in facilities in Bitlis were collected and analyzed. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of building materials were measured using NaI detector (NaI(Tl)) with an efficiency of 24%. The radon measurements of building material samples were determined using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radioactivity concentrations ranged from (29.6±5.9 to 228.2±38.1Bq/kg), (10.8±5.4 to 95.5±26.1Bq/kg) and (249.3±124.7 to 2580.1±266.9Bq/kg), respectively. Radon concentration, radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate, excess lifetime cancer risk and the values of hazard indices were calculated for the measured samples to assess the radiation hazards arising from using those materials in the construction of dwellings. Radon concentration ranged between 89.2±12.0Bq/m(3) and 1141.0±225.0Bq/m(3). It was determined that Raeq values of samples conformed to world standards except for perlite and single samples of brick and Ahlat stone. Calculated values of absorbed dose rate ranged from 81.3±20.5 to 420.6±42.8nGy/h. ELCR values ranged from (1.8±0.3)×10(-3) to (9.0±1.0)×10(-3). All samples had ELCR values higher than the world average. The values of Hin and Hex varied from 0.35±0.11 to 1.78±0.18 and from 0.37±0.09 to 1.17±0.13, respectively. The results were compared with standard radioactivity values determined by international organizations and with similar studies. There would be a radiation risk for people living in buildings made of perlite, Ahlat-1 and Brick-3.

  5. Measurements of radioactivity and dose assessments in some building materials in Bitlis, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kayakökü, Halime; Karatepe, Şule; Doğru, Mahmut

    2016-09-01

    In this study, samples of perlite, pumice and Ahlat stones (Ignimbrite) extracted from mines in Bitlis and samples of other building materials produced in facilities in Bitlis were collected and analyzed. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of building materials were measured using NaI detector (NaI(Tl)) with an efficiency of 24%. The radon measurements of building material samples were determined using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radioactivity concentrations ranged from (29.6±5.9 to 228.2±38.1Bq/kg), (10.8±5.4 to 95.5±26.1Bq/kg) and (249.3±124.7 to 2580.1±266.9Bq/kg), respectively. Radon concentration, radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate, excess lifetime cancer risk and the values of hazard indices were calculated for the measured samples to assess the radiation hazards arising from using those materials in the construction of dwellings. Radon concentration ranged between 89.2±12.0Bq/m(3) and 1141.0±225.0Bq/m(3). It was determined that Raeq values of samples conformed to world standards except for perlite and single samples of brick and Ahlat stone. Calculated values of absorbed dose rate ranged from 81.3±20.5 to 420.6±42.8nGy/h. ELCR values ranged from (1.8±0.3)×10(-3) to (9.0±1.0)×10(-3). All samples had ELCR values higher than the world average. The values of Hin and Hex varied from 0.35±0.11 to 1.78±0.18 and from 0.37±0.09 to 1.17±0.13, respectively. The results were compared with standard radioactivity values determined by international organizations and with similar studies. There would be a radiation risk for people living in buildings made of perlite, Ahlat-1 and Brick-3. PMID:27389882

  6. Hypocholesterolaemic effect of rat-administered oral doses of the isolated 7S globulins from cowpeas and adzuki beans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ederlan S; Amaral, Ana Lucia S; Demonte, Aureluce; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Capraro, Jessica; Duranti, Marcello; Neves, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The role of seed proteins, especially soyabean 7S globulins, in controlling dyslipidaemia is widely acknowledged. Amino acid sequence homology among the proteins of this family could reflect similar biological functions in other species. The aim of the present study was to unveil a hypolipidaemic effect of the 7S globulins from cowpeas (7S-C) and adzuki beans (7S-A), administered orally to rats fed a hypercholesterolaemic (HC; high cholesterol and TAG) diet for 28 d. A total of forty-five rats were divided into five groups (nine rats per group): (1) standard (STD) diet; (2) HC diet; (3) HC diet + 7S-C (300 mg/kg per d); (4) HC diet + 7S-A (300 mg/kg per d); and (5) HC diet + simvastatin (SVT; 50 mg/kg per d), as a control. Significant decreases in food intake and final body weight of rats receiving HC + 7S-C and HC + 7S-A diets compared with groups fed the HC and STD diets were observed. Significant decreases in serum total and non-HDL-cholesterol of 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups were also observed. HDL-cholesterol levels increased in the 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups, while hepatic cholesterol and TAG concentrations were significantly lower than in the HC diet group for the 7S-C-supplemented group only. Faecal excretions of fat and cholesterol in HC diet groups were considerably higher in animals consuming the 7S globulins. The results show that cowpea and adzuki bean 7S globulins promote cholesterol-decreasing effects in hypercholesterolaemic rats even at low dosages, as already observed for other legume seed storage proteins of this family. This main effect is discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26090103

  7. Thyroid carcinoma after radioiodide therapy for hyperthyroidism. Analysis based on age, latency, and administered dose of I-/sup 131/

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, R.P.; Chapman, C.N.; Rao, H.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-five reports in the medical literature of thyroid carcinomas which were detected after radioiodide therapy for hyperthyroidism were reviewed. These cases did not show a usual characteristic of radiation-associated tumors, namely a long latency period. That is, in 8/25 the latency period was under five years, and the mean latency was only 7.3 years. Further, there was no relationship between latency and age at treatment, or between latency and the dose of radioiodide employed. In 15/25 of the cases, there were known thyroid nodules. Three of the patients had thyroiditis (which itself has a correlation with thyroid carcinoma), and one individual had prior head and neck external radiation. There was no substantiating evidence that radioiodide treatment for hyperthyroidism was the cause of these thyroid carcinomas.

  8. The effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or combined, on the dose and quality of anaesthetic induction with alfaxalone in goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T Brighton; Zeiler, Gareth E; Dzikiti, Loveness N; Garcia, Eva R

    2014-01-01

    Goats are rarely anaesthetised; consequently, scant information is available on the efficacy of anaesthetic drugs in this species. Alfaxalone is a relatively new anaesthetic agent, of which the efficacy in goats has not yet been studied. In this study, the sedative and alfaxalone sparing effects of midazolam and butorphanol, administered alone or concomitantly, in goats were assessed. Eight clinically healthy goats, four does and four wethers, were enlisted in a randomised crossover manner to receive intramuscular sedative treatments consisting of saline 0.05 mL/kg, or midazolam 0.30 mg/kg, or butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg, or a combination of midazolam 0.30 mg/kg with butorphanol 0.10 mg/kg before intravenous induction of general anaesthesia with alfaxalone. Following induction, the goats were immediately intubated and the quality of anaesthesia and basic physiological cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were assessed until the goats had recovered from anaesthesia. The degree of sedation, quality of induction and recovery were scored. When compared with saline (3.00 mg/kg), midazolam,administered alone or with butorphanol, caused a statistically significant increased level of sedation and a reduction in the amount of alfaxalone required for induction (2.00 mg/kg and 1.70 mg/kg, respectively). Butorphanol alone (2.30 mg/kg) did not cause significant changes in level of sedation or alfaxalone-induction dose. During induction and recovery, the goats were calm following all treatments, including the control group. Cardiorespiratory and blood-gas parameters were maintained within clinically acceptable limits. The present study showed that midazolam, administered alone or combined with butorphanol, produces a degree of sedation that significantly reduces the dose of alfaxalone required for induction of general anaesthesia in goats, without causing any major adverse cardiorespiratory effects. PMID:25686277

  9. A kinematic model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive isotopes in the human body for radiological protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure becomes a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplified the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed an exact model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that the above method accord too much with the actual mechanism of metabolism in human bodies, it becomes rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional hydrological tank model. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of this method is to estimate the energy radiated from the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of E. Fermi of beta decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this study are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no intentional and operational parameters of coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to observation of ICRP. Figure.1 compares time

  10. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  11. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modeling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modeling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rates above flat, undisturbed fields in Fukushima Prefecture are consistent with decrement by radioactive decay and downward migration of cesium into soil. Analysis of remediation strategies for farmland soils confirmed that topsoil removal and interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer result in similar reductions in the air dose rate. These two strategies are more effective than reverse tillage to invert and mix the topsoil.

  12. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modeling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modeling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rates above flat, undisturbed fields in Fukushima Prefecture are consistent with decrement by radioactive decay and downward migration of cesium into soil. Analysis of remediation strategies for farmland soils confirmed that topsoil removal and interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer result in similar reductions in the air dose rate. These two strategies are more effective than reverse tillage to invert and mix the topsoil. PMID:26408835

  13. Neoadjuvant Sequential Docetaxel Followed by High-Dose Epirubicin in Combination With Cyclophosphamide Administered Concurrently With Trastuzumab. The DECT Trial.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, Laura; Barba, Maddalena; Giannarelli, Diana; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Marchetti, Paolo; Anzà, Michele; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Natoli, Clara; Di Filippo, Simona; Catenaro, Teresa; Tomao, Federica; Amodio, Antonella; Carpano, Silvia; Perracchio, Letizia; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Anna; Giordano, Antonio; Vici, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    To report the results of the DECT trial, a phase II study of locally advanced or operable HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) treated with taxanes and concurrent anthracyclines and trastuzumab. Eligible patients (stage IIA-IIIB HER2-positive BC, 18-75 years, normal organ functions, ECOG ≤1, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥55%) received four cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel, 100 mg/m(2) intravenously, plus trastuzumab 6 mg/kg (loading dose 8 mg/kg) every 3 weeks, followed by four 3-weekly cycles of epirubicin 120 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m(2) , plus trastuzumab. Primary objective was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, defined as ypT0/is ypN0 at definitive surgery. We enrolled 45 consecutive patients. All but six patients (13.3%) completed chemotherapy and all underwent surgery. pCR was observed in 28 patients (62.2%) overall and in 6 (66.7%) from the inflammatory subgroup. The classification and regression tree analysis showed a 100% pCR rate in patients with BMI ≥25 and with hormone negative disease. The median follow up was 46 months (8-78). Four-year recurrence-free survival was 74.7% (95%CI, 58.2-91.2). Seven patients (15.6%) recurred and one died. Treatment was well tolerated, with limiting toxicity being neutropenia. No clinical cardiotoxicity was observed. Six patients (13.4%) showed a transient LVEF decrease (<10%). In one patient we observed a ≥10% asymptomatic LVEF decrease persisting after surgery. Notwithstanding their limited applicability due to the current guidelines, our findings support the efficacy of the regimen of interest in the neoadjuvant setting along with a fairly acceptable toxicity profile, including cardiotoxicity. Results on BMI may invite further assessment in future studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2541-2547, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Neoadjuvant Sequential Docetaxel Followed by High-Dose Epirubicin in Combination With Cyclophosphamide Administered Concurrently With Trastuzumab. The DECT Trial.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, Laura; Barba, Maddalena; Giannarelli, Diana; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Marchetti, Paolo; Anzà, Michele; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Natoli, Clara; Di Filippo, Simona; Catenaro, Teresa; Tomao, Federica; Amodio, Antonella; Carpano, Silvia; Perracchio, Letizia; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Anna; Giordano, Antonio; Vici, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    To report the results of the DECT trial, a phase II study of locally advanced or operable HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) treated with taxanes and concurrent anthracyclines and trastuzumab. Eligible patients (stage IIA-IIIB HER2-positive BC, 18-75 years, normal organ functions, ECOG ≤1, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥55%) received four cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel, 100 mg/m(2) intravenously, plus trastuzumab 6 mg/kg (loading dose 8 mg/kg) every 3 weeks, followed by four 3-weekly cycles of epirubicin 120 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m(2) , plus trastuzumab. Primary objective was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, defined as ypT0/is ypN0 at definitive surgery. We enrolled 45 consecutive patients. All but six patients (13.3%) completed chemotherapy and all underwent surgery. pCR was observed in 28 patients (62.2%) overall and in 6 (66.7%) from the inflammatory subgroup. The classification and regression tree analysis showed a 100% pCR rate in patients with BMI ≥25 and with hormone negative disease. The median follow up was 46 months (8-78). Four-year recurrence-free survival was 74.7% (95%CI, 58.2-91.2). Seven patients (15.6%) recurred and one died. Treatment was well tolerated, with limiting toxicity being neutropenia. No clinical cardiotoxicity was observed. Six patients (13.4%) showed a transient LVEF decrease (<10%). In one patient we observed a ≥10% asymptomatic LVEF decrease persisting after surgery. Notwithstanding their limited applicability due to the current guidelines, our findings support the efficacy of the regimen of interest in the neoadjuvant setting along with a fairly acceptable toxicity profile, including cardiotoxicity. Results on BMI may invite further assessment in future studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2541-2547, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187274

  15. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  16. The effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle 3.5 days after ovulation on luteal function, morphology, and follicular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Arango, J; García-Roselló, E; García-Muñoz, A; Valldecabres-Torres, X; Martínez-Ros, P; González-Bulnes, A

    2011-12-01

    A single treatment with PGF2α is assumed to have no luteolytic effect on cows with corpora lutea < 5 days old. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle on the morphology and function of the early CL. The study followed a crossover design with a treatment cycle in which 50 mg of dinoprost were administered 3.5 days postovulation and a control untreated cycle. Ultrasound examination and blood samples were performed during the two consecutive cycles. Corpus luteum (CL) diameter, progesterone concentration, and follicular dynamics characteristics were compared between control and treated cycles. Two of nine cows (22%) developed full luteolysis. The remaining seven cows (78%) had partial luteolysis with a decrease (P < 0.05) in progesterone concentration and CL diameter for two and 12 days post-treatment, respectively. The interovulatory interval of treated cycles (19.7 ± 2.4 days) was not different (P > 0.05) from that of controls (23.8 ± 0.9 days). The transient reduction in progesterone of cows with partial luteolysis had no effect on the proportion of cows with two or three follicular waves, follicle growth rate, or preovulatory diameter (P > 0.05). Two cows developed ovarian cystic degeneration during the PGF2α-induced cycle. In conclusion, the treatment of cows with a high dose of PGF2α 3.5 days postovulation induced some degree of luteolysis in all treated cows. This resulted in partial luteolysis in 78% of treated animals and in full luteolysis in the remaining 22%.

  17. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab′)2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition. PMID:27380003

  18. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants.

  19. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants. PMID:24684601

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of two doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine or one dose of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine, both administered concomitantly with routine immunization to 12- to 18-month-old children

    PubMed Central

    Noya, Francisco; McCormack, Deirdre; Reynolds, Donna L; Neame, Dion; Oster, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the immunogenicity and safety of a two-dose series of a quadrivalent meningococcal (serogroups A, C, Y and W) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACYW-D) administered to toddlers. METHODS: Children were randomly assigned (1:1) at study entry to receive MenACYW-D at 12 and 18 months of age (group 1; n=61) or meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MCC) at 12 months of age (group 2; n=62). All received routine childhood immunizations. A, C, Y and W antibody titres were measured in group 1 before and one month after the 18-month MenACYW-D vaccination and were measured in group 2 at one and seven months post-MCC vaccination. Antibodies elicited by diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed combined with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine coadministered at the 18-month vaccination were measured one month later. Safety data were collected. RESULTS: At 19 months of age, ≥96% in group 1 achieved protective titres for the four meningococcal serogroups after dose 2; 67% in group 2 exhibited protective titres against serogroup C 28 days after MCC vaccination at 12 months of age, declining to 27% seven months later. DTaP-IPV-Hib elicited high antibody concentrations/titres in groups 1 and 2, consistent with historical values. The safety profiles after each dose generated no unexpected safety signals; no serious adverse events were related to vaccination. DISCUSSION: A two-dose series of MenACYW-D given concomitantly with a DTaP-IPV-Hib booster dose at 18 months of age demonstrated a good immunogenicity and safety profile. A two-dose series of MenACYW-D can be used as an alternative to one dose of MCC and provides protection against additional serogroups (NCT ID: NCT01359449). PMID:25285126

  1. Effect of sodium arsenite dose administered in the drinking water on the urinary bladder epithelium of female arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yokohira, Masanao; Arnold, Lora L; Pennington, Karen L; Suzuki, Shugo; Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Thomas, David J; Cohen, Samuel M

    2011-06-01

    The enzyme arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes reactions converting inorganic arsenic to methylated metabolites, some of which are highly cytotoxic. In a previous study, female As3mt knockout (KO) mice treated with diet containing 100 or 150 ppm arsenic as arsenite showed systemic toxicity and significant effects on the urothelium. In the present study, we showed that the cytotoxic and proliferative effects of arsenite administration on the urothelium are dose dependent. Female wild-type C57BL/6 mice and As3mt KO mice were divided into five groups (n = 7) with free access to drinking water containing 0, 1, 10, 25, or 50 ppm arsenic as arsenite for 4 weeks. At sacrifice, urinary bladders of both As3mt KO and wild-type mice showed hyperplasia by light microscopy; however, the hyperplasia was more severe in the As3mt KO mice. Intracytoplasmic granules were detected in the urothelium of As3mt KO and wild-type mice at arsenic doses ≥ 10 ppm but were more numerous, more extensive, and larger in the KO mice. A no effect level for urothelial effects was identified at 1 ppm arsenic in the wild-type and As3mt KO mice. In As3mt KO mice, livers showed mild acute inflammation and kidneys showed hydronephrosis. The present study shows a dose-response for the effects of orally administered arsenite on the bladder urothelium of wild-type and As3mt KO mice, with greater effects in the KO strain but with a no effect level of 1 ppm for both.

  2. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Katherine A.; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, noninvasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50 mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat. PMID:23500335

  3. Comparison of concentrations of two doses of clavulanic acid (200 and 400 milligrams) administered with amoxicillin (2,000 milligrams) in tissues of patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Mallet, M N; Sastre, B; Viviand, X; Martin, A; De Micco, P; Gouin, F

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin were determined in sera and different abdominal tissues of 17 patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. At the time of induction of anesthesia, patients in group 1 were given 200 mg of clavulanic acid with 2,000 mg of amoxicillin and patients in group 2 received 400 mg of clavulanic acid with 2,000 mg of amoxicillin. In both groups, the initial dose was administered again after 2 h. Blood samples were collected to determine peak and trough antibiotic levels. Serial blood samples were also collected at predetermined periods (opening and closure of the abdominal cavity and surgical anastomosis). Abdominal wall fat, epiploic fat, and colonic wall tissue samples were collected simultaneously. Antibiotic concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increasing the dose of clavulanic acid to 400 mg resulted in significantly higher peak and trough levels in serum (P < 0.03). Following the injection of 400 mg, mean concentrations of clavulanic acid in the fatty tissues were significantly increased at the time of opening (P < 0.02). The concentrations of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin in fatty tissues were 17 to 52% and 12 to 23% of the levels in sera, respectively. In the colonic wall, the concentrations of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin were 52 to 63% and 49 and 27% of the levels in sera, respectively. In sera, clavulanic acid given at a dose of 200 or 400 mg reached or exceeded the concentrations found to be effective in vitro to reduce the MICs of amoxicillin from the resistant to the susceptible category for 90% of the potential pathogens. In most of the tissues investigated, increased the dose of clavulanic acid to 400 mg resulted in a significantly higher number of samples with concentrations found to be effective in vitro (72 versus 11%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, increasing the dose of clavulanic acid to 400 mg resulted in

  4. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  5. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: Biological doses and treatment efficiency for vascularized tumors with or without a central hypoxic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Michiels, C.; and others

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Radioactive atoms attached to monoclonal antibodies are used in radioimmunotherapy to treat cancer while limiting radiation to healthy tissues. One limitation of this method is that only one radioactive atom is linked to each antibody and the deposited dose is often insufficient to eradicate solid and radioresistant tumors. In a previous study, simulations with the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code showed that physical doses up to 50 Gy can be delivered inside tumors by replacing the single radionuclide by a radioactive nanoparticle of 5 nm diameter containing hundreds of radioactive atoms. However, tumoral and normal tissues are not equally sensitive to radiation, and previous works did not take account the biological effects such as cellular repair processes or the presence of less radiosensitive cells such as hypoxic cells. Methods: The idea is to adapt the linear-quadratic expression to the tumor model and to determine biological effective doses (BEDs) delivered through and around a tumor. This BED is then incorporated into a Poisson formula to determine the shell control probability (SCP) which predicts the cell cluster-killing efficiency at different distances ''r'' from the center of the tumor. BED and SCP models are used to analyze the advantages of injecting radioactive nanoparticles instead of a single radionuclide per vector in radioimmunotherapy. Results: Calculations of BED and SCP for different distances r from the center of a solid tumor, using the non-small-cell lung cancer as an example, were investigated for {sup 90}Y{sub 2} O{sub 3} nanoparticles. With a total activity of about 3.5 and 20 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, results show that a very high BED is deposited in the well oxygenated part of the spherical carcinoma. Conclusions: For either small or large solid tumors, BED and SCP calculations highlight the important benefit in replacing the single {beta}-emitter {sup 90}Y attached to each antibody by a {sup

  6. Hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability of insulin-loaded liposomes containing bile salts in rats: the effect of cholate type, particle size and administered dose.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mengmeng; Lu, Yi; Hovgaard, Lars; Guan, Peipei; Tan, Yanan; Lian, Ruyue; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Oral delivery of protein or polypeptide drugs remains a challenge due to gastric and enzymatic degradation as well as poor permeation across the intestinal epithelia. In this study, liposomes containing bile salts were developed as a new oral insulin delivery system. The primary goal was to investigate the effect of cholate type, particle size and dosage of the liposomes on the hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability. Liposomes containing sodium glycocholate (SGC), sodium taurocholate (STC) or sodium deoxycholate (SDC) were prepared by a reversed-phase evaporation method. After oral administration, all liposomes elicited a certain degree of hypoglycemic effect in parallel with an increase in blood insulin level. The highest oral bioavailability of approximately 8.5% and 11.0% could be observed with subcutaneous insulin as reference for SGC-liposomes in non-diabetic and diabetic rats, respectively. Insulin-loaded liposomes showed slower and sustained action over a period of over 20 h with peak time around 8-12h. SGC-liposomes showed higher oral bioavailability than liposomes containing STC or SDC and conventional liposomes. The hypoglycemic effect was size-dependent with the highest at 150 nm or 400 nm and was proportionally correlated to the administered dose. The results supported the hypothesis of insulin absorption as intact liposomes.

  7. ISCORS ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVITY IN SEWAGE SLUDGE: MODELING TO ASSESS RADIATION DOSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tran...

  8. Radioactive labeling of proteins in cultured postimplantation mouse embryos. II. Dose and time dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Klose, J. )

    1989-07-01

    The conditions for optimum incorporation of radioactive amino acids into proteins of cultured postimplantation mouse embryos were investigated under the aspect of using these proteins for two-dimensional electrophoretic separations and fluorography. The aim was to obtain highly radioactively labeled proteins under conditions as physiological as possible. Mouse embryos of Days 8, 10, and 11 of gestation were cultured in Tyrode's solution. Incubation time and concentration of ({sup 3}H (or {sup 14}C))amino acids in the culture medium were varied over a broad range. Embryos were prepared with placenta and yolk sac or without any embryonic envelopes. After culturing, the physiologic-morphologic state of the embryos was registered on the basis of several criteria. The radioactivity taken up by the total protein of each embryo was determined and calculated in disintegrations per minute per milligram protein per embryo. To approach our aim, embryos of different developmental stages had to be cultured under different conditions. A good compromise for Day-8, Day-10, and Day-11 embryos was: embryos prepared with yolk sac (opened) and placenta, 150 microCi radioactive amino acids added per milliliter medium, incubation for 4 to 5 h. For maximum labeling of proteins it is advisable to culture Day-10 embryos without embryonic envelopes under particular conditions.

  9. Serum thyroxine concentrations following fixed-dose radioactive iodine treatment in hyperthyroid cats: 62 cases (1986-1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, S.M.; Rubin, S.I. )

    1990-09-01

    The medical records of 62 hyperthyroid cats treated with a fixed dose of 4 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) were reviewed. In 60 cats, serum thyroxine concentrations were determined after treatment, allowing evaluation of treatment success. Eighty-four percent of the cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations after treatment. Five of the 60 cats (8%) remained hyperthyroxinemic after treatment. Five cats (8%) were hypothyroxinemic when evaluated within 60 days of treatment. Three of these cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations 6 months after treatment, and none had clinical signs of hypothyroidism. The administration of a fixed dose of 4 mCi of 131I was determined to be an effective treatment for feline hyperthyroidism.

  10. NTP toxicity report of reproductive dose range-finding study of Genistein (CAS No. 446-72-0) administered in feed to Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Delclos, K B; Newbold, Retha

    2007-11-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone that interacts with estrogen receptors and multiple other molecular targets. Human exposure to genistein is predominantly through consumption of soy products, including soy-based infant formula and dietary supplements. A series of short-term studies with genistein was conducted with two goals: 1) to obtain data necessary to establish dose levels for subsequent multigeneration reproductive and chronic toxicity studies and 2) to evaluate the effects of genistein on endpoints outside the reproductive tract. The data generated from these studies have been reported previously in the peer-reviewed literature or in technical reports (Appendix C). In addition, selected data from these studies were analyzed and discussed in the National Toxicology Program's Report of the Endocrine Disruptors Low-Dose Peer Review (NTP, 2001). The present report focuses on the reproductive and general toxicology endpoints evaluated. Data obtained in separate evaluations of behavioral, neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and immunological endpoints, as well as the assessment of serum genistein levels, are also discussed to put in better perspective the selection of doses for the multigenerational and chronic studies. Genistein was administered in an irradiated soy- and alfalfa-free diet (Purina 5K96) at exposure concentrations of 0, 5, 25, 100, 250, 625, or 1,250 ppm to 10 vaginal plug-positive, female Sprague-Dawley rats starting on gestation day 7 and continuing throughout pregnancy. These dietary exposure concentrations resulted in ingested doses of approximately 0.3, 1.7, 6.4, 16, 38, and 72 mg genistein/kg body weight to dams in the 5, 25, 100, 250, 625, and 1,250 ppm groups, respectively. Dietary exposure of the dams continued through lactation, during which time ingested doses were approximately 0.6, 3.5, 14, 37, 84, and 167 mg/kg per day. Pups from five litters, culled to eight per litter with an equal sex distribution on postnatal day (PND) 2

  11. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commericial power reactors operating during 1985. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 61 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 73 person-rem to a low of 0.011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 200 person-rem for the 110 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  12. Population Dose Commitments Due to Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plant Sites in 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. A.

    1980-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1977. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ, Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 220 person-rem to a low of 0.003 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 16 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 700 person-rem for the 92 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10{sup -5} mrem to a high of 0.1 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  13. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear-power-plant sites in 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Peloquin, R.A.; Schwab, J.D.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1978. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 200 person-rem to a low of 0.0004 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 14 person-rem. The total population dose for allsites was estimated at 660 person-rem for the 93 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 3 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.08 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  14. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1984. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 56 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 110 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 5 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 280 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.04 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  15. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from Nuclear-Power-Plant Sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1979. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 1300 person-rem to a low of 0.0002 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 38 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 1800 person-rem for the 94 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 2 x 10/sup -6/ mrem to a high of 0.7 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  16. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1982. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1982. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 51 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 30 person-rem to a low of 0.007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 130 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk. The average individual dose commitment from all pathways on a site basis ranged from a low of 6 x 10/sup -7/ mrem to a high of 0.06 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites.

  17. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1987. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 70 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for reach of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mrem to a high of 0.009 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year). 2 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1986. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 66 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 31 person-rem to a low of 0.0007 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.7 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 110 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 2 {times} 10{sup -6} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. 12 refs.

  19. Comparing radiation dose rates in soils and riverine sediment to track the dispersion of radioactive contamination in Fukushima coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident that occurred in March 2011 led to the formation of a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume on soils located up to 70 km to the northwest of the damaged site. Forests and paddy fields are the dominant land uses in this mountainous region drained to the Pacific Ocean by several rivers that flow across densely inhabited coastal plains. It is then crucial to track the dispersion of radioactive material conveyed by those rivers to estimate the continental supply of radionuclides to the Ocean and to assess redistribution of radioactive sediment in those catchments. Radiations emitted by this contaminated material may indeed lead to an external exposure threat for local populations. As river discharge and sediment concentration data were not available during the first two years that followed the accident, alternative methods had to be developed to track this dispersion. We therefore organized field campaigns every six months and conducted local ground dose rate measurements to estimate whether fresh sediment drape deposits were more or less contaminated compared to local soils. Overall, our results showed that, in those regions exposed to violent typhoons and spring snowmelt, transfers of sediment are massive and episodic, and that they followed a seasonal cycle in 2011-2012. Then, in May 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. This could have indicated a drying-up of the upstream sources of contamination. However, after the violent typhoons that occurred during summer in 2013, dose rates measured in fresh sediment deposits in November 2013 increased again systematically across the region. We thereby suggest that remobilization of contaminated sediment by typhoons and their storage in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the

  20. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1992. Volume 14

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1992. Fifty-year dose commitments for a 1-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager, and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses, which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I, design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 3.7 person-rem to a low of 0.0015 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 0.66 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 47 person-rem for the 130-million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the 10 CFR 50, Appendix I, design objectives.

  1. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  2. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1980. In addition doses derived from the shutdown reactors at the Three Mile Island site were included. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways ranged from a high of 40 person-rem to a low of 0.02 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 4 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 180 person-rem for the 96 million people considered at risk.

  3. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1991. Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1995-04-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1991. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1 design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 22 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 88 person-rem for the 130 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix 1 design objectives.

  4. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Population and individual radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1989. Fifty-year dose commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 72 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is an estimate of individual doses which are compared with 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I design objectives. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 14 person-rem to a low of 0.005 person-rem for the sites with plants in operation and producing power during the year. The arithmetic mean was 1.2 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 84 person-rem for the 140 million people considered at risk. The individual dose commitments estimated for all sites were below the Appendix I design objectives.

  5. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

  6. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1988. Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1988. Fifty-year commitments for a one-year exposure from both liquid and atmospheric releases were calculated for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 71 reactor sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both water and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total collective dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 16 person-rem to a low of 0.0011 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 1.1 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 75 person-rem for the 150 million people considered at risk. The site average individual dose commitment from all pathways ranged from a low of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mrem to a high of 0.02 mrem. No attempt was made in this study to determine the maximum dose commitment received by any one individual from the radionuclides released at any of the sites. However, licensee calculation of doses to the maximally exposed individual at some sites indicated values of up to approximately 100 times average individual doses (on the order of a few millirem per year).

  7. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular tumors was investigated with histological, histochemical, and morphometrical methods in male Sprague-Dawley rats continuously administered N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) or N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM) in the drinking water at low doses (0.5 mg DEN/100 ml; 1 mg NNM/100 ml). Groups of control, DEN-, and NNM-treated rats were investigated at 5-week intervals. Similar results were obtained in DEN- and NNM-treated rats. Two types of areas composed of basophilic or glycogenotic hepatocytes were observed preceding the appearance of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas. Besides their cytologic differences, the basophilic and glycogenotic areas induced displayed distinct histochemical features. Both types of areas were detected simultaneously and increased in parallel with time to a similar incidence, but basophilic areas reached larger sizes than the glycogenotic ones. Furthermore, each type of area, which clustered around and along efferent veins, was differently linked to tumorigenesis. Basophilic areas frequently developed into basophilic adenomas and trabecular carcinomas through a characteristic sequence. Early basophilic areas consisted of hepatocytes with lamellar cytoplasmic hyperbasophilia and exhibited the normal laminar liver structure. With time, an increasing number of basophilic areas also contained hepatocytes with powdered diffuse hyperbasophilia, which frequently were arranged in thick trabeculae, showed abundant mitotic figures, and invaded efferent veins. Neither such signs of malignancy nor conversion into basophilic areas or tumors could be established for areas of clear and acidophilic glycogenotic hepatocytes. However, a few small glycogenotic adenomas probably developed from glycogenotic areas. Our data thus underline the central role of basophilic areas for hepatocarcinogenesis. Moreover, taking into account the data from other experiments, it seems likely that although glycogenotic areas may be associated with the

  8. MAXINE: An improved methodology for estimating maximum individual dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-02-01

    An EXCEL{reg_sign} spreadsheet has been developed that, when combined with the PC version of XOQDOQ, will generate estimates of maximum individual dose from routine atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The spreadsheet, MAXINE, utilizes a variety of atmospheric dispersion factors to calculate radiation dose as recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Regulatory Guide 1.109 [USNRC 1977a]. The methodology suggested herein includes use of both the MAXINE spreadsheet and the PC version of XOQDOQ.

  9. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1983. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teen-ager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each of 52 sites. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each of the sites is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitments (from both liquid and airborne pathways) for each site ranged from a high of 45 person-rem to a low of 0.002 person-rem for the sites with plants operating throughout the year with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 170 person-rem for the 100 million people considered at risk.

  10. Population dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites in 1981. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Population radiation dose commitments have been estimated from reported radionuclide releases from commercial power reactors operating during 1981. Fifty-year dose commitments from a one-year exposure were calculated from both liquid and atmospheric releases for four population groups (infant, child, teenager and adult) residing between 2 and 80 km from each site. This report tabulates the results of these calculations, showing the dose commitments for both liquid and airborne pathways for each age group and organ. Also included for each site is a histogram showing the fraction of the total population within 2 to 80 km around each site receiving various average dose commitments from the airborne pathways. The total dose commitment from both liquid and airborne pathways from 48 sites ranged from a high of 20 person-rem to a low of 0.008 person-rem with an arithmetic mean of 3 person-rem. The total population dose for all sites was estimated at 160 person-rem for the 98 million people considered at risk.

  11. Dose reconstruction by EPR spectroscopy of tooth enamel: application to the population of Zaborie village exposed to high radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ivannikov, A I; Gaillard-Lecanu, E; Trompier, F; Stepanenko, V F; Skvortsov, V G; Borysheva, N B; Tikunov, D D; Petin, D V

    2004-02-01

    Individual irradiation doses were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tooth enamel of the inhabitants of Zaborie, the most contaminated inhabited settlement not evacuated after the Chernobyl accident. Dose determination was performed using a specially developed automatic spectrum processing procedure. Spectrum processing was carried out in different operating modes, and average results were taken in order to reduce the contribution of uncertainty in dose determination caused by spectrum processing. The absorbed doses determined in enamel were corrected to take into account the contribution of natural background radiation and to determine the individual excess dose due to radioactive contamination of the territory. Individual excess doses are compared to calculated individualized doses to teeth, estimated using the local radioactive contamination levels, dose rates, and information concerning individual behavior. The individual excess doses measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the calculated individualized doses are fully independent. Mean square variation between results of two methods was found to be 34 mGy, which is consistent with error estimation for both methods. This result can validate both the methodology of signal processing presented here when using electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry of tooth enamel for low doses and the methodology of individualized dose calculation.

  12. Utilization of orally administered D-[14C]mannitol via fermentation by intestinal microbes in rats.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Ryoko; Nakamura, Sadako; Oku, Tsuneyuki

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the available energy of orally administered [(14)C]mannitol via intestinal microbes, [(14)C]mannitol (222 kBq, 105 mg) or [(14)C]glucose (222 kBq, 105 mg) was administered to conventional rats and antibiotics-treated rats whose intestinal microbes were depleted by drinking water containing antibiotics, respectively. The exhausted CO(2), feces and urine were then separately collected at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 24 h after administration of the test solution. In the conventional rats, 45% of administered radioactivity was recovered as (14)CO(2) in the administration of [(14)C]mannitol, while 57% of administered radioactivity was recovered as (14)CO(2) following the administration of [(14)C]glucose for 24 h. The time sequence for the (14)CO(2) excretion from [(14)C]mannitol was delayed as compared to [(14)C]glucose by about 4-6 h (p<0.05). However, when [(14)C]mannitol was orally administered to antibiotics-treated rats, only 3% of administered radioactivity was excreted as (14)CO(2) for 24 h. The total radioactivity of the gastrointestinal contents and feces for 24 h after administration was over 70%, much higher than those of the conventional rats (p<0.05). When a half dose (222 kBq, 52.5 mg) of [(14)C]mannitol was administered to conventional rats, the recovery as (14)CO(2) for 24 h (%) was significantly higher than that of a regular dose of [(14)C]mannitol (105 mg). When cold mannitol (105 mg) was orally administered to the antibiotics-treated rats, about 9% of intact mannitol was excreted in feces within 48 h after administration. However, no intact mannitol was detected in the conventional rats. These results demonstrate that more than 95% of mannitol administered orally is utilized via fermentation by intestinal microbes.

  13. Radiation doses to critical groups since the early 1950`s due to discharges of liquid radioactive waste from Sellafield

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.J.

    1997-04-01

    First, some of the early work is reviewed on exposure pathways in connection with proposed and early liquid radioactive waste discharges from Sellafield. The main historical features of these discharges, affected by relevant plant operations, are then briefly described. The important radiological exposure pathways resulting from the discharges and people`s consumption and occupancy habits are considered. To place the changing scenario onto a consistent basis using present-day methodology, a reconstruction of exposures has been carried out using environmental monitoring data and models. The three major pathways are examined of Porphyral laverbread consumption in South Wales, fish and shellfish consumption near Sellafield, and external exposure over local and more distant sediments. The results show that over the period 1952 to about 1970 the laverbread pathway was probably critical, taking a cautious approach. Effective dose rates fluctuated at around 1 mSv y{sup -1} from about 1956 to 1971. From about 1970 to 1985, the fish and shellfish pathway was likely to have been critical, with effective dose rates peaking at about 2 mSv y{sup -1} in 1975-1976. External exposure was likely to have been of lesser importance than the other two pathways until about 1985, when with the retention of previously-released radiocesium on sediments it has become dominant. This phenomenon applies particularly further afield where radiocesium concentrations have been slower to decline; in the Ribble estuary, houseboat dwellers have been the critical group from about 1985. Effective doses have been at about 0.3 mSv y{sup -1} and declining; they are due to the effects of radiocesium discharges in earlier years. Dose rates have remained within contemporary ICRP dose limits.

  14. Evaluation of total effective dose due to certain environmentally placed naturally occurring radioactive materials using a procedural adaptation of RESRAD code.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Z S; Thompson, K H; Kearfott, K J

    2009-07-01

    Due to a recent upward trend in the price of uranium and subsequent increased interest in uranium mining, accurate modeling of baseline dose from environmental sources of radioactivity is of increasing interest. Residual radioactivity model and code (RESRAD) is a program used to model environmental movement and calculate the dose due to the inhalation, ingestion, and exposure to radioactive materials following a placement. This paper presents a novel use of RESRAD for the calculation of dose from non-enhanced, or ancient, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). In order to use RESRAD to calculate the total effective dose (TED) due to ancient NORM, a procedural adaptation was developed to negate the effects of time progressive distribution of radioactive materials. A dose due to United States' average concentrations of uranium, actinium, and thorium series radionuclides was then calculated. For adults exposed in a residential setting and assumed to eat significant amounts of food grown in NORM concentrated areas, the annual dose due to national average NORM concentrations was 0.935 mSv y(-1). A set of environmental dose factors were calculated for simple estimation of dose from uranium, thorium, and actinium series radionuclides for various age groups and exposure scenarios as a function of elemental uranium and thorium activity concentrations in groundwater and soil. The values of these factors for uranium were lowest for an adult exposed in an industrial setting: 0.00476 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) for soil and 0.00596 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) for water (assuming a 1:1 234U:238U activity ratio in water). The uranium factors were highest for infants exposed in a residential setting and assumed to ingest food grown onsite: 34.8 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) in soil and 13.0 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) in water. PMID:19509509

  15. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Neuder, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    Because of uncertainties associated with assessing the potential risks from onsite burials of radioactive waste, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has amended its regulations to provide greater assurance that buried radioactive material will not present a hazard to public health and safety. The amended regulations now require licensees to apply for approval of proposed procedures for onsite disposal pursuant to 10 CFR 20.302. The NRC technically reviews these requests on a case-by-case basis. These technical reviews require modeling potential pathways to man and projecting radiation dose commitments. This document contains a summary of our efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and to modify a version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. The documentation of the ONSITE/MAXI computer program is written for two audiences. The first (Audience A) includes persons concerned with the mathematical models and computer algorithms. The second (Audience B) includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and scenarios for specific onsite disposal applications. Five sample problems are presented and discussed to assist the user in operating the computer program. Summaries of the input and output for the sample problems are included along with a discussion of the hand calculations performed to verify the correct operation of the computer program. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program with an abbreviated data base listing are included as Appendix 1 to this document. Finally, complete listings of the data base with listings of the special codes used to create the data base are included in Appendix 2 as a microfiche attachment to this document.

  16. Methods for estimating doses to organisms from radioactive materials released into the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy recently published an interim dose limit of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} for controlling the radiation exposure of nature aquatic organisms. A computer program named CRITR, developed previously for calculating radiation doses to aquatic organisms and their predators, has been updated as an activity of the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project to facilitate demonstration of compliance with this limit. This report presents the revised models and the updated computer program, CRITR2, for the assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and their predators; tables of the required input parameters are also provided. Both internal and external doses to fish, crustacea, mollusks, and algae, as well as organisms that subsist on them, such as muskrats, raccoons, and ducks, may be estimated using CRITR2. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water to which the organisms are exposed may be entered directly into the user-input file or may be calculated from a source term and standard dilution models developed for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  17. Letter report: References for radioactive releases to the atmosphere from Hanford operations, 1944--1957. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.

    1991-11-01

    A search was made for published documents related to discharges of radioactive material from Hanford Site facilities to the atmosphere from 1944--1957. The purpose was to list documents that contain data that might be useful in developing a source term for airborne releases. The source term for the radionuclide that contributes most to dose, ioidine-131, is a separate effort. Other source terms will be developed later. This tabulation of published summaries of atmospheric release data shows the type of measurements that were being made from 1944--1957 and the magnitude of the discharges to the atmosphere. In the early years, very little data were collected that related to specific radionuclides. However, most of the key radionuclides were known to be present in effluents from occasional specific radionuclide analyses. 2 refs.

  18. Natural radioactivity and evaluation of effective dose equivalent of granites in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2006-01-01

    Annual effective dose equivalent due to natural gamma radiation from (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K have been evaluated from granites in Turkey. Forty samples were taken for spectrometric analysis. Specific concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in granite samples were determined. Spectroscopy system was used with 1.8 keV (FWHM) coaxial high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Average values of concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were detected at 15.85, 33.76 and 359 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The average value of radon varies from 0.073 to 0.185 Bq m(-2) h(-1) exhalation depends on the specific concentration of uranium. The dose rate due to this highest activity which have been evaluated by a Monte Carlo transport calculations does not exceed 0.4 mSv a(-1).

  19. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  20. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  1. RESRAD-BUILD: A computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.J.; Jones, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material inside the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to: three compartments, 10 distinct source geometries, and 10 receptor locations. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments. 4 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A biosphere modeling methodology for dose assessments of the potential Yucca Mountain deep geological high level radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B M; Smith, G M; Little, R H; Kessler, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent developments in performance standards for proposed high level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain suggest that health risk or dose rate limits will likely be part of future standards. Approaches to the development of biosphere modeling and dose assessments for Yucca Mountain have been relatively lacking in previous performance assessments due to the absence of such a requirement. This paper describes a practical methodology used to develop a biosphere model appropriate for calculating doses from use of well water by hypothetical individuals due to discharges of contaminated groundwater into a deep well. The biosphere model methodology, developed in parallel with the BIOMOVS II international study, allows a transparent recording of the decisions at each step, from the specification of the biosphere assessment context through to model development and analysis of results. A list of features, events, and processes relevant to Yucca Mountain was recorded and an interaction matrix developed to help identify relationships between them. Special consideration was given to critical/potential exposure group issues and approaches. The conceptual model of the biosphere system was then developed, based on the interaction matrix, to show how radionuclides migrate and accumulate in the biosphere media and result in potential exposure pathways. A mathematical dose assessment model was specified using the flexible AMBER software application, which allows users to construct their own compartment models. The starting point for the biosphere calculations was a unit flux of each radionuclide from the groundwater in the geosphere into the drinking water in the well. For each of the 26 radionuclides considered, the most significant exposure pathways for hypothetical individuals were identified. For 14 of the radionuclides, the primary exposure pathways were identified as consumption of various crops and animal products following assumed agricultural use of the contaminated

  3. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    PubMed

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking. PMID:26942842

  4. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    PubMed

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking.

  5. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Jung, Seongmoon; Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s-1 Bq-1), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10-5 cGy s-1 and 2.259×10-5 cGy s-1, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1 and 1.071×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Evaluation of Radioactivity Concentration in Tilapia Nilotica and Radiation Dose to Egyptian Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Hannan H.; El-Khawas, Enas H.

    2013-03-01

    One of the three goals of the United Nations for sustainable food security is to ensure that all people have access to sufficient, nutritionally adequate, and safe food. The study was carried out to evaluate the Uranium (238U) and thorium (232Th) concentration in the Bolti (Tilapia nilotica) fish collected from Nasser Lake by using two different types of detectors CR-39 SSNTDs and gamma spectroscopy. The annual intake of Bolti fish was estimated on the basis of their average annual consumption. Calculations were also made to determine the effective dose to an individual consuming such diet.

  7. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

  8. Re-suspension of the radioactive fallout after the Fukushima accident: risk of internal dose during the first week and the first two months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 contaminated an area of more than 100 km in diameter by radioactive material with amount of about 10-20% of that by the Chernobyl accident. According to the Chernobyl experience, a part of fallout radionuclide is expected to be re-suspended by wind, causing possible risk of internal dose. However, this re-suspension process and its amounts have not been studied very much due to the difficulty of direct measurement of low-density dusts. To estimate forms and periods of the re-suspension of the radioactive fallout, we used both the radiation dose rate data and vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 km away from the accident site. The data indicates: (1) During 14-15 March, the radioactive dust is most likely suspended in the air near the ground. (2) During 2-7 UT on 16 March, the radioactive dust is most likely blown up from the surface by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) During 16-20 March, the radioactive dust most likely stayed re-suspended. (4) After the wet contamination on 20 March until late April, the radioactive fallout on the ground are re-suspended during daytime by daily convection due to sunshine, and transported to downwind direction. (5) At more than 30 km distance from the accident site, the re-suspension most likely ceased by the end of April. However, no data is available within 20 km distance from the accident site. Yamauchi, et al. (2012): Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement, Ann. Geophys., 30, 49-56, doi:10.5194/angeo-30-49-2012. Yamauchi (2012): Secondary wind transport of radioactive materials after the Fukushima accident, Earth Planet Space, accepted for publication.

  9. Radioactive contamination in the Arctic--sources, dose assessment and potential risks.

    PubMed

    Strand, P; Howard, B J; Aarkrog, A; Balonov, M; Tsaturov, Y; Bewers, J M; Salo, A; Sickel, M; Bergman, R; Rissanen, K

    2002-01-01

    Arctic residents, whose diets comprise a large proportion of traditional terrestrial and freshwater foodstuffs, have received the highest radiation exposures to artificial radionuclides in the Arctic. Doses to members of both the average population and selected indigenous population groups in the Arctic depend on the rates of consumption of locally-derived terrestrial and freshwater foodstuffs, including reindeer/caribou meat, freshwater fish, goat cheese, berries, mushrooms and lamb. The vulnerability of arctic populations, especially indigenous peoples, to radiocaesium deposition is much greater than for temperate populations due to the importance of terrestrial, semi-natural exposure pathways where there is high radiocaesium transfer and a long ecological half-life for this radionuclide. In contrast, arctic residents with diets largely comprising marine foodstuffs have received comparatively low radiation exposures because of the lower levels of contamination of marine organisms. Using arctic-specific information, the predicted collective dose is five times higher than that estimated by UNSCEAR for temperate areas. The greatest threats to human health and the environment posed by human and industrial activities in the Arctic are associated with the potential for accidents in the civilian and military nuclear sectors. Of most concern are the consequences of potential accidents in nuclear power plant reactors, during the handling and storage of nuclear weapons, in the decommissioning of nuclear submarines and in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from vessels. It is important to foster a close association between risk assessment and practical programmes for the purposes of improving monitoring, formulating response strategies and implementing action plans. PMID:11936613

  10. [Long-term evacuation after the nuclear accident in Fukushima ~Different daily living under low-dose radioactive suffering~].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    One year has passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident. Even currently, more than 150,000 evacuees in Fukushima Prefecture are forced to leave their home and to move throughout Japan. Because of the limited space of temporary housing and the weakening of personal ties in local communities, many families need to move and have separate lives. As a consequence, Fukushima has a serious shortage of caregivers for the elderly. There have been more than 1,300 disaster-related deaths due to shock and stress after long-distance drifts from town to town. Most of the victims were the elderly, who collapsed, caught pneumonia, suffered stroke and heart attack. Concerns about the safety of low-dose radiation exposure deprived the elderly of important contact with playing outside with their grandchildren in Fukushima. Fear of invisible radioactive contamination inactivated outdoor activities such as farming, dairy, fishing, gardening, hiking and wild-vegetable/mushroom hunting, although most of these activities have been traditionally supported by the wisdom of the elderly. Several recent questionnaire investigations revealed that older evacuees wish to go home even if the environment has significant contamination. In contrast, more than half of younger generation with small children have a different attitude. Nuclear accident brought serious social pains although it did not acutely hurt our bodies.

  11. [Long-term evacuation after the nuclear accident in Fukushima ~Different daily living under low-dose radioactive suffering~].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    One year has passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident. Even currently, more than 150,000 evacuees in Fukushima Prefecture are forced to leave their home and to move throughout Japan. Because of the limited space of temporary housing and the weakening of personal ties in local communities, many families need to move and have separate lives. As a consequence, Fukushima has a serious shortage of caregivers for the elderly. There have been more than 1,300 disaster-related deaths due to shock and stress after long-distance drifts from town to town. Most of the victims were the elderly, who collapsed, caught pneumonia, suffered stroke and heart attack. Concerns about the safety of low-dose radiation exposure deprived the elderly of important contact with playing outside with their grandchildren in Fukushima. Fear of invisible radioactive contamination inactivated outdoor activities such as farming, dairy, fishing, gardening, hiking and wild-vegetable/mushroom hunting, although most of these activities have been traditionally supported by the wisdom of the elderly. Several recent questionnaire investigations revealed that older evacuees wish to go home even if the environment has significant contamination. In contrast, more than half of younger generation with small children have a different attitude. Nuclear accident brought serious social pains although it did not acutely hurt our bodies. PMID:23925101

  12. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    This document summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrusion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. Supplement 1 of NUREG/CR-3620 (1986) summarized modifications and improvements to the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. This document summarizes a modified version of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. This modified version of the computer program operates on a personal computer and permits the user to optionally select radiation dose conversion factors published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication No. 30 (ICRP 1979-1982) in place of those published by the ICRP in their Publication No. 2 (ICRP 1959) (as implemented in the previous versions of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program). The pathway-to-human models used in the computer program have not been changed from those described previously. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program and supporting data bases are included in the appendices of this document.

  13. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  14. Analysis of dose to patient, spouse/caretaker, and staff, from an implanted trackable radioactive fiducial for use in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Barnea, Gideon; Stokar, Saul; Corn, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A fiducial tracking system based on a novel radioactive tracking technology is being developed for real-time target tracking in radiation therapy. In this study, the authors calculate the radiation dose to the patient, the spouse/caretaker, and the medical staff that would result from a 100 {mu}Ci Ir192 radioactive fiducial marker permanently implanted in the prostate of a radiation therapy patient. Methods: Local tissue dose was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The patient's whole body effective dose equivalent was calculated by summing the doses to the sensitive organs. Exposure of the spouse/caretaker was calculated from the NRC guidelines. Exposure of the medical staff was based on estimates of proximity to and time spent with the patient. Results: The local dose is below 40 Gy at 5 mm from the marker and below 10 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. The whole body effective dose equivalent to the patient is 64 mSv. The dose to the spouse/caretaker is 0.25 mSv. The annual exposures of the medical staff are 0.2 mSv for a doctor performing implantations and 0.34 mSv for a radiation therapist positioning patients for therapy. Conclusions: The local dose is not expected to have any clinically significant effect on the surrounding tissue which is irradiated during therapy. The dose to the patient is small in comparison to the whole body dose received from the therapy itself. The exposure of all other people is well below the recommended limits. The authors conclude that there is no radiation exposure related contraindication for use of this technology in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  16. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  17. Synthesis and dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity evaluation of intravenously administered polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Balan; Sathish, Shanmugam; Balakumar, Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are being used in medical imaging, drug delivery, cancer therapy, and so on. However, there is a direct need to identify any nanotoxicity associated with these nanoparticles. However uncommon, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major health concern that challenges pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory agencies alike. In this study we have synthesized and evaluated the dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity of polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PUSPIOs). To assess the hepatotoxicity of intravenously injected PUSPIOs, alterations in basic clinical parameters, hematological parameters, hemolysis assay, serum levels of liver marker enzymes, serum and liver lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, enzymatic antioxidant levels, and finally histology of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain, and heart tissues were studied in control and experimental Wistar rat groups over a 30-day period. The results of our study showed a significant increase in the aspartate transaminase (AST) enzyme activity at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week. Besides, alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) enzyme activity showed a slender increase when compared with control experimental groups. A significant increase in the serum and liver LPO levels at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week was also observed. Histological analyses of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart tissue samples showed no obvious uncharacteristic changes. In conclusion, PUSPIOs were found to posses excellent biocompatibility and Wistar rats showed much better drug tolerance to the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. per week than the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. twice a week for the period of 30 days.

  18. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm3 for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm3 (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  19. Synthesis and dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity evaluation of intravenously administered polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Balan; Sathish, Shanmugam; Balakumar, Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are being used in medical imaging, drug delivery, cancer therapy, and so on. However, there is a direct need to identify any nanotoxicity associated with these nanoparticles. However uncommon, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major health concern that challenges pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory agencies alike. In this study we have synthesized and evaluated the dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity of polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PUSPIOs). To assess the hepatotoxicity of intravenously injected PUSPIOs, alterations in basic clinical parameters, hematological parameters, hemolysis assay, serum levels of liver marker enzymes, serum and liver lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, enzymatic antioxidant levels, and finally histology of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain, and heart tissues were studied in control and experimental Wistar rat groups over a 30-day period. The results of our study showed a significant increase in the aspartate transaminase (AST) enzyme activity at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week. Besides, alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) enzyme activity showed a slender increase when compared with control experimental groups. A significant increase in the serum and liver LPO levels at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week was also observed. Histological analyses of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart tissue samples showed no obvious uncharacteristic changes. In conclusion, PUSPIOs were found to posses excellent biocompatibility and Wistar rats showed much better drug tolerance to the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. per week than the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. twice a week for the period of 30 days. PMID:25721486

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of mefloquine, administered as a fixed-dose combination of artesunate-mefloquine in Indian patients for the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fixed-dose combinations of artemisinin combination therapy are strongly recommended to facilitate drug administration and compliance. New fixed-dose combinations must nevertheless be evaluated in relevant populations in terms of efficacy and pharmacokinetics. Methods A single-arm, open-label, clinical trial was performed in Indian patients with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria to investigate the efficacy and the pharmacokinetics of mefloquine when combined with artesunate in a fixed-dose combination (400/200 mg of mefloquine base/artesunate). The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a population approach. Results Seventy-seven patients were included in the study. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics obeys a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Mean parameter estimates (% inter-individual variability) were as follows: 0.16 h-1 (75%) for the absorption rate constant, 1.13 L/h (30%) for the apparent plasma clearance, 271 L (21%) for the apparent central distribution volume, 344 L (54%) for the apparent peripheral distribution volume, and 1.43 L/h for the apparent distribution clearance. These values were consistent with the pharmacokinetic results described in Thai patients. No significant covariate was found for clearance. Body weight explained the inter-individual variability of the apparent central and peripheral distribution volumes. The PCR-adjusted efficacy of the treatment was 100%. Conclusions The lack of significant covariate explaining the inter-individual variability of mefloquine clearance, combined with the excellent efficacy, supports the use of the standard 200/400 mg of artesunate-mefloquine fixed-dose combination in Indian patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Registration: ISRCTN70618692 PMID:24886117

  1. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general.

  2. Radiological Survey of Contaminated Installations of Research Reactor before Dismantling in High Dose Conditions with Complex for Remote Measurements of Radioactivity - 12069

    SciTech Connect

    Danilovich, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Lemus, Alexey; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Volkovich, Anatoly

    2012-07-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the research reactors MR (Testing Reactor) and RFT (Reactor of Physics and Technology) has recently been initiated in the National Research Center (NRC) 'Kurchatov institute', Moscow. These research reactors have a long history and many installations - nine loop facilities for experiments with different kinds of fuel. When decommissioning nuclear facilities it is necessary to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination in the rooms and at the equipment at high levels of background radiation. At 'Kurchatov Institute' some special remote control measuring systems were developed and they are applied during dismantling of the reactors MR and RFT. For a survey of high-level objects a radiometric system mounted on the robotic Brokk vehicle is used. This system has two (4π and collimated) dose meters and a high resolution video camera. Maximum measured dose rate for this system is ∼8.5 Sv/h. To determine the composition of contaminants, a portable spectrometric system is used. It is a remotely controlled, collimated detector for scanning the distribution of radioactive contamination. To obtain a detailed distribution of contamination a remote-controlled gamma camera is applied. For work at highly contaminated premises with non-uniform background radiation, another camera is equipped with rotating coded mask (coded aperture imaging). As a result, a new system of instruments for remote radioactivity measurements with wide range of sensitivity and angular resolution was developed. The experience and results of measurements in different areas of the reactor and at its loop installations, with emphasis on the radioactive survey of highly-contaminated samples, are presented. These activities are conducted under the Federal Program for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of Russia. Adaptation of complex remote measurements of radioactivity and survey of contaminated installations of research reactor before dismantling in high dose

  3. Efficiency of oxfendazole administered as a single dose or in a controlled release capsule against benzimidazole-resistant haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus colubriformis.

    PubMed

    Le Jambre, L F; Prichard, P K; Hennessy, D R; Laby, R H

    1981-11-01

    Laboratory strains of Haemonchus contortus and Ostertagia circumcincta selected for thiabendazole resistance were found to have a strong side resistance to a single dose of oxfendazole. The LD50 and LD95 in mg of drug per host liveweight were respectively 4.28 and 18.46 mg/kg for H contortus and 3.61 and 11.20 mg/kg for O circumcincta. A field strain of Trichostrongylus colubriformis that had not been selected with thiabendazole for seven years also had a strong side resistance to oxfendazole with approximately 50 per cent of its population resistant to the recommended dose rate of 5 mg/kg. Prolonged administration of oxfendazole by intraruminal controlled release capsules was found to be effective against both susceptible and resistant strains of the above parasites. The first observed effect of oxfendazole, from controlled release capsules, on resistant worms was a decrease in the percentage of eggs developing to third stage larvae. This was followed by a decrease in egg count and in worm numbers.

  4. Efficacy and safety of ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate administered in a hydrofluoroalkane metered-dose inhaler for the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Amal; Bhargava, Salil; Singh, Virendra; Talwar, Deepak; Whig, Jagdeep; Rebello, Juliet; Purandare, Shrinivas; Gogtay, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has contributed to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer resulting in serious health concerns. Ipratropium bromide/salbutamol sulphate CFC-pressurized metered-dose inhalers (IB/SAL-CFC pMDI) have been in widespread use for many years without any apparent ill consequences. This combination has now been reformulated using the hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant. This study sought to establish the clinical noninferiority of a new HFA-containing IB/SAL pMDI to the conventional IB/SAL-CFC pMDI in subjects with mild/moderate COPD. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study in two consecutive periods: a 14-day run-in period followed by a 85-day treatment period. Eligible mild-to-moderate stable COPD subjects aged 40−75 years were enrolled into the study and entered the run-in period during which subjects withdrew all the bronchodilators, except for salbutamol as rescue medication. Subjects were randomized to 85 days treatment with either IB/SAL-HFA or IB/SAL-CFC, 20 μg qid. Results Of the 290 randomized patients, 249 completed the study. The primary efficacy variable was the change in forced expiratory volume in one second from predose to 60 minutes after dosing on day 85. At the end of the treatment period, the adjusted mean change in forced expiratory volume in one second at 60 minutes was 123 mL in the IB/SAL-HFA pMDI group and 115 mL in the IB/SAL-CFC pMDI group. Because the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval for the between-group difference (−62 mL) was well within the noninferiority margin (−100 mL), the HFA formulation was deemed clinically noninferior to the CFC formulation. This finding was supported by secondary efficacy assessments. Both formulations of IB/SAL were well tolerated during the prolonged multiple dosing. Conclusion It is concluded that IB/SAL-HFA pMDI provides effective bronchodilation of similar degree to that achieved with IB/SAL-CFC p

  5. Effects of two human chorionic gonadotropin doses administered to the ovarian states during the in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer program

    PubMed Central

    MA, MINGXING; WANG, JIALIN; XU, LIJUN; ZHANG, QINXI; DU, BOTAO; JIANG, XIAOYING; SHI, QINGLI; ZHOU, LILI; LI, BAOXIN; SAITO, HIDEKAZU; KURACHI, HIROHISA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) dose on the pulsatility indices (PI) of the intraovarian artery on the day of follicle aspiration and the oocyte quality, intrafollicular oxidative stress and luteinization. PI was also measured on the day of hCG administration. A total of 15 patients were undergoing the in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) program. To estimate whether there was any difference between the intraovarian artery blood flow and oocyte development of the same patients treated with 5,000 or 10,000 IU hCG, the intraovarian artery blood flow was measured by transvaginal color ultrasonography pulsed wave Doppler, and the follicular fluids and the granulosa cells were collected at follicle aspiration. There were statistically significant differences between the same patients undergoing the two different hCG-dose treatments in which the first protocol included 10,000 IU and the second protocol included 5,000 IU hCG treatment. These differences were apparent in the PI of intraovarian artery blood flow on the day of follicle aspiration (P=0.0023), in the incidence of apoptosis in cumulus (ApoC) and mural (ApoM) granulosa cells (ApoC, P=0.0077; ApoM, P=0.0128), in the total oocytes retrieved (P=0.0342) and in the follicle fluid progesterone concentration (P=0.0044). There were no significant differences between the two protocols in the PI of intraovarian artery blood flow on the day of hCG administration (P=0.4326), serum steroid on the day of follicle aspiration [serum P, P>0.9999; serum estradiol (E2), P=0.8589], follicle fluid E2 concentration (P=0.8939), mature oocyte rate (P=0.3743) and total mature oocytes retrieved (P=0.2026). In conclusion, the dose of hCG administration can significantly affect the intraovarian artery blood flow and the development of follicles and oocytes in an IVF-ET program. PMID:26075075

  6. Uranium and thorium series radionuclides in drinking water from drilled bedrock wells: correlation to geology and bedrock radioactivity and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Isam Salih, M M; Pettersson, H B L; Lund, E

    2002-01-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water from 328 drilled wells was studied in correlation to source parameters. Poor correlation to both aquifer geology and bedrock radioactivity was observed. Concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 222Rn and 210Po in groundwater samples was in the ranges <0.027-5.3, <0.016-4.9, <0.014-1.24, 5-8105 and <0.05-0.947 Bq.l(-1) respectively. In about 80% of the sites the radon concentration exceeds the Nordic recommended exemption level for radon in drinking water and 15% of the sites exceed the action limit. The effective doses from ingestion were calculated and presented in association with geology. Doses due to ingestion ranged between 0.05 and 20.4 mSv.y(-1), where the average contribution from 222Rn amounted to 75%. In comparison, the effective doses from inhalation of indoor 222Rn ranged between 0.2 and 20 mSv.y(-1). The average contribution from inhalation of 222Rn in air to the total effective dose (ingestion+inhalation) was 58 +/- 22%, 73 +/- 18% and 77 +/- 16% (1 SD) for the age categories 1 y, 10 y and adults respectively.

  7. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame.

  8. Establishment of the central radiation dose registration system for decontamination work involving radioactive fallout emitted by the Fukushima Daiichi APP accident.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2016-10-01

    With respect to radiation protection for decontamination efforts involving radioactive fallout emitted by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant, new regulations were established and obligated employers to monitor, record, and store of workers' dose records, and to check their past dose records at the time of employment. However, cumulative doses may not be properly maintained if a worker declares incorrect values for past doses. In response, with facilitation from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, primary contractors of decontamination works decided to establish a central dose registration system. There are four major issues in the design of the system to be resolved, included the following: primary contractors (a) do not have a legal responsibility to perform dose control for subcontractors, (b) do not have the right to control decontamination sites, (c) often organize joint ventures, and (d) correspond to a wide range of ambient dose rates. To resolve the issues, requirements of the system included the following: (a) centralize the operation of radiation passbooks, which records past doses and the results of medical examinations to each worker; (b) develop a database system that could register all dose data and accept inquiry from primary contractors; (c) establish a permanent data storage system for transferred records; and (d) provide graded type of services that are appropriate to the risk of radiation exposure. The system started its operation in December 2013 and provided dose distributions in April and July 2015. The average yearly dose in 2014 was 0.7 mSv, which increased by 0.2 mSv from 0.5 mSv in 2012 and 2013. However, no cumulative dose from 2012-2014 exceeded 20 mSv, which was far below than the dose limits (100 mSv/5 years and 50 mSv/year). Although current dose distributions of decontamination workers were within appropriate levels, careful monitoring of dose distribution is necessary for preserving the proper

  9. Establishment of the central radiation dose registration system for decontamination work involving radioactive fallout emitted by the Fukushima Daiichi APP accident.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2016-10-01

    With respect to radiation protection for decontamination efforts involving radioactive fallout emitted by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant, new regulations were established and obligated employers to monitor, record, and store of workers' dose records, and to check their past dose records at the time of employment. However, cumulative doses may not be properly maintained if a worker declares incorrect values for past doses. In response, with facilitation from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, primary contractors of decontamination works decided to establish a central dose registration system. There are four major issues in the design of the system to be resolved, included the following: primary contractors (a) do not have a legal responsibility to perform dose control for subcontractors, (b) do not have the right to control decontamination sites, (c) often organize joint ventures, and (d) correspond to a wide range of ambient dose rates. To resolve the issues, requirements of the system included the following: (a) centralize the operation of radiation passbooks, which records past doses and the results of medical examinations to each worker; (b) develop a database system that could register all dose data and accept inquiry from primary contractors; (c) establish a permanent data storage system for transferred records; and (d) provide graded type of services that are appropriate to the risk of radiation exposure. The system started its operation in December 2013 and provided dose distributions in April and July 2015. The average yearly dose in 2014 was 0.7 mSv, which increased by 0.2 mSv from 0.5 mSv in 2012 and 2013. However, no cumulative dose from 2012-2014 exceeded 20 mSv, which was far below than the dose limits (100 mSv/5 years and 50 mSv/year). Although current dose distributions of decontamination workers were within appropriate levels, careful monitoring of dose distribution is necessary for preserving the proper

  10. Developmental toxicity of clarified slurry oil, syntower bottoms, and distillate aromatic extract administered as a single oral dose to pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Clarified slurry oil (CSO), syntower bottoms (STB), and distillate aromatic extract (DAE) are refinery streams produced by processing crude oil. Available data indicate that some refinery streams are developmentally toxic by the dermal route of exposure. However, there is no conclusive evidence for their being teratogenic. The present studies were designed to further explore the suspected teratogenic potency of refinery streams while at the same time limiting embryolethality. In general, evidence of maternal toxicity (i.e., decreased body weight gain, decreased thymus weight) was observed at doses greater than or equal to 500 mg/kg. For each refinery stream tested, the incidence of resorption was greatest on GD 11. A common pattern of fetal malformations was observed for all of the refinery streams tested and included cleft palate, diaphragmatic hernia, and paw and tail defects. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations were greatest on GD 11 and 12 for fetuses exposed to CSO; on GD 13 and 14, the incidence of malformation was comparable for CSO- and STB-exposed fetuses. The incidence of visceral anomalies was greatest on GD 11-13 for fetuses exposed to CSO and STB; on Gestation D 14, the incidence was comparable for each of the refinery streams tested. In general, the ability to produce adverse effects on development was greatest for CSO and least for DAE. Effects produced by STB were comparable to or less severe than those observed for CSO. 24 refs., 11 tabs.

  11. [Two cases of long-term home parenteral nutrition in which increased doses of intravenous selenium were administered and the serum and hair selenium concentration was measured].

    PubMed

    Washizawa, Naohiro; Kozono, Koki; Naganuma, Hirokazu; Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Yukihiko; Sakai, Masahiro; Chino, Kenichi; Shimoda, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Oshima, Yoko; Kaneko, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Care should be taken regarding the intravenous administration of selenium (Se), an essential element, which is known to be associated with toxemia. The concentration of Se in the serum and hair of 2 patients (patient A and B) with short bowel syndrome, undergoing long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN), was measured. As nutritional management, commercial total parenteral nutrition infusion was used without restricting oral intake. The patients received sodium selenite (Na2O3Se x 5H2O), a hospital preparation, at the Toho University Omori Medical Center. The dosage was gradually increased from 40 microg/ week to 120 micog/week over 17 months, and the Se concentration in serum and hair was measured bimonthly using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The serum concentration of Se increased from 2.0 to 5.3 microg/dL and from 9.0 to 9.7 microg/dL in the case of patient A and B, respectively; however, it did not reach the average value that was observed in healthy volunteers (11.8 microg/dL). In contrast, the concentration of Se in hair gradually approached the reference value (reference range, 405-784 ppb at color correction criteria range 217-520 ppb) in the case of patient A (change from 189 to 278 ppb) and B (change from 291 to 200 ppb). Therefore, we were able to safely manage these cases without any deficiency and poisoning symptoms, by gradually increasing the administration doses.

  12. Orally administered grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Taudorf, E; Weeke, B

    1983-11-01

    In 1900 it was claimed that oral administration of ragweed could be used for the hyposensitization of hay fever patients. Several uncontrolled trials have been published, all showing an effect of oral hyposensitization. Only one study was controlled and showed no effect of oral hyposensitization. It was decided to undertake controlled clinical trials to determine the safety and effectiveness of orally administered enteric-coated grass pollen tablets in patients with hay fever. The actual grass pollen dose in the first trial was 30 times the dose that is normally recommended for preseasonal oral pollen hyposensitization using pollen aqueous solution or pollen powder. The safety study will be described here. Twelve young adults with a history of grass pollen hay fever positive skin prick test and positive nasal provocation test with extracts of timothy grass pollen were randomly allocated to one of the treatment groups with four patients in each group taking enteric-coated Conjuvac Timothy tablets or enteric-coated Whole Timothy pollen tablets or enteric-coated placebo tablets. The study was double blind. Preseasonally, the patients received 342,500 PNU and in total they received 4,500,000 PNU during 6 months. The patients receiving active treatment did not have any side effects. No significant changes were shown in the skin and nasal reactivity to grass pollen during the study. Neither were there any changes in timothy-specific IgE, IgG, total IgE nor histamine liberation from basophils.

  13. Treatment of primary Sjögren's syndrome with low-dose natural human interferon-alpha administered by the oral mucosal route: a phase II clinical trial. IFN Protocol Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ship, J A; Fox, P C; Michalek, J E; Cummins, M J; Richards, A B

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the safety and efficacy of four dosages of natural human interferon-alpha (nHuIFN-alpha) delivered over a 12-week period orally in lozenges (150 IU and 450 IU, once [QD] or three times [TID] daily) compared to placebo in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome. This randomized, double-blinded clinical trial demonstrated that nHuIFN-alpha at a dose of 150 IU administered TID by oral lozenge significantly improved stimulated whole saliva output compared to placebo after 12 weeks of treatment. The 150 IU TID dose also was suggestive of benefit for 5 of 7 subjective measures of oral and ocular comfort. IFN lozenges demonstrated a good safety profile, with no serious adverse events found in any treatment group. There were no significant differences between the placebo and the four doses of IFN for adverse events by total number, organ system, severity, dropouts, and number judged to be related to treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the use of 150 IU IFN lozenges TID for 12 weeks in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome improved salivary output and decreased complaints of xerostomia without causing significant adverse medical events. PMID:10476942

  14. Intruder dose pathway analysis for the onsite disposal of radioactive wastes: the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program. Supplement No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.; Neuder, S.M.

    1986-05-01

    The document entitled Intruder Dose Pathway Analysis of the Onsite Disposal of Radioactive Wastes: The ONSITE/MAXI1 Computer Program (1984) summarizes initial efforts to develop human-intrustion scenarios and a modified version of the MAXI computer program for potential use by the NRC in reviewing applications for onsite radioactive waste disposal. This document is a supplement to that document and summarizes efforts to further modify and improve the ONSITE/MAXI1 software package. To facilitate cross-referencing, it follows the same format. Notable improvements to the software package include the capability to account for shielding conditions that represent noncompacted trash wastes and the option to indicate alternative land-use condition;s. This supplement contains a description of the implementation of these modifications. In addition, a series of discussions are included in an attempt to increase the user's understanding of the scenarios and dose calculation methods. These discussions respond to frequently asked questions about the mathematical models and use of the software. Computer listings of the ONSITE/MAXI1 computer program are included as Appendices A and B of this document. Appendix C lists external exposure dose-rate factor libraries.

  15. Distribution of iodine into blood components of the Sprague-Dawley rat differs with the chemical form administered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrall, K. D.; Bull, R. J.; Sauer, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    It has been reported previously that radioactivity derived from iodine distributes differently in the Sprague-Dawley rat depending on the chemical form administered (Thrall and Bull, 1990). In the present communication we report the differential distribution of radioactivity derived from iodine (I2) and iodide (I-) into blood components. Twice as much radioiodine is in the form of I- in the plasma of animals treated with 125I- compared to 125I2-treated rats. No I2 could be detected in the plasma. With an increase in dose, increasing amounts of radioactivity derived from 125I2-treated animals distribute to whole blood compared to equivalent doses of 125I-, reaching a maxima at a dose of 15.8 mumol I/kg body weight. Most of the radioactivity derived from I2 associates with serum proteins and lipids, in particular with albumin and cholesteryl iodide. These data indicate a differential distribution of radioactivity depending on whether it is administered as iodide or iodine. This is inconsistent with the commonly held view that iodine (I2) is reduced to iodide (I-) before it is absorbed systemically from the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Dose commitments due to radioactive releases from nuclear power plant sites: Methodology and data base. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    This manual describes a dose assessment system used to estimate the population or collective dose commitments received via both airborne and waterborne pathways by persons living within a 2- to 80-kilometer region of a commercial operating power reactor for a specific year of effluent releases. Computer programs, data files, and utility routines are included which can be used in conjunction with an IBM or compatible personal computer to produce the required dose commitments and their statistical distributions. In addition, maximum individual airborne and waterborne dose commitments are estimated and compared to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix 1, design objectives. This supplement is the last report in the NUREG/CR-2850 series.

  17. Assessing doses to terrestrial wildlife at a radioactive waste disposal site: inter-comparison of modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Johansen, M P; Barnett, C L; Beresford, N A; Brown, J E; Černe, M; Howard, B J; Kamboj, S; Keum, D-K; Smodiš, B; Twining, J R; Vandenhove, H; Vives i Batlle, J; Wood, M D; Yu, C

    2012-06-15

    Radiological doses to terrestrial wildlife were examined in this model inter-comparison study that emphasised factors causing variability in dose estimation. The study participants used varying modelling approaches and information sources to estimate dose rates and tissue concentrations for a range of biota types exposed to soil contamination at a shallow radionuclide waste burial site in Australia. Results indicated that the dominant factor causing variation in dose rate estimates (up to three orders of magnitude on mean total dose rates) was the soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides that included variation in transfer parameter values as well as transfer calculation methods. Additional variation was associated with other modelling factors including: how participants conceptualised and modelled the exposure configurations (two orders of magnitude); which progeny to include with the parent radionuclide (typically less than one order of magnitude); and dose calculation parameters, including radiation weighting factors and dose conversion coefficients (typically less than one order of magnitude). Probabilistic approaches to model parameterisation were used to encompass and describe variable model parameters and outcomes. The study confirms the need for continued evaluation of the underlying mechanisms governing soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides to improve estimation of dose rates to terrestrial wildlife. The exposure pathways and configurations available in most current codes are limited when considering instances where organisms access subsurface contamination through rooting, burrowing, or using different localised waste areas as part of their habitual routines.

  18. Radioactivity concentrations in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of Turkish Sea coast and contribution of ²¹⁰Po to the radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Önder; Belivermiş, Murat; Cotuk, Yavuz; Topçuoğlu, Sayhan

    2014-03-15

    Radionuclides levels were determined in indigenous and transplanted mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Turkish marine environment. Radioactivity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb were determined in the soft tissues of the mussel samples collected in Bosphorus Strait, Coasts of Black Sea, Marmara Sea and Aegean Sea. Mussel transplantation was carried out by using mussel cages in Levantine Sea coast since M. galloprovincialis did not naturally adapt along the coast. The average activity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb in the coastline of Turkey were found to be 0.7±0.1, 469±24, 0.9±0.1, 1.0±0.1, 122±4 and 10.9±0.9 Bq kg⁻¹ in dry weight (dw), respectively. The average of ²¹⁰Po/²¹⁰Pb ratio was found to be ∼14. Total annual effective ²¹⁰Po dose was calculated to be in the range of 0.25-3.30 μSv due to mussel consumption. Radioactivity and dose levels were compared with those of similar studies carried out in Mediterranean countries. PMID:24398417

  19. Radioactivity concentrations in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of Turkish Sea coast and contribution of ²¹⁰Po to the radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Önder; Belivermiş, Murat; Cotuk, Yavuz; Topçuoğlu, Sayhan

    2014-03-15

    Radionuclides levels were determined in indigenous and transplanted mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected from Turkish marine environment. Radioactivity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb were determined in the soft tissues of the mussel samples collected in Bosphorus Strait, Coasts of Black Sea, Marmara Sea and Aegean Sea. Mussel transplantation was carried out by using mussel cages in Levantine Sea coast since M. galloprovincialis did not naturally adapt along the coast. The average activity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs, ⁴⁰K, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²¹⁰Po and ²¹⁰Pb in the coastline of Turkey were found to be 0.7±0.1, 469±24, 0.9±0.1, 1.0±0.1, 122±4 and 10.9±0.9 Bq kg⁻¹ in dry weight (dw), respectively. The average of ²¹⁰Po/²¹⁰Pb ratio was found to be ∼14. Total annual effective ²¹⁰Po dose was calculated to be in the range of 0.25-3.30 μSv due to mussel consumption. Radioactivity and dose levels were compared with those of similar studies carried out in Mediterranean countries.

  20. Calculation of indoor effective dose factors in ORNL phantoms series due to natural radioactivity in building materials.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the effective dose in the age-dependent ORNL phantoms series, due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, was calculated. The absorbed doses for various organs or human tissues have been calculated. The MCNP-4B computer code was used for this purpose. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP Publication 74. The obtained values of dose conversion factors for a standard room are: 1.033, 0.752 and 0.0538 nSv h-1 per Bq kg-1 for elements of the U and Th decay series and for the K isotope, respectively. The values of effective dose agreed generally with those found in the literature, although the values estimated here for elements of the U series were higher in some cases.

  1. Calculation of indoor effective dose factors in ORNL phantoms series due to natural radioactivity in building materials.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the effective dose in the age-dependent ORNL phantoms series, due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, was calculated. The absorbed doses for various organs or human tissues have been calculated. The MCNP-4B computer code was used for this purpose. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP Publication 74. The obtained values of dose conversion factors for a standard room are: 1.033, 0.752 and 0.0538 nSv h-1 per Bq kg-1 for elements of the U and Th decay series and for the K isotope, respectively. The values of effective dose agreed generally with those found in the literature, although the values estimated here for elements of the U series were higher in some cases. PMID:19741358

  2. Relationships between biomarkers of exposure and toxicokinetics in Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice administered single doses of acrylamide and glycidamide and multiple doses of acrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Tareke, Eden; Twaddle, Nathan C.; McDaniel, L. Patrice; Churchwell, Mona I.; Young, John F.; Doerge, Daniel R. . E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov

    2006-11-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells and carcinogenic in rodents. AA is also formed in many commonly consumed starchy foods during cooking. Our previous toxicokinetic investigations of AA and its important genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide (GA), in rodents showed that AA is highly bioavailable from oral routes of administration, is widely distributed to tissues and that the dietary route, in particular, favors metabolism to GA. Measurements of DNA adducts in many tissues supported the hypothesis that AA is carcinogenic in rodent bioassays through metabolism to GA. The current investigation describes the development and validation of methodology for measuring hemoglobin (Hb) adducts with AA and GA in the same rodents previously used for toxicokinetic and DNA adduct measurements. The goal was to investigate possible relationships between these circulating biomarkers of exposure and serum toxicokinetic parameters for AA and GA and tissue GA-DNA adducts in rodents from both single and repeated dosing with AA. Significant correlations were observed between GA-Hb and liver GA-DNA adducts for either single or multiple dosing regimens with AA. Using available GA-Hb adduct data, empirical and allometric relationships permitted estimation of liver DNA adducts in humans in the range of 0.06-0.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides. This approach may prove useful in extrapolating human cancer risks from findings in rodent bioassays.

  3. Study of Natural Radioactivity, Radon Exhalation Rate and Radiation Doses in Coal and Flyash Samples from Thermal Power Plants, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Mukesh; Sahoo, B. K.; Sapra, B. K.; Kumar, Rajesh

    Coal is one of the most important source used for electrical power generation. Its combustion part known as fly ash is used in the manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. Coal and its by-products have significant amounts of radionuclide's including uranium, thorium which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas radon and thoron respectively. Radiation hazard from airborne emissions of coal-fired power plants have been cited as possible causes of health in environmental. Assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the concentration of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash. In the present study, samples of coal and flyash were collected from Rajghat Power Plant and Badarpur Thermal Power Plant, New Delhi, India. Radon exhalation is important parameter for the estimation of radiation risk from various materials. Solis State Nuclear Track Detector based sealed Can Technique (using LR-115 type II) has been used for measurement radon exhalation rate. Also accumulation chamber based Continuous Radon Monitor and Continuous Thoron Monitor have been used for radon masss exhalation and thoron surface exhalation rate respectively. Natural radioactivity has been measured using a low level NaI(Tl) detector based on gamma ray spectrometry.

  4. Metabolic fate of radioactive acyclovir in humans.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Good, S S; Krasny, H C; Connor, J D; Laskin, O L; Lietman, P S

    1982-07-20

    The metabolic fate and the kinetics of elimination of [8-14C]acyclovir in plasma and blood was investigated in five cancer patients. Doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg were administered by one-hour intravenous infusion. Radioactivity was distributed nearly equally in blood and plasma. The plasma and blood concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model. The overall mean acyclovir plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hours and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of acyclovir to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4 percent. The radioactive dose was excreted predominantly in the urine (71 to 99 percent) with less than 2 percent excretion in the feces and only trace amounts of radioactivity in the expired air. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of acyclovir accounting for 8.5 to 14.1 percent of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2 percent of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary acyclovir ranged from 62 to 91 percent of the dose. There was no indication of acyclovir cleavage to guanine. The renal clearances of acyclovir were three times higher than the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  5. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  6. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m−2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  7. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  8. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m−2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  9. Alternative Dose for Choroidal Melanoma Treated With an Iodine-125 Radioactive Plaque: A Single-Institution Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saconn, Paul A.; Gee, Christopher J.; Greven, Craig M.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Greven, Kathryn M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) established iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy as an accepted standard treatment for medium-size choroidal melanoma. In the COMS, the prescription dose was 85 Gy. This is a retrospective review of our outcomes in patients treated with lower doses than those used in the COMS. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2004, 62 patients were treated with iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma. COMS eye plaques were used with dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor. The median and average dose rates at the tumor apex were 63.5 cGy/h and 62.7 cGy/h, respectively. The median and average total doses were 63.0 Gy and 62.5 Gy (range, 56-69 Gy), respectively. The median and mean durations of implant were 100.0 hours and 101.1 hours (range, 71-165 hours). Results: Median follow-up time was 58.2 months. The 5-year outcomes including overall survival, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, local failure, secondary enucleation rate, and visual acuity (VA) <20/200 were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, there were 7 local failures, 4 distant failures, and 10 secondary enucleations (6 due to local failure and 4 due to treatment complications). Univariate analysis was performed to identify significant prognostic factors associated with disease-free survival (baseline VA in tumor eye, tumor shape), cause-specific survival (diabetic retinopathy), local failure (none found), secondary enucleation rate (diabetic retinopathy, basal tumor dimension) and VA <20/200 (diabetic retinopathy, tumor shape, age, retinal detachment, treatment depth, and history of vision-limiting condition). Conclusions: Our survival and local control outcomes are comparable to those of the COMS. However, VA at 5 years seems to be better. Lower doses of radiation could potentially lead to better visual outcomes.

  10. Natural radioactivity and effective dose due to the bottom sea and estuaries marine animals in the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M U; Olatunji, M A; Shuib, K S K; Hakimi, N A; Nasir, N L M; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Amin, Y M; Kassim, H A

    2015-11-01

    Malaysia is among the countries with the highest fish consumption in the world and relies on seafood as a main source of animal protein. Thus, the radioactivity in the mostly consumed marine animals such as fishes, crustaceans and molluscs collected from the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia has been determined to monitor the level of human exposure by natural radiation via seafood consumption. The mean activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra ((238)U), (228)Ra ((232)Th) and (40)K ranged from 0.67 ± 0.19 Bq kg(-1) (Perna viridis) to 1.20 ± 0.70 Bq kg(-1) (Rastrelliger), from 0.19 ± 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida) to 0.82 ± 0.67 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) and from 34 ± 13 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) to 48 ± 24 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida), respectively. The mean annual committed effective dose due to the individual radionuclides shows an order of (228)Ra > (226)Ra > (40)K in all marine samples. The obtained doses are less than the global internal dose of 290 µSv y(-1) set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, discarding any significant radiological risks to the populace of Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:25956784

  11. Natural radioactivity and effective dose due to the bottom sea and estuaries marine animals in the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M U; Olatunji, M A; Shuib, K S K; Hakimi, N A; Nasir, N L M; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Amin, Y M; Kassim, H A

    2015-11-01

    Malaysia is among the countries with the highest fish consumption in the world and relies on seafood as a main source of animal protein. Thus, the radioactivity in the mostly consumed marine animals such as fishes, crustaceans and molluscs collected from the coastal waters around Peninsular Malaysia has been determined to monitor the level of human exposure by natural radiation via seafood consumption. The mean activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra ((238)U), (228)Ra ((232)Th) and (40)K ranged from 0.67 ± 0.19 Bq kg(-1) (Perna viridis) to 1.20 ± 0.70 Bq kg(-1) (Rastrelliger), from 0.19 ± 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida) to 0.82 ± 0.67 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) and from 34 ± 13 Bq kg(-1) (Caridea) to 48 ± 24 Bq kg(-1) (Teuthida), respectively. The mean annual committed effective dose due to the individual radionuclides shows an order of (228)Ra > (226)Ra > (40)K in all marine samples. The obtained doses are less than the global internal dose of 290 µSv y(-1) set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, discarding any significant radiological risks to the populace of Peninsular Malaysia.

  12. Illustration of sampling-based approaches to the calculation of expected dose in performance assessments for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD.

    2007-04-01

    A deep geologic repository for high level radioactive waste is under development by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. As mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated public health and safety standards (i.e., 40 CFR Part 197) for the YM repository, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has promulgated licensing standards (i.e., 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc.) consistent with 40 CFR Part 197 that the DOE must establish are met in order for the YM repository to be licensed for operation. Important requirements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. relate to the determination of expected (i.e., mean) dose to a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) and the incorporation of uncertainty into this determination. This presentation describes and illustrates how general and typically nonquantitive statements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. can be given a formal mathematical structure that facilitates both the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI and the appropriate separation in this calculation of aleatory uncertainty (i.e., randomness in the properties of future occurrences such as igneous and seismic events) and epistemic uncertainty (i.e., lack of knowledge about quantities that are poorly known but assumed to have constant values in the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI).

  13. Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection (EROS): an open-label, prospective, multicenter, single-arm study to investigate erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y S; Lee, S W; Park, K; Chung, W S; Kim, S W; Hyun, J S; Moon, D G; Yang, S-K; Ryu, J K; Yang, D Y; Moon, K H; Min, K S; Park, J K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the change of erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction (ED). Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection was an open-label, prospective, multicenter and single-arm study designed to measure the duration of erection in men with ED receiving a flexible dose of vardenafil over an 8-week treatment period. Patients were instructed to take vardenafil 10 mg 60 min before attempting the intercourse. Vardenfil could be increased to 20 mg or decreased to 5 mg concerning patients' efficacy and safety. Following the initial screening, patients entered a 4-week treatment-free run-in phase and 8-week treatment period, during which they were instructed to attempt intercourse at least four times on four separate days. A total of 95 men were enrolled in 10 centers. After the 8 weeks treatment, the mean duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was statistically superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. After an 8-week treatment, the duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was 9.39 min. There were significant benefits with vardenafil in all domains of International Index of Erectile Function. Secondary efficacy end points included success rate of penetration, maintaining erection, ejaculation and satisfaction were superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. There was a significant correlation between duration of erection with other sexual factors. Also partner's sexual satisfaction was increased with vardenafil. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Vardenafil was safe and well tolerated. Vardenafil therapy provided a statistically superior duration of erection leading to successful intercourse in men with ED with female partner. PMID:25471318

  14. Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection (EROS): an open-label, prospective, multicenter, single-arm study to investigate erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y S; Lee, S W; Park, K; Chung, W S; Kim, S W; Hyun, J S; Moon, D G; Yang, S-K; Ryu, J K; Yang, D Y; Moon, K H; Min, K S; Park, J K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the change of erection duration measured by stopwatch with flexible dose vardenafil administered for 8 weeks in subjects with erectile dysfunction (ED). Effect of levitra on sustenance of erection was an open-label, prospective, multicenter and single-arm study designed to measure the duration of erection in men with ED receiving a flexible dose of vardenafil over an 8-week treatment period. Patients were instructed to take vardenafil 10 mg 60 min before attempting the intercourse. Vardenfil could be increased to 20 mg or decreased to 5 mg concerning patients' efficacy and safety. Following the initial screening, patients entered a 4-week treatment-free run-in phase and 8-week treatment period, during which they were instructed to attempt intercourse at least four times on four separate days. A total of 95 men were enrolled in 10 centers. After the 8 weeks treatment, the mean duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was statistically superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. After an 8-week treatment, the duration of erection leading to successful intercourse was 9.39 min. There were significant benefits with vardenafil in all domains of International Index of Erectile Function. Secondary efficacy end points included success rate of penetration, maintaining erection, ejaculation and satisfaction were superior when patients were treated with vardenafil. There was a significant correlation between duration of erection with other sexual factors. Also partner's sexual satisfaction was increased with vardenafil. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Vardenafil was safe and well tolerated. Vardenafil therapy provided a statistically superior duration of erection leading to successful intercourse in men with ED with female partner.

  15. [The dose estimation to the population as a result of radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk Test area].

    PubMed

    Spiridonova, S I; Mukusheva, M K; Shubina, O A; Solomatin, V M; Epifanova, I E

    2008-01-01

    The results are presented from estimation of spatial distribution of 137Cs and 90Sr contamination densities in the areas of horses and sheep grazing within the Semipalatinsk Test Site. Dose burdens to various cohorts of the population living within the STS and consuming contaminated animal products are predicted. Doses of shepherds in the most contaminated pasture areas have been found to exceed the accepted limit (1 mSv/y). The conclusion is made about the need for further studies on the risk assessment of the STS population exposure above the accepted limits.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and buccal mucosal concentrations of a 15 milligram per kilogram of body weight total dose of liposomal amphotericin B administered as a single dose (15 mg/kg), weekly dose (7.5 mg/kg), or daily dose (1 mg/kg) in peripheral stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Paul O; Amsden, Jarrett R; McConnell, Scott A; Anaissie, Elias J

    2009-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of extended-interval dosing of prophylactic liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) in peripheral stem cell transplant recipients were evaluated. The patients received L-AMB daily at 1 mg/kg of body weight or weekly at 7.5 mg/kg or received L-AMB as a single dose (15 mg/kg). The buccal mucosal tissue concentrations of L-AMB were measured. Of the 24 patients enrolled, 5 withdrew after the initial dose due to an infusion-related reaction (n = 2) or significant increases in the serum creatinine (Scr) levels (n = 3). Weekly L-AMB dosing (7.5 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.300 microg/ml for the first 7 days and >0.220 microg/ml for 7 days after the second dose. A single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.491 microg/ml for at least 7 seven days. These concentrations are within the range of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and are at the lower limits of the MICs for Aspergillus spp. Extended-interval dosing produced buccal mucosal tissue concentrations well in excess of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and Aspergillus spp. Infusion-related reactions occurred in 24% of the patients. Baseline and end-of-study Scr, electrolyte (K+, Mg2+, PO4), and serum transaminase levels were similar across the dosage groups. Five (31%) patients met the nephrotoxicity definition prior to completion of the study. Patients in the weekly or single-dose groups experienced nephrotoxicity significantly faster than the patients in the daily dosing cohort. A weekly L-AMB dose (7.5 mg/kg) or a single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced sufficient concentrations in plasma and highly vascular tissue to warrant further studies of the safety, efficacy, and practicality of the weekly prophylactic administration of L-AMB. PMID:19546359

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Buccal Mucosal Concentrations of a 15 Milligram per Kilogram of Body Weight Total Dose of Liposomal Amphotericin B Administered as a Single Dose (15 mg/kg), Weekly Dose (7.5 mg/kg), or Daily Dose (1 mg/kg) in Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Gubbins, Paul O.; Amsden, Jarrett R.; McConnell, Scott A.; Anaissie, Elias J.

    2009-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of extended-interval dosing of prophylactic liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) in peripheral stem cell transplant recipients were evaluated. The patients received L-AMB daily at 1 mg/kg of body weight or weekly at 7.5 mg/kg or received L-AMB as a single dose (15 mg/kg). The buccal mucosal tissue concentrations of L-AMB were measured. Of the 24 patients enrolled, 5 withdrew after the initial dose due to an infusion-related reaction (n = 2) or significant increases in the serum creatinine (Scr) levels (n = 3). Weekly L-AMB dosing (7.5 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.300 μg/ml for the first 7 days and >0.220 μg/ml for 7 days after the second dose. A single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.491 μg/ml for at least 7 seven days. These concentrations are within the range of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and are at the lower limits of the MICs for Aspergillus spp. Extended-interval dosing produced buccal mucosal tissue concentrations well in excess of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and Aspergillus spp. Infusion-related reactions occurred in 24% of the patients. Baseline and end-of-study Scr, electrolyte (K+, Mg2+, PO4), and serum transaminase levels were similar across the dosage groups. Five (31%) patients met the nephrotoxicity definition prior to completion of the study. Patients in the weekly or single-dose groups experienced nephrotoxicity significantly faster than the patients in the daily dosing cohort. A weekly L-AMB dose (7.5 mg/kg) or a single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced sufficient concentrations in plasma and highly vascular tissue to warrant further studies of the safety, efficacy, and practicality of the weekly prophylactic administration of L-AMB. PMID:19546359

  18. Pharmacokinetics and buccal mucosal concentrations of a 15 milligram per kilogram of body weight total dose of liposomal amphotericin B administered as a single dose (15 mg/kg), weekly dose (7.5 mg/kg), or daily dose (1 mg/kg) in peripheral stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Paul O; Amsden, Jarrett R; McConnell, Scott A; Anaissie, Elias J

    2009-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of extended-interval dosing of prophylactic liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) in peripheral stem cell transplant recipients were evaluated. The patients received L-AMB daily at 1 mg/kg of body weight or weekly at 7.5 mg/kg or received L-AMB as a single dose (15 mg/kg). The buccal mucosal tissue concentrations of L-AMB were measured. Of the 24 patients enrolled, 5 withdrew after the initial dose due to an infusion-related reaction (n = 2) or significant increases in the serum creatinine (Scr) levels (n = 3). Weekly L-AMB dosing (7.5 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.300 microg/ml for the first 7 days and >0.220 microg/ml for 7 days after the second dose. A single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced mean plasma concentrations of >0.491 microg/ml for at least 7 seven days. These concentrations are within the range of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and are at the lower limits of the MICs for Aspergillus spp. Extended-interval dosing produced buccal mucosal tissue concentrations well in excess of the MICs reported in the literature for susceptible strains of Candida and Aspergillus spp. Infusion-related reactions occurred in 24% of the patients. Baseline and end-of-study Scr, electrolyte (K+, Mg2+, PO4), and serum transaminase levels were similar across the dosage groups. Five (31%) patients met the nephrotoxicity definition prior to completion of the study. Patients in the weekly or single-dose groups experienced nephrotoxicity significantly faster than the patients in the daily dosing cohort. A weekly L-AMB dose (7.5 mg/kg) or a single L-AMB dose (15 mg/kg) produced sufficient concentrations in plasma and highly vascular tissue to warrant further studies of the safety, efficacy, and practicality of the weekly prophylactic administration of L-AMB.

  19. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  20. Semi-micro column high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection for quantification of aspirin and salicylic acid and its application to patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Yuichi; Yamane, Tomoko; Ishimatsu, Takashi; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    A simultaneous determination of aspirin (ASA) and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), in human serum by a semi-micro column HPLC-UV was developed. A relatively small size of serum sample (100 microL) containing ASA and SA was cleaned up by a simple solid phase extraction. A good separation of ASA and SA could be achieved within 25 min using a semi-micro ODS column with an eluent of MeOH/0.7 mm phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.5) = 50:50 (v/v). The calibration curves for ASA and SA showed good linearity (r = 0.999) with the detection limits 114 and 38 ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. ASA and SA in patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin were determined, and the concentration ranges obtained for ASA and SA were 1.2-2.2 and 0.5-57.3 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:17221906

  1. Semi-micro column high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection for quantification of aspirin and salicylic acid and its application to patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Yuichi; Yamane, Tomoko; Ishimatsu, Takashi; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    A simultaneous determination of aspirin (ASA) and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), in human serum by a semi-micro column HPLC-UV was developed. A relatively small size of serum sample (100 microL) containing ASA and SA was cleaned up by a simple solid phase extraction. A good separation of ASA and SA could be achieved within 25 min using a semi-micro ODS column with an eluent of MeOH/0.7 mm phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.5) = 50:50 (v/v). The calibration curves for ASA and SA showed good linearity (r = 0.999) with the detection limits 114 and 38 ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. ASA and SA in patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin were determined, and the concentration ranges obtained for ASA and SA were 1.2-2.2 and 0.5-57.3 microg/mL, respectively.

  2. Issues related to estimating potential radiological doses from treatment, storage, and disposal facilities handling waste containing trace amounts of radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, L.E.; Nimmagadda, M.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Ma, C.W.; Wheeler, T.; Owens, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    A simplified calculational model has been developed to permit a rapid, yet realistic, estimate of potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility. The waste-handling operations include transport, handling, storage, incineration, and landfilling of waste containing trace amounts of radioactive materials. The main objective of the model is to provide a radiological assessment methodology that can be used in a waste clearance strategy that addresses US Department of Energy mixed-waste moratorium issues. The model was developed on the basis of previous detailed studies of eight TSD facilities and incorporates the essential features of such a facility. The model provides a simplified physical concept of the potential human exposure associated with the radioactive contents of the chemical wastes. Issues pertaining to the development of the model, as well as application and future use, are discussed. Specifically, these issues include physical model approximations, isotope selection, waste-handling operations, and selection of input parameters. Also, pathway and isotope selection criteria are discussed relative to the previous TSD sites studied. This model is being considered for additional development as a waste clearance strategy tool.

  3. INTERNAL DOSES OF THREE PERSONS STAYING 110 KM SOUTH OF THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION DURING THE ARRIVAL OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES BASED ON DIRECT MEASUREMENTS.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Osamu; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tani, Kotaro; Kim, Eunjoo; Momose, Takumaro

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe the results of direct measurements made on three persons who stayed in Tokai-mura, a village located ∼110 km south of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), during the arrival of significant radioactive plumes released from the FDNPS as a consequence of the Tohoku earthquake/tsunami/FDNPS accident in March 2011. These measurements were made using a NaI(Tl) spectrometer and a whole-body counter shortly after the accident. Their thyroid equivalent doses ((131)I) were estimated to be 0.9-1.4 mSv under the assumption of acute intake via inhalation on 15 March, when the first significant release event was observed. Although greatly depending on the physicochemical form of iodine, the intake amount ratios of (131)I to (137)Cs for the three subjects were calculated as 2.7-3.7, which were much smaller than the radioactivity ratio (7.8) found in air sampling at the same site. PMID:26868009

  4. Naturally occurring radioactivity in some Swedish concretes and their constituents - Assessment by using I-index and dose-model.

    PubMed

    Döse, M; Silfwerbrand, J; Jelinek, C; Trägårdh, J; Isaksson, M

    2016-05-01

    The reference level for effective dose due to gamma radiation from building materials and construction products used for dwellings is set to 1 mSv per year (EC, 1996, 1999), (CE, 2014). Given the specific conditions presented by the EC in report 112 (1999) considering building and construction materials, an I-index of 1 may generate an effective dose of 1 mSv per year. This paper presents a comparison of the activity concentrations of (4)(0)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th of aggregates and when these aggregates constitute a part of concrete. The activity concentration assessment tool for building and construction materials, the I-index, introduced by the EC in 1996, is used in the comparison. A comparison of the I-indices values are also made with a recently presented dose model by Hoffman (2014), where density variations of the construction material and thickness of the construction walls within the building are considered. There was a ∼16-19% lower activity index in concretes than in the corresponding aggregates. The model by Hoffman further implies that the differences between the I-indices of aggregates and the concretes' final effective doses are even larger. The difference is due, mainly to a dilution effect of the added cement with low levels of natural radioisotopes, but also to a different and slightly higher subtracted background value (terrestrial value) used in the modeled calculation of the revised I-index by Hoffman (2014). Only very minimal contributions to the annual dose could be related to the water and additives used, due to their very low content of radionuclides reported. PMID:26942843

  5. Naturally occurring radioactivity in some Swedish concretes and their constituents - Assessment by using I-index and dose-model.

    PubMed

    Döse, M; Silfwerbrand, J; Jelinek, C; Trägårdh, J; Isaksson, M

    2016-05-01

    The reference level for effective dose due to gamma radiation from building materials and construction products used for dwellings is set to 1 mSv per year (EC, 1996, 1999), (CE, 2014). Given the specific conditions presented by the EC in report 112 (1999) considering building and construction materials, an I-index of 1 may generate an effective dose of 1 mSv per year. This paper presents a comparison of the activity concentrations of (4)(0)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th of aggregates and when these aggregates constitute a part of concrete. The activity concentration assessment tool for building and construction materials, the I-index, introduced by the EC in 1996, is used in the comparison. A comparison of the I-indices values are also made with a recently presented dose model by Hoffman (2014), where density variations of the construction material and thickness of the construction walls within the building are considered. There was a ∼16-19% lower activity index in concretes than in the corresponding aggregates. The model by Hoffman further implies that the differences between the I-indices of aggregates and the concretes' final effective doses are even larger. The difference is due, mainly to a dilution effect of the added cement with low levels of natural radioisotopes, but also to a different and slightly higher subtracted background value (terrestrial value) used in the modeled calculation of the revised I-index by Hoffman (2014). Only very minimal contributions to the annual dose could be related to the water and additives used, due to their very low content of radionuclides reported.

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of a combined DTaP-IPV vaccine compared with separate DTaP and IPV vaccines when administered as pre-school booster doses with a second dose of MMR vaccine to healthy children aged 4-6 years.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven; Friedland, Leonard R; Schuind, Anne; Howe, Barbara

    2006-08-28

    Combination vaccines represent one solution to the problem of increased numbers of injections during single clinic visits. A combined DTaP-IPV (Infanrix-IPV) vaccine has been developed for use as a pre-school booster. Four hundred healthy children aged 4-6 years previously primed with 4 doses of DTaP vaccine (Infanrix), 3 doses of poliovirus vaccine and 1 dose of MMR vaccine were randomized to receive single doses of either the combined DTaP-IPV vaccine or separate DTaP and IPV vaccines in a Phase II trial (DTaP-IPV-047). All children also received a second dose of MMR vaccine. Immunogenicity was assessed in serum samples taken before and 1 month after booster administration. Safety was actively assessed for 42 days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of the DTaP-IPV vaccine to separate DTaP and IPV vaccines was demonstrated for all DTaP antigen booster response rates and poliovirus geometric mean titers of antibody ratios. Post-vaccination, > or =99.4% of children in both groups had seroprotective levels of anti-diphtheria and anti-tetanus antibodies (> or =0.1IU/mL) and seroprotective anti-poliovirus antibody titers (> or =1:8). All children in both groups were seropositive for measles, mumps and rubella antibodies, with similar post-vaccination geometric mean concentrations/titers. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of solicited local or general symptoms, unsolicited symptoms and serious adverse events between the two groups. This combined DTaP-IPV appeared safe and immunogenic when given as a booster dose at 4-6 years of age. The DTaP-IPV vaccine had no negative effect on the response to co-administered MMR vaccine, making it well-suited for use as a pre-school booster.

  7. Radioactivity measurement of primordial radionuclides in and dose evaluation from marble and glazed tiles used as covering building materials in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ş; Varinlioğlu, A

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the natural radioactivity arising from primordial radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) in marble and glazed tile samples used covering building materials in Turkey were carried out by gamma-ray spectrometer with a high purity germanium detector. The mean activity concentrations of the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in marble and glazed tile samples were found as 8.2, 5.5 and 58.1 Bq kg(-1) and 81.2, 65.4 and 450.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radiation doses received by occupants of buildings in which the sample marble and glazed tiles might be used are estimated using measured activity concentrations of constituent primordial radionuclides and dose conversion factors evaluated by the European Commission from models of tile use. Results obtained are presented for each radionuclide, analysed and compared with relevant national and international legislation, guidance and report, and with the results obtained from other studies. Results show that the use of such decorative building materials in the construction of domestic homes or workplaces in Turkey is unlikely to lead to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  8. Sustained immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered as a two-dose schedule in adolescent girls: Five-year clinical data and modeling predictions from a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F; Ferguson, Linda; Peters, Klaus; Dionne, Marc; Behre, Ulrich; Schulze, Karin; Hillemanns, Peter; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized, partially-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00541970), the licensed formulation of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (20 μg each of HPV-16/18 antigens) was found highly immunogenic up to 4 y after first vaccination, whether administered as a 2-dose (2D) schedule in girls 9–14 y or 3-dose (3D) schedule in women 15–25 y. This end-of-study analysis extends immunogenicity and safety data until Month (M) 60, and presents antibody persistence predictions estimated by piecewise and modified power law models. Healthy females (age stratified: 9–14, 15–19, 20–25 y) were randomized to receive 2D at M0,6 (N = 240 ) or 3D at M0,1,6 (N = 239). Here, results are reported for girls 9–14 y (2D) and women 15–25 y (3D). Seropositivity rates, geometric mean titers (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and geometric mean titer ratios (GMRs; 3D/2D; post-hoc exploratory analysis) were calculated. All subjects seronegative pre-vaccination in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort were seropositive for anti-HPV-16 and −18 at M60. Antibody responses elicited by the 2D and 3D schedules were comparable at M60, with GMRs close to 1 (anti-HPV-16: 1.13 [95% confidence interval: 0.82–1.54]; anti-HPV-18: 1.06 [0.74–1.51]). Statistical modeling predicted that in 95% of subjects, antibodies induced by 2D and 3D schedules could persist above natural infection levels for ≥ 21 y post-vaccination. The vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile in both groups. In conclusion, a 2D M0,6 schedule of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine was immunogenic for up to 5 y in 9–14 y-old girls. Statistical modeling predicted that 2D-induced antibodies could persist for longer than 20 y. PMID:26176261

  9. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan. PMID:23831927

  10. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan.

  11. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Villalba, L; Montero-Cabrera, M E; Manjón-Collado, G; Colmenero-Sujo, L; Rentería-Villalobos, M; Cano-Jiménez, A; Rodríguez-Pineda, A; Dávila-Rangel, I; Quirino-Torres, L; Herrera-Peraza, E F

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222Rn, 226Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from <0.03 up to 1.34 Bq l-1. Generally, radium activity concentration was <0.16 Bq l-1, with some exceptions; in spring water of San Diego de Alcalá, in contrast, the value reached approximately 5.3 Bq l-1. Radon activity concentration obtained throughout the state was from 1.0 to 39.8 Bq l-1. A linear correlation between uranium and radon dissolved in groundwater of individual wells was observed near Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 microSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality.

  12. Analytical results and effective dose estimation of the operational Environmental Monitoring Program for the radioactive waste repository in Abadia de Goiás from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Edison; Tauhata, Luiz; dos Santos, Eliane Eugenia; da Silveira Corrêa, Rosangela

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program for the Radioactive waste repository of Abadia de Goiás, which was originated from the accident of Goiania, conducted by the Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-CO) of the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (CNEN), from 1998 to 2008. The results are related to the determination of (137)Cs activity per unit of mass or volume of samples from surface water, ground water, depth sediments of the river, soil and vegetation, and also the air-kerma rate estimation for gamma exposure in the monitored site. In the phase of operational Environmental Monitoring Program, the values of the geometric mean and standard deviation obtained for (137)Cs activity per unit of mass or volume in the analyzed samples were (0.08 ± 1.16) Bq.L(-1) for surface and underground water, (0.22 ± 2.79) Bq.kg(-1) for soil, and (0.19 ± 2.72) Bq.kg(-1) for sediment, and (0.19 ± 2.30) Bq.kg(-1) for vegetation. These results were similar to the values of the pre-operational Environmental Monitoring Program. With these data, estimations for effective dose were evaluated for public individuals in the neighborhood of the waste repository, considering the main possible way of exposure of this population group. The annual effective dose obtained from the analysis of these results were lower than 0.3 mSv.y(-1), which is the limit established by CNEN for environmental impact in the public individuals indicating that the facility is operating safely, without any radiological impact to the surrounding environment.

  13. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-03-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine (/sup 131/I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of /sup 131/I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of /sup 131/I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that /sup 131/I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined.

  15. RECONSTRUCTION OF EXTERNAL DOSES TO OZYORSK RESIDENTS DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF INERT RADIOACTIVE GASES FROM THE STACKS OF THE “MAYAK” PA REACTOR PLANT FROM 1948 TO 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Glagolenko, Y. V.; Drozhko, Evgeniy G.; Mokrov, Y.; Rovny, Sergey I.; Beregich, D. A.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Ivanov, I. A.; Alexakhin, A. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    The article provides the results of reconstruction of external doses to population due to atmospheric releases of inert radioactive gases of activation (41Ar) and fission origin (xenon and krypton isotopes) from the stacks of the “Mayak” PA industrial reactors from 1948 to 1989. Calculation of surface volumetric activities was performed using the RATCHET code. Dose estimate was obtained in a semi-infinite cloud approximation. It is demonstrated that more than 90% of external dose was accumulated from 1948 to 1956. It is established that, generally, the calculation results are in good agreement with archive instrument monitoring data on exposure dose rate and thermoluminescence dosimetry data. External effective doses to the residents of Ozyorsk obtained for different age groups of population with consideration of shielding properties of buildings and duration of time spent outdoors were estimated in the range from 16 to 23 mSv.

  16. Modification of the Monte Carlo method for calculation of the influence of unknown placement of solid radioactive waste on the uncertainty of dose fields at different overall container dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Androsenko, P. A.; Kolganov, K. M. Mogulyan, V. G.

    2012-12-15

    An approach to estimating the uncertainty of initial data in calculations by the Monte Carlo method is considered. The relative geometrical position of parts of the analyzed system is assumed to be unknown. The influence of different approximations in the description of the geometrical shape of system objects is studied. The effect of unknown location and approximate shape description of solid radioactive waste in the container on the magnitude of dose fields is considered for photon transport problems.

  17. Measurements of natural radioactivity concentration in drinking water samples of Shiraz city and springs of the Fars province, Iran, and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Simin; Faghihi, Reza; Sina, Sedigheh; Derakhshan, Shahrzad

    2013-11-01

    The Fars province is located in the south-west region of Iran where different nuclear sites has been established, such as Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant. In this research, 92 water samples from the water supplies of Shiraz city and springs of the Fars province were investigated with regard to the concentrations of natural radioactive elements, total uranium, (226)Ra, gross alpha and gross beta. (226)Ra concentration was determined by the (222)Rn emanation method. To measure the total uranium concentration, a laser fluorimetry analyzer (UA-3) was used. The mean concentration of (226)Ra in Shiraz's water resources was 23.9 mBq l(-1), while 93 % of spring waters have a concentration <2 mBq l(-1). The results of uranium concentration measurements show the mean concentrations of 7.6 and 6 μg l(-1) in the water of Shiraz and springs of Fars, respectively. The gross alpha and beta concentrations measured by the evaporation method were lower than the limit of detection of the measuring instruments used in this survey. The mean annual effective doses of infants, children and adults from (238)U and (226)Ra content of Shiraz's water and spring waters were estimated. According to the results of this study, the activity concentration in water samples were below the maximum permissible concentrations determined by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Finally, the correlation between (226)Ra and total U activity concentrations and geochemical properties of water samples, i.e. pH, total dissolve solids and SO4(-2), were estimated. PMID:23650643

  18. Measurements of natural radioactivity concentration in drinking water samples of Shiraz city and springs of the Fars province, Iran, and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Simin; Faghihi, Reza; Sina, Sedigheh; Derakhshan, Shahrzad

    2013-11-01

    The Fars province is located in the south-west region of Iran where different nuclear sites has been established, such as Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant. In this research, 92 water samples from the water supplies of Shiraz city and springs of the Fars province were investigated with regard to the concentrations of natural radioactive elements, total uranium, (226)Ra, gross alpha and gross beta. (226)Ra concentration was determined by the (222)Rn emanation method. To measure the total uranium concentration, a laser fluorimetry analyzer (UA-3) was used. The mean concentration of (226)Ra in Shiraz's water resources was 23.9 mBq l(-1), while 93 % of spring waters have a concentration <2 mBq l(-1). The results of uranium concentration measurements show the mean concentrations of 7.6 and 6 μg l(-1) in the water of Shiraz and springs of Fars, respectively. The gross alpha and beta concentrations measured by the evaporation method were lower than the limit of detection of the measuring instruments used in this survey. The mean annual effective doses of infants, children and adults from (238)U and (226)Ra content of Shiraz's water and spring waters were estimated. According to the results of this study, the activity concentration in water samples were below the maximum permissible concentrations determined by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Finally, the correlation between (226)Ra and total U activity concentrations and geochemical properties of water samples, i.e. pH, total dissolve solids and SO4(-2), were estimated.

  19. The fate of the orally administered bile acid sequestrant, polidexide, in humans.

    PubMed

    Simons, L A

    1976-01-01

    1. The metabolic fate of the insoluble bile acid sequestrant polidexide, (poly-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl] polyglycerylenedextran hydrochloride), was studied in four adult humans following the oral administration of the 14C-labelled substance. 2. The mean cumulative recovery of 14C in faeces was 95-3% (s.e.m. = 1-1) of the administered dose, while mean cumulative recovery in urine was 0-37% (s.e.m. = 0-13) of the oral dose. 3. Only background levels of radioactivity were detectable in plasma samples taken 1-3 days after administration of tracer. 4. The findings suggested that polidexide was not absorbed from the gastrointestinal in man to any significant degree.

  20. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of FV-100, a Novel Oral Anti-Herpes Zoster Nucleoside Analogue, Administered in Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Young Adult and Elderly Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Pentikis, Helen S.; Matson, Mark; Atiee, George; Boehlecke, Brian; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey W.; Morris, Amy

    2011-01-01

    FV-100 is the prodrug of the highly potent anti-varicella zoster virus bicyclic nucleoside analogue CF-1743. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral FV-100, 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were conducted: (i) a single-ascending-dose study in 32 healthy subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100-, 200-, 400-, and 800-mg doses) with an evaluation of the food effect in the 400-mg group; (ii) a multiple-ascending-dose study in 48 subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100 mg once daily [QD], 200 mg QD, 400 mg QD, 400 mg twice a day, and 800 mg QD for 7 days); and (iii) a 2-part study in subjects aged 65 years and older with a single 400-mg dose in 15 subjects and a 400-mg QD dosing regimen for 7 days in 12 subjects. FV-100 was rapidly and extensively converted to CF-1743, the concentration of which remained above that required to reduce viral activity by 50% for the 24-hour dosing period. Renal excretion of CF-1743 was very low. A high-fat meal reduced exposure to CF-1743; a low-fat meal did not. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly subjects were comparable to those for the younger subjects. FV-100 was well tolerated by all subjects. The pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of FV-100 support its continued investigation for the treatment of herpes zoster and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with once-daily dosing and without dose modifications for elderly or renally impaired patients. PMID:21444712

  2. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides. PMID:25627942

  3. Disposition of decabromobiphenyl ether in rats dosed intravenously or by feeding

    SciTech Connect

    El Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The disposition of /sup 14/C-labeled decabromobiphenyl ether (DBBE) in male Fischer rats dosed by feeding (0.025-5.0% of the diet) or intravenously (1 mg/kg) was determined. For rats dosed by feeding, intestinal absorption of DBBE was evident in that the intact compound was present in extracts of liver. For these rats, the size of the liver increased with increasing concentration of DBBE in the diet. Liver contained a maximum of 0.449% of the administered radioactivity at 24 h after feeding rats a diet containing 0.0277% (/sup 14/C)DBBE; no other organ or tissue contained more than 0.26%. The total amount of radioactivity found in tissues was less than 1% of the dose. Of the radioactivity recovered in the feeding experiments, more than 99% was in the feces and gut contents at 72 h; a maximum of 0.012% of the dose was in the urine. In the feces of rats fed (/sup 14/C)DBBE, there were three metabolites, which together comprised 1.5-27.9% of the radioactivity. Since absorption was minimal, most of the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE apparently took place in the gastrointestinal tract. The metabolites increased in percent of total radioactivity with the content of DBBE in the diet, an indication that enzyme induction in intestinal bacteria may have occurred at the higher doses. More extensive metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DBBE occurred after intravenous administration; only 37% of the radioactivity in the feces was unchanged DBBE. At 72 h after dosing, fecal excretion accounted for 70% of the dose; only 0.129% appeared in the urine. Muscle retained 12.9% and skin 7.25% of the radioactivity administered. In 4 h, rats with biliary cannulas excreted in the bile 7.17% of the intravenously administered radioactivity; less than 1% was excreted as intact DBBE. Biliary excretion was apparently the major route for elimination of the intravenously administered compound.

  4. The immunogenicity and safety of a single 0.5 mL dose of virosomal subunit influenza vaccine administered to unprimed children aged ≥6 to <36 months: data from a randomized, Phase III study.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Montinaro, Valentina; Bianchini, Sonia; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Pariani, Elena; Amendola, Antonella; Fabiano, Valentina; Pivetti, Valentina; Zanetti, Alessandro; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2012-11-19

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of a single 0.5 mL dose of the seasonal virosomal subunit influenza vaccine (Inflexal V, Crucell, Switzerland) in 205 healthy, unprimed children aged at least 6 to <36 months, evaluated at four weeks post-vaccination and seven months from baseline. Of the enrolled children, 102 received one single 0.5 mL dose and 103 received the standard two 0.25 mL doses given four weeks apart. Both treatments evoked an immune response that satisfied the EMA/CHMP criteria for yearly vaccine licensing for all three vaccine strains. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences between the groups at four weeks post-vaccination. Furthermore, immunogenicity was maintained seven months after the first vaccination after both the 0.5 mL and standard two 0.25 mL doses. Adverse events were comparable between groups and were as expected according to the safety profile of the vaccine; overall, the vaccine was well tolerated. Our results show that a single 0.5 mL dose effectively and safely provided long-term immunogenicity to all three influenza strains in unprimed children aged at least 6 to <36 months.

  5. Absorption of orally administered amphotericin B lozenges.

    PubMed

    Ching, M S; Raymond, K; Bury, R W; Mashford, M L; Morgan, D J

    1983-07-01

    The systemic absorption of amphotericin B, administered as a 10 mg lozenge, was investigated in 14 patients with malignancies, who received three or four doses daily during chronic administration. The mean plasma amphotericin B concentration, measured 3 h after the morning dose on from 1-20 occasions over a 1-80 day period, ranged among subjects from 46 +/- 13 ng/ml (s.d., n = 20) to 136 +/- 25 ng/ml (n = 19). Using the previously reported intravenous clearance of the drug, the fraction of the dose absorbed was estimated at 8.3-9.9%. This is considerably greater than that estimated from earlier reports (0.2-0.9%), which used much higher oral doses (2-10 g/day). PMID:6882617

  6. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity.

  8. Disposition of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone in rats dosed orally, intravenously, or topically.

    PubMed

    el Dareer, S M; Kalin, J R; Tillery, K F; Hill, D L

    1986-01-01

    Administration to rats of oral doses of [14C]-2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (HMB) in the range of 3.01-2570 mg/kg revealed that a dose-dependent elimination process was operative at the highest dose. Urinary excretion (63.9-72.9% of the dose in 72 h) was the major route for elimination of radioactivity. An intravenous dose (4.63 mg/kg) distributed rapidly throughout the body of rats and appeared in the urine in an amount (67.4%) similar to those for the oral doses. Rats absorbed large portions of doses of [14C]HMB administered topically, either as an ethanolic solution (50, 200, or 800 micrograms/rat) or formulated in a lotion (50 micrograms/rat). For rats with biliary cannulas, 36.6% of the radioactivity of an intravenous dose (4.46 mg/kg) appeared in the bile in 4 h; the initial half-life for biliary elimination was 40 min. In the bile, at least five radioactive components, none of which was intact HMB, were present. The two major components were glucuronides of HMB and demethylated HMB, and a third was probably a sulfate ester of hydroxylated HMB. In urine, there were nine radioactive components, two of which were unchanged HMB and its glucuronide.

  9. Determination of Appropriate Weight-Based Cutoffs for Empiric Cefazolin Dosing Using Data from a Phase 1 Pharmacokinetics and Safety Study of Cefazolin Administered for Surgical Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients Aged 10 to 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Michael L.; Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Cetnarowski, Wes

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 40 years of worldwide usage, relatively few data have been published on the pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in pediatric surgical patients. The primary objectives of this study were to examine the pharmacokinetics and safety of cefazolin in children 10 to 12 years of age (inclusive) receiving 1 or 2 g of cefazolin, based on body weight. This multiple-center, open-label study enrolled pediatric patients electively scheduled for surgical procedures who required cefazolin as part of their routine clinical management. Patients weighing ≥25 to <50 kg received a 1-g dose, and patients weighing ≥50 to ≤85 kg received a 2-g dose. Postdose pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were conducted following drug administration. Cefazolin concentration-time data were analyzed by using both noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetics methods. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to identify appropriate weight-based cutoffs for the dosing of children aged 10 to 17 years of age. Twelve patients were enrolled in this study and provided the requisite pharmacokinetic data. In general, cefazolin was well tolerated. The mean cefazolin terminal elimination half-life, clearance, and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity in this population were 1.95 h, 0.804 ml/min/kg, and 607 mg · h/liter, respectively. Patients weighing 50 to 60 kg exhibited elevated cefazolin exposures. Observed pharmacokinetic parameters and simulation results indicated that a weight-based cutoff of 60 kg is predicted to provide cefazolin exposure consistent with that observed in normal, healthy adults at recommended doses for surgical prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01904357.) PMID:25941220

  10. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  11. Pharmacokinetic profile of rizatriptan 10-mg tablet and 10-mg orally disintegrating tablet administered with or without water in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomized, single-dose, 3-period crossover study.

    PubMed

    Swan, Suzanne K; Alcorn, Harry; Rodgers, Anthony; Hustad, Carolyn M; Ramsey, Karen E; Woll, Susan; Skobieranda, Franck

    2006-02-01

    This open-label, 3-period crossover study compared the plasma concentration profiles of rizatriptan tablet, orally disintegrating tablet with water (ODTc), and ODT without water (ODTs) in 24 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. At each period, subjects received a single dose of either 10-mg rizatriptan tablet, 10-mg rizatriptan ODTs, or 10-mg rizatriptan ODTc. The authors hypothesized that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) than ODTs and that ODTc has a greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) than tablet. A secondary end point was to compare the time of occurrence of the maximum rizatriptan plasma concentration (t(max)) of each dosing method. ODTc had a statistically significantly greater geometric mean AUC(0-2h) compared with ODTs (33.84 h x ng/mL vs 18.83 h x ng/mL; P < .001). ODTc had a slightly, but not statistically significantly, greater geometric mean AUC(0-1h) compared with rizatriptan tablet (17.07 h x ng/mL vs 13.32 h x ng/mL). The median t(max) was 0.67 hours for ODTc and tablet and 1.33 hours for ODTs. ODTc showed a slightly, but not significantly, faster rate of absorption compared with tablet. ODTs with water had a faster rate of absorption than ODTc. Future studies are needed to determine whether this pharmacokinetic difference produces differential efficacy in a clinical setting. PMID:16432269

  12. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide in rats dosed intravenously, orally, and topically and in guinea pigs dosed topically

    SciTech Connect

    el Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.; Barnett, J.W. Jr. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine the metabolic disposition of (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide (MBTS), male and female rats were dosed topically. Topical doses were 36.1 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBT and 33.6 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBTS. Although more MBT passed through the skin than MBTS and although, relative to rats, guinea pigs absorbed a greater percentage of the dose (33.4% compared to 16.1-17.5% of the MBT and 12.2% compared to 5.94-7.87% for MBTS), the disposition of radioactivity derived from the two compounds was similar. Washing of the skin removed more of the radioactivity from guinea pigs than from rats. For both sexes of rats dosed intravenously with (14C)MBT or (14C)MBTS, disposition of the compounds was similar. In 72 h, 90.9-101% of the dose appeared in the urine and 3.79-15.1% in the feces. At this time, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes. Oral dosing of rats for 14 d with unlabeled MBT prior to a single dose of (14C)MBT or with unlabeled MBTS prior to a single dose of (14C)MBTS (0.730 mg/kg). For both sexes, disposition of the compounds was similar. At 96 h after dosing, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes, most of which was bound to the membranes. For both compounds and sexes, 60.8-101% of the radioactivity administered appeared in the urine and 3.46-9.99% in the feces in 96 h. At the time, only trace amounts of radioactivity remained in tissues other than blood. Of these tissues, thyroid contained the highest concentration. In the urine, there was a detectable MBT or MBTS, but there were two metabolites, one of which was identified as a thioglucuronide derivative of MBT. The other was possibly a sulfonic acid derivative of MBT.

  13. Radioactivity in municipal sewage and sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J E; Fenner, F D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the environmental consequences of discharges of radioactivity from a large medical research facility into municipal sewage, specifically 131I activity in sewage sludge, and the radiation exposures to workers and the public when sludges are incinerated. METHODS: The authors measured radioactivity levels in the sludge at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, Waste Water Treatment Plant following radioiodine treatments of two patients at the University of Michigan hospital complex and performed a series of calculations to estimate potential radiation doses due to releases of 131I from incineration of sewage sludge. RESULTS: Approximately 1.1% of the radioactive 131I administered therapeutically to patients was measured in the primary sludge. Radiation doses from incineration of sludge were calculated to be 0.048 millirem (mrem) for a worker during a period in which the incinerator filtration system failed, a condition that could be considered to represent maximum exposure conditions, for two nine-hour days. Calculated results for a more typically exposed worker (with the filtration system in operation and a 22-week period of incineration) yielded a committed effective dose equivalent of 0.066 mrem. If a worker were exposed to both conditions during the period of incineration, the dose was calculated to be 0.11 mrem. For a member of the public, the committed effective dose equivalent was calculated as 0.003 mrem for a 22-week incineration period. Exposures to both workers and the public were a very small fraction of a typical annual dose (about 100 mrem excluding radon, or 300 mrem with radon) due to natural background radiation. Transport time to the treatment plant for radioiodine was found to be much longer than that of a normal sewage, possibly due to absorption of iodine by organic material in the sewer lines. The residence time of radioiodine in the sewer also appears to be longer than expected. CONCLUSION: 131I in land-applied sludge presents few

  14. Malaria-Infected Mice Live Until At Least Day 30 After A New Artemisinin-Derived Thioacetal Thiocarbonate Combined with Mefloquine Are Administered Together In A Single, Low, Oral Dose

    PubMed Central

    Jacobine, Alexander M.; Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Slack, Rachel D.; Tripathi, Abhai K.; Sullivan, David J.; Posner, Gary H.

    2012-01-01

    In only three steps and in 21–67% overall yields from the natural trioxane artemisinin, a series of 21 new trioxane C-10 thioacetals was prepared. Upon receiving a single oral dose of only 6 mg/kg of the monomeric trioxane 12c combined with 18 mg/kg of mefloquine hydrochloride, Plasmodium berghei-infected mice survived on average 29.8 days after infection. Two of the four mice in this group had no parasites detectable in their blood on day 30 after infection and they behaved normally and appeared healthy. One of the mice had 11% blood parasitemia on day 30, and one mouse in this group died on day 29. Of high medicinal importance, the efficacy of this ACT chemotherapy is much better than (almost double) the efficacy under the same conditions using as a positive control the popular trioxane drug artemether plus mefloquine hydrochloride (average survival time of only 16.5 days). PMID:22891714

  15. Overflow of Radioactive Water from K Basins

    SciTech Connect

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-10-06

    This report documents the dose calculations for the postulated K Basin overflow accident using current methods to model the environmental doses for radioactive releases into the Columbia River and the air.

  16. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  17. Accounting for Shared and Unshared Dosimetric Uncertainties in the Dose Response for Ultrasound-Detected Thyroid Nodules after Exposure to Radioactive Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, F. Owen; Moroz, Brian; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Beck, Harold; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Weinstock, Robert M.; Simon, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetic uncertainties, particularly those that are shared among subgroups of a study population, can bias, distort or reduce the slope or significance of a dose response. Exposure estimates in studies of health risks from environmental radiation exposures are generally highly uncertain and thus, susceptible to these methodological limitations. An analysis was published in 2008 concerning radiation-related thyroid nodule prevalence in a study population of 2,994 villagers under the age of 21 years old between August 1949 and September 1962 and who lived downwind from the Semi-palatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan. This dose-response analysis identified a statistically significant association between thyroid nodule prevalence and reconstructed doses of fallout-related internal and external radiation to the thyroid gland; however, the effects of dosimetric uncertainty were not evaluated since the doses were simple point “best estimates”. In this work, we revised the 2008 study by a comprehensive treatment of dosimetric uncertainties. Our present analysis improves upon the previous study, specifically by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainties in dose estimation and risk analysis, and differs from the 2008 analysis in the following ways: 1. The study population size was reduced from 2,994 to 2,376 subjects, removing 618 persons with uncertain residence histories; 2. Simulation of multiple population dose sets (vectors) was performed using a two-dimensional Monte Carlo dose estimation method; and 3. A Bayesian model averaging approach was employed for evaluating the dose response, explicitly accounting for large and complex uncertainty in dose estimation. The results were compared against conventional regression techniques. The Bayesian approach utilizes 5,000 independent realizations of population dose vectors, each of which corresponds to a set of conditional individual median internal and external doses for the 2,376 subjects. These 5

  18. Accounting for shared and unshared dosimetric uncertainties in the dose response for ultrasound-detected thyroid nodules after exposure to radioactive fallout.

    PubMed

    Land, Charles E; Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Beck, Harold; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Weinstock, Robert M; Simon, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetic uncertainties, particularly those that are shared among subgroups of a study population, can bias, distort or reduce the slope or significance of a dose response. Exposure estimates in studies of health risks from environmental radiation exposures are generally highly uncertain and thus, susceptible to these methodological limitations. An analysis was published in 2008 concerning radiation-related thyroid nodule prevalence in a study population of 2,994 villagers under the age of 21 years old between August 1949 and September 1962 and who lived downwind from the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan. This dose-response analysis identified a statistically significant association between thyroid nodule prevalence and reconstructed doses of fallout-related internal and external radiation to the thyroid gland; however, the effects of dosimetric uncertainty were not evaluated since the doses were simple point "best estimates". In this work, we revised the 2008 study by a comprehensive treatment of dosimetric uncertainties. Our present analysis improves upon the previous study, specifically by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainties in dose estimation and risk analysis, and differs from the 2008 analysis in the following ways: 1. The study population size was reduced from 2,994 to 2,376 subjects, removing 618 persons with uncertain residence histories; 2. Simulation of multiple population dose sets (vectors) was performed using a two-dimensional Monte Carlo dose estimation method; and 3. A Bayesian model averaging approach was employed for evaluating the dose response, explicitly accounting for large and complex uncertainty in dose estimation. The results were compared against conventional regression techniques. The Bayesian approach utilizes 5,000 independent realizations of population dose vectors, each of which corresponds to a set of conditional individual median internal and external doses for the 2,376 subjects. These 5,000 population

  19. Comparative analysis between radiation doses obtained by EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel and established analytical methods for the population of radioactively contaminated territories

    PubMed Central

    Ivannikov, Alexander I.; Skvortsov, Valeri G.; Stepanenko, Valeri F.; Zhumadilov, Kassym Sh.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of radiation doses determined by tooth enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by an acknowledged analytical method is performed for individual doses and for average doses in population of some settlements of the Bryansk region (Russia), which have been contaminated after the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The analysis is performed for doses in the range of 0–200 mGy for individuals and in the range of 0–50 mGy for the averaged populations. The method of orthogonal distance linear regression is used for the analysis. For both data sets the slopes of the regression line close to unity and the intercept close to zero are obtained, which indicates that doses determined by these two methods agree with each other. The root-mean-square difference between the results of EPR and analytical methods is estimated to be 35 mGy for individual doses and 15 mGy for averaged doses, which is consistent with uncertainty of these methods. PMID:24771210

  20. Analgesic efficacy of orally administered buprenorphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, L B; Thompson, A C; Martin, T; Kristal, M B

    2001-02-01

    The analgesic effect of orally administered buprenorphine was compared with that induced by a standard therapeutic injected dose (0.05 mg/kg of body weight, s.c.) in male Long-Evans rats. Analgesia was assessed by measuring pain threshold, using the hot-water tail-flick assay before and after administration of buprenorphine. The results suggest that a commonly used formula for oral buprenorphine in flavored gelatin, at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, does not increase pain threshold in rats. Instead, oral buprenorphine doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg were necessary to induce significant increases in pain threshold. However, these doses had to be administered by orogastric infusion because the rats would not voluntarily eat flavored gelatin containing this much buprenorphine. The depth of analgesia induced by these infused doses was comparable to that induced by the clinically effective s.c. treatment (0.05 mg/kg).

  1. Combined Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (HibMenC) or serogroup C and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate (and HibMenCY) vaccines are well-tolerated and immunogenic when administered according to the 2,3,4 months schedule with a fourth dose at 12-18 months of age.

    PubMed

    Habermehl, Pirmin; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Sänger, Roland; Mächler, Gudrun; Boutriau, Dominique

    2010-08-01

    Combined HibMenCY and HibMenC conjugate vaccines may facilitate inclusion of vaccination against MenC and MenY into routine vaccination schedules, without additional injections. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of vaccination with three different formulations of a novel HibMenCY-conjugate vaccine, or a HibMenC-conjugate vaccine was assessed. Infants were randomized to receive either Hib(2.5 µg)-MenC(5 µg)-MenY(5 µg)-TT, Hib(5 µg)-MenC(10 µg)-MenY(10 µg)-TT, Hib(5 µg)-MenC(5 µg)-MenY(5 µg)-TT or Hib(5 µg)-MenC(5 µg)-TT vaccines co-administered with DTPa-HBV-IPV at 2-3-4 months of age. Controls received licensed conjugate MenC-CRM197 vaccine co-administered with DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib. A fourth dose was administered to a subset of children at age 12-18 months. Anti-PRP concentrations and meningococcal bactericidal (rSBA-MenC/Y) titres were measured prior to and one month post third and fourth vaccination dose. Solicited local, general symptoms and unsolicited adverse events were recorded for 7 and 30 days after each vaccination, respectively. Post dose 3, all subjects had anti-PRP antibody levels ≥ 0.15 µg/ml and rSBA-MenC ≥ 1:8. 97.0%-98.6% of HibMenCY recipients had rSBA-MenY ≥ 1:8. Pre-dose-4, 95.6%-100% of HibMenCY and HibMenC recipients had anti-PRP ≥ 0.15 µg/ml and 90.7%-97.6% recipients had rSBA-MenC titres ≥ 1:8. In HibMenCY groups, 78.6%-86.7% had persisting rSBA-MenY ≥ 1:8. The post-dose-4 response was robust after all vaccines with all subjects having anti-PRP ≥ 1 µg/ml and 92.3%-100% rSBA-MenC ≥ 1:128. All HibMenCY recipients had rSBA-MenY ≥ 1:128. Vaccination with the novel Hib-meningococcal vaccines had a safety profile similar to control. HibMenCY and HibMenC conjugate vaccine formulations given at 2-3-4 months of age with a fourth dose in the second year of life were immunogenic and had a comparable safety profile to licensed vaccines. (study 792014 and 100381;www.clinicaltrial.govID:NCT00129116)

  2. Estimation of thyroid doses and health risks resulting from the intake of radioactive iodine in foods and drinking water by the citizens of Tokyo after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Michio; Oki, Taikan

    2012-06-01

    The release of radioactive materials from the Fukushima nuclear power plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 poses health risks. In this study, the intake of iodine 131 (I-131) in drinking water and foods (milk, dairy products, and vegetables) by citizens of Tokyo was estimated. The effects of countermeasures (restrictions on the distribution of foods and the distribution of bottled water for infants) on reducing intake were also evaluated. The average thyroid equivalent doses without countermeasures from 21 March 2011 were 0.42 mSv in adults, 1.49 mSv in children, and 2.08 mSv in infants. Those with countermeasures were 0.28, 0.97, and 1.14 mSv respectively, reductions of 33%, 35%, and 45%. Drinking water contributed more to intake by adults and children than foods. The intake of I-131 within the first 2 weeks was more than 80% of the estimated intake, owing to its short half-life, indicating that rapid countermeasures are important in reducing intake. The average risks of cancer incidence and mortality due to I-131 for infants were estimated to be 3×10(-5) and 0.2×10(-5), respectively, lower than the annual risks of traffic accidents, naturally occurring radioactive material (potassium 40), and environmental pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles.

  3. Evaluation of radionuclide dose-calibrator measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Paras, P.; Comer, F.M.; Demeis, F.; Coursey, B.M.; Calhoun, J.M.; Golas, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    Performance data for radionuclide dose calibrators, which are primarily ionization chambers, are scarce. Large deviations have occasionally been reported, particularly for low photon energies, i.e., emissions from /sup 201/Tl, /sup 133/Xe. The volunteer user program (QB series) of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) (laboratory intercomparison quality control), supported by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS), for quality control of dose calibrators was suspended. The Atomic Industrial Forum (AIF) has a quality control program among radiopharmaceutical manufacturers but there is no user program in the US at this time, and the performance of dose calibrators in the field is not known. In addition, a number of professionals expressed a strong feeling for the continuation of the CAP program and the availability of standards for dose calibrators from NBS. The objective of this study is twofold: (a) to evaluate the accuracy of dose calibrator measurements for individual patient radioactivity administered doses, and (b) to provide certified sources of certain radionuclides to calibrate the instruments for these radionuclides.

  4. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  5. Efficacy of intravenously administered ibandronate in postmenopausal Korean women with insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung Jin; Kim, Beom-Jun; Lim, Kyeong Hye; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Hong Kyu; Kim, Ghi Su; Koh, Jung-Min

    2012-09-01

    We investigated rates of insufficient and over-responsiveness to orally administered bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women, and tested the efficacy of intravenous ibandronate in patients with insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates. Postmenopausal women were treated with either alendronate (70 mg/week; n = 88) or risedronate (35 mg/week; n = 84) for 1 year, and their response to orally administered bisphosphonates was assessed using serum C-telopeptide (CTX) levels. Insufficient responders were changed to once-quarterly intravenous ibandronate 3 mg injection (n = 13) or maintained on orally administered bisphosphonates (n = 19), according to patients' preference, for an additional 1 year. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between two orally administered bisphosphonate groups except the bone mineral density values at the lumbar spine. Insufficient rate was higher in the risedronate group (19.0 %) than in the alendronate group (8.0 %), using the premenopausal serum CTX median as a cut-off (P = 0.043). The over-response rate among the alendronate group (59.1 %) was significantly higher than that in the risedronate group (38.1 %), based on a serum CTX cut-off value of 0.100 ng/ml (P = 0.006). Intravenous ibandronate suppressed serum CTX levels to a significantly greater degree at 7 days after the second dosing (0.191 ± 0.110 ng/mL; P < 0.001) and 3 months after the fourth dosing (0.274 ± 0.159 ng/mL; P = 0.004) among insufficient responders, compared with post-oral/pre-intravenous levels (0.450 ± 0.134 ng/mL). Rates of insufficient and over-responsiveness to orally administered bisphosphonates were considerable, and a change to intravenous bisphosphonates may be considered in patients showing an insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates.

  6. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  7. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  8. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  9. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  10. Radioactive iodine therapy: Effect on functioning metastases of adenocarcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Seidlin, S.M.; Marinelli, L.D.; Oshry, E. )

    1990-09-01

    A case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the thyroid is reported in which treatment by means of radioactive iodine has been successful. The patient was completely thyroidectomized for malignant adenoma in 1923, with neither thyrotoxicosis then nor hypothyroidism postoperatively; 15 years later there developed classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism and severe pain in the lower back. In October 1939 a pulsating tumor removed from the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra proved to be metastatic thyroid adenocarcinoma (histologically well differentiated, with small follicles and colloid). In the next two years hyperthyroidism increased and roentgenograms revealed new metastases in the lungs, upper part of the right femur, second rib on the left side, left ilium, and skull. Roentgenologic irradiation of the metastases proved ineffectual. In March 1943 a tracer dose of radioactive iodine revealed iodine retention by all the known lesions and no evidence of residual thyroid tissue in the neck. Therapeutic amounts of radioactive iodine were administered orally between May and October 1943. Definite and lasting clinical improvement followed. In April 1944 and March 1945 additional I* was administered with a resultant disappearance of pain, increase in weight, and progressive change in all clinical criteria in the direction of hypothyroidism. Roentgenographic evidence pointed to an arrest if not a regression of the disease. No untoward effects followed this therapy. Radioactive iodine seems to be an effective therapeutic agent in the control of this type of tumor.

  11. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  12. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  13. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  14. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  15. Tissue distribution and excretion of radioactivity following administration of /sup 14/C-labeled deoxynivalenol to White Leghorn hens

    SciTech Connect

    Prelusky, D.B.; Hamilton, R.M.; Trenholm, H.L.; Miller, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    The disposition of (/sup 14/C)deoxynivalenol ((/sup 14/C)DON) administered to hens as either a single oral dose or consumed in spiked feed over a 6-day period was determined by tracing the specific radioactivity of tissues and excreta. Following a single intubated dose (2.2 mg (/sup 14/C)DON; 2.4 microCi/bird), the toxin was found to be poorly absorbed; peak plasma levels (2-2.5 hr post-treatment) accounted for less than 1% of the administered dose. Maximum tissue residues were measured at 3 hr in all tissues (liver, kidney, brain, heart, spleen, proventriculus, gizzard, small intestine) except for fat, muscle, and oviduct which occurred at 6 hr postdosing. Among the organs, the highest activities were measured in kidney, liver, and spleen; however, these levels were equal to less than 500 ng DON equivalents/g tissue, and declined quickly. Clearance of radioactivity from tissue had an average half-life of 16.83 +/- 8.2 hr (range 7.7-33.3 hr, depending on the tissue). Elimination of the labeled toxin in excreta occurred rapidly; recovery of radioactivity accounted for 78.6, 92.1, and 98.5% of the dose by 24, 48, and 72 hr, respectively. In continuously dosed birds fed 2.2 mg unlabeled DON for 6 days followed by 2.2 mg (1.5 microCi) (/sup 14/C)DON for 6 days, accumulation of radioactivity in tissues did not occur. Maximum residual levels, which occurred in the kidneys, were only 60 ng DON equivalents/g. Estimated level of residues contained in the edible tissues amounted to only 13-16 micrograms DON/1.5 kg hen.

  16. Natural radioactivity in tap waters from the private wells in the surroundings of the former Žirovski Vrh uranium mine and the age-dependent dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Ljudmila; Rovan, Leja; Klemenčič, Hiacinta; Gantar, Ivan; Prosen, Helena

    2015-08-01

    Activity concentration of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po in tap water from selected springs and private wells in the area of the former uranium mine at Žirovski Vrh were determined. A total of 22 tap water samples were collected at consumer's houses. The results show that the activity concentrations of uranium in water samples are in range (0.17-372) and (0.22-362) mBq L(-1) for (238)U and (234)U, respectively. Radium activity concentrations are in range (0.14-16.7) and (0.9-11.7) mBq L(-1) for (226)Ra and (228)Ra, respectively. (210)Po activity concentration is in range (0.28-8.0) mBq L(-1) and can be regarded as the lowest amongst all analysed radionuclides. The range for (210)Pb is (0.5-24.6) mBq L(-1). Based on the results obtained for activity concentrations of six radionuclides, the committed effective dose for three different age groups of population were estimated. It was found that the committed effective dose was well below the recommended value of 100 μSv year(-1), ranging from 2.3 to 34.3 μSv year(-1) for adults, from 3.5 to 32.0 μSv year(-1) for children (7-12 years) and from 3.0 to 23.3 μSv year(-1) for infants. PMID:25874436

  17. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  18. Comparison of total costs of administering calcium polycarbophil and psyllium mucilloid in an institutional setting.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, R; Cimino, J A; Cooperman, J M; Kugel, R

    1990-01-01

    The total cost of administering calcium polycarbophil per unit dose (two tablets) was compared with that of administering psyllium mucilloid (one packet dissolved in 8 oz of water) in 20 elderly nursing-home residents. Times for printing labels, checking and initialing labels, gathering materials needed, and preparing and administering the medications were recorded during at least 50 observations in each treatment group. Total cost included nurses' and pharmacists' time, materials, and medications. Calcium polycarbophil doses were prepared and administered more quickly (mean, 49.5 sec) than psyllium mucilloid (105.3 sec). The mean cost of preparing and administering a unit dose was 28.2 for calcium polycarbophil tablets and 59.9 for psyllium mucilloid. The results suggest that the use of calcium polycarbophil tablets would save time and money in institutions in which laxatives are frequently administered.

  19. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  20. Radioactivity method.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactivity measurements have played an important role in geophysics since about 1935, and they have increased in importance to the present. The most important areas of application have been in petroleum and uranium exploration. Radioactivity measurements have proved useful in geologic mapping, as well as in specialized applications such as reactor-site monitoring. The technological development of the method has reached a plateau, and the future of the method for some applications will depend upon development of more sophisticated data processing and interpretation. -Author

  1. Biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous administration of (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in man

    SciTech Connect

    Ledger, J.E.; Watson, G.J.; Compston, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    The biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was studied in nine patients with T-tube bile drainage. The mean +/- SD 24-hr radioactivity excretion in T-tube bile expressed as a percentage of the administered dose was 6.7 +/- 2.9%; after correction for incomplete bile collection, the value obtained was 16.0 +/- 11.1%. Chloroform solubility of biliary radioactivity increased from 27.4 +/- 8.9% to 72.9 +/- 10.1% following incubation with beta-glucuronidase. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of chloroform extracts of bile revealed that most of the eluted radioactivity was more polar than (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3. No free (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was demonstrated. Thus in man, most of the biliary radioactivity excreted following (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is in the form of water-soluble compounds, mainly glucuronides. However, our results suggest that glucuronides of metabolites other than 25-OHD3 are predominantly formed.

  2. Disposition of cefixime in the material-fetal unit after an i. v. dose to pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin-Walega, E.; Barr, A.; Tonelli, A.P.; Shin, K.; Batra, V.K.

    1986-03-01

    Cefixime, a potent, broad spectrum oral cephalosporin, is currently undergoing clinical trials. To determine the extent of transfer of cefixime across the placenta to the fetus, a single dose of 17.8 mg/kg /sup 14/C-cefixime was administered to rats on day 18 of gestation via the caudal vein. Maternal serum and urine, fetal plasma and tissues, and placentae were sampled at appropriate times after dosing. Separate rats were subjected to whole body autoradiography. The half-life for elimination of radioactivity from both maternal serum and placentae was 6.9 hours. Elimination from fetal plasma and tissues was somewhat longer, 12.5 and 13.7 hours, respectively. However, based on a comparison of area under the curve, relative to maternal dose, exposure of the fetuses to cefixime was far less than that of placentae. Peak radioactivity in fetal plasma occurred at 2 hours and was less than 2% of the maternal peak at 0.5 hours after dosing. Whole body autoradiography showed the greatest radioactivity in maternal liver, kidney and intestines. Somewhat less radioactivity appeared in placentae and virtually none could be visualized within the amniotic sac. Overall, the data indicate that exposure of the rat fetus to cefixime after a single maternal dose is limited by the placenta.

  3. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  5. Computer Model Buildings Contaminated with Radioactive Material

    1998-05-19

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material.

  6. Radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.S.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1985-12-01

    Potential radiation doses from several scenarios involving nuclear attack on an unsheltered United States population are calculated for local, intermediate time scale and long-term fallout. Dose estimates are made for both a normal atmosphere and an atmosphere perturbed by smoke produced by massive fires. A separate section discusses the additional doses from nuclear fuel facilities, were they to be targeted in an attack. Finally, in an appendix the direct effects of fallout on humans are considered. These include effects of sheltering and biological repair of damage from chronic doses. 21 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. The Model 9977 Radioactive Material Packaging Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.

    2015-10-09

    The Model 9977 Packaging is a single containment drum style radioactive material (RAM) shipping container designed, tested and analyzed to meet the performance requirements of Title 10 the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A radioactive material shipping package, in combination with its contents, must perform three functions (please note that the performance criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations have alternate limits for normal operations and after accident conditions): Containment, the package must “contain” the radioactive material within it; Shielding, the packaging must limit its users and the public to radiation doses within specified limits; and Subcriticality, the package must maintain its radioactive material as subcritical

  8. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  9. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  10. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  11. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  12. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  13. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  14. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest

  15. [Investigation of radioactivity measurement of medical radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Kazutaka; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kida, Tetsuo; Yanagisawa, Masamichi; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Hideharu; Kusama, Keiji; Namiki, Nobuo; Okuma, Hiroshi; Fujimura, Yoko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2004-11-01

    To explore the possibility of which medical radioactive wastes could be disposed as general wastes after keeping them a certain period of time and confirming that their radioactivity reach a background level (BGL), we made a survey of these wastes in several nuclear medicine facilities. The radioactive wastes were collected for one week, packed in a box according to its half-life, and measured its radioactivity by scintillation survey meter with time. Some wastes could reach a BGL within 10 times of half-life, but 19% of the short half-life group (group 1) including 99mTc and 123I, and 8% of the middle half-life group (group 2) including 67Ga, (111)In, and 201Tl did not reach a BGL within 20 times of half-life. A reason for delaying the time of reaching a BGL might be partially attributed to high initial radiation dose rate or heavy package weight. However, mixing with the nuclides of longer half-life was estimated to be the biggest factor affecting this result. When disposing medical radioactive wastes as general wastes, it is necessary to avoid mixing with radionuclide of longer half-life and confirm that it reaches a BGL by actual measurement.

  16. Safety of florfenicol administered in feed to tilapia (Oreochromis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Schleis, Susan M.; Tuomari, Darrell; Endris, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of Aquaflor® (50% w/w florfenicol [FFC]) incorporated in feed then administered to tilapia for 20 days (2x the recommended duration) at 0, 15, 45, or 75 mg/kg body weight/day (0, 1, 3, or 5x the recommended dose of 15 mg FFC/kg BW/d) was investigated. Mortality, behavioral change, feed consumption, body size, and gross and microscopic lesions were determined. Estimated delivered doses were >96.9% of target. Three unscheduled mortalities occurred but were considered incidental since FFC-related findings were not identified. Feed consumption was only affected during the last 10 dosing days when the 45 and 75 mg/kg groups consumed only 62.5% and 55.3% of the feed offered, respectively. There were significant, dose-dependent reductions in body size in the FFC-dose groups relative to the controls. Treatment-related histopathological findings included increased severity of lamellar epithelial hyperplasia, increased incidence of lamellar adhesions, decreased incidence of lamellar telangiectasis in the gills, increased glycogen-type and lipid-type hepatocellular vacuolation in the liver, decreased lymphocytes, increased blast cells, and increased individual cell necrosis in the anterior kidney, and tubular epithelial degeneration and mineralization in the posterior kidney. These changes are likely to be of minimal clinical relevance, given the lack of mortality or morbidity observed. This study has shown that FFC, when administered in feed to tilapia at the recommended dose (15 mg FFC/kg BW/day) for 10 days would be well tolerated.

  17. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  18. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  19. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  20. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  1. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  2. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  3. Natural radioactivity in groundwater--a review.

    PubMed

    Dinh Chau, Nguyen; Dulinski, Marek; Jodlowski, Pawel; Nowak, Jakub; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Sleziak, Monika; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2011-12-01

    The issue of natural radioactivity in groundwater is reviewed, with emphasis on those radioisotopes which contribute in a significant way to the overall effective dose received by members of the public due to the intake of drinking water originating from groundwater systems. The term 'natural radioactivity' is used in this context to cover all radioactivity present in the environment, including man-made (anthropogenic) radioactivity. Comprehensive discussion of radiological aspects of the presence of natural radionuclides in groundwater, including an overview of current regulations dealing with radioactivity in drinking water, is provided. The presented data indicate that thorough assessments of the committed doses resulting from the presence of natural radioactivity in groundwater are needed, particularly when such water is envisaged for regular intake by infants. They should be based on a precise determination of radioactivity concentration levels of the whole suite of radionuclides, including characterisation of their temporal variability. Equally important is a realistic assessment of water intake values for specific age groups. Only such an evaluation may provide the basis for possible remedial actions.

  4. Determination of 14C residue in eggs of laying hens administered orally with [14C] sulfaquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B; Rummel, N; Smith, D

    2004-06-01

    Ten layer hens were dosed for 5 consecutive days with 6.2 mg kg(-1) [14C] sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). Eggs were collected from the hens during the 5-day dosing period and during a 10-day post-dose withdrawal period. Egg yolk and albumen were separated and assayed for total radioactive residues (TRR) using a combustion oxidizer and liquid scintillation counting techniques. Significant amounts of radioactivity were detected on the second day of dosing (greater than 24h after the initial dose) in both egg yolk and albumen. First eggs were collected about 8 h after dosing; the second-day eggs were collected during 8-h period after the second dose. Radioactive residues reached a maximum on the fifth day of dosing in albumen, whereas on the second day of withdrawal in egg yolk, the peak TRR levels in albumen were about threefold higher than in yolk. Thereafter, the TRR levels declined rapidly in albumen and were detectable up to withdrawal day 6, whereas the TRR levels in egg yolk declined more slowly and were detectable up to withdrawal day 10. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the parent drug sulfaquinoxaline was the major component in both the egg albumen and yolk. Additionally, this work suggests that egg yolk is the appropriate matrix for monitoring SQX residues PMID:15204532

  5. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  6. Biological and imaging characteristics and radiation dose rates associated with the use of technetium-99m-labelled imidodiphosphate in the horse.

    PubMed

    Riddolls, L J; Byford, G G; McKee, S L

    1996-04-01

    The biological and imaging characteristics of technetium-99m imidodiphosphate (Tc99m-IDP) were measured in 4 horses once and in 1 horse twice. All computational results are expressed with 95.5% (mean +/- 2 SD) confidence limits. The clearance half-time of the radiopharmaceutical from the blood was 29.6 +/- 2.3 min. The percentage of the administered dose circulating in the whole-blood volume at 4 h was 3.9 +/- 0.8%. The Tc99m-IDP radioactivity confined at the plasma fraction of the whole blood at 4 h was 85.3 +/- 1.6%. At 8 h, approximately 45 +/- 16% of the dose administered had been excreted via the urine. The mean effective half-time of the urine activity concentration was 1.1 +/- 0.3 h. The ratios of bone-to-soft tissue activities increased with time postinjection. Urinary radioactivity concentration measurements and radiation dose rate measurements immediately behind the elbows were analysed and it was determined that 24 h is an appropriate radioisolation time for mature horses administered 3.7 GBq (100 mCi) Tc99m-IDP.

  7. Chemical Dosing and First-Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladky, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    College students encounter a variety of first-order phenomena in their mathematics and science courses. Introductory chemistry textbooks that discuss first-order processes, usually in conjunction with chemical kinetics or radioactive decay, stop at single, discrete dose events. Although single-dose situations are important, multiple-dose events,…

  8. Evaluation of Terrorist Interest in Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.N.; Langsted, J.M.; Young, M.E.; Day, J.E.

    2006-07-01

    Since September 11, 2001, intelligence gathered from Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan, and the ensuing terrorist activities, indicates nuclear material security concerns are valid. This paper reviews available information on sealed radioactive sources thought to be of interest to terrorists, and then examines typical wastes generated during environmental management activities to compare their comparative 'attractiveness' for terrorist diversion. Sealed radioactive sources have been evaluated in numerous studies to assess their security and attractiveness for use as a terrorist weapon. The studies conclude that tens of thousands of curies in sealed radioactive sources are available for potential use in a terrorist attack. This risk is mitigated by international efforts to find lost and abandoned sources and bring them under adequate security. However, radioactive waste has not received the same level of scrutiny to ensure security. This paper summarizes the activity and nature of radioactive sources potentially available to international terrorists. The paper then estimates radiation doses from use of radioactive sources as well as typical environmental restoration or decontamination and decommissioning wastes in a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) attack. These calculated doses indicate that radioactive wastes are, as expected, much less of a health risk than radioactive sources. The difference in radiation doses from wastes used in an RDD are four to nine orders of magnitude less than from sealed sources. We then review the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) definition of 'dangerous source' in an adjusted comparison to common radioactive waste shipments generated in environmental management activities. The highest waste dispersion was found to meet only category 1-3.2 of the five step IAEA scale. A category '3' source by the IAEA standard 'is extremely unlikely, to cause injury to a person in the immediate vicinity'. The obvious conclusion of the

  9. Radioactivity concentrations in soils of the Xiazhuang granite area, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Xin; Wu, Xin-Min; Jiang, Zhong-Ying; Wang, Wei-Xing; Lu, Ji-Gen; Lin, Jun; Wang, Lei-Ming; Hsia, Yuan-Fu

    2005-08-01

    The natural radioactivity of soils at the Xiazhuang granite massif of Southern China has been studied. The radioactivities of 55 samples have been measured with a low-background HPGe detector. The radioactivity concentrations of (238)U and (40)K ranged from 40.2 to 442 and from 442 to 913 Bq/kg, respectively, while the radioactivity concentration of (232)Th varied only slightly. In order to evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the absorbed dose rate (D ), the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index (H(ex)) have been calculated and compared with the internationally approved values. The study provides background radioactivity concentrations in a granite area, specifically, the area in the vicinity of a uranium mine in Southern China. The data can be used in exploring granite-type uranium deposits.

  10. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Usang, M. D. Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-29

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  11. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-01

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  12. PRODUCTION OF RADIOACTIVE IODINE.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHLYER,D.J.

    2001-08-08

    Probably the most widely used cyclotron produced radiohalogen is I-123. It has gradually replaced I-131 as the isotope of choice for diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals containing radioiodine. It gives a much lower radiation dose to the patient and the gamma ray energy of 159 keV is ideally suited for use in a gamma camera. The gamma ray will penetrate tissue very effectively without excessive radiation dose. For this reason, it has in many instances replaced the reactor produced iodine-131 (Lambrecht and Wolf 1973). A great number of radiopharmaceuticals have been labeled using I-123 and the number is increasing. One of the most promising uses of I-123 is in the imaging of monoclonal antibodies to localize and visualize tumors. However, preclinical and clinical experiences with radiolabeled antibodies have not realized the expectations regarding specificity and sensitivity of tumor localization with these agents. It appears that much of the administered activity is not associated with the tumor site and only a small fraction actually accumulates there. Work continues in this area and tumor-associated antigens can be targets for specific antibody reagents.

  13. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  14. Dose-dependent elimination of 8-methoxypsoralen in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, P.; Pacula, C.M.; Gerber, N.; Mays, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a photoactive linear furocoumarin, is effective in the treatment of several diseases, including psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and T-cell leukemia. Recently, a specific extraction procedure for /sup 14/C-8-MOP showed that the elimination of 8-MOP in the rat was dose-dependent. Similar pharmacokinetic studies were undertaken in mice. Purity of /sup 14/C-8-MOP, verified by a four-tube countercurrent distribution using hexane (8 ml) and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer (0.1 M 15 ml) as described by Bush, was >98% and distributed with a partition coefficient of 3.86. Male CD-1 mice were each given an i.p. dose of 10 or 50 mg/kg of /sup 14/C-8-MOP (3.4 ..mu..Ci/mg) sacrificed at timed intervals, homogenized in 150 ml of 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and a portion (0.8 ml) of the homogenate used to quantify 8-MOP as described above. The elimination half-life measured in the first 45 min was 7.4 min at 10 mg/kg and 95 min at 50 mg/kg. A similar half-life of 9.2 min was measured in mice given an i.v. dose 10 mg/kg of 8-MOP. Explanations of dose-dependent elimination include enzyme saturation, product inhibition or both. Between 58-80% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. Nine peaks of radioactivity were observed in the urine by HPLC, two of which coeluted with 5,8-dihydroxypsoralen and 6-(7-hydroxy-8-methoxycoumaryl)-acetic acid.

  15. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  16. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  17. Lymphatic absorption and metabolism of orally administered testosterone undecanoate in man.

    PubMed

    Horst, H J; Höltje, W J; Dennis, M; Coert, A; Geelen, J; Voigt, K D

    1976-09-15

    [3H]-testosterone undecanoate ([3H]TU) was administered orally to 4 patients with a thoracic duct catheter after neck dissection surgery. Appearance of radioactivity in lymph, plasma and urine was measured at different times. Metabolites of TU in these fluids were investigated. Peak levels of radioactivity appeared simultaneously in lymph and plasma (2.5-5 h after administration) while the excretion in urine was highest approximately 2 h after the plasma and lymph peak. The main compounds appearing in the lymph were TU and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone undecanoate (5alpha-DHTU), but 5beta-DHTU could not be detected. In plasma almost all metabolites were probably conjugated. During the first 24 h approximately 40% of the administered radioactivity was excreted in the urine. The total amount of radioactivity excreted in the urine during the first week was 45-48%. The predominant urinary metabolites were testosterone- and androsterone-glucuronide. The results indicate that TU is metabolized partly in the intestinal wall. The remaining TU and newly-formed 5alpha-DHTU, at least partly, are absorbed via the lymphatic system. PMID:966635

  18. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the

  19. Transplacental and mammary passage of radioactivity in rats treated vaginally and orally with (/sup 14/C)propranolol

    SciTech Connect

    Buttar, H.S.; Moffatt, J.H.; Bura, C.

    1988-01-01

    Single doses (10 mg/kg) of an aqueous solution of (14C)propranolol were administered either orally (po) or intravaginally (ivg) on gestational d 15, or on postpartum d 7-10. Upon ivg administration, (14C)propranolol was quickly transferred to systemic circulation and the mean blood (14C) concentrations were significantly greater during the first 0.25-2 h than in po dosed counterparts. About 98% of the ivg applied dose was absorbed after 6 h in gravid rats, and the combined 6-h excretions of radioactivity in the urine (ivg = 24.6%; po = 22.9%) and feces (ivg = 16.8%; po = 14.6%) were equivalent in both groups. At the end of 6 h, the levels of (14C) in the urinary bladder, adrenal, uterus, ovary, spleen, skeletal muscle, brain, heart, lung and fat were significantly higher in ivg treated rats than po dosed animals. Compared with the maternal plasma (ivg = 0.76; po = 0.88 microgram/ml), the mean concentrations of (14C) in the placentas were similar in both groups, while the amounts of (14C) were three to five times lower in the amniotic fluids and the fetuses of both po and ivg treated dams. In lactating rats, over 99% of the administered radioactivity was absorbed from the vagina within 6 h. The blood concentrations of (14C) were significantly elevated at 0.5 and 1 h in the per vaginam treated animals, and afterward the disappearance rate of (14C) followed a similar course in both groups. Following ivg application, the milk radioactivity peaked at 0.5 h and declined rapidly. However, the appearance of (14C) in milk was rather slow after oral dosing: the milk (14C) peaked between 2 and 3 h posttreatment and remained steady thereafter. The milk to blood (M/B) (14C) concentration ratios were markedly greater during 0.5 to 1 h in the ivg group than in their po dosed counterparts.

  20. Teaching Students to Administer the WISC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Yost

    1977-01-01

    A college level psychology course is described in which students were trained by both traditional and experimental methods to administer individual intelligence tests. Comparative analysis of performance by each group indicates that student motivation and performance is not greatly influenced by teaching method and that videotape demonstrations…

  1. Changes in Medications Administered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Johnson, Shella; Roman, Jaclyn; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to determine if there have been changes in the type and number of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) medications administered in schools since the introduction of long-acting stimulants. A survey was sent to 1,000 school nurses randomly selected from the National Association…

  2. Incorporation of radioactive polyunsaturated fatty acids into liver and brain of developing rat.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A J

    1975-03-01

    The incorporation of radioactivity from orally administered linoleic acid-1-14C, linolenic acid-1-14C, arachidonic acid-3H8, and docosahexaenoic acid-14C into the liver and brain lipids of suckling rats was studied. In both tissues, 22 hr after dosing, 2 distinct levels of incorporation were observed: a low uptake (from 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C) and a high uptake (from 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C). In adult rats, the incorporation of radioactivity into brain lipids from 18:2-1-14C and 20:4-3H was considerably lower than the incorporation into the brains of the young rats. In the livers of the suckling rats, the activity from the 18 carbon acids was associated mostly with the triglyceride fraction, whereas the activity from the 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C was concentrated in the phospholipid fraction. In the brain lipids, the activity from the different fatty apid fatty acids, some of the activity in the 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C experiments was associated with 20 and 22 carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids; however, radioactivity from orally administered 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C was incorporated intact into the tissue phospholipid to a much greater extent compared with the incorporation of radioactivity into 20:4 and 22:6 in the experiments where 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C, respectively, were administered. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed. Rat milk contains a wide spectrum of polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleate, linolenate, arachidonate, and docosahexaenoate. During the suckling period in the rat, there is a rapid deposition of 20:4 and 22:6 in the brain. The results of the present experiments suggested that dietary 20:4 and 22:6 were important sources of brain 20:4 and 22:6 in the developing rat.

  3. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  4. Safe Handling of Radioactive Materials. Recommendations of the National Committee on Radiation Protection. Handbook 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook is designed to help users of radioactive materials to handle the radioactive material without exposing themselves or others to radiation doses in excess of maximum permissible limits. The discussion of radiation levels is in terms of readings from dosimeters and survey instruments. Safety in the handling of radioactive materials in…

  5. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1989-06-01

    The project is divided into the technical tasks that address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates. These include source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, and food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. These estimates will be based on historical measurements and production information. The environmental transport task will reconstruct the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. Movement via the atmosphere, surface water (Columbia River), and ground water will be studied.

  7. Environmental biochemistry of current environmental levels of heavy metals: preparation of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity for metallobiochemical experiments on laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sabbioni, E; Goetz, L; Birattari, C; Bonardi, M

    1981-03-01

    Environmental toxicology research on dose-response relationships of heavy metals requires experiments on laboratory animals exposed to "low doses" of trace elements which should reflect "present or actual environmental levels" characteristic of polluted environments. Unfortunately no criteria exist to establish the "low doses" to which laboratory animals must be exposed, in practice the choice of the level used is made in an almost arbitrary manner. In order to define the "present environmental levels" of heavy metals which should be administered to laboratory animals an approach is suggested, based upon knowledge of the concentrations of trace elements in the diet, air and food as well as the fractions absorbed. Today daily intakes of trace elements by man are of the order of few micrograms or nanograms thus requiring the use of extremely sensitive analytical techniques to determine the very low amounts of heavy metals in tissues and cellular components. In these fields of research the use of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity appears particularly advantageous but requires considerable care during their preparation and use. The first part of this paper deals with a definition of the ranges of concentrations of trace elements which should be used for metabolic studies on laboratory animals when they are exposed via different routes such as ingestion, inhalation in injection; the second part describes the production of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity by proton activation in the cyclotron and by neutron irradiation in the nuclear reactor. Their use to label present levels of heavy metals under conditions adapted for biochemical purposes, as well as the preparation of different metal-labelled chemical species is also reported. Particular attention is directed to quality control of the radiotracer solutions which are administered to the animals including those of radioactivity concentrations, radioisotopic purity, radiochemical purity

  8. Analgesic and cardiovascular effects of centrally administered substance P.

    PubMed

    Clint, B D; Lipton, J M; Giesecke, A H

    1988-01-01

    Substance P (SP) injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into rabbits caused dose-related thermal analgesia with the maximum effect after 2 micrograms. The analgesia was measured by timing the withdrawal of the rabbit's ear from an infrared beam. Equimolar amounts of the related peptides physalaemin and eledoisin-related peptide also caused analgesia, but the SP N-terminal fragment (1-9) was inactive. This suggests that the analgesic message of SP resides within the C-terminal fragment. The analgesia caused by each peptide developed more rapidly but did not last as long as that after central injection of beta-endorphin. In separate experiments, 2 micrograms SP injected ICV increased blood pressure and decreased heart rate. The analgesic, bradycardic and pressor responses to central administration of SP were opposite to effects of peripherally administered SP, described previously. These results indicate that the effect induced by SP depends upon its specific neuroanatomical site of action.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole administered orally or by nasogastric tube in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth S; Varkey, Jay B; Krishna, Gopal; Vickery, Donna; Ma, Lei; Yu, Xin; Malavade, Darshana; Goodwin, Megan; Perfect, John R; Power, Eddie

    2009-07-01

    The use of a nasogastric tube is one means of administering antifungal therapy to critically ill patients unable to receive medication via the oral route. This was a phase 1, open-label, single-center, randomized, crossover study of posaconazole administered via nasogastric tube in healthy volunteers. Each subject received two 400-mg single doses of posaconazole, one administered orally and one administered by nasogastric tube, with a 7-day washout period between each dose. Posaconazole was administered 5 to 10 min after subjects received a nutritional supplement. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were obtained up to 120 h postdose. The analysis of variance estimate of the study population suggests that the posaconazole nasogastric tube administration least-square mean values of observed maximum concentration (C(max)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) to the last measurable concentration, and AUC to time infinity were 81%, 76%, and 77%, respectively, of the corresponding oral administration values. The reason for lower C(max) and AUC values when posaconazole is administered via the nasogastric tube route is not known. Oral and nasogastric tube administration of a single 400-mg dose of posaconazole suspension was safe and well tolerated in healthy adult subjects. The incidence and nature of treatment-emergent adverse events were similar with both administration routes, and no serious adverse events or clinically significant laboratory test or vital sign abnormalities were reported. Obtaining plasma posaconazole concentrations may be warranted when posaconazole is given to patients via a nasogastric tube to ensure adequate posaconazole exposure. Strategies that have been shown to enhance posaconazole exposure (such as splitting the dose and minimizing the use of proton pump inhibitors) may also be used.

  10. Dose fractionation and single subject studies in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Karthikayan

    Conventional positron emission tomography (PET) for cognitive brain studies typically relies on information collected from the distribution of decays following an injection of 15O-labeled water. The number of injections that can be administered to the subject are constrained by radiation dose to the subject and total length of the PET scan. The standard protocol involves 8--10 injections of H152O separated by approximately 5--7 half-lives of 15O. The number of activation conditions that can be realistically studied in a standard PET session is between 8 and 10. This work investigates the physiological response of a simulated subject to H152O injections that are administered in small doses (1--5 mCi) with short inter-injection intervals (40--180 seconds). A larger number of activation conditions are presented to the subject with a wider variation in the activation paradigm. Repeat conditions are studies. Signal averaging methods are feasible with this method of dose administration. Sinograms from scans with similar activation conditions are summed together before reconstruction. The signal in the primary activation region of the brain is shown to increase while suppressing the contribution of secondary activation regions in the brain. The contrast of the final image is similarly increased which leads to easier identification of the primary activation region. An automated H152O -production unit controlled by a PC running LabView software was developed to produce the dose required for the injection sequence by controlling the flow of H152O -vapor that diffuses across a semi-permeable membrane into saline. The unit is capable of producing H152O rapidly for both the standard and the proposed dose administration methods. The system also detects the bolus arrival time at the subject's lungs using a small external plastic detector. Activation sequence commences with the rise in radioactivity observed by the detector. The simulations indicate that inter-injection intervals

  11. Radioactive substances in tap water.

    PubMed

    Atsuumi, Ryo; Endo, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Kannotou, Yasumitu; Nakada, Masahiro; Yabuuchi, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    A 9.0 magnitude (M) earthquake with an epicenter off the Sanriku coast occurred at 14: 46 on March 11, 2011. TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP) was struck by the earthquake and its resulting tsunami. Consequently a critical nuclear disaster developed, as a large quantity of radioactive materials was released due to a hydrogen blast. On March 16(th), 2011, radioiodine and radioactive cesium were detected at levels of 177 Bq/kg and 58 Bq/kg, respectively, in tap water in Fukushima city (about 62km northwest of TEPCO F-1 NPP). On March 20th, radioiodine was detected in tap water at a level of 965 Bq/kg, which is over the value-index of restrictions on food and drink intake (radioiodine 300 Bq/kg (infant intake 100 Bq/kg)) designated by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Therefore, intake restriction measures were taken regarding drinking water. After that, although the all intake restrictions were lifted, in order to confirm the safety of tap water, an inspection system was established to monitor all tap water in the prefecture. This system has confirmed that there has been no detection of radioiodine or radioactive cesium in tap water in the prefecture since May 5(th), 2011. Furthermore, radioactive strontium ((89) Sr, (90)Sr) and plutonium ((238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu) in tap water and the raw water supply were measured. As a result, (89) Sr, (238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu were undetectable and although (90)Sr was detected, its committed effective dose of 0.00017 mSv was much lower than the yearly 0.1 mSv of the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality. In addition, the results did not show any deviations from past inspection results.

  12. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  13. Comparisons between radioactive and non-radioactive gas lantern mantles.

    PubMed

    Furuta, E; Yoshizawa, Y; Aburai, T

    2000-12-01

    Gas lantern mantles containing radioactive thorium have been used for more than 100 years. Although thorium was once believed to be indispensable for giving a bright light, non-radioactive mantles are now available. From the radioactivities of the daughter nuclides, we estimated the levels of radioactivity of 232Th and 228Th in 11 mantles. The mantles contained various levels of radioactivity from background levels to 1410 +/- 140 Bq. Our finding that radioactive and non-radioactive mantles are equally bright suggests that there is no advantage in using radioactive mantles. A remaining problem is that gas lantern mantles are sold without any information about radioactivity.

  14. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  15. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  16. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  17. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  18. 10 CFR 20.1302 - Compliance with dose limits for individual members of the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distribution, solubility, density, radioactive decay equilibrium, chemical form). ..., surveys of radiation levels in unrestricted and controlled areas and radioactive materials in effluents... annual dose limit; or (2) Demonstrating that— (i) The annual average concentrations of...

  19. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  20. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-04-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates for radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. These estimates will be based on historical measurements and production information. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Technical basis for establishing residual radioactive concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr. ); Meck, R.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the release of slightly radioactive property for unrestricted use. On July 3, 1990, the NRC published a Policy Statement concerning slightly radioactive materials that are below regulatory concern (BRC). The BRC Policy Statement establishes the framework within which the Commission will formulate rules or make licensing decisions to exempt from some or all regulatory controls certain practices involving small quantities of radioactive material.'' The heart of the NRC Policy Statement on BRC material is its individual and collective radiation dose limits. To ensure a uniform approach and consistent regulatory decisions, the NRC authorized the development of a comprehensive technical basis that considers the translation of residual contamination levels to annual dose. Radiation doses from residual contamination in buildings and soil are derived from a generic radiation exposure scenario analysis. This paper describes the development of the comprehensive technical basis for translating residual contamination levels to annual dose, provides the modeling details of an example scenario, and presents a comparison of results with existing guidance in Regulatory Guide 1.86. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Trials of intranasally administered rubella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hillary, I B

    1971-12-01

    No evidence of vaccine virus transmission was found in two studies where Wistar RA 27/3 rubella vaccine was administered intranasally. Vaccine was immunogenic in all of 23 vaccinated children in one study, while in the other only 5 of the 11 vaccinees developed antibody. The reduced seroconversion rate in the latter study appears to have been caused by one or a combination of factors, including the vaccination technique, the presence of infective nasal conditions in vaccinees and the titre of vaccine used.

  3. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9-14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9-14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49-1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97-5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54-1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82-3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9-14 years).

  4. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9-14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9-14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49-1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97-5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54-1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82-3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9-14 years

  5. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine administered according to 2- and 3-dose schedules in girls aged 9–14 years: Results to month 12 from a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting Fan; Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Lim, Fong Seng; Thollot, Franck; Oh, Helen May Lin; Lee, Bee Wah; Rombo, Lars; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Rouzier, Roman; Friel, Damien; De Muynck, Benoit; De Simoni, Stéphanie; Suryakiran, Pemmaraju; Hezareh, Marjan; Folschweiller, Nicolas; Thomas, Florence; Struyf, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18(2D)) vs. 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D)) in healthy girls aged 9–14 y. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive HPV-16/18(2D) at months (M) 0,6 (N = 359), HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M0,6 (N = 358) or HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M0,2,6 (N = 358). The primary objective was non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies by ELISA for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) at M7 in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I) and total vaccinated cohort, respectively. Secondary objectives included non-inferiority/superiority of HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7, non-inferiority/superiority at M12, HPV-16/18 neutralizing antibodies, frequencies of T-cells/B-cells, reactogenicity and safety. Antibody responses at M7 for HPV-16/18(2D) were superior to those for HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) (lower limit of 95% confidence interval for geometric mean titer ratio (GMR) was >1): HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) GMRs were 1.69 [1.49–1.91] for anti-HPV-16 and 4.52 [3.97–5.13] for anti-HPV-18; HPV-16/18(2D)/HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) GMRs were 1.72 [1.54–1.93] for anti-HPV-16 and 3.22 [2.82–3.68] for anti-HPV-18; p = 0.0001 for all comparisons. Non-inferiority/superiority was also demonstrated at M12. Among initially seronegative girls in the ATP-I, neutralizing antibody titers were at least 1.8-fold higher for HPV-16/18(2D) vs. HPV-6/11/16/18(2D) and HPV-6/11/16/18(3D) at M7 and M12. Frequencies of HPV-16/18-specific T-cells and B-cells were in similar ranges between groups. Reactogenicity and safety were in line with the known profile of each vaccine. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2 doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine compared with 2 or 3 doses of the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in girls (9–14

  6. Ocular toxicity from systemically administered xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The eye is considered as the most privileged organ because of the blood–ocular barrier that acts as a barrier to systemically administered xenobiotics. However, there has been a significant increase in the number of reports on systemic drug-induced ocular complications. If such complications are left untreated, then it may cause permanent damage to vision. Hence, knowledge of most recent updates on ever-increasing reports of such toxicities has become imperative to develop better therapy while minimizing toxicities. Areas covered The article is mainly divided into anterior and posterior segment manifestations caused by systemically administered drugs. The anterior segment is further elaborated on corneal complications where as the posterior segment is focused on optic nerve, retinal and vitreous complications. Furthermore, this article includes recent updates on acute and chronic ocular predicaments, in addition to discussing various associated symptoms caused by drugs. Expert opinion Direct correlation of ocular toxicities due to systemic drug therapy is evident from current literature. Therefore, it is necessary to have detailed documentation of these complications to improve understanding and predict toxicities. We made an attempt to ensure that the reader is aware of the characteristic ocular complications, the potential for irreversible drug toxicity and indications for cessation. PMID:22803583

  7. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  8. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  9. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  10. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  11. Absorption and effectiveness of orally administered low molecular weight collagen hydrolysate in rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Kamiyama, Mari; Shimizu, Muneshige; Kamiyama, Shin; Taguchi, Yasuki; Sone, Hideyuki; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Furukawa, Yuji; Komai, Michio

    2010-01-27

    Collagen, a major extracellular matrix macromolecule, is widely used for biomedical purposes. We investigated the absorption mechanism of low molecular weight collagen hydrolysate (LMW-CH) and its effects on osteoporosis in rats. When administered to Wistar rats with either [(14)C]proline (Pro group) or glycyl-[(14)C]prolyl-hydroxyproline (CTp group), LMW-CH rapidly increased plasma radioactivity. LMW-CH was absorbed into the blood of Wistar rats in the peptide form. Glycyl-prolyl-hydroxyproline tripeptide remained in the plasma and accumulated in the kidney. In both groups, radioactivity was retained at a high level in the skin until 14 days after administration. Additionally, the administration of LMW-CH to ovariectomized stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats increased the organic substance content and decreased the water content of the left femur. Our findings show that LMW-CH exerts a beneficial effect on osteoporosis by increasing the organic substance content of bone.

  12. Comparison of Four Commercial One-Dose Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccines Administered to Pigs Challenged with PCV2 and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus at 17 Weeks Postvaccination To Control Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex under Korean Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changhoon; Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Under Korean field conditions, coinfection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is most commonly observed in porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Despite the wide use of PCV2 vaccination, PRDC remains a serious respiratory problem. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of 4 one-dose PCV2 vaccines on 3-week-old pigs with an experimental PCV2-PRRSV challenge at 17 weeks postvaccination. Regardless of which commercial PCV2 vaccine was used, the vaccination of piglets at 3 weeks of age was efficacious against cochallenge of PCV2 and PRRSV, on the basis of growth performance and PCV2-associated lesions. However, the inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 and the PCV2 vaccines induced higher PCV2-specific neutralizing antibody (NA) titers and PCV2-specific gamma interferon-secreting cells and lower PCV2 viremia levels than the two PCV2 subunit vaccines. The vaccination of piglets against PCV2 at 3 weeks of age was effective in reducing PCV2 viremia and PCV2-associated lesions during the finishing period, which is an age at which pigs are frequently affected by PRDC caused by coinfection with PCV2 and PRRSV under Korean field conditions. PMID:24403524

  13. Absorption, Distribution, and Excretion of the Investigational Agent Orteronel (TAK-700) in Healthy Male Subjects: A Phase 1, Open-Label, Single-Dose Study.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ajit; Pusalkar, Sandeepraj; Li, Yuexian; Prakash, Shimoga

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the absorption, distribution, and excretion of orteronel, an investigational, nonsteroidal, reversible, selective 17,20-lyase inhibitor. Six healthy male subjects received a single 400-mg dose of radiolabeled [(14) C]-orteronel (18.5 kBq). The pharmacokinetics of [(14) C]-radioactivity, orteronel, and the primary metabolite M-I were characterized by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and mass balance recovery of [(14) C]-radioactivity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and accelerator mass spectrometry. Median time to maximum observed concentration of [(14) C]-radioactivity was 2.5 hours (plasma/whole blood) and of orteronel was 1 hour (plasma). Mean terminal half-life for [(14) C]-radioactivity in plasma and whole blood was 9.46 and 7.39 hours, respectively. For [(14) C]-radioactivity, the geometric mean whole blood-to-plasma ratios for maximum observed plasma/whole-blood concentration, area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to last quantifiable concentration (AUC0-last ), and AUC0-inf (AUC from time 0 to infinity) were 1.04, 0.92, and 0.93, respectively. Dose recovery accounted for 95.9% of the administered orteronel dose; the majority of excretion occurred by 96 hours postdose. The principal excretion route was via urine (mean, 77.5%; including 49.7% unchanged drug and 16.3% M-I) compared with 18.4% via feces. Three mild adverse events were reported; none were considered serious or related to orteronel. PMID:27163496

  14. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one of us (MV) worked at, and after talking with numerous colleagues we know this is still the case at many schools. What options are there then for physics teachers to allow their students to experimentally investigate certain characteristics of radioactivity, such as how distance affects the intensity of radiation coming from a radioactive source? There are computer simulations that can be run, or perhaps the teacher has a light sensor and tries to make an analogy between the intensity of light from a light bulb and the intensity of radiation from a radioactive source based on geometric arguments to get an inverse-square law. But for many there is no direct experimental option if one does not possess a Geiger counter and good radioactive sample. It is for that teacher and class of students that an online, remote radioactivity experiment was created.

  15. Radioactivity in the industrial effluent disposed soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, R. D.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Meenashisundaram, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on radiation and radioactivity distribution in the soils of effluent disposed from the sugar industry in India have been conducted. The external gamma dose rates in air and natural radionuclides activities in the soils were measured using an Environmental Radiation Dosimeter and a Gamma-ray Spectrometer respectively. The soil samples were also subject to various physico-chemical analyses. This study revealed some remarkable results that are discussed in the article.

  16. A Three-Parameter Model for Estimating Atmospheric Tritium Dose at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.; Hamby, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    The models used in the NRC approach to assess chronic atmospheric release of radioactivity generate deterministic dose estimates by using assumptions about exposure conditions and environmental transport mechanisms.

  17. Radioactive Reliability of Programmable Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncar, Boris; Osmokrovic, Predrag; Stojanovic, Marko; Stankovic, Srboljub

    2001-02-01

    In this study, we examine the reliability of erasable programmable read only memory (EPROM) and electrically erasable programmable read only memory (EEPROM) components under the influence of gamma radiation. This problem has significance in military industry and space technology. Total dose results are presented for the JL 27C512D EPROM and 28C64C EEPROM components. There is evidence that EPROM components have better radioactive reliability than EEPROM components. Also, the changes to the EPROM are reversible, and after erasing and reprogramming all EPROM components are functional. On the other hand, changes to the EEPROM are irreversible, and under the influence of gamma radiation, all EEPROM components became permanently nonfunctional. The obtained results are analyzed and explained via the interaction of gamma radiation with oxide layers.

  18. RESRAD: A computer code for evaluating radioactively contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    This document briefly describes the uses of the RESRAD computer code in calculating site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines and radiation dose-risk to an on-site individual (worker or resident) at a radioactively contaminated site. The adoption by the DOE in order 5400.5, pathway analysis methods, computer requirements, data display, the inclusion of chemical contaminants, benchmarking efforts, and supplemental information sources are all described. (GHH)

  19. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... much radioactive iodine is taken up by your thyroid gland in a certain time period. A similar test ... over the area of your neck where the thyroid gland is located. The probe detects the location and ...

  20. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  1. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  2. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  3. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  4. Radioactive Standards Laboratory ININ as a reference laboratory in Mexico.

    PubMed

    GarcíaDíaz, O; MartínezAyala, L; HerreraValadez, L; TovarM, V; Karam, L

    2016-03-01

    The Radioactive Standards Laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is the National reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in Mexico. It has a gamma-ray spectrometry system with a high-purity Ge-detector for measurements from 50 keV to 2000 keV, and develops standardized radioactive (beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting) sources in different geometries with uncertainties less than or equal to 5% for applications such as the calibration of radionuclide calibrators (clinically used dose calibrators), Ge-detectors and NaI(Tl) detectors. PMID:27358942

  5. Natural radioactivity contamination problems. Report no. 2. (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides associated with the bauxite, columbium-tantalum, phosphate, tin, pumice, and titanium mineral extraction industries are reported. Data is also presented on radioactivity measurements in ground water, in selected geothermal waters, and in oil production brines. Radiation protection guidance is provided for uranium recovery from wet-process phosphate plants, for soil contamination limits, and for radiological exposure in natural caves. Dose pathways from incidental uses of naturally occurring radioactive materials are presented. Model state regulations for protecting public health and safety from use and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material are outlined.

  6. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  7. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  9. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  12. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  13. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee to comply with...

  14. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  15. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  16. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  17. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  18. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  19. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  20. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  1. Radiation Safety of Sealed Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-29

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of occupational settings and under differing regulatory/licensing structures. The definition of a sealed radioactive source varies between US regulatory authorities and standard-setting organizations. Potential problems with sealed sources cover a range of risks and impacts. The loss of control of high activity sealed sources can result in very high or even fatal doses to members of the public who come in contact with them. Sources that are not adequately sealed, and that fail, can cause spread of contamination and potential intake of radioactive material. There is also the possibility that sealed sources may be (or threatened to be) used for terrorist purposes and disruptive opportunities. Until fairly recently, generally-licensed sealed sources and devices received little, if any, regulatory oversight, and were often forgotten, lost or unaccounted for. Nonetheless, generally licensed devices can contain fairly significant quantities of radioactive material and there is some potential for exposure if a device is treated in a way that it was never designed. Industrial radiographers use and handle high activity and/or high-dose rate sealed sources in the field with a high degree of independence and minimal regulatory oversight. Failure to follow operational procedures and properly handle radiography sources can and has resulted in serious injuries and death. Industrial radiographers have experienced a disproportionately large fraction of incidents that result in unintended exposure to radiation. Sources do not have to contain significant quantities of radioactive material to cause problems in the event of their failure. A loss of integrity can cause the spread of contamination and potential exposure to workers and members of the public. The NCRP has previously provided recommendations on select aspects of sealed source programs. Future efforts to provide recommendations for sealed source programs are discussed.

  2. Radiation safety of sealed radioactive sources.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Kathryn H

    2015-02-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of occupational settings and under differing regulatory/licensing structures. The definition of a sealed radioactive source varies between U.S. regulatory authorities and standard-setting organizations. Potential problems with sealed sources cover a range of risks and impacts. The loss of control of high activity sealed sources can result in very high or even fatal doses to members of the public who come in contact with them. Sources that are not adequately sealed and that fail can cause spread of contamination and potential intake of radioactive material. There is also the possibility that sealed sources may be (or threaten to be) used for terrorist purposes and disruptive opportunities. Until fairly recently, generally licensed sealed sources and devices received little, if any, regulatory oversight and were often forgotten, lost or unaccounted for. Nonetheless, generally licensed devices can contain fairly significant quantities of radioactive material, and there is some potential for exposure if a device is treated in a way for which it was never designed. Industrial radiographers use and handle high activity and/or high dose-rate sealed sources in the field with a high degree of independence and minimal regulatory oversight. Failure to follow operational procedures and properly handle radiography sources can and has resulted in serious injuries and death. Industrial radiographers have experienced a disproportionately large fraction of incidents that have resulted in unintended exposure to radiation. Sources do not have to contain significant quantities of radioactive material to cause problems in the event of their failure. A loss of integrity can cause the spread of contamination and potential exposure to workers and members of the public. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has previously provided recommendations on select aspects of sealed source programs. Future efforts to

  3. Clinical and clinicopathologic effects of samarium-153-EDTMP administered intravenously to normal beagle dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, J.C.; Corwin, L.A. Jr.; Stapleton, J.; Volkert, W.A.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Hewett, J.E.; Simon, J.; Goeckeler, W.F. )

    1990-05-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the degree of acute bone marrow and vital organs injury sustained when dogs were administered doses of 153Sm-EDTMP calculated to irradiate an acute bone lesion arising from cancer metastasis to a dose considered palliative or even therapeutic (20-160 Gy). The study revealed significant (p less than 0.05) temporary depression of the bone marrow in all doses in the therapeutic (greater than 40 Gy) range. Palliative (20 Gy) doses caused significant leukocyte depression but insignificant (p greater than 0.05) depression of platelet and packed cell volumes when compared to control animals. A mild transient rise in the levels of serum alkaline phosphatase occurred immediately following radioisotope administration. All hematologic parameters had returned to normal by six weeks after the last injection of radioisotope. The study indicates potential for this compound as a safe, therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for treatment of cancer bone metastasis.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assembles, evaluates, and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water resources and consumption patterns for populations are estimated because they provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford radiation. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Who Should Administer Energy-Efficiency Programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen L.

    2003-05-01

    The restructuring of the electric utility industry in the US created a crisis in the administration of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. Before restructuring, nearly all energy-efficiency programs in the US were administered by utilities and funded from utility rates. Restructuring called these arrangements into question in two ways. First, the separation of generation from transmission and distribution undermined a key rationale for utility administration. This was the Integrated Resource Planning approach in which the vertically integrated utility was given incentives to provide energy services at least cost. Second, questions were raised as to whether funding through utility rates could be sustained in a competitive environment and most states that restructured their electricity industry adopted a system benefits charge. The crisis in administration of energy-efficiency programs produced a variety of responses in the eight years since restructuring in the US began in earn est. These responses have included new rationales for energy-efficiency programs, new mechanisms for funding programs, and new mechanisms for program administration and governance. This paper focuses on issues related to program administration. It describes the administrative functions and some of the options for accomplishing them. Then it discusses criteria for choosing among the options. Examples are given that highlight some of the states that have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved. The conclusion attempts to summarize lessons learned.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of centrally administered, norcocaine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Barber, D A; Tackett, R L

    1992-01-01

    Norcocaine is the N-demethylated metabolite of cocaine. It is present in the CNS and is reported to be pharmacologically active. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiovascular actions of norcocaine following central administration. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and instrumented for measurement of blood pressure and renal and hindlimb blood flow (via Doppler flowprobes). A cerebroventricular cannula was placed in the lateral ventricle for drug administration. Cocaine or norcocaine was administered centrally in a dose range of 0.025 to 4.0 mg/kg. Under the above experimental conditions, 4.0 mg/kg of norcocaine decreased blood pressure without a significant change in either hind limb or renal blood flow. Central administration of cocaine also produced a similar depressor response. In conscious, unrestrained rats, cocaine produced a pressor response while norcocaine did not significantly alter blood pressure. The depressor response to both cocaine and norcocaine in the anesthetized animal is speculated to be due to the local anesthetic properties of the drugs.

  8. Inducing and Administering Tregs to Treat Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control unwanted immune responses, including those that mediate tolerance to self as well as to foreign antigens. Their mechanisms of action include direct and indirect effects on effector T cells and important functions in tissue repair and homeostasis. Tregs express a number of cell surface markers and transcriptional factors that have been instrumental in defining their origins and potentially their function. A number of immune therapies, such as rapamycin, IL-2, and anti-T cell antibodies, are able to induce Tregs and are being tested for their efficacy in diverse clinical settings with exciting preliminary results. However, a balance exists with the use of some, such as IL-2, that may have effects on unwanted populations as well as promoting expansion and survival of Tregs requiring careful selection of dose for clinical use. The use of cell surface markers has enabled investigators to isolate and expand ex vivo Tregs more than 500-fold routinely. Clinical trials have begun, administering these expanded Tregs to patients as a means of suppressing autoimmune and alloimmune responses and potentially inducing immune tolerance. Studies in the future are likely to build on these initial technical achievements and use combinations of agents to improve the survival and functional capacity of Tregs. PMID:26834735

  9. Effects of Systemically Administered Hydrocortisone on the Human Immunome

    PubMed Central

    Olnes, Matthew J.; Kotliarov, Yuri; Biancotto, Angélique; Cheung, Foo; Chen, Jinguo; Shi, Rongye; Zhou, Huizhi; Wang, Ena; Tsang, John S.; Nussenblatt, Robert; Dickler, Howard B.; Hourigan, Christopher S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; McCoy, J. Phillip; Perl, Shira; Schum, Paula; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Valdez, Janet; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for decades to modulate inflammation therapeutically, yet there is a paucity of data on their effects in humans. We examined the changes in cellular and molecular immune system parameters, or “immunome”, in healthy humans after systemic corticosteroid administration. We used multiplexed techniques to query the immunome in 20 volunteers at baseline, and after intravenous hydrocortisone (HC) administered at moderate (250 mg) and low (50 mg) doses, to provide insight into how corticosteroids exert their effects. We performed comprehensive phenotyping of 120 lymphocyte subsets by high dimensional flow cytometry, and observed a decline in circulating specific B and T cell subsets, which reached their nadir 4–8 hours after administration of HC. However, B and T cells rebounded above baseline 24 hours after HC infusion, while NK cell numbers remained stable. Whole transcriptome profiling revealed down regulation of NF-κB signaling, apoptosis, and cell death signaling transcripts that preceded lymphocyte population changes, with activation of NK cell and glucocorticoid receptor signaling transcripts. Our study is the first to systematically characterize the effects of corticosteroids on the human immunome, and we demonstrate that HC exerts differential effects on B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells in humans. PMID:26972611

  10. Immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine administered in mass campaigns versus routine immunization programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, G.; Linkins, R. W.; Eames, M. A.; Wood, D. J.; Campbell, P. J.; Ankers, E.; Deniel, M.; Kabbaj, A.; Magrath, D. I.; Minor, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    Reported are the results of a study to investigate the immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) when administered in mass campaigns compared with that following routine immunization programmes. For this purpose, paired sera were collected from a cohort of children before and after a mass vaccination with OPV in Morocco in 1987. Serum samples and information on vaccination status and other confounding factors that could influence antibody responses to OPV were collected. Neutralizing antibody titres to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were determined using a standardized assay. OPV doses administered exclusively during the mass campaign were consistently associated with higher type-specific seroprevalence rates than the same number of doses administered in the routine programme. These findings could not be attributed to differences in confounding factors. Enhanced secondary spread of vaccine virus may have occurred but could not be demonstrated because of limitations in the study design. Mass campaigns appear to be highly effective in raising the dose-related poliovirus type-specific immunity of the population above that achieved by the routine immunization programme. Our findings support the continued use of mass campaigns as an adjunct to routine programmes in order to both enhance and catalyse current efforts to achieve the global eradication of poliomyelitis by the year 2000. PMID:8907770

  11. Natural radioactivity measurements in building materials used in Samsun, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tufan, M Çagatay; Disci, Tugba

    2013-01-01

    In this study, radioactivity levels of 35 different samples of 11 commonly used building materials in Samsun were measured by using a gamma spectrometry system. The analysis carried out with the high purity Germanium gamma spectrometry system. Radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K range from 6 to 54 Bq kg(-1), 5 to 88 Bq kg(-1) and 6 to 1070 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From these results, radium equivalent activities, gamma indexes, absorbed dose rates and annual effective doses were calculated for all samples. Obtained results were compared with the available data, and it was concluded that all the investigated materials did not have radiological risk.

  12. Serum thyroxine concentrations after radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, S.M.; Hawkins, E.C.; Washabau, R.J.; Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-one cats with hyperthyroidism were given one dose of radioactive iodine (131I) IV. Serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were measured before treatment in all cats, at 12-hour intervals after treatment in 10 cats, and at 48-hour intervals after treatment in 21 cats. Serum T4 concentrations also were measured one month after /sup 131/I therapy in 29 cats. Activity of 131I administered was 1.5 to 6.13 mCi, resulting in a dose of 20,000 rads to the thyroid. Serum T4 concentrations before /sup 131/I administration were 5.3 to 51.0 micrograms/dl, with a median T4 concentration of 11.0 micrograms/dl. Serum T4 decreased most rapidly during the first 3 to 6 days after treatment. Sixteen cats (55%) had normal serum thyroxine concentrations by day 4 after 131I administration, and 23 cats (74%) were euthyroxinemic by day 8 after treatment. One month after administration of 131I, the 29 cats evaluated were clinically improved, and 24 (83%) of the 29 cats evaluated had normal serum T4 concentrations, 3 cats (10%) remained hyperthyroxinemic, and 2 cats (7%) were hypothyroxinemic. Therefore, administration of 131I was a safe and effective method to quickly decrease serum T4 concentrations in hyperthyroid cats.

  13. Radioactive excretion in human milk following administration of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pittard, W.B.; Merkatz, R.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1982-08-01

    Albumin-tagged sodium pertechnetate (technetium) is routinely used in nuclear medicine for scanning procedures of the lung. The rate of excretion of this radionuclide into breast milk and the resultant potential radiation hazard to the nursing infant have received little attention. Therefore the milk from a nursing mother who required a lung scan because of suspected pulmonary emboli using an intravenous injection of 4 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated human serum albumin was monitored. Albumin tagging severely limited the entrance of technetium into her milk and the radioactivity of the milk returned to base line by 24 hours. A total of 2.02 muCi of technetium was measured in the 24-hour milk collection after technetium injection and 94% of this amount was excreted by 15.5 hours. This amount of technetium administered orally to a newborn would deliver a total body radiation dose of .3 mrad. Therefore, an infant would receive trivial doses of radiation if breast-feeding were resumed 15.5 hours after administration of the radionuclide to the mother and nursing can clearly be resumed safely 24 hours after injection.

  14. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  15. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  16. Automated administration of intermittent intravenous doses.

    PubMed

    Lutomski, D M; Schwartz-Fulton, J; Rivera, J O

    1985-11-01

    The cost difference of administering cimetidine 300 mg via intravenous piggyback (IVPB) every six hours by a conventional separate container system versus using an automated intermittent i.v. administration system was evaluated. The study was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 documented the amount of drug waste with the two systems, and phase 2 examined the practical use of the IVAC Multi Dose System. Nurses who administered the medication using the multiple-dose system completed a questionnaire on its operation. A materials cost analysis was performed to compare the two methods. The two systems were found to have approximately equivalent amounts of drug waste over the 30-day evaluation period of phase 1. The mean percentage of doses wasted was 12.2% with the conventional single-dose minibag method and 12.7% with the automated multiple-dose method. The multiple-dose system had a lower cost per dose of cimetidine ($2.25 versus $3.47). These savings appear to outweigh the cost of the additional equipment necessary for the automated system. The majority of nurses preferred the multiple-dose system. Potential problems encountered in accurately delivering doses with the multiple-dose automated system were identified, and possible solutions are suggested. The use of an automated multiple-dose i.v. administration system can potentially decrease the materials cost portion of drug administration. The total impact on hospital costs needs to be evaluated, and other comparisons with alternative administration systems need to be performed.

  17. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically.

  18. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically. PMID:24376927

  19. Skin dose measurement with MICROSPEC-2{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, H.H.; Chen, J.; Ing, H.; Clifford, E.T.H.; McLean, T.

    1997-10-01

    For many years, the Eberline HP-260{trademark} beta detectors were used for skin dose measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This detector does not measure the beta spectrum and the skin dose can only be determined if the contaminating radioactive isotope is known. A new product MICROSPEC-2{trademark}, has been developed which consists of a small portable computer with a multichannel analyzer and a beta probe consisting of a phoswich detector. The system measures the beta spectrum and automatically folds in the beta fluence-to-dose conversion function to yield the skin dose.

  20. A Stochastic Problem Arising in the Storage of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2004-07-15

    Nuclear waste drums can contain a collection of radioactive components of uncertain activity and randomly dispersed in position. This implies that the dose-rate at the surface of different drums in a large assembly of similar drums can have significant variations according to the physical makeup and configuration of the waste components. The present paper addresses this problem by treating the drum, and its waste, as a stochastic medium. It is assumed that the sources in the drum contribute a dose-rate to some external point. The strengths and positions are chosen by random numbers, the dose-rate is calculated and, from several thousand realizations, a probability distribution for the dose-rate is obtained. It is shown that a very close approximation to the dose-rate probability function is the log-normal distribution. This allows some useful statistical indicators, which are of environmental importance, to be calculated with little effort.As an example of a practical situation met in the storage of radioactive waste containers, we study the problem of 'hotspots'. These arise in drums in which most of the activity is concentrated on one radioactive component and hence can lead to the possibility of large surface dose-rates. It is shown how the dose-rate, the variance, and some other statistical indicators depend on the relative activities on the sources. The results highlight the importance of such hotspots and the need to quantify their effect.

  1. RESRAD. Site-Specific Residual Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1989-06-01

    RESRAD is designed to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil. A guideline is defined as a radionuclide concentration or a level of radiation or radioactivity that is acceptable if a site is to be used without radiological restrictions. Guidelines are expressed as (1) concentrations of residual radionuclides in soil, (2) concentrations of airborne radon decay products, (3) levels of external gamma radiation, (4) levels of radioactivity from surface contamination, and (5) concentrations of residual radionuclides in air and water. Soil is defined as unconsolidated earth material, including rubble and debris that may be present. The controlling principles of all guidelines are (1) the annual radiation dose received by a member of the critical population group from the residual radioactive material - predicted by a realistic but reasonably conservative analysis and averaged over a 50 year period - should not exceed 100 mrem/yr, and (2) doses should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. All significant exposure pathways for the critical population group are considered in deriving soil guidelines. These pathways include direct exposure to external radiation from the contaminated soil material; internal radiation from inhalation of airborne radionuclides; and internal radiation from ingestion of plant foods grown in the contaminated soil, meat and milk from livestock fed with contaminated fodder and water, drinking water from a contaminated well, and fish from a contaminated pond.

  2. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  3. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  4. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  5. Measurement of radioactivity levels and assessment of radioactivity hazards of soil samples in Karaman, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Agar, O; Boztosun, I; Korkmaz, M E; Özmen, S F

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the levels of the natural and artificial radioactivity in soil samples collected from surrounding of Karaman in Turkey were measured. Activity concentrations of the concerned radionuclides were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector with a relative efficiency of 40 % at 1.332 MeV. The results obtained for the (238)U series ((226)Ra, (214)Pb and (214)Bi), (232)Th series ((228)Ac), (40)K and fission product (137)Cs are discussed. To evaluate the radiological hazard of radioactivity in samples, the radium equivalent activity (Raeq), the absorbed dose rate (D), the annual effective dose and the external (Hex) and internal hazard index (Hin) were calculated and presented in comparison with the data collected from different areas in the world and Turkey.

  6. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  7. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    -99% pure population of leukocytes. Viability was assessed using Trypan blue histological analysis. We successfully isolated and labeled ~25-30 x 10{sup 7} CD34+ lymphocytes in cytokine mobilized progenitor cell apharesis harvests. Cells were also subjected to a stat gram stain to look for bacterial contamination, stat endotoxin LAL to look for endotoxin contamination, flow cytometry for evaluation of the purity of the cells and 14-day sterility culture. Colony forming assays confirm the capacity of these cells to proliferate and function ex-vivo with CFU-GM values of 26 colonies/ 1 x 10{sup 4} cells plated and 97% viability in cytokine augmented methylcellulose at 10-14 days in CO{sub 2} incubation. We developed a closed-processing system for the product labeling prior to infusion to maintain autologous cell integrity and sterility. Release criteria for the labeled product were documented for viability, cell count and differential, and measured radiolabel. We were successful in labeling the cells with up to 500 uCi/10{sup 8} cells, with viability of >98%. However, due to delays in getting the protocol approved by the FDA, the cells were not infused in humans in this location (although we did successfully use CD34+ cells in humans in a study in Australia). The approach developed should permit labeling of progenitor cells that can be administered to human subjects for tracking. The labeling approach should be useful for all progenitor cell types, although this would need to be verified since different cell lines may have differential radiosensitivity.

  8. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  9. Ideal dose level in treatment planning optimization.

    PubMed

    Begnozzi, L; Malaspina, F; Gentile, F P; Chiatti, L; Carpino, S; Fragomeni, R; Benassi, M

    1992-10-01

    The biological response of the tumor is expressed in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and its dependence on the inhomogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor volume is studied. The ideal dose level to which the prescribed dose must be referred is derived, by employing a formula based on the linear quadratic model. To administer the prescribed dose to the ideal dose level renders the tumor control probability equal to that one corresponding to a uniform irradiation of the tumor. For the normal tissue irradiated a normal tissue complication probability index (NTCPI) is also defined and calculated. The comparison between NTCPIs of competing plans supports the optimization. In general the resulting ideal dose level is lower than the mean dose level, but not necessarily equal to the minimum in the tumor. This result shows the possibility of administering the prescribed dose to a dose level higher than the minimum, maintaining the tumor control probability at a good level and consequently lowering the complications to the normal tissue. The method offers a general support for the choice of the reference dose level and of the better technique. An example of application of the method is shown.

  10. A factorization procedure for calculations of gamma exposure from radioactive clouds.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, V I

    1993-11-01

    A procedure is proposed to factor the integrand in the expression for dose characteristics of gamma emission of radioactive clouds. This method permits a reduction of the multiplicity of the integration for conventional models with an arbitrary collocation of a source and a receptor. This can result in more economic numerical schemes for analyzing the consequences of radioactive releases into the atmosphere.

  11. Radioactivity test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of nuclear test performed to evaluate thyroid function. The patient ingests radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) capsules or liquid. After a time (usually 6 and 24-hours later), a gamma probe is placed over the thyroid gland to ...

  12. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  13. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  14. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  15. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  16. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  17. Radioactivity and foods

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food--on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undersirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chenobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods.

  18. The use of dexamethasone administered to mares at breeding time in the modulation of persistent mating induced endometritis.

    PubMed

    Bucca, S; Carli, A; Buckley, T; Dolci, G; Fogarty, U

    2008-10-15

    The present study describes the effect of a single dose of dexamethasone administered to mares at time of breeding. In an initial experiment, the authors investigated safety of treatment. In a second experiment the effect of treatment on the uterine environment, fetal development and pregnancy outcome was examined. In the final part of the study, mares susceptible to persistent mating induced endometritis were identified, by means of a risk factor score system and the effect of treatment evaluated. Results indicated that dexamethasone administered at breeding time did not negatively impact on mares medical and reproductive traits. A reduced inflammatory response was observed post-mating in treated versus control mares and mares with multiple risk factors for susceptibility to persistent mating induced endometritis showed improved pregnancy rates following treatment. The authors concluded that a single dose of dexamethasone administered at the time of breeding is safe and can be used to modulate the uterine inflammatory response to breeding in susceptible mares.

  19. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  20. DELAYED PREPUTIAL SEPARATION (PPS) AND SP22 MEASUREMENT IN RATS ADMINISTERED BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (BCA) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproductive effects of BCA were determined in a dose range finding study (DRFS) and definitive two-generational study. Adult male and female CD� (SD) rats were administered BCA in drinking water for two weeks in the DRFS (10/sex/group) and ten weeks in the definitive study (25/s...

  1. Methotrexate Dosing Regimen for Plaque-type Psoriasis: A Systematic Review of the Use of Test-dose, Start-dose, Dosing Scheme, Dose Adjustments, Maximum Dose and Folic Acid Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Menting, Stef P; Dekker, Paul M; Limpens, Jacqueline; Hooft, Lotty; Spuls, Phyllis I

    2016-01-01

    There is a range of methotrexate dosing regimens for psoriasis. This review summarizes the evidence for test-dose, start-dose, dosing scheme, dose adjustments, maximum dose and use of folic acid. A literature search for randomized controlled trials and guidelines was performed. Twenty-three randomized controlled trials (29 treatment groups) and 10 guidelines were included. Two treatment groups used a test-dose, 5 guidelines recommend it. The methotrexate start-dose in randomized controlled trials varied from 5 to 25 mg/week, most commonly being either 7.5 mg or 15 mg. Guidelines vary from 5 to 15 mg/week. Methotrexate was administered as a single dose or in a Weinstein schedule in 15 and 11 treatment-groups, respectively; both recommended equally in guidelines. A fixed dose (n = 18), predefined dose (n = 3), or dose adjusted on clinical improvement (n = 8) was used, the last also being recommended in guidelines. Ten treatment groups used folic acid; in 2 it was allowed, in 14 not mentioned, and in 3 no folic acid was used. Most guidelines recommend the use of folic acid. Authors' suggestions for methotrexate dosing are given.

  2. Comparative efficacy of terbutaline administered by Nebuhaler and by nebulizer in young children with acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, J; Hopkins, J; Timms, B; Van Asperen, P P

    1989-10-01

    We compared the use of terbutaline sulphate that was delivered by a nebulizer with its delivery by a Nebuhaler at two dose levels in 27 children (nine children per group) of between three and six years of age with acute asthma. No significant difference was found in the mean baseline clinical score among the three groups, and a significant decline occurred in the mean clinical scores in all groups by 15 minutes which was maintained to 60 minutes after the dose was administered. The decline that was achieved with delivery of the drug by way of a Nebuhaler (at either dose level) was not significantly different from that with a nebulizer, although cooperation with Nebuhaler usage was not universal in the age-group. PMID:2677624

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates. Included are source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The environmental transport task will reconstruct the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations via the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water. The environmental monitoring task will assemble, evaluate, and report historical environmental monitoring data. The demographics, agriculture, and food habits task will develop the data needed to determine the populations that could have been affected by the releases. Population and demographic information will be developed for the general population within the study area. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water consumption patterns and sources of food and water for these populations must be estimated since these provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The environmental pathways and dose estimates task will use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  4. Investigation of radioactivity concentration in spent technetium generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idriss, Hajo; Salih, Isam; Alaamer, Abdulaziz S.; Eisa, M. H.; Sam, A. K.

    2014-04-01

    This study was carried out to survey and measure radioactivity concentration and estimate radiation dose level at the surface of spent technetium generator columns for the safe final disposal of radioactive waste. High resolution γ-spectrometry with the aid of handheld radiation survey meters has been used. The radioactivity measurements has shown that 238U, 40K and 137Cs were only measurable in one sample whereas 125Sb was found in 14 samples out of total of 20 samples with an activity concentration which ranged from 21 to 7404 with an average value of 1095 Bq/kg. The activity concentration of 125Sb is highly variable indicating that the spent 99mTc generator columns are of different origin. This investigation highlighted the importance of radiation monitoring of spent technetium generators in the country in order to protect workers, and the public from the dangers posed by radioactive waste.

  5. Low-level radioactive waste: Gamma rays in the garbage

    SciTech Connect

    Saleska, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Of the four categories of radioactive waste (uranium mill tailings, high-level waste, transuranic, and low-level), the last term, low-level, proves to be the most misleading. The author suggests that a better term for this category would be miscellaneous radioactive junk, since it is by definition everything not included in the other three categories. Ted Taylor, a New York State resident and physicist and former nuclear weapons designer, points out that this category includes such intensely radioactive materials as reactor components that would deliver in a few minutes a lethal dose of gamma rays to anyone standing nearby. It is pointed out that of the original 6 low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, only 3 are still operating and two of those are slated to be closed in 1993 when they will be full. Unquestionably, new standards and policies are needed to deal sensibly with the problem; these are discussed briefly. 9 refs.

  6. Natural radioactivity of granites used as building materials.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, S; Koroneos, A; Papastefanou, C; Christofides, G; Stoulos, S; Vavelides, M

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen kinds of different granites, used as building materials, imported to Greece mainly from Spain and Brazil, were sampled and their natural radioactivity was measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K of granites are presented and compared to those of other building materials as well as other granite types used all over the world. In order to assess the radiological impact from the granites investigated, the absorbed and the effective doses were determined. Although the annual effective dose is higher than the limit of 1mSvy(-1) for some studied granites, they could be used safely as building materials, considering that their contribution in most of the house constructions is very low. An attempt to correlate the relatively high level of natural radioactivity, shown by some of the granites, with their constituent radioactive minerals and their chemical composition, was also made.

  7. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.; McElroy, Jack L.; Mendel, John E.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

  8. Difference in nephrotoxicity of vancomycin administered once daily and twice daily in rats.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Hiroki; Morita, Yukiko; Mizumura, Miyo; Iga, Ikumi; Nagai, Katsuhito

    2013-10-01

    We compared the degree of nephrotoxicity of vancomycin (VCM) administered once daily and twice daily in rats. VCM was intraperitoneally administered once daily to rats at a dose of 400 mg/kg (VCM-1-treated) or administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg twice daily at 12-hour intervals (VCM-2-treated) for 7 consecutive days. Creatinine clearance was decreased more markedly in VCM-1 rats relative to VCM-2 rats, although there was no significant difference in renal accumulation of VCM between the two groups. Renal superoxide dismutase activity was lower in VCM-1 rats than that in VCM-2 rats. The magnitude of histological change in kidney tissue was in agreement with the degree of alterations in the abovementioned biochemical values. These results suggest that the nephrotoxic effect of once-daily VCM administration is more pronounced than that of the twice-daily treatment. Our findings provide fundamental evidence for the advantage in choosing a divided VCM administration to attenuate nephrotoxicity.

  9. The Relative Reinforcing Strength of Methamphetamine and d-Amphetamine in Monkeys Self-Administering Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Charnigo, Richard J.; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of d-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially-increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of d-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A range of doses of methamphetamine (0.003–0.1 mg/kg/injection), d-amphetamine (0.003–0.1 mg/kg/injection) and cocaine (0.003–0.3 mg/kg/injection) was tested to capture the ascending and descending limbs of the dose-effect functions. Each drug functioned as a reinforcer, but the peak number of self-administered d-amphetamine injections was significantly lower compared to methamphetamine and cocaine; the peak number of self-administered injections of cocaine and methamphetamine did not differ. Although differences in availability and other social factors likely impact relative rates of abuse, the present data suggest that the greater reinforcing strength of methamphetamine contributes to its increased use compared to d-amphetamine. PMID:23907377

  10. The relative reinforcing strength of methamphetamine and D-amphetamine in monkeys self-administering cocaine.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Charnigo, Richard J; Nader, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of D-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of D-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A range of doses of methamphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), D-amphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), and cocaine (0.003-0.3 mg/kg/injection) was tested to capture the ascending and descending limbs of the dose-effect functions. Each drug functioned as a reinforcer, but the peak number of self-administered D-amphetamine injections was significantly lower compared with methamphetamine and cocaine; the peak number of self-administered injections of cocaine and methamphetamine did not differ. Although differences in availability and other social factors likely impact relative rates of abuse, the present data suggest that the greater reinforcing strength of methamphetamine contributes to its increased use compared with D-amphetamine.

  11. The relative reinforcing strength of methamphetamine and D-amphetamine in monkeys self-administering cocaine.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Charnigo, Richard J; Nader, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that rates of methamphetamine misuse surpass those of D-amphetamine, but self-administration research in animals and humans has not typically demonstrated differences in their reinforcing effects. The present study used a within-session, exponentially increasing progressive-ratio schedule and extended-access conditions to assess the relative reinforcing strength of D-amphetamine and methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys (n=5) trained to self-administer cocaine. A range of doses of methamphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), D-amphetamine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/injection), and cocaine (0.003-0.3 mg/kg/injection) was tested to capture the ascending and descending limbs of the dose-effect functions. Each drug functioned as a reinforcer, but the peak number of self-administered D-amphetamine injections was significantly lower compared with methamphetamine and cocaine; the peak number of self-administered injections of cocaine and methamphetamine did not differ. Although differences in availability and other social factors likely impact relative rates of abuse, the present data suggest that the greater reinforcing strength of methamphetamine contributes to its increased use compared with D-amphetamine. PMID:23907377

  12. Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2009-07-13

    Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

  13. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18–20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent. PMID:26612096

  14. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18-20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent.

  15. 24 CFR 982.51 - PHA authority to administer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false PHA authority to administer program. 982.51 Section 982.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... PHA Plan for Administration of Program § 982.51 PHA authority to administer program. (a) The PHA...

  16. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  17. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  18. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  20. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  2. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  5. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  6. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  7. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  8. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  9. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  13. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  14. 49 CFR 7.22 - Who administers this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who administers this subpart? 7.22 Section 7.22 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Availability of Reasonably Described Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 7.22 Who administers this subpart? (a) A Chief FOIA Officer is appointed...

  15. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1550 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register on June 25, 1984. (1) Water Pollution Control Act, New Jersey Statutes... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New Jersey § 147.1550 State-administered program. The UIC program for all classes of wells in the State of New Jersey,...

  18. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  19. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  20. Membrane permeation employed for radioactive wastes treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    1996-12-31

    In the paper certain aspects of development process aiming at reducing the radioactivity of liquid low-level waste streams (LLLW) are presented. The influence of gamma and electron radiation on ultrafiltration membranes has been studied and changes of their transport properties have been determined at different doses. Membrane processes: ultrafiltration (UF), seeded ultrafiltration (SUF), low-pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) and membrane distillation (MD) have been examined. The UF/RO pilot plant for purification/concentration of low-level liquid waste is described. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Recycling and reuse of radioactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dou, Thomas Joseph

    The Radiochemistry Program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) has a Radiation Protection Program that was designed to provide students with the ability to safely work with radioactive materials in quantities that are not available in other academic environments. Requirements for continuous training and supervision make this unique program capable of turning out graduates that have an understanding of contamination and dose control techniques that complement their knowledge of the elements that they work with. The Program has also adopted a radionuclide recovery and reuse program that has provided materials from other universities, government agencies, and private companies for use in experiments.

  2. A study of environmental radioactivity measurements for Cankiri, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kapdan, Enis; Taskin, Halim; Kam, Erol; Osmanlioglu, A Erdal; Karahan, Gursel; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2012-07-01

    This study is the first to assess the level of background radiation for the Cankiri province of Turkey. Indoor air radon concentrations were determined using Columbia Resin-39 nuclear track detectors and the average (222)Rn activity was found to be 44 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.1 mSv). Measurements of gamma doses in outdoor air were performed using a portable plastic scintillation detector and the average gamma absorbed dose rate was found to be 8 μR h(-1) (corresponding to an annual effective dose of 87.7 μSv). Radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were measured through gamma-ray spectrometry and the average activities were determined as 17.7, 22.3, 357 and 4.1 Bq kg(-1) for the radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The average annual effective dose from the natural radioactivity sources ((238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K) was calculated to be 44.4 μSv. Radioactivity levels of drinking water samples were carried out using a low-background proportional counter and the average gross alpha and beta activities were obtained as 0.25 and 0.26 Bq l(-1), respectively (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 184 μSv). The average radon concentrations in indoor air and the average radionuclide activities in soil were found to be lower than most Turkish cities while higher levels of outdoor gamma dose rate and water radioactivity were observed. The results of this study showed that the region's background radioactivity level differs considerably from the reported data for Turkish cities.

  3. Ecological Role of Soils upon Radioactive Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetnov, Evgeny; Shcheglov, Alexei; Tsvenova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The ecological role of soils upon radioactive contamination is clearly manifested in the system of notions about ecosystems services, i.e., benefits gained by humans from ecosystems and their components, including soils (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2005). For the soils, these services are considered on the basis of soil functions in the biosphere that belong to the protective ecosystem functions within the group of soil functions known under the names of "Buffer and protective biogeocenotic shield" (at the level of particular biogeocenoses) and "Protective shield of the biosphere" (at the global biospheric level) (according to Dobrovol'skii & Nikitin, 2005). With respect to radionuclides, this group includes (1) the depositing function, i.e., the accumulation and long-term sequestration of radioactive substances by the soil after atmospheric fallout; (2) the geochemical function, i.e., the regulation of horizontal and vertical fluxes of radionuclides in the system of geochemically conjugated landscapes and in the soil-groundwater and soil-plant systems; and (3) the dose-forming function that is manifested by the shielding capacity of the soil with respect to the external ionizing radiation (lowering of the dose from external radiation) and by the regulation of the migration of radionuclides in the trophic chain (lowering of the dose from internal radiation). The depositing and geochemical functions of the soils are interrelated, which is seen from quantitative estimates of the dynamics of the fluxes of radionuclides in the considered systems (soil-plant, soil-groundwater, etc.). The downward migration of radionuclides into the lower soil layers proceeds very slowly: for decades, more than 90% of the pool of radionuclides is stored in the topmost 10 cm of the soil profile. In the first 3-5 years after the fallout, the downward migration of radionuclides with infiltrating water flows decreases from several percent to decimals and hundredths of percent from the

  4. Kinetics of Radioactive Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, S.

    At present there are over 3,000 known nuclides (see the Appendix in Vol. 2 on the “Table of the Nuclides”), 265 of which are stable, while the rest, i.e., more than 90% of them, are radioactive. The chemical applications of the specific isotopes of chemical elements are mostly connected with the latter group, including quite a number of metastable nuclear isomers, making the kinetics of radioactive decay an important chapter of nuclear chemistry. After giving a phenomenological and then a statistical interpretation of the exponential law, the various combinations of individual decay processes as well as the cases of equilibrium and nonequilibrium will be discussed. Half-life systematics of the different decay modes detailed in Chaps. 2 and 4 of this volume are also summarized.

  5. Sources of radioactive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Beams of unstable nuclei can be formed by direct injection of the radioactive atoms into an ion source, or by using the momentum of the primary production beam as the basis for the secondary beam. The effectiveness of this latter mechanism in secondary beam formation, i.e., the quality of the emerging beam (emittance, intensity, energy spread), depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics, and on the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies typical of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed, along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific secondary product. The ongoing radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example, with applications, present performance and plans for improvements.

  6. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  7. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  8. Subchronic dispositional and toxicological effects of arsenate administered in drinking water to mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.F.; Thompson, D.J.

    1996-10-11

    Exposure to the drinking water contaminant arsenate is a daily occurrence and there are concerns that this exposure may lead to cancer. Although the acute dispositional effects of arsenate have been studied in detail, there is minimal information on the disposition and toxicological effects of it after continuous exposure. The objective of this study was to examine in mice the effect of a 4-wk treatment with arsenate administered in drinking water. Female B6C3F1 mice were housed in metabolism cages and given water and food ad libitum. Two groups (A,B) of mice were treated with distilled water or water containing 0.025 mg/L (L) or 2.5 mg/L (H) arsenate. Several toxicological effects were observed in animals administered arsenate in drinking water, but no changes in the disposition of this arsenical were detected at the doses used in this study. 86 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  10. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  11. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  12. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  13. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  14. Imaging plant leaves to determine changes in radioactive contamination status in Fukushima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Tanihata, Isao; Saito, Tadashi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    The chemical composition of plant leaves often reflects environmental contamination. The authors analyzed images of plant leaves to investigate the regional radioactivity ecology resulting from the 2011 accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, Japan. The present study is not an evaluation of the macro radiation dose per weight, which has been performed previously, but rather an image analysis of the radioactive dose per leaf, allowing the capture of various gradual changes in radioactive contamination as a function of elapsed time. In addition, the leaf analysis method has potential applications in the decontamination of food plants or other materials.

  15. MESORAD dose assessment of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Hubbe, J.M.; Athey, G.F.; Davis, W.E.

    1989-12-01

    An accident involving Unit 4 of the Chernobylskaya Atomic Energy Station resulted in the release of a large amount of radioactive material to the atmosphere. This report describes the results of an assessment of the doses near the site (within 80 km) made at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory using the MESORAD Dose Assessment model. 6 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    PubMed Central

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A. I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. PMID:26347593

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Intranasal Insulin Spray (Nasulin™) Administered to Healthy Male Volunteers:

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Andrew C.; Dowling, Muiris; Cussen, Kathleen; O'Brien, Jackie; Stote, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a Bentley Pharmaceuticals proprietary intranasal (IN) insulin formulation (Nasulin™) were studied in healthy volunteers. Methods Thirteen fasting healthy male volunteers received five doses of medication (one dose of 4 international units [IU] subcutaneous (SC) regular insulin and four doses of 25 IU IN insulin) at least 48 h apart. Serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose were measured in the 4 h after dosing. Profiles were compared for IN insulin spray following administration into the dominant nostril (more open at time of dosing) and into the nondominant nostril (less open at time of dosing). Results The formulation was generally well tolerated. A rise in serum insulin levels accompanied by a decrease in plasma glucose was seen following all doses. For IN doses, peak insulin levels were generally attained in 10–20 min and remained elevated for approximately 40–50 min; the resultant effect on glucose peaked at 40 min and waned approximately 2 h postdosing. As reported in other studies, the interindividual response to insulin was variable. The comparative absorption of IN insulin relative to SC insulin was 12.0% (dominant nostril) or 15.4% (nondominant nostril) over 2 h. This increased somewhat if sneezers and volunteers with moderately blocked nostrils were removed from the analysis. Conclusions This IN formulation was generally well tolerated and relatively well absorbed. While both insulin data (maximal plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration time curve) and glucose data (% fall) support a trend toward better absorption from the nondominant nostril, this did not reach statistical significance. Nasulin can be administered without reference to the nasal cycle. PMID:19885293

  18. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  19. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.; Mavi, B.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  20. Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

    1990-06-01

    A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

  1. Increased brain radioactivity by intranasal 32P-labeled siRNA dendriplexes within in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Ana Paula; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia; Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecules taken up by olfactory and trigeminal nerve neurons directly access the brain by the nose-to-brain pathway. In situ-forming mucoadhesive gels would increase the residence time of intranasal material, favoring the nose-to-brain delivery. In this first approach, brain radioactivity after intranasal administration of 32P-small interference RNA (siRNA) complexed with poly(amidoamine) G7 dendrimers (siRNA dendriplexes) within in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels, was determined. Materials 32P-siRNA dendriplexes were incorporated into in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels prepared by blending thermosensitive poloxamer (23% w/w) with mucoadhesive chitosan (1% w/w, PxChi) or carbopol (0.25% w/w, PxBCP). Rheological properties, radiolabel release profile, and local toxicity in rat nasal mucosa were determined. The best-suited formulation was intranasally administered to rats, and blood absorption and brain distribution of radioactivity were measured. Results The gelation temperature of both formulations was 23°C. The PxChi liquid showed non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior of high consistency and difficult manipulation, and the gel retained 100% of radiolabel after 150 minutes. The PxCBP liquid showed a Newtonian behavior of low viscosity and easy manipulation, while in the gel phase showed apparent viscosity similar to that of the mucus but higher than that of aqueous solution. The gel released 35% of radiolabel and the released material showed silencing activity in vitro. Three intranasal doses of dendriplexes in PxCBP gel did not damage the rat nasal mucosa. A combination of 32P-siRNA complexation with dendrimers, incorporation of the dendriplexes into PxCBP gel, and administration of two intranasal doses was necessary to achieve higher brain radioactivity than that achieved by intravenous dendriplexes or intranasal naked siRNA. Conclusion The increased radioactivity within the olfactory bulb suggested that the combination above mentioned favored the

  2. Instrumentation, Equipment and Methods for the In Vivo Measurement of Radioactive Material in the Body

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2005-07-01

    The current applications for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material can be divided into three broad categories: (1) occupational exposure monitoring, (2) monitoring of the public, and (3) medical monitoring. The focus of this chapter is on occupational exposure monitoring that is part of an internal dosimetry program for monitoring workers for intakes and assessing the dose consequences of an intake. In the 1920's when electroscopes were first used to measure radium in the body of dial painters issues affecting the measurement accuracy were identified related to external contamination interferences, properly measuring the instrument background, need for measurement QC, microphonic interferences, shielding and others. The sophistication of the radiation detection instrumentation has evolved to the point where most systems today employ one or more detectors primarily either sodium iodide or germanium. Many different styles of detectors and cryostat designs are used at different facilities. However, the same issues identified in the 1920's are still issues today. The in vivo measurement systems are calibrated with anthropometric phantoms that simulate the body or parts of the body. Whole body phantoms, torso phantoms, lung phantoms, thyroid phantoms and skeletal phantoms are just some of the different types used.The systems are typically shielded with low background materials such as pre-World War II steel from battleships. Interferences can come from naturally occurring radioactive material, medically administered radiopharmaceuticals, equipment instability, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation and other sources. These contribute to the uncertainties in measurement results that can range from 10% to 1000% or more depending on the measurement system, the energy of the radiation associated with the radionuclide to be measured, the accuracy of the phantom versus the person especially how well the distributions of activity match.

  3. Empiric Therapy with Low-Dose I-131 in Differentiated Cancer Thyroid: What is the Magic Number?

    PubMed

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Shibu, Deepu K; Vyshak, K; Antony, Joppy

    2013-05-01

    Low dose radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) has been widely reported in the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) since 1970's. However, the clinical outcomes, dosage of I-131 and criteria for successful ablation are different in various studies. The aim of this study was to assess clinical outcome 18-month after RAI therapy in selected DTC patients and identify factors associated with a good response. In this experimental study, among patients with DTC referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department and had an indication for RAI therapy in the period between December 2008 and January 2011, 108 subjects were selected randomly. The patients were randomly divided into three groups and empiric low dose therapy with 30, 50 or 75 mCi of I-131 was administered. Patients were monitored closely clinically and with serum thyroglobulin assays and I-131 whole-body scans at 6 monthly intervals for 18-month after treatment. Among 105 patients who completed follow-up, 86% were successfully ablated with a single low dose of I-131. There was no statistically significant difference in ablation rates in the subgroups receiving 30.50 or 75 mCi of I-131. Cumulative ablation rate was 99% in patients after the second dose of low dose therapy. If appropriate selection criteria are used in DTC, successful remnant ablation can be achieved with low doses of I-131 in the range of 30-75 mCi. No significant differences were found in results achieved with 30.50 or 75 mCi of I-131. As the majority of the DTC patients fall within the inclusion criteria of this study, they can be treated on an ambulatory basis with associated low cost, convenience, and low whole-body radiation-absorbed dose to the patients.

  4. Empiric Therapy with Low-Dose I-131 in Differentiated Cancer Thyroid: What is the Magic Number?

    PubMed Central

    Shinto, Ajit S.; Kamaleshwaran, K. K.; Shibu, Deepu K.; Vyshak, K.; Antony, Joppy

    2013-01-01

    Low dose radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) has been widely reported in the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) since 1970's. However, the clinical outcomes, dosage of I-131 and criteria for successful ablation are different in various studies. The aim of this study was to assess clinical outcome 18-month after RAI therapy in selected DTC patients and identify factors associated with a good response. In this experimental study, among patients with DTC referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department and had an indication for RAI therapy in the period between December 2008 and January 2011, 108 subjects were selected randomly. The patients were randomly divided into three groups and empiric low dose therapy with 30, 50 or 75 mCi of I-131 was administered. Patients were monitored closely clinically and with serum thyroglobulin assays and I-131 whole-body scans at 6 monthly intervals for 18-month after treatment. Among 105 patients who completed follow-up, 86% were successfully ablated with a single low dose of I-131. There was no statistically significant difference in ablation rates in the subgroups receiving 30.50 or 75 mCi of I-131. Cumulative ablation rate was 99% in patients after the second dose of low dose therapy. If appropriate selection criteria are used in DTC, successful remnant ablation can be achieved with low doses of I-131 in the range of 30-75 mCi. No significant differences were found in results achieved with 30.50 or 75 mCi of I-131. As the majority of the DTC patients fall within the inclusion criteria of this study, they can be treated on an ambulatory basis with associated low cost, convenience, and low whole-body radiation-absorbed dose to the patients. PMID:25125997

  5. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J.

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  6. Implementation of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses for a mathematical absorption model (transit compartment model).

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Boeckmann, Alison; Vick, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical absorption model (e.g. transit compartment model) is useful to describe complex absorption process. However, in such a model, an assumption has to be made to introduce multiple doses that a prior dose has been absorbed nearly completely when the next dose is administered. This is because the drug input cannot be determined from drug depot compartment through integration of the differential equation system and has to be analytically calculated. We propose a method of dose superimposition to introduce multiple doses; thereby eliminating the assumption. The code for implementing the dose superimposition in WinNonlin and NONMEM was provided. For implementation in NONMEM, we discussed a special case (SC) and a general case (GC). In a SC, dose superimposition was implemented solely using NM-TRAN abbreviated code and the maximum number of the doses that can be administered for any subject must be pre-defined. In a GC, a user-supplied function (FUNCA) in FORTRAN code was defined to perform dose superimposition to remove the restriction that the maximum number of doses must be pre-defined. PMID:22555854

  7. [Radioactivity of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingke; Cai, Wei; Zhao, Liancheng

    2003-09-01

    Exposed to neutron flow, the phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy gets radioactive. This radioactive material is used in vascular stent for prevention and cure of restenosis. Phosphorus implantation is carried out in a plasma immerged ion implantation system, and the dose of phosphorus implantation is in the range of 2-10 x 10(17) cm-2. After ion implantation, the alloy is exposed to the slow neutron flow in a nuclear reactor, the dose of the slow neutron is 1.39-5.88 x 10(19) n/cm2. The radioactivity of the TiNi alloy was measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry and radio-chromic-film dosimetry. The result shows that whether the phosphorus is implanted or not, the TiNi alloy comes to be radioactive after exposure to neutron flow. Just after neutron irradiation, the radiation dose of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is about one hundred times higher than that of un-phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy. The radiation difference between phosphorus and un-phosphorus implanted alloy decreases as time elapses. Within three months after neutron irradiation, the average half-decay period of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is about 62 days. The radiation ray penetration of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is deeper than that of pure 32P; this is of benefit to making radiation uniformity between stent struts and reducing radiation grads beyond the edge of stent.

  8. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  9. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  10. Phase I trial of orally administered pentosan polysulfate in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J L; Wellstein, A; Rae, J; DeLap, R J; Phipps, K; Hanfelt, J; Yunmbam, M K; Sun, J X; Duchin, K L; Hawkins, M J

    1997-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critically important to tumor growth and metastasis. We have shown that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is an effective inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors in vitro and can effectively inhibit the establishment and growth of tumors in nude mice. Following completion of our Phase I trial of s.c. administered PPS, we performed a Phase I trial of p.o. administered PPS in patients with advanced cancer to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity profile and to search for any evidence for biological activity in vivo. Patients diagnosed with advanced, incurable malignancies who met standard Phase I criteria and who did not have a history of bleeding complications were enrolled, in cohorts of three, to receive PPS p.o. t.i.d., at planned doses of 180, 270, 400, 600, and 800 mg/m2. Patients were monitored at least every 2 weeks with physical exams and weekly with hematological, chemistry, stool hemoccult, and coagulation blood studies, and serum and urine samples for PPS and basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) levels were also taken. The PPS dose was escalated in an attempt to reach the MTD. Eight additional patients were enrolled at the highest dose to further characterize the toxicity profile and biological in vivo effects of PPS. A total of 21 patients were enrolled in the three cohorts of doses 180 (n = 4), 270 (n = 3), and 400 (n = 14) mg/m2. The most severe toxicities seen were grade 3 proctitis and grade 4 diarrhea; however, 20 of the 21 patients had evidence of grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These toxicities became evident at a much earlier time point as the dose was increased, but their severities were similar at all dose levels. There were no objective responses, although three patients had prolonged stabilization of previously progressing disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested marked accumulation of PPS upon chronic administration. Serum and urine bFGF levels failed to show a consistent, interpretable

  11. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... Seneca Indian Tribe is June 25, 1984. The effective date for the UIC program for the lands of the...

  12. Findings from Survey Administered to Weatherization Training Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian; Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes results of a survey administered to directors of weatherization training centers that receive funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The survey presents results related to questions on training offered and future plans.

  13. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  14. Emergency department management of patients internally contaminated with radioactive material

    DOE PAGES

    Kazzi, Ziad; Buzzell, Jennifer; Bertelli, Luiz; Christensen, Doran

    2014-11-15

    After a radiation emergency that involves the dispersal of radioactive material, patients can become externally and internally contaminated with one or more radionuclides. Internal contamination can lead to the delivery of harmful ionizing radiation doses to various organs and tissues or the whole body. The clinical consequences can range from acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to the long term development of cancer. Estimating the amount of radioactive material absorbed into the body can guide the management of patients. Treatment includes, in addition to supportive care and long term monitoring, certain medical countermeasures like Prussian blue, Calcium DTPA and Zinc DTPA.

  15. Radioactive and magnetic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heye, D.; Beiersdorf, H.

    1979-01-01

    Age and growth pattern determination of manganese nodules were explored. Two methods are discussed: (1) measurement of the presence of radioactive iodine isotopes; which is effective only up to 3.105 years, and (2) measurements of magnetism. The growth rates of three nodules were determined. The surface of the nodule was recent, and the overall age of the nodule could be determined with accuracy of better than 30%. Measurement of paleomagnetic effect was attempted to determine wider age ranges, however, the measured sign changes could not be interpreted as paleomagnetic reversals.

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  17. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  18. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  19. Collection and Segregation of Radioactive Waste. Principals for Characterization and Classification of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinska, K.M.

    1998-09-28

    Radioactive wastes are generated by all activities which utilize radioactive materials as part of their processes. Generally such activities include all steps in the nuclear fuel cycle (for power generation) and non-fuel cycle activities. The increasing production of radioisotopes in a Member State without nuclear power must be accompanied by a corresponding development of a waste management system. An overall waste management scheme consists of the following steps: segregation, minimization, treatment, conditioning, storage, transport, and disposal. To achieve a satisfactory overall management strategy, all steps have to be complementary and compatible. Waste segregation and minimization are of great importance mainly because they lead to cost reduction and reduction of dose commitments to the personnel that handle the waste. Waste characterization plays a significant part in the waste segregation and waste classification processes, it implicates required waste treatment process including the need for the safety assessment of treatment conditioning and storage facilities.

  20. Levels of radioactivity in Qatar

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Mohammed, K.

    1995-12-31

    The levels of natural and man-made radioactivity in soil and seabed were measured in Qatar to assess radiation exposure levels and to evaluate any radioactive contamination that may have reached the country from fallout or due to the Chernobyl accident radioactivity release. Qatar peninsula is located on the Arabian Gulf, 4500 km from Chernobyl, and has an area of {approximately}11,600 km{sup 2} and a population of {approximately}600,000.