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Sample records for administered structured interviews

  1. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients.

  2. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients. PMID:26611666

  3. Validation of interviewer- and self-administered physical activity checklists for fifth grade students.

    PubMed

    Sallis, J F; Strikmiller, P K; Harsha, D W; Feldman, H A; Ehlinger, S; Stone, E J; Williston, J; Woods, S

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate two physical activity recall instruments appropriate for use in epidemiologic studies of fifth grade children. The instruments were similar, except one (PACI) was administered in a personal interview, and the other (SAPAC) was self-completed in a group setting. Both forms required children to report the minutes during the previous day they spent in 21 common physical activities that represented a range of intensities, plus sedentary pursuits. To validate the recalls, children simultaneously wore an accelerometer (motion sensor) and a heart rate monitor for at least 8 h the day before the interview. Subjects were 55 boys and 70 girls from four regions of the United States. The Pearson correlation between the self- and interviewer-administered forms was 0.76 (P < 0.001). The interviewer-administered form correlated 0.51 (P < 0.001) with the heart rate index and 0.33 (P < 0.001) with the accelerometer score. The self-administered form correlated 0.57 (P < 0.001) with the heart rate index and 0.30 (P < 0.001) with the accelerometer score. It is concluded that both self-report forms received moderate support for their validity in all gender and ethnic subgroups. The self-administered format is more cost-effective. PMID:8832538

  4. Comparison of Interviewer-Administered and Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recalls in 3 Diverse Integrated Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Frances E; Dixit-Joshi, Sujata; Potischman, Nancy; Dodd, Kevin W; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Kushi, Lawrence H; Alexander, Gwen L; Coleman, Laura A; Zimmerman, Thea P; Sundaram, Maria E; Clancy, Heather A; Groesbeck, Michelle; Douglass, Deirdre; George, Stephanie M; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Subar, Amy F

    2015-06-15

    Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls provide high-quality intake data but have been prohibitively expensive for large epidemiologic studies. This study's goal was to assess whether the web-based Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Recall (ASA24) performs similarly enough to the standard interviewer-administered, Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) 24-hour dietary recall to be considered a viable alternative. In 2010-2011, 1,081 adults from 3 integrated health systems in Detroit, Michigan; Marshfield, Wisconsin; and Kaiser-Permanente Northern California participated in a field trial. A quota design ensured a diverse sample by sex, age, and race/ethnicity. Each participant was asked to complete 2 recalls and was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 protocols differing by type of recall and administration order. For energy, the mean intakes were 2,425 versus 2,374 kcal for men and 1,876 versus 1,906 kcal for women by AMPM and ASA24, respectively. Of 20 nutrients/food groups analyzed and controlling for false discovery rate, 87% were judged equivalent at the 20% bound. ASA24 was preferred over AMPM by 70% of the respondents. Attrition was lower in the ASA24/AMPM study group than in the AMPM/ASA24 group, and it was lower in the ASA24/ASA24 group than in the AMPM/AMPM group. ASA24 offers the potential to collect high-quality dietary intake information at low cost with less attrition.

  5. A Qualitative Study of Interviewer-Administered Physical Activity Recalls by Children

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dawn K.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Guinn, Caroline; Pate, Russell; McIver, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative methods were used to better understand how to obtain interviewer-administered recalls of physical activity from children. Methods Subjects were 24 third- and fifth-grade children from one school in Columbia, South Carolina. Cognitive interviews targeted different retention intervals (about the same or previous school day). Round 1's protocols used an open format and had four phases (obtain free recall, review free recall, obtain details, review details). Round 2's protocols used a chronological format and had three phases (obtain free recall, obtain details, review details). Trained coders identified discrepancies across interview phases in children's recalls of physical activity at physical education (PE) and recess. Based on the school's schedule, children's reports of PE and recess were classified as omissions (scheduled but unreported) or intrusions (unscheduled but reported). Results Across interview phases, there were numerous discrepancies for Round 1 (regardless of grade, sex, or retention interval) but few discrepancies for Round 2. For Rounds 1 and 2, respectively, 0% and 0% of children omitted PE, while 33% and 0% intruded PE; 44% and 56% of children omitted recess, while 33% and 0% intruded recess. Conclusions Results provide important information for facilitating interviewer-administered recalls of physical activity with elementary-age children. PMID:23072783

  6. Protecting eyewitness evidence: examining the efficacy of a self-administered interview tool.

    PubMed

    Gabbert, Fiona; Hope, Lorraine; Fisher, Ronald P

    2009-08-01

    Given the crucial role of eyewitness evidence, statements should be obtained as soon as possible after an incident. This is not always achieved due to demands on police resources. Two studies trace the development of a new tool, the Self-Administered Interview (SAI), designed to elicit a comprehensive initial statement. In Study 1, SAI participants reported more correct details than participants who provided a free recall account, and performed at the same level as participants given a Cognitive Interview. In Study 2, participants viewed a simulated crime and half recorded their statement using the SAI. After a delay of 1 week, all participants completed a free recall test. SAI participants recalled more correct details in the delayed recall task than control participants. PMID:18561007

  7. Interviewer versus self-administered health-related quality of life questionnaires - Does it matter?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes are measured in many epidemiologic studies using self- or interviewer-administered questionnaires. While in some studies differences between these administration formats were observed, other studies did not show statistically significant differences important to patients. Since the evidence about the effect of administration format is inconsistent and mainly available from cross-sectional studies our aim was to assess the effects of different administration formats on repeated measurements of patient-reported outcomes in participants with AIDS enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS. Methods We included participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications in AIDS (LSOCA) who completed the Medical Outcome Study [MOS] -HIV questionnaire, the EuroQol, the Feeling Thermometer and the Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ) 25 every six months thereafter using self- or interviewer-administration. A large print questionnaire was available for participants with visual impairment. Considering all measurements over time and adjusting for patient and study site characteristics we used linear models to compare HRQL scores (all scores from 0-100) between administration formats. We defined adjusted differences of ≥0.2 standard deviations [SD]) to be quantitatively meaningful. Results We included 2,261 participants (80.6% males) with a median of 43.1 years of age at enrolment who provided data on 23,420 study visits. The self-administered MOS-HIV, Feeling Thermometer and EuroQol were used in 70% of all visits and the VFQ-25 in 80%. For eight domains of the MOS-HIV differences between the interviewer- and self- administered format were < 0.1 SD. Differences in scores were highest for the social and role function domains but the adjusted differences were still < 0.2 SD. There was no quantitatively meaningful difference between administration formats for EuroQol, Feeling Thermometer and VFQ-25 domain

  8. A Review of a Telephone-Administered Behavior-Based Interview Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliphant, Gary C.; Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Becky J.

    2008-01-01

    The employment interview is intended to provide insight into a candidate's future performance by evaluating the oral responses to the questions presented by the interviewer. For decades, researchers have studied many facets of the interview and have produced mixed results as to the predictive validity of the employment interview. Still,…

  9. JADE: computerization of a structured interview for childhood psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hauan, M J

    1999-01-01

    JADE is a new, computerized structured interview system to design, administer, and report results of the National Institute of Health's Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (NIMH-DISC). It has been developed under the auspices of the DISC Group at the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute. The development of JADE is based on extensive experience in the use of the DISC and with several previous computerized versions. It illustrates the importance to program design of consultation with those experienced in research and clinical application of the system and of the early adoption of a mature software development strategy.

  10. Test Takers' Experiences with Computer-Administered Listening Comprehension Tests: Interviewing for Qualitative Explorations of Test Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsuch, Greta

    2004-01-01

    In this study, retrospective interviews were used to investigate reliability (and thus validity) threats to a computerized ESL listening comprehension test administered at a university in the US. The participants in the investigation, six international graduate students, were asked to respond to semi- and open-ended questions during individual…

  11. Screening for Substance Use Disorder among Incarcerated Men with the Alcohol, Smoking, Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST): A Comparative Analysis of Computer-administered and Interviewer-administered Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nancy; Shi, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Substance use disorders are overrepresented in incarcerated male populations. Cost- effective screening for alcohol and substance use problems among incarcerated populations is a necessary first step forward intervention. The Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) holds promise because it has strong psychometric properties, requires minimal training, is easy to score, is available in the public domain but, because of complicated skip patterns, cannot be self-administered. This study tests the feasibility, reliability, and validity of using computer-administered self-interviewing (CASI) versus interviewer-administered interviewing (IAI) to screen for substance use problems among incarcerated men using the ASSIST. A 2 X 2 factorial design was used to randomly assign 396 incarcerated men to screening modality. Findings indicate that computer screening was feasible. Compared to IAI, CASI produced equally reliable screening information on substance use and symptom severity, with test-retest intraclass correlations for ASSIST total and substance-specific scores ranging from 0.7 to 0.9, and ASSIST substance-specific scores and a substance abuse disorder diagnosis based on the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) were significantly correlated for IAI and CASI. These findings indicate that data on substance use and symptom severity using the ASSIST can be reliably and validly obtained from CASI technology, increasing the efficiency by which incarcerated populations can be screened for substance use problems and, those at risk, identified for treatment. PMID:25659203

  12. The psychiatric interview: validity, structure, and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Nordgaard, Julie; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2013-06-01

    There is a glaring gap in the psychiatric literature concerning the nature of psychiatric symptoms and signs, and a corresponding lack of epistemological discussion of psycho-diagnostic interviewing. Contemporary clinical neuroscience heavily relies on the use of fully structured interviews that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric interview. We address the ontological status of pathological experience, the notions of symptom, sign, prototype and Gestalt, and the necessary second-person processes which are involved in converting the patient's experience (originally lived in the first-person perspective) into an "objective" (third person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully structured interview is neither theoretically adequate nor practically valid in obtaining psycho-diagnostic information. Failure to address these basic issues may have contributed to the current state of malaise in the study of psychopathology. PMID:23001456

  13. Reliability and Validity of the Self- and Interviewer-Administered Versions of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Anne H. Y.; Ng, Sheryl H. X.; Koh, David; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) was originally designed to be interviewer-administered by the World Health Organization in assessing physical activity. The main aim of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of a self-administered GPAQ with the original interviewer-administered approach. Additionally, this study explored whether using different accelerometry-based physical activity bout definitions might affect the questionnaire’s validity. Methods A total of 110 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to an interviewer- (n = 56) or a self-administered (n = 54) group for test-retest reliability, of which 108 participants who met the wear time criteria were included in the validity study. Reliability was assessed by administration of questionnaires twice with a one-week interval. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing against seven-day accelerometer measures. Two definitions for accelerometry-data scoring were employed: (1) total-min of activity, and (2) 10-min bout. Results Participants had similar baseline characteristics in both administration groups and no significant difference was found between the two formats in terms of validity (correlations between the GPAQ and accelerometer). For validity, the GPAQ demonstrated fair-to-moderate correlations for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for self-administration (rs = 0.30) and interviewer-administration (rs = 0.46). Findings were similar when considering 10-min activity bouts in the accelerometer analysis for MVPA (rs = 0.29 vs. 0.42 for self vs. interviewer). Within each mode of administration, the strongest correlations were observed for vigorous-intensity activity. However, Bland-Altman plots illustrated bias toward overestimation for higher levels of MVPA, vigorous- and moderate-intensity activities, and underestimation for lower levels of these measures. Reliability for MVPA revealed moderate correlations (rs = 0.61 vs. 0.63 for self vs

  14. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  15. A Structured Interview for the Selection of Physician's Assistant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebuhr, Bruce R.; And Others

    To improve the reliability of selection interviews, the faculty of the University of Texas Medical Branch physician's assistant program developed a structured fourteen-category interview. The thirty-minute interview was used to select from 94 applicants; each applicant was interviewed three times and independently rated on a five-point scale of…

  16. Agreement between an online dietary assessment tool (myfood24) and an interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall in British adolescents aged 11-18 years.

    PubMed

    Albar, Salwa A; Alwan, Nisreen A; Evans, Charlotte E L; Greenwood, Darren C; Cade, Janet E

    2016-05-01

    myfood24 Is an online 24-h dietary assessment tool developed for use among British adolescents and adults. Limited information is available regarding the validity of using new technology in assessing nutritional intake among adolescents. Thus, a relative validation of myfood24 against a face-to-face interviewer-administered 24-h multiple-pass recall (MPR) was conducted among seventy-five British adolescents aged 11-18 years. Participants were asked to complete myfood24 and an interviewer-administered MPR on the same day for 2 non-consecutive days at school. Total energy intake (EI) and nutrients recorded by the two methods were compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots (using between and within-individual information) and weighted κ to assess the agreement. Energy, macronutrients and other reported nutrients from myfood24 demonstrated strong agreement with the interview MPR data, and ICC ranged from 0·46 for Na to 0·88 for EI. There was no significant bias between the two methods for EI, macronutrients and most reported nutrients. The mean difference between myfood24 and the interviewer-administered MPR for EI was -230 kJ (-55 kcal) (95 % CI -490, 30 kJ (-117, 7 kcal); P=0·4) with limits of agreement ranging between 39 % (3336 kJ (-797 kcal)) lower and 34 % (2874 kJ (687 kcal)) higher than the interviewer-administered MPR. There was good agreement in terms of classifying adolescents into tertiles of EI (κ w =0·64). The agreement between day 1 and day 2 was as good for myfood24 as for the interviewer-administered MPR, reflecting the reliability of myfood24. myfood24 Has the potential to collect dietary data of comparable quality with that of an interviewer-administered MPR.

  17. Agreement between an online dietary assessment tool (myfood24) and an interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall in British adolescents aged 11-18 years.

    PubMed

    Albar, Salwa A; Alwan, Nisreen A; Evans, Charlotte E L; Greenwood, Darren C; Cade, Janet E

    2016-05-01

    myfood24 Is an online 24-h dietary assessment tool developed for use among British adolescents and adults. Limited information is available regarding the validity of using new technology in assessing nutritional intake among adolescents. Thus, a relative validation of myfood24 against a face-to-face interviewer-administered 24-h multiple-pass recall (MPR) was conducted among seventy-five British adolescents aged 11-18 years. Participants were asked to complete myfood24 and an interviewer-administered MPR on the same day for 2 non-consecutive days at school. Total energy intake (EI) and nutrients recorded by the two methods were compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots (using between and within-individual information) and weighted κ to assess the agreement. Energy, macronutrients and other reported nutrients from myfood24 demonstrated strong agreement with the interview MPR data, and ICC ranged from 0·46 for Na to 0·88 for EI. There was no significant bias between the two methods for EI, macronutrients and most reported nutrients. The mean difference between myfood24 and the interviewer-administered MPR for EI was -230 kJ (-55 kcal) (95 % CI -490, 30 kJ (-117, 7 kcal); P=0·4) with limits of agreement ranging between 39 % (3336 kJ (-797 kcal)) lower and 34 % (2874 kJ (687 kcal)) higher than the interviewer-administered MPR. There was good agreement in terms of classifying adolescents into tertiles of EI (κ w =0·64). The agreement between day 1 and day 2 was as good for myfood24 as for the interviewer-administered MPR, reflecting the reliability of myfood24. myfood24 Has the potential to collect dietary data of comparable quality with that of an interviewer-administered MPR. PMID:26975650

  18. A Meta-Model for Structuring the Clinical Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Allen E.; Matthews, William J.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a meta-model based on genetic epistemology for interviewing structure. Discusses developing rapport, gathering information, determining outcome, exploring alternatives and confronting incongruity, generalizing and transfering training, and the model's usefulness for counselors in planning sessions, developing interviewing summary notes,…

  19. The Work Experience Survey (WES) Manual: A Structured Interview for Identifying Barriers to Career Maintenance. A Service Provider's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; And Others

    This manual provides information on and instructions for administering the Work Experience Survey (WES), a 30- to 60-minute structured interview methodology to help individuals with disabilities direct their own accommodation planning. Section 1 describes the WES, which consists of six sections: (1) background information on the respondent, (2) an…

  20. The Standard for Clinicians’ Interview in Psychiatry (SCIP): A Clinician-administered Tool with Categorical, Dimensional, and Numeric Output—Conceptual Development, Design, and Description of the SCIP

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Henry; Muvvala, Srinivas; El-Missiry, Ahmed; Mansour, Hader; Hill, Cheryl; Elswick, Daniel; Price, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Existing standardized diagnostic interviews (SDIs) were designed for researchers and produce mainly categorical diagnoses. There is an urgent need for a clinician-administered tool that produces dimensional measures, in addition to categorical diagnoses. The Standard for Clinicians’ Interview in Psychiatry (SCIP) is a method of assessment of psychopathology for adults. It is designed to be administered by clinicians and includes the SCIP manual and the SCIP interview. Clinicians use the SCIP questions and rate the responses according to the SCIP manual rules. Clinicians use the patient’s responses to questions, observe the patient’s behaviors and make the final rating of the various signs and symptoms assessed. The SCIP method of psychiatric assessment has three components: 1) the SCIP interview (dimensional) component, 2) the etiological component, and 3) the disorder classification component. The SCIP produces three main categories of clinical data: 1) a diagnostic classification of psychiatric disorders, 2) dimensional scores, and 3) numeric data. The SCIP provides diagnoses consistent with criteria from editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) and International Classification of Disease (ICD). The SCIP produces 18 dimensional measures for key psychiatric signs or symptoms: anxiety, posttraumatic stress, obsessions, compulsions, depression, mania, suicidality, suicidal behavior, delusions, hallucinations, agitation, disorganized behavior, negativity, catatonia, alcohol addiction, drug addiction, attention, and hyperactivity. The SCIP produces numeric severity data for use in either clinical care or research. The SCIP was shown to be a valid and reliable assessment tool, and the validity and reliability results were published in 2014 and 2015. The SCIP is compatible with personalized psychiatry research and is in line with the Research Domain Criteria framework. PMID:27800284

  1. Exploration of Habitability Factors Influencing Short Duration Spaceflight: Structured Postflight Interviews of Shuttle Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, James; Leveton, Lauren; Keeton, Kathryn; Whitmire, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts report significant difficulties with sleep during Space missions. Psychological, physiological, and habitability factors are all thought to play a role in spaceflight insomnia. Crewmembers gain experience with the spaceflight sleep environment as their missions progress, but this knowledge is not formally collected and communicated to subsequent crews. This lack of information transfer prevents crews from optimizing their capability to sleep during mission, which leads to fatigue and its potentially deleterious effects. The goal of this project is astronauts with recent spaceflight experience to gather their knowledge of and insights into sleep in Space. Structured interviews consisting of standardized closed and open-ended questionnaires are administered to astronauts who have flown on the Space Shuttle since the Columbia disaster. It is hoped that review and analysis of the pooled responses to the interview questions will lead to greater understanding of the sleep environment during short duration spaceflight, with attention placed on problem aspects and their potential solutions.

  2. Accuracy of audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) and self-administered questionnaires for the assessment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Beedy, Dianne; Carey, Michael P; Tu, Xin

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the accuracy of two retrospective methods and assessment intervals for recall of sexual behavior and assessed predictors of recall accuracy. Using a 2 [mode: audio-computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) vs. self-administered questionnaire (SAQ)] by 2 (frequency: monthly vs. quarterly) design, young women (N =102) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions. Participants completed baseline measures, monitored their behavior with a daily diary, and returned monthly (or quarterly) for assessments. A mixed pattern of accuracy between the four assessment methods was identified. Monthly assessments yielded more accurate recall for protected and unprotected vaginal sex but quarterly assessments yielded more accurate recall for unprotected oral sex. Mode differences were not strong, and hypothesized predictors of accuracy tended not to be associated with recall accuracy. Choice of assessment mode and frequency should be based upon the research question(s), population, resources, and context in which data collection will occur. PMID:16721506

  3. How I Learned to Design and Conduct Semi-Structured Interviews: An Ongoing and Continuous Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabionet, Silvia E.

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative interviewing is a flexible and powerful tool to capture the voices and the ways people make meaning of their experience Learning to conduct semi-structure interviews requires the following six stages: (a) selecting the type of interview; (b) establishing ethical guidelines, (c) crafting the interview protocol; (d) conducting and…

  4. [SCAN system--semi-structured interview based on diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej; Hadryś, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of contemporary diagnostic systems which are implemented into the SCAN--modern and semi-structured diagnostic interview. The concepts of further development of the classifications, rationale for operationalized diagnostic criteria and for the divisional approach to mental diagnoses will be in focus. The structure and components of SCAN ver. 2.1 (WHO), i.e. Present State Examination--10th edition, Item Group Checklist, Clinical History Schedule, Glossary of Definitions and computer software with the diagnostic algorithm: I-Shell, as well as rules for a reliable use of diagnostic rating scales, will be discussed within the scope of this paper. The materials and training sets necessary for the learning of proper use of the SCAN, especially training sets for SCAN Training Centers and the Reference Manual--a form of guidebook for SCAN shall be introduced. Finally the paper will present evidence that SCAN is an instrument feasible in different cultural settings. Reliability and validity data of SCAN will also be dealt with indicating that SCAN could be widely used in research studies as well as in everyday clinical practice facilitating more detailed diagnostic approach to a patient. PMID:17068947

  5. [SCAN system--semi-structured interview based on diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej; Hadryś, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of contemporary diagnostic systems which are implemented into the SCAN--modern and semi-structured diagnostic interview. The concepts of further development of the classifications, rationale for operationalized diagnostic criteria and for the divisional approach to mental diagnoses will be in focus. The structure and components of SCAN ver. 2.1 (WHO), i.e. Present State Examination--10th edition, Item Group Checklist, Clinical History Schedule, Glossary of Definitions and computer software with the diagnostic algorithm: I-Shell, as well as rules for a reliable use of diagnostic rating scales, will be discussed within the scope of this paper. The materials and training sets necessary for the learning of proper use of the SCAN, especially training sets for SCAN Training Centers and the Reference Manual--a form of guidebook for SCAN shall be introduced. Finally the paper will present evidence that SCAN is an instrument feasible in different cultural settings. Reliability and validity data of SCAN will also be dealt with indicating that SCAN could be widely used in research studies as well as in everyday clinical practice facilitating more detailed diagnostic approach to a patient.

  6. Interaction exchange structure and patient satisfaction with medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Stiles, W B; Putnam, S M; Wolf, M H; James, S A

    1979-06-01

    The verbal interaction between patients and physicians in 52 initial interviews in a university hospital screening clinic was studied using a new discourse coding system. Factor analysis of category frequencies showed that each interview segment, medical history, physical examination, and conclusion, consisted mainly of two or three types of verbal exchange. Patient satisfaction with the interviews, assessed with a questionnaire that yields separate scores for satisfaction with cognitive and affective aspects, was found to be associated with exchanges involving the transmission of information in particular interview segments. Affective satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from patient to physician in "exposition" exchanges during the medical history, in which patients told their story in their own words. Cognitive satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from physician to patient in "feedback" exchanges during the conclusion segment, in which physicians gave patients information about illness and treatment. PMID:449436

  7. Interaction exchange structure and patient satisfaction with medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Stiles, W B; Putnam, S M; Wolf, M H; James, S A

    1979-06-01

    The verbal interaction between patients and physicians in 52 initial interviews in a university hospital screening clinic was studied using a new discourse coding system. Factor analysis of category frequencies showed that each interview segment, medical history, physical examination, and conclusion, consisted mainly of two or three types of verbal exchange. Patient satisfaction with the interviews, assessed with a questionnaire that yields separate scores for satisfaction with cognitive and affective aspects, was found to be associated with exchanges involving the transmission of information in particular interview segments. Affective satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from patient to physician in "exposition" exchanges during the medical history, in which patients told their story in their own words. Cognitive satisfaction was associated with transmission of information from physician to patient in "feedback" exchanges during the conclusion segment, in which physicians gave patients information about illness and treatment.

  8. A Study of the Structure and Content of Principal Selection Interviews in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The principal plays a key role in student success. The employment interview is a critical element in the principal selection process. This study examined the interview structure and the content of the interview questions that districts used in their principal search for the 2011-2012 school year. The research-based practices for interview…

  9. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses of the Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoboria, Alan; Ford, Julian; Lin, Hsiu-ju; Frisman, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to provide the first empirical examination of the factor structure of a revised version of the clinically derived Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress, a structured interview designed to assess associated features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) thought to be related to early onset, interpersonal,…

  10. A Spatial View of the Interpersonal Structure of Family Interviews: Similarities and Differences Across Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Highlen, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the interpersonal structures of interviews by Ackerman, Bowen, Jackson, and Whitaker with the same family to identify common features across counselors. Multidimensional scaling provided a spatial representation of the hidden structure in the communication patterns of these interviews. Correlations indicated counselors' interactions were…

  11. Psychometric Properties of a Structured Interview Guide for the Rating for Anxiety in Dementia (RAID-SI)

    PubMed Central

    Snow, A. Lynn; Huddleston, Cashuna; Robinson, Christina; Kunik, Mark E.; Bush, Amber L.; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Paukert, Amber; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Petersen, Nancy J.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The Rating Anxiety in Dementia (RAID; Shankar et al, 1999)is a clinical rating scale developed to evaluate anxiety in persons with dementia. This report explores the psychometric properties and clinical utility of a new structured interview format of the RAID (RAID-SI), developed to standardize administration and scoring based on information obtained from the patient, an identified collateral, and rater observation. METHOD The RAID-SI was administered by trained master’s level raters. Participants were 32 persons with dementia who qualified for an anxiety treatment outcome study. Self-report anxiety, depression, and quality of life measures were administered to both the person with dementia and a collateral. RESULTS The RAID-SI exhibited adequate internal consistency reliability and inter-rater reliability. There was also some evidence of construct validity as indicated by significant correlations with other measures of patient-reported and collateral-reported anxiety, and non-significant correlations with collateral reports of patient depression and quality of life. Further, RAID-SI scores were significantly higher in persons with an anxiety diagnosis compared to those without an anxiety diagnosis. CONCLUSION There is evidence that the RAID-SI exhibits good reliability and validity in older adults with dementia. The advantage of the structured interview format is increased standardization in administration and scoring, which may be particularly important when RAID raters are not experienced clinicians. PMID:22372475

  12. The feasibility and acceptability of administering a telemedicine objective structured clinical exam as a solution for providing equivalent education to remote and rural learners

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, RT; Biagioli, FE; Mujcic, J; Schneider, BN; Spires, L; Dodson, LG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although many medical schools incorporate distance learning into their curricula, assessing students at a distance can be challenging. While some assessments are relatively simple to administer to remote students, other assessments, such as objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) are not. This article describes a means to more effectively and efficiently assess distance learners and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the assessment. Methods We developed a teleOSCE, administered online in real time, to two cohorts of students on a rural clerkship rotation and assessed the feasibility and acceptability of using such an approach to assess medical students’ clinical skills at rural locations. Project feasibility was defined as having development and implementation costs of less than $5000. Project acceptability was determined by analyzing student interview transcripts. A qualitative case study design framework was chosen due to the novel nature of the activity. Results The implementation cost of the teleOSCE was approximately US$1577.20, making it a feasible educational endeavor. Interview data indicated the teleOSCE was also acceptable to students. Conclusions The teleOSCE format may be useful to other institutions as a method to centrally administer clinical skills exams for assessment of distance medical students. PMID:26632083

  13. Developing Teachers' Knowledge of Students as Learners of Mathematics through Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Oliver F.

    2010-01-01

    A structured interview process is proffered as an effective means to advance prospective teachers' understandings of students as learners of mathematics, a key component of pedagogical content knowledge. The interview process is carried out in three phases with the primary objective of developing listening skills for accessing students'…

  14. Reliability and Validity of an Interviewer-Administered Adaptation of the Youth Self-Report for Mental Health Screening of Vulnerable Young People in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Geibel, Scott; Habtamu, Kassahun; Mekonnen, Gebeyehu; Jani, Nrupa; Kay, Lynnette; Shibru, Julyata; Bedilu, Lake; Kalibala, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the reliability and validity of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) as a screening tool for mental health problems among young people vulnerable to HIV in Ethiopia. Design A cross-sectional assessment of young people currently receiving social services. Methods Young people age 15–18 participated in a study where a translated and adapted version of the YSR was administered by trained nurses, followed by an assessment by Ethiopian psychiatrists. Internal reliability of YSR syndrome scales were assessed using Chronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was assessed through repeating the YSR one month later. To assess validity, analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of the YSR compared to the psychiatrist assessment was conducted. Results Across the eight syndrome scales, the YSR best measured the diagnosis of anxiety/depression and social problems among young women, and attention problems among young men. Among individual YSR syndrome scales, internal reliability ranged from unacceptable (Chronback’s alpha = 0.11, rule-breaking behavior among young women) to good (α≥0.71, anxiety/depression among young women). Anxiety/depression scores of ≥8.5 among young women also had good sensitivity (0.833) and specificity (0.754) to predict a true diagnosis. The YSR syndrome scales for social problems among young women and attention problems among young men also had fair consistency and validity measurements. Most YSR scores had significant positive correlations between baseline and post-one month administration. Measures of reliability and validity for most other YSR syndrome scales were fair to poor. Conclusions The adapted, personally administered, Amharic version of the YSR has sufficient reliability and validity in identifying young vulnerable women with anxiety/depression and/or social problems, and young men with attention problems; which were the most common mental health disorders observed by psychiatrists among the migrant populations in this

  15. Structured oral interview. One way to identify family physicians' educational needs.

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A.; Sindon, A.; Bourque, A.; Bordage, G.; Ferland, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and test a structured oral interview that would elicit information on the educational needs of physicians in order to help them plan individualized continuing education. DESIGN: Seven different sets of problems were prepared, each including 40 cases, of which 26 are common. Each pilot test candidate was interviewed by two physician-interviewers during a 1-day session. After each answer, candidates were told the predetermined correct answer. PARTICIPANTS: Six candidates were selected at random from among Montreal physicians aged 50 and older with no hospital privileges. All had to have no history of professional complaints or prosecution and to be unknown to the interviewers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inter-rater reliability and perceived difficulty of the cases. RESULTS: Candidates rated the interview process and cases used pertinent, credible, and not too difficult. Candidates' performance level was about 50%. Agreement between interviewers averaged 91.2%. CONCLUSIONS: A structured oral interview appears to be a credible instrument for helping determine practising physicians' deficiencies in clinical knowledge and reasoning. PMID:7580383

  16. Recall and validation of phobia origins as a function of a structured interview versus the Phobia Origins Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kheriaty, E; Kleinknecht, R A; Hyman, I E

    1999-01-01

    Memory for fear onset events was examined in 43 dog-fearful and 48 blood/injection-fearful participants. Half of each fear type was administered the Phobia Origins Questionnaire (POQ), and half the Phobia Origins Structured Interview (POSI). Written accounts of recalled onset experiences were sent to participants' parents for verification. More participants assessed by the POQ reported a phobia onset event (93%) than did those assessed by the POSI (54%). A majority in both methods recalled conditioning-like experiences. The POQ resulted in more reports of vicarious and informational onset reports than did the POSI. Parents confirmed more onset event reports obtained by the POSI (81%) than those obtained by the POQ, (50%). In addition, in 21% of cases where a child recalled an event, a parent reported an onset event that predated the one provided by the child. Results are discussed in terms of memory mechanisms operative in autobiographical memories.

  17. Combining Dual Scaling with Semi-Structured Interviews to Interpret Rating Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Ruth A.; Ram, Anita; Xu, Yunmei

    2009-01-01

    Dual scaling, a variation of multidimensional scaling, can reveal the dimensions underlying scores, such as raters' judgments. This study illustrates the use of a dual scaling analysis with semi-structured interviews of raters to investigate the differences among the raters as captured by the dimensions. Thirty applications to a one-year…

  18. Assessing Depression in Youth: Relation Between the Children's Depression Inventory and a Structured Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timbremont, Benedikte; Braet, Caroline; Dreessen, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) for predicting a diagnosis of a depressive disorder derived from the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Child Edition (KID-SCID). The participants were 80…

  19. The health preoccupation diagnostic interview: inter-rater reliability of a structured interview for diagnostic assessment of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder and illness anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Erland; Andersson, Erik; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Wallhed Finn, Daniel; Hedman, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) and illness anxiety disorder (IAD) are two new diagnoses introduced in the DSM-5. There is a need for reliable instruments to facilitate the assessment of these disorders. We therefore developed a structured diagnostic interview, the Health Preoccupation Diagnostic Interview (HPDI), which we hypothesized would reliably differentiate between SSD, IAD, and no diagnosis. Persons with clinically significant health anxiety (n = 52) and healthy controls (n = 52) were interviewed using the HPDI. Diagnoses were then compared with those made by an independent assessor, who listened to audio recordings of the interviews. Ratings generally indicated moderate to almost perfect inter-rater agreement, as illustrated by an overall Cohen's κ of .85. Disagreements primarily concerned (a) the severity of somatic symptoms, (b) the differential diagnosis of panic disorder, and (c) SSD specifiers. We conclude that the HPDI can be used to reliably diagnose DSM-5 SSD and IAD. PMID:27096407

  20. Measuring Use of Research Evidence: The Structured Interview for Evidence Use

    PubMed Central

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Garcia, Antonio R.; Aarons, Gregory A.; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Holloway, Ian W.; Mackie, Thomas I.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article describes the Standard Interview for Evidence Use (SIEU), a measure to assess the level of engagement in acquiring, evaluating, and applying research evidence in health and social service settings. Method Three scales measuring input, process, and output of research evidence and eight subscales were identified using principal axis factor analysis and parallel analysis of data collected from 202 state and county child welfare, mental health, and juvenile justice systems leaders. Results The SIEU scales and subscales demonstrate strong internal consistency as well as convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The SIEU is easy to use and can be administered as a complete scale or as three smaller scales to separately examine evidence in acquisition, evaluation, or application. The measure demonstrates potential in understanding the role of research evidence in service settings and in monitoring the process of evidence-based practice and application of scientific principles in social work practice. PMID:27616869

  1. Measuring Use of Research Evidence: The Structured Interview for Evidence Use

    PubMed Central

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Garcia, Antonio R.; Aarons, Gregory A.; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Holloway, Ian W.; Mackie, Thomas I.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article describes the Standard Interview for Evidence Use (SIEU), a measure to assess the level of engagement in acquiring, evaluating, and applying research evidence in health and social service settings. Method Three scales measuring input, process, and output of research evidence and eight subscales were identified using principal axis factor analysis and parallel analysis of data collected from 202 state and county child welfare, mental health, and juvenile justice systems leaders. Results The SIEU scales and subscales demonstrate strong internal consistency as well as convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The SIEU is easy to use and can be administered as a complete scale or as three smaller scales to separately examine evidence in acquisition, evaluation, or application. The measure demonstrates potential in understanding the role of research evidence in service settings and in monitoring the process of evidence-based practice and application of scientific principles in social work practice.

  2. Trained student pharmacists’ telephonic collection of patient medication information: Evaluation of a structured interview tool

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Amanda R.; Martin, Beth A.; Mott, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and fidelity of student pharmacists collecting patient medication list information using a structured interview tool and the accuracy of documenting the information. The medication lists were used by a community pharmacist to provide a targeted medication therapy management (MTM) intervention. Design Descriptive analysis of patient medication lists collected via telephone interviews. Participants 10 trained student pharmacists collected the medication lists. Intervention Trained student pharmacists conducted audio-recorded telephone interviews with 80 English-speaking community dwelling older adults using a structured interview tool to collect and document medication lists. Main outcome measures Feasibility was measured using the number of completed interviews, the time student pharmacists took to collect the information, and pharmacist feedback. Fidelity to the interview tool was measured by assessing student pharmacists’ adherence to asking all scripted questions and probes. Accuracy was measured by comparing the audio recorded interviews to the medication list information documented in an electronic medical record. Results On average it took student pharmacists 26.7 minutes to collect the medication lists. The community pharmacist said the medication lists were complete and that having the medication lists saved time and allowed him to focus on assessment, recommendations, and education during the targeted MTM session. Fidelity was high with an overall proportion of asked scripted probes of 83.75% (95%CI: 80.62–86.88%). Accuracy was also high for both prescription (95.1%, 95%CI: 94.3–95.8%) and non-prescription (90.5%, 95%CI: 89.4–91.4%) medications. Conclusion Trained student pharmacists were able to use an interview tool to collect and document medication lists with a high degree of fidelity and accuracy. This study suggests that student pharmacists or trained technicians may be able to collect patient medication

  3. The use of semi-structured interviews for the characterisation of farmer irrigation practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, J.; Buytaert, W.; Mijic, A.; Brozovic, N.; Sinha, R.

    2015-08-01

    Generating information on the behaviours, characteristics and drivers of users, as well on the resource itself, is vital in developing sustainable and realistic water security options. In this paper we present a methodology for collecting qualitative and quantitative data on water use practices through semi-structured interviews. This approach facilitates the collection of detailed information on actors' decisions in a convenient and cost-effective manner. The interview is organised around a topic guide, which helps lead the conversation in a standardised way while allowing sufficient opportunity to identify relevant issues previously unknown to the researcher. In addition, semi-structured interviews can be used to obtain certain types of quantitative data. While not as accurate as direct measurements, it can provide useful information on local practices and farmers' insights. We present an application of the methodology on two districts in the State of Uttar Pradesh in North India. By means of 100 farmer interviews, information was collected on various aspects of irrigation practices, including irrigation water volumes, irrigation cost, water source and their spatial variability. A statistical analysis of the information, along with some data visualisation is also presented, which highlights a significant variation in irrigation practices both within and between the districts. Our application shows that semi-structured interviews are an effective and efficient method of collecting both qualitative and quantitative information for the assessment of drivers, behaviours and their outcomes in a data scarce region. The collection of this type of data could significantly improve insight on water resources, leading to more realistic management options and increased water security in the future.

  4. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under “impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified”. This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM–IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including “SMS pathological use” and “High monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test–retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder. PMID:27437008

  5. The use of semi-structured interviews for the characterisation of farmer irrigation practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozović, Nicholas; Sinha, Rajiv

    2016-05-01

    For the development of sustainable and realistic water security, generating information on the behaviours, characteristics, and drivers of users, as well as on the resource itself, is essential. In this paper we present a methodology for collecting qualitative and quantitative data on water use practices through semi-structured interviews. This approach facilitates the collection of detailed information on actors' decisions in a convenient and cost-effective manner. Semi-structured interviews are organised around a topic guide, which helps lead the conversation in a standardised way while allowing sufficient opportunity for relevant issues to emerge. In addition, they can be used to obtain certain types of quantitative data. While not as accurate as direct measurements, they can provide useful information on local practices and users' insights. We present an application of the methodology on farmer water use in two districts in the state of Uttar Pradesh in northern India. By means of 100 farmer interviews, information was collected on various aspects of irrigation practices, including irrigation water volumes, irrigation cost, water source, and their spatial variability. Statistical analyses of the information, along with data visualisation, are also presented, indicating a significant variation in irrigation practices both within and between districts. Our application shows that semi-structured interviews are an effective and efficient method of collecting both qualitative and quantitative information for the assessment of drivers, behaviours, and their outcomes in a data-scarce region. The collection of this type of data could significantly improve insights on water resources, leading to more realistic management options and increased water security in the future.

  6. The Comparability of Mother-Report Structured Interviews and Checklists for the Quantification of Youth Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Melanie A.; Boyle, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although structured interviews are assumed to be scientifically superior to checklists for measuring youth psychopathology, few studies have tested this hypothesis. Interviews place a much greater burden on respondents, making it critical to determine their added value when quantifying psychiatric symptoms. Methods: Confirmatory factor…

  7. Validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization–Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER)

    PubMed Central

    Mula, Marco; Pini, Stefano; Calugi, Simona; Preve, Matteo; Masini, Matteo; Giovannini, Ilaria; Conversano, Ciro; Rucci, Paola; Cassano, Giovanni B

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity and reliability of a new instrument developed to assess symptoms of depersonalization: the Structured Clinical Interview for the Depersonalization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER). The instrument is based on a spectrum model that emphasizes soft-signs, sub-threshold syndromes as well as clinical and subsyndromal manifestations. Items of the interview include, in addition to DSM-IV criteria for depersonalization, a number of features derived from clinical experience and from a review of phenomenological descriptions. Study participants included 258 consecutive patients with mood and anxiety disorders, 16.7% bipolar I disorder, 18.6% bipolar II disorder, 32.9% major depression, 22.1% panic disorder, 4.7% obsessive compulsive disorder, and 1.5% generalized anxiety disorder; 2.7% patients were also diagnosed with depersonalization disorder. A comparison group of 42 unselected controls was enrolled at the same site. The SCI-DER showed excellent reliability and good concurrent validity with the Dissociative Experiences Scale. It significantly discriminated subjects with any diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders from controls and subjects with depersonalization disorder from controls. The hypothesized structure of the instrument was confirmed empirically. PMID:19183789

  8. Assessment of genuine and simulated dissociative identity disorder on the structured interview of reported symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; McNary, Scot W; Loewenstein, Richard J; Kolos, Amie C; Barr, Stefanie R

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about how to detect malingered dissociative identity disorder (DID). This study presents preliminary data from an ongoing study about the performance of DID patients on the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS, Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1992), considered to be a "gold standard" structured interview in forensic psychology to detect feigning of psychological symptoms. Test responses from 20 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients are compared to those of 43 well informed and motivated DID simulators. Both the simulators and DID patients endorsed such a high number of symptoms that their average overall scores would typically be interpreted as indicative of feigning. The simulators' mean scores were significantly higher than those of the DID patients on only four out of 13 scales. These results provide preliminary evidence that well informed and motivated simulators are able to fairly successfully simulate DID patients and avoid detection on the SIRS. Furthermore, many DID patients may be at risk for being inaccurately labeled as feigning on the SIRS.

  9. Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO): preliminary psychometrics in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Stern, Barry L; Caligor, Eve; Clarkin, John F; Critchfield, Kenneth L; Horz, Susanne; MacCornack, Verna; Lenzenweger, Mark F; Kernberg, Otto F

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe the development and preliminary psychometric properties of the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO), a semistructured interview designed for the dimensional assessment of identity, primitive defenses, and reality testing, the three primary content domains in the model of personality health and disorder elaborated by Kernberg (1984; Kernberg & Caligor, 2005). Results of this investigation, conducted in a clinical sample representing a broad range of personality pathology, indicate that identity and primitive defenses as operationalized in the STIPO are internally consistent and that interrater reliability for all 3 content domains is adequate. Validity findings suggest that the assessment of one's sense of self and significant others (Identity) is predictive of measures of positive and negative affect, whereas the maladaptive ways in which the subject uses his or her objects for purposes of regulating one's self experience (Primitive Defenses) is predictive of measures of aggression and personality disorder traits associated with cluster B personality disorders. We discuss implications of these findings in terms of the theory-driven and trait-based assessment of personality pathology. PMID:20013454

  10. Preparedness of emergency departments in northwest England for managing chemical incidents: a structured interview survey

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jane; Walter, Darren; Challen, Kirsty

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of significant chemical incidents occur in the UK each year and may require Emergency Departments (EDs) to receive and manage contaminated casualties. Previously UK EDs have been found to be under-prepared for this, but since October 2005 acute hospital Trusts have had a statutory responsibility to maintain decontamination capacity. We aimed to evaluate the level of preparedness of Emergency Departments in North West England for managing chemical incidents. Methods A face-to-face semi-structured interview was carried out with the Nurse Manager or a nominated deputy in all 18 Emergency Departments in the Region. Results 16/18 departments had a written chemical incident plan but only 7 had the plan available at interview. All had a designated decontamination area but only 11 felt that they were adequately equipped. 12/18 had a current training programme for chemical incident management and 3 had no staff trained in decontamination. 13/18 could contain contaminated water from casualty decontamination and 6 could provide shelter for casualties before decontamination. Conclusion We have identified major inconsistencies in the preparedness of North West Emergency Departments for managing chemical incidents. Nationally recognized standards on incident planning, facilities, equipment and procedures need to be agreed and implemented with adequate resources. Issues of environmental safety and patient dignity and comfort should also be addressed. PMID:18096030

  11. [The suicide assessment in the psychiatric emergencies: A semi-structured interview].

    PubMed

    Vandevoorde, Jérémie; Baudoin, Thierry; Chabert, Béatrice; Baudoin, Emmanuelle; Sanchez Valero, Ambre

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiological literature shows that the population going through general or psychiatric emergencies indicates a high suicide risk. Suicide is classified as an avoidable mortality by the WHO. Therefore, suicidal potential must be assessed at different stages of hospitalization: when the patient comes to the emergency, during hospitalization, after hospitalization in the context of prevention and regularly monitoring. The authors present a simple approach to the investigation of suicidal activity through a semi-structured clinical interview and propose a fast and convenient grid report, experienced at psychiatric emergencies. A real and concrete case illustrates the method whereas are reminded the suicide warning signs and indices of increase about risk of acting out at the hospital. PMID:26071030

  12. Changing organizational structure and organizational memory in primary care practices: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Organizational structure is built through dynamic processes which blend historical force and management decisions, as a part of a broader process of constructing organizational memory (OM). OM is considered to be one of the main competences leading to the organization's success. This study focuses on the impact of the Quality and Outcome Framework (QOF), which is a Pay-for-Performance scheme, on general practitioner (GP) practices in the UK. The study is based on semistructured interviews with four GP practices in the north of England involving 39 informants. The findings show that the way practices assigned different functions into specialized units, divisions or departments shows the degree of specialization in their organizational structures. More specialized unit arrangements, such as an IT division, particular chronic disease clinics or competence-based job distributions enhanced procedural memory development through enabling regular use of knowledge in specific context, which led to competence building. In turn, such competence at particular functions or jobs made it possible for the practices to achieve their goals more efficiently. This study concludes that organizational structure contributed strongly to the enhancement of OM, which in turn led to better organizational competence.

  13. Improving Quality of Life in Nursing Homes: The Structured Resident Interview Approach

    PubMed Central

    Degenholtz, Howard B.; Resnick, Abby L.; Chia, Lichun

    2014-01-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of the approximately 1.5 million nursing facility (NF) residents in the US is undoubtedly lower than desired by residents, families, providers, and policy makers. Although there have been important advances in defining and measuring QOL for this population, there is a need for interventions that are tied to standardized measurement and quality improvement programs. This paper describes the development and testing of a structured, tailored assessment and care planning process for improving the QOL of nursing home residents. The Quality of Life Structured Resident Interview and Care Plan (QOL.SRI/CP) builds on a decade of research on measuring QOL and is designed to be easily implemented in any US nursing home. The approach was developed through extensive and iterative pilot testing and then tested in a randomized controlled trial in three nursing homes. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the assessment alone or both the assessment and an individualized QOL care plan task. The results show that residents assigned to the intervention group experienced improved QOL at 90- and 180-day follow-up, while QOL of residents in the control group was unchanged. PMID:25371822

  14. Item-Level Psychometrics of the Glasgow Outcome Scale: Extended Structured Interviews.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ickpyo; Li, Chih-Ying; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) structured interview captures critical components of activities and participation, including home, shopping, work, leisure, and family/friend relationships. Eighty-nine community dwelling adults with mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) were recruited (average = 2.7 year post injury). Nine items of the 19 items were used for the psychometrics analysis purpose. Factor analysis and item-level psychometrics were investigated using the Rasch partial-credit model. Although the principal components analysis of residuals suggests that a single measurement factor dominates the measure, the instrument did not meet the factor analysis criteria. Five items met the rating scale criteria. Eight items fit the Rasch model. The instrument demonstrated low person reliability (0.63), low person strata (2.07), and a slight ceiling effect. The GOSE demonstrated limitations in precisely measuring activities/participation for individuals after TBI. Future studies should examine the impact of the low precision of the GOSE on effect size. PMID:27504879

  15. Measurement equivalence of the Toronto Structured Interview for Alexithymia across language, gender, and clinical status.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Kateryna V; Taylor, Graeme J; Parker, James D A; Inslegers, Ruth; Michael Bagby, R

    2015-08-30

    The Toronto Structured Interview for Alexithymia (TSIA) has been translated into Dutch, German, and Italian and validated in clinical and nonclinical populations. In order to make valid comparisons across different population groups, it is important to establish measurement equivalence across variables such as language, gender, and clinical status. Our objective in this study was to establish measurement equivalence in relation to language (English, Dutch, German, and Italian), gender, and clinical status (non-clinical, psychiatric, and medical) using differential item functioning (DIF). The sample was composed of 842 adults representing the four language groups, all of whom had undergone the TSIA assessment as part of several earlier studies. Ordinal Logistic Regression was employed to explore DIF of the TSIA items. Although several items were found to exhibit DIF for language, gender, or clinical status, all of these effects were within an acceptable range. These findings provide support for the measurement equivalence of the TSIA, and allow researchers to reliably compare results from studies using the TSIA across the four language groups, gender, and clinical status.

  16. Psychopathology in Bariatric Surgery Candidates: A Review of Studies Using Structured Diagnostic Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott; Crosby, Ross; Wonderlich, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are not uncommon among severely obese patients who present for bariatric surgery. This paper (1) reviews the results of the published studies using the structured interviews to assess psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates; (2) compares the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders across these studies with the data from other population samples; and (3) assesses whether sociodemographic variables appear to affect these prevalence rates. We searched online resources, PubMed, PsychINFO and reference lists of all the relevant articles to provide an overview of evidence so far and highlight some details in the assessment and comparisons of different samples in different countries. The prevalence estimates in the non- treatment obese group did not appear to differ substantially from the general population group in the US or the Italian population samples, although they were relatively higher for the German population. However, the rates of psychopathology in the bariatric surgery candidates were considerably higher than the other two population groups in all the samples. Overall, the most common category of lifetime Axis I disorders in all the studies was affective disorders, with anxiety disorders being the most common category of current Axis I disorders. Certain demographic characteristics are also associated with higher rates of psychopathology, such as, female gender, low socioeconomic status, higher BMI. Overall, methodological and sociodemographic differences make these studies difficult to compare and these differences should be taken into account when interpreting the results. PMID:24290079

  17. Testing Models of Psychopathology in Preschool-aged Children Using a Structured Interview-based Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Bufferd, Sara J.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have found that broadband internalizing and externalizing factors provide a parsimonious framework for understanding the structure of psychopathology across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. However, few of these studies have examined psychopathology in young children, and several recent studies have found support for alternative models, including a bi-factor model with common and specific factors. The present study used parents’ (typically mothers’) reports on a diagnostic interview in a community sample of 3-year old children (n=541; 53.9 % male) to compare the internalizing-externalizing latent factor model with a bi-factor model. The bi-factor model provided a better fit to the data. To test the concurrent validity of this solution, we examined associations between this model and paternal reports and laboratory observations of child temperament. The internalizing factor was associated with low levels of surgency and high levels of fear; the externalizing factor was associated with high levels of surgency and disinhibition and low levels of effortful control; and the common factor was associated with high levels of surgency and negative affect and low levels of effortful control. These results suggest that psychopathology in preschool-aged children may be explained by a single, common factor influencing nearly all disorders and unique internalizing and externalizing factors. These findings indicate that shared variance across internalizing and externalizing domains is substantial and are consistent with recent suggestions that emotion regulation difficulties may be a common vulnerability for a wide array of psychopathology. PMID:24652485

  18. Detection of malingering: psychometric evaluation of the Chinese version of the structured interview of reported symptoms-2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malingering detection has emerged as an important issue in clinical and forensic settings. The Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms-2 (SIRS-2) was designed to assess the feigned symptoms in both clinical and non-clinical subjects. The aim of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of this scale. Methods Two studies were conducted to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Chinese Version of SIRS-2. In Study one, with a simulation design, the subjects included a. 40 students asked to simulate symptoms of mental illness; b. 40 general psychiatric inpatients and c. 40 students asked to reply to questions honestly. Scales scores for feigning symptoms among three groups were carried out for discriminant validity of the Chinese Version of SIRS-2. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2(MMPI-2) was administered in 80 undergraduate students. In Study two, with a known-groups comparison design, scales scores for feigning symptoms were compared between 20 suspected malingerers and 80 psychiatric outpatients from two forensic centers using the Chinese Version of SIRS-2. Results The Chinese Version of SIRS-2 demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency in both study one and two. In study one, criterion validity of this scale was supported by its significantly positive correlation with the MMPI-2 (r = 0.282 ~ 0.481 for Infrequency), and by its significantly negative correlation with the MMPI-2 (r = -0.255 ~ -0.519 for Lie and -0.205 ~ 0.391 for Correction). Scores of 10 out of 13 subscales of the Chinese Version of SIRS-2 for simulators were significantly higher than scores of honest students and general psychiatric patients. In study two, the mean scores of the Chinese Version of 13 subscales for suspected malingerers were significantly higher than those of psychiatric outpatients. For discriminant validity, it yielded a large effect size (d = 1.80) for the comparison of the participant

  19. The feasibility of a new intake routine to assess substance use disorders by means of a structured interview.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, B; Jonasson, U; Ekselius, L; von Knorring, L

    1997-01-01

    A structured interview, ADDIS (Alkohol Drog Diagnos InStrument), designed to assess substance use disorders, was included as a part of the intake protocol in a department of orthopedics at a general hospital. To evaluate both the effectiveness and feasibility of the new procedure, the attitudes of 29 staff members were sampled during follow-up interviews. In addition, a questionnaire was sent to 254 patients to examine their opinions about the interview. The staff made a global evaluation of the new routine on a 10-point scale, ranging from completely negative (1) to completely positive (10). The mean rating was 8.2 (range 5-10). The evaluations made by the staff members in the interviews were very positive. Of the 254 patients, 177 (70%) returned the questionnaire. More than 90% of the patients appreciated being asked about their use of analgesics and sedatives, and 77% felt it was positive to be asked about their alcohol use. The result of the patient questionnaire supports the feasibility of the routine, suggesting that a structured interview can be included in the intake protocol in order to improve the assessment of substance use disorders.

  20. Reliability and validity of the German version of the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The assessment of personality organization and its observable behavioral manifestations, i.e. personality functioning, has a long tradition in psychodynamic psychiatry. Recently, the DSM-5 Levels of Personality Functioning Scale has moved it into the focus of psychiatric diagnostics. Based on Kernberg’s concept of personality organization the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO) was developed for diagnosing personality functioning. The STIPO covers seven dimensions: (1) identity, (2) object relations, (3) primitive defenses, (4) coping/rigidity, (5) aggression, (6) moral values, and (7) reality testing and perceptual distortions. The English version of the STIPO has previously revealed satisfying psychometric properties. Methods Validity and reliability of the German version of the 100-item instrument have been evaluated in 122 psychiatric patients. All patients were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and were assessed by means of the STIPO. Moreover, all patients completed eight questionnaires that served as criteria for external validity of the STIPO. Results Interrater reliability varied between intraclass correlations of .89 and 1.0, Crohnbach’s α for the seven dimensions was .69 to .93. All a priori selected questionnaire scales correlated significantly with the corresponding STIPO dimensions. Patients with personality disorder (PD) revealed significantly higher STIPO scores (i.e. worse personality functioning) than patients without PD; patients cluster B PD showed significantly higher STIPO scores than patients with cluster C PD. Conclusions Interrater reliability, Crohnbach’s α, concurrent validity, and differential validity of the STIPO are satisfying. The STIPO represents an appropriate instrument for the assessment of personality functioning in clinical and research settings. PMID:23941404

  1. New and Improved? A Comparison of the Original and Revised Versions of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Debbie; Rosenfeld, Barry; Belfi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the accuracy of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms, Second Edition (SIRS-2) in a criterion-group study using a sample of forensic psychiatric patients and a community simulation sample, comparing it to the original SIRS and to results published in the SIRS-2 manual. The SIRS-2 yielded an impressive…

  2. Nursing and Dental Hygiene Selection Procedures. Part I: The Structured Interview as a Tool for Selecting Students into an Associate of Arts Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatham, Elaine L.; And Others

    A structured interview procedure was used during the spring of 1975 as a tool in selecting nursing and dental hygiene students at Johnson County Community College. Potential students had two 20-minute interviews: one by a staff member of the program to which application was made, and one by another staff member. Interviewers rated the applicants…

  3. Measuring Use of Research Evidence: The Structured Interview for Evidence Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Garcia, Antonio R.; Aarons, Gregory A.; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Holloway, Ian W.; Mackie, Thomas I.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This article describes the Standard Interview for Evidence Use (SIEU), a measure to assess the level of engagement in acquiring, evaluating, and applying research evidence in health and social service settings. Method: Three scales measuring input, process, and output of research evidence and eight subscales were identified using…

  4. The Family Map: Structured Family Interview to Identify Risks and Strengths in Head Start Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Bradley, Robert; Conners, Nicola; Bokony, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The Family Map is a semistructured interview developed to assess important aspects of the family and home environment associated with well-being in 3- to 5-year old children. The measure is designed so that it can be used during home visits with Head Start families. Accordingly, it was developed in collaboration with Head Start providers and…

  5. Structured Interviews on Children's Conceptions of Computers. Technical Report No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Ronald; And Others

    The terms and concepts children used to explain their beliefs about computers before and after classroom exposure to microcomputers were studied to identify misconceptions about computers that could interfere with computer-based learning. Children in each of two classrooms at the Bank Street School for Children were interviewed individually on…

  6. The Structure of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised: Diagnostic and Phenotypic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Anne V.; Lecavalier, Luc; Houts, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multivariate statistics can assist in refining the nosology and diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and also contribute important information for genetic studies. The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is one of the most widely used assessment instruments in the field of PDD. The current study investigated its…

  7. Parent Interview Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    This 116-item interview schedule designed for parents who failed to respond to the Questionnaire for Parents, is individually administered to the mother of the child of elementary school age. It consists of scales measuring 14 parent variables plus a section devoted to demographic variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the child, (2)…

  8. Personal Social Networks and the Cultivation of Expertise in Magic: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissanen, Olli; Palonen, Tuire; Pitkänen, Petteri; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine expertise in magic by interviewing 16 prominent Finnish magicians who were identified earlier through a social network analysis of 120 Finnish magicians. A semi-structured interview was administered that addressed the participants' histories; their relationship to magic, the nature of their…

  9. Structured interview for mild traumatic brain injury after military blast: inter-rater agreement and development of diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Hudak, Anne M; Goldberg, Gary; Kunz, Richard D; Sima, Adam P

    2015-04-01

    The existing gold standard for diagnosing a suspected previous mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is clinical interview. But it is prone to bias, especially for parsing the physical versus psychological effects of traumatic combat events, and its inter-rater reliability is unknown. Several standardized TBI interview instruments have been developed for research use but have similar limitations. Therefore, we developed the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) retrospective concussion diagnostic interview, blast version (VCU rCDI-B), and undertook this cross-sectional study aiming to 1) measure agreement among clinicians' mTBI diagnosis ratings, 2) using clinician consensus develop a fully structured diagnostic algorithm, and 3) assess accuracy of this algorithm in a separate sample. Two samples (n = 66; n = 37) of individuals within 2 years of experiencing blast effects during military deployment underwent semistructured interview regarding their worst blast experience. Five highly trained TBI physicians independently reviewed and interpreted the interview content and gave blinded ratings of whether or not the experience was probably an mTBI. Paired inter-rater reliability was extremely variable, with kappa ranging from 0.194 to 0.825. In sample 1, the physician consensus prevalence of probable mTBI was 84%. Using these diagnosis ratings, an algorithm was developed and refined from the fully structured portion of the VCU rCDI-B. The final algorithm considered certain symptom patterns more specific for mTBI than others. For example, an isolated symptom of "saw stars" was deemed sufficient to indicate mTBI, whereas an isolated symptom of "dazed" was not. The accuracy of this algorithm, when applied against the actual physician consensus in sample 2, was almost perfect (correctly classified = 97%; Cohen's kappa = 0.91). In conclusion, we found that highly trained clinicians often disagree on historical blast-related mTBI determinations. A fully structured interview

  10. Structured interview for mild traumatic brain injury after military blast: inter-rater agreement and development of diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Hudak, Anne M; Goldberg, Gary; Kunz, Richard D; Sima, Adam P

    2015-04-01

    The existing gold standard for diagnosing a suspected previous mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is clinical interview. But it is prone to bias, especially for parsing the physical versus psychological effects of traumatic combat events, and its inter-rater reliability is unknown. Several standardized TBI interview instruments have been developed for research use but have similar limitations. Therefore, we developed the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) retrospective concussion diagnostic interview, blast version (VCU rCDI-B), and undertook this cross-sectional study aiming to 1) measure agreement among clinicians' mTBI diagnosis ratings, 2) using clinician consensus develop a fully structured diagnostic algorithm, and 3) assess accuracy of this algorithm in a separate sample. Two samples (n = 66; n = 37) of individuals within 2 years of experiencing blast effects during military deployment underwent semistructured interview regarding their worst blast experience. Five highly trained TBI physicians independently reviewed and interpreted the interview content and gave blinded ratings of whether or not the experience was probably an mTBI. Paired inter-rater reliability was extremely variable, with kappa ranging from 0.194 to 0.825. In sample 1, the physician consensus prevalence of probable mTBI was 84%. Using these diagnosis ratings, an algorithm was developed and refined from the fully structured portion of the VCU rCDI-B. The final algorithm considered certain symptom patterns more specific for mTBI than others. For example, an isolated symptom of "saw stars" was deemed sufficient to indicate mTBI, whereas an isolated symptom of "dazed" was not. The accuracy of this algorithm, when applied against the actual physician consensus in sample 2, was almost perfect (correctly classified = 97%; Cohen's kappa = 0.91). In conclusion, we found that highly trained clinicians often disagree on historical blast-related mTBI determinations. A fully structured interview

  11. Narrative interviewing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews. PMID:26613739

  12. Comparison of dissociative identity disorder with other diagnostic groups using a structured interview in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yargiç, L I; Sar, V; Tutkun, H; Alyanak, B

    1998-01-01

    Twenty patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID), 20 with schizophrenic disorder, 20 with panic disorder, and 20 with complex partial epilepsy were evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Subjects with dissociative identity disorder were more frequently diagnosed as having somatization disorder, past or concurrent major depressive episode, borderline personality disorder, depersonalization disorder, and dissociative amnesia than other groups. They reported Schneiderian symptoms and extrasensory perceptions more frequently. In their anamnesis suicide attempts, trance states, sleepwalking, and childhood traumas were more frequent than those in comparison groups. The secondary features of dissociative identity disorder and the DES score differentiated these patients from comparison groups significantly. DID has a set of clinical features different from that of schizophrenic disorder, panic disorder and complex partial epilepsy. The differences are similar to those yielded previously in studies from North America.

  13. Amobarbital treatment of multiple personality. Use of structured video tape interviews as a basis for intensive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hall, R C; LeCann, A F; Schoolar, J C

    1978-09-01

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with five distinct personalities is presented. The patient was treated, using a system of structured video taped sodium amobarbital interviews, in which areas to be explored were developed in psychotherapy. Tapes were played for the patient after each session. The taped material was used as the basis for psychotherapeutic investigation. The patient evidenced many of the features previously reported in cases of multiple personality, specifically: being the product of an unwanted pregnancy in a repressively rigid family; emotional distancing by one parent; strong sibling rivalry with an adopted sib; family history of mental illness; a traumatic first sexual experience (rape); a marriage to a maladjusted individual in an attempt to escape the parental home; a high internalized standard of performance and an inability to display anger or negative feelings toward the parents. In the course of treatment, the patient's personalties fused and she was able to accept each component as part of herself. No further fragmentation has occurred during the year following discharge. The therapy technique minimized dependency, and the possiblity of addiction to amobarbital interviews permitted more active patient therapy involvement, and set clear-cut goals and expectations for improvement before further amobarbital interviews could be conducted.

  14. Amobarbital treatment of multiple personality. Use of structured video tape interviews as a basis for intensive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hall, R C; LeCann, A F; Schoolar, J C

    1978-09-01

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with five distinct personalities is presented. The patient was treated, using a system of structured video taped sodium amobarbital interviews, in which areas to be explored were developed in psychotherapy. Tapes were played for the patient after each session. The taped material was used as the basis for psychotherapeutic investigation. The patient evidenced many of the features previously reported in cases of multiple personality, specifically: being the product of an unwanted pregnancy in a repressively rigid family; emotional distancing by one parent; strong sibling rivalry with an adopted sib; family history of mental illness; a traumatic first sexual experience (rape); a marriage to a maladjusted individual in an attempt to escape the parental home; a high internalized standard of performance and an inability to display anger or negative feelings toward the parents. In the course of treatment, the patient's personalties fused and she was able to accept each component as part of herself. No further fragmentation has occurred during the year following discharge. The therapy technique minimized dependency, and the possiblity of addiction to amobarbital interviews permitted more active patient therapy involvement, and set clear-cut goals and expectations for improvement before further amobarbital interviews could be conducted. PMID:690626

  15. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Dissociative Disorders: preliminary report on a new diagnostic instrument.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, M; Rounsaville, B; Cicchetti, D V

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), which investigates five groups of dissociative symptoms (amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alteration) and systematically rates both the severity of individual symptoms and the evaluation of overall diagnosis of dissociative disorder. Preliminary findings from a study of 48 subjects with and without psychiatric diagnoses indicate good to excellent reliability and discriminant validity for the SCID-D as a diagnostic instrument for the five dissociative disorders and as a tool for the evaluation of dissociative symptoms encountered within nondissociative syndromes.

  16. Structures and chaos in galaxies. An interview with A. M. Fridman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, R. R.

    A. M. Fridman is one of the distinguished astrophysicists of the modern times. He with his colleagues has brought a fundamental contribution to the explanation of the observed structure and stability of the planetary rings. Basing on the laboratory modeling of the vortex motion Fridman with his colleagues has developed the appropriate technique and predicted giant vortexes in galaxies which were revealed in observations. These researches produce the remarkable examples of the nonlinear phenomena in astronomy: on the one hand - self-organization, on the other hand - chaotic behavior. The Lyapunov characteristics numbers are used for description of the chaotic dynamics phenomena, its positive value for a family of nearby trajectories implies that they follow an exponential divergence, testify to a local instability and chaotic behavior. Phenomena having regular and chaotic nature were discovered in a gaseous disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631.

  17. Chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua: a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with physicians and pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Northwestern Nicaragua has a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown cause among young adult men. In addition, frequent occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTI) among men and a dysuria syndrome described by sugarcane workers as “chistata” are both reported. This study examines health professionals´ perceptions regarding etiology of these conditions and their treatment approaches, including use of potentially nephrotoxic medications. Methods Nineteen in-person semi-structured interviews were conducted in November 2010 among ten physicians and nine pharmacists practicing in the region. Results Health professionals perceived CKD as a serious and increasing problem in the region, primarily affecting young men working as manual laborers. All interviewees regarded occupational and environmental exposure to sun and heat, and dehydration as critical factors associated with the occurrence of CKD. These factors were also considered to play a role in the occurrence of chistata in the region. Health professionals indicated that reluctance among workers to hydrate might be influenced by perceptions of water contamination. Symptoms often were treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diuretics and antibiotics. Physicians acknowledged that the diagnosis of UTI usually was not based on microbial culture and opined that the use of potentially nephrotoxic medications may be contributing to CKD. Conclusions Interviews provided evidence suggesting that medications such as diuretics, antibiotics and NSAIDs are widely used and sold over the counter for symptoms that may be related to dehydration and volume depletion. These factors, alone or in combination, may be possible contributors to kidney damage. Acute kidney damage coupled with volume depletion and exposures including medications and infectious agents should be further evaluated as causal factors for CKD in this region. PMID:23590528

  18. An Empirically Derived Approach to the Latent Structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Additional Convergent and Discriminant Validity Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Marks, Michael J.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Building on studies examining the latent structure of attachment-related individual differences as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) via Principal Components Analysis, the current report further explores the validity of four AAI dimensions reported by Haydon, Roisman, and Burt (in press): dismissing states of mind, preoccupied states of mind, and inferred negative experience with maternal and paternal caregivers. Study 1 reports evidence of distinctive cognitive correlates of dismissing v. preoccupied states of mind with reaction time in an attachment Stroop task and the valence of endorsed self-descriptors, respectively. Study 2 replicates prior meta-analytic findings of generally trivial convergence between state of mind dimensions and self-reported avoidance and anxiety (i.e., Roisman, Holland, et al., 2007). Study 3 contrastively demonstrates moderate empirical overlap between inferred experience—but not state of mind—AAI scales and self-reported avoidance and anxiety when the latter were assessed at the level of specific caregivers. Taken together, these findings add to accumulating evidence that an empirically-driven approach to scaling adults on AAI dimensions (Haydon et al., in press; Roisman et al., 2007) aids in identifying theoretically anticipated and distinctive affective, behavioral, and cognitive correlates of dismissing versus preoccupied states of mind. PMID:21838649

  19. New and improved? A comparison of the original and revised versions of the structured interview of reported symptoms.

    PubMed

    Green, Debbie; Rosenfeld, Barry; Belfi, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The current study evaluated the accuracy of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms, Second Edition (SIRS-2) in a criterion-group study using a sample of forensic psychiatric patients and a community simulation sample, comparing it to the original SIRS and to results published in the SIRS-2 manual. The SIRS-2 yielded an impressive specificity rate (94.3%) that exceeded that obtained using the original SIRS scoring method (92.0%) and approached that observed in the SIRS-2 normative data (97.5%). However, changes in scoring resulted in markedly lower sensitivity rates of the SIRS-2 (36.8% among forensic patients and 66.7% among simulators) compared with the SIRS (47.4% and 75.0%, respectively). The removal of the Total Score from the SIRS-2 further hindered identification of feigning. Analyses also evaluated the additive value of the new RS-Total and MT Index scales in the SIRS-2. Implications of these results for forensic psychologists are discussed.

  20. Assessing Traumatic Event Exposure: Comparing the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

    PubMed Central

    Peirce, Jessica M.; Burke, Christopher K.; Stoller, Kenneth B.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Brooner, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis requires first identifying a traumatic event, but very few studies have evaluated methods of potential traumatic event assessment and their impact on PTSD diagnosis. We compared a behaviorally-specific comprehensive multiple-item traumatic event measure to a single-item measure to determine their impact on traumatic event identification and subsequent PTSD diagnosis. In a within-subject, counterbalanced design, the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire (TLEQ; Kubany et al., 2000) was compared to the single-question traumatic event assessment in the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID; First, Spitzer, Gibbon, & Williams, 1998) in 129 participants in opioid dependence treatment. The TLEQ produced a 9-fold higher rate of traumatic events reported by the participants as compared to the SCID. As a result, PTSD diagnoses in the sample increased to 33% after the TLEQ measure from 24% after the SCID. The increase in potential traumatic event identification and PTSD diagnosis was greater in women than men. This study provides strong support for the use of comprehensive traumatic event assessments to measure traumatic events and PTSD diagnoses, particularly in women. PMID:19485675

  1. Prevalence of major depressive disorder among hemodialysis patients compared with healthy people in Japan using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Tetsu; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Sugawara, Norio; Ogasawara, Kohei; Katagai, Koki; Saito, Hisao; Sawada, Kaori; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the prevalence of depression in hemodialysis (HD) patients using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression (CES-D) scale and the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID) and compared the rates with those of community dwelling people in Japan. Patients and methods A total of 99 patients undergoing HD were recruited. Blood sampling was performed no later than 2 weeks prior to assessment. As a reference group for SCID and CES-D evaluation, 404 age- and sex-matched healthy controls who had participated in the Iwaki Health Promotion Project were included in this study. The SCID and the CES-D scale were administered to all participants to diagnose their depression. Participants who met the criteria of a major depressive episode according to the SCID were classified as SCID depression and the participants whose CES-D score was 16 or higher were classified as CES-D depression. Results Ninety-nine HD patients completed the evaluation and data collection. There were no significant differences in age, sex, or CES-D scores between HD patients and controls. There were 12 cases of SCID depression in HD patients and four cases in controls. There was a significant difference between HD patients and controls in the prevalence of SCID depression. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to demographic or clinical data. There were 19 HD patients and 24 controls who showed CES-D depression. There was no significant difference between HD patients and controls in the prevalence of CES-D depression. There was a significant difference in potassium level between the two groups, but there were no significant differences in any of the other items. Conclusion There were significantly more HD patients showing SCID depression than controls in the present study. In clinical settings, the SCID might be useful in surveying cases of depression detected by

  2. Differences between Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) and SIRS-2 sensitivity estimates among forensic inpatients: A criterion groups comparison.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Glassmire, David M

    2016-10-01

    The Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) underwent a major revision in 2010 yielding the SIRS-2. The new test has since been criticized for several potential problems, particularly in terms of its sensitivity to feigned psychopathology. For this reason, the purpose of this study was to examine the concordance between SIRS and SIRS-2 classifications and sensitivity estimates in an archival sample of 263 criminal defendants (215 males, 48 females) who were admitted to a high-security state psychiatric hospital for restoration of competency to stand trial. In a subgroup of 39 presumed feigning patients who elevated 1 or more collateral measures of feigning (primarily the M-FAST) at conservative cutoffs, we found marked discrepancies between the sensitivity of the SIRS (.87) and SIRS-2 (.54). The marked differences in sensitivity were partially explained by a global interpretation discordance rate of 47%, with discordance primarily resulting from SIRS-based feigning cases being classified as indeterminate on the SIRS-2. Follow-up analyses of intercorrelations and percentile distributions indicated that the new SIRS-2 scales may lack utility in the assessment of feigning because of problems relating to the construct validity of the scales and their interpretive cutoffs. Future directions in research and clinical practice are discussed, with added emphasis on the significant limitations of archival pretrial forensic samples for identifying presumed genuine groups necessary to calculate specificity estimates (which were meaningfully higher for the SIRS-2 in this sample). Overall, the primary clinical implication is that feigning should remain a strong consideration in SIRS-2 cases yielding an indeterminate classification. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. The use of semi-structured interviews for collection of qualitative and quantitative data in hydrological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozovic, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    To build an accurate, robust understanding of the environment, it is important to not only collect information describing its physical characteristics, but also the drivers which influence it. As environmental change, from increasing CO2 levels to decreasing water levels, is often heavily influenced by human activity, gathering information on anthropogenic as well as environmental variables is extremely important. This can mean collecting qualitative, as well as quantitative information. In reality studies are often bound by financial and time constraints, limiting the depth and detail of the research. It is up to the researcher to determine what the best methodology to answer the research questions is likely to be. Here we present a methodology of collecting qualitative and quantitative information in tandem for hydrological studies through the use of semi-structured interviews. This is applied to a case study in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, North India, one of the most intensely irrigated areas of the world. Here, decreasing water levels exacerbated by unchecked water abstraction, an expanding population and government subsidies, have put the long term resilience of the farming population in doubt. Through random selection of study locations, combined with convenience sampling of the participants therein, we show how the data collected can provide valuable insight into the drivers which have led to the current water scenario. We also show how reliable quantitative information can, using the same methodology, be effectively and efficiently extracted for modelling purposes, which along with developing an understanding of the characteristics of the environment is vital in coming up with realistic and sustainable solutions for water resource management in the future.

  4. A First Look at the Structured Clinical Interview for "DSM-IV" Personality Disorders Screening Questionnaire: More Than Just a Screener?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedmont, Ralph L.; Sherman, Martin F.; Sherman, Nancy C.; Williams, Joseph E. G.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the psychometrics of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders Personality Questionnaire (SCID-IIP) self-report personality questionnaire. The responses to the instrument were found reliable and evidenced good self-other convergence. Correlations with external criteria showed the SCID-IIP to contain…

  5. The Incremental Utility of Behavioral Rating Scales and a Structured Diagnostic Interview in the Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Aaron J.; Hoza, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental utility of rating scales, a structured diagnostic interview, and multiple informants in a comprehensive assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The sample included 185 children with ADHD (M[subscript age] = 9.22, SD = 0.95) and 82 children without ADHD (M[subscript age] = 9.24, SD =…

  6. A Validational Study of the Structured Interview of Symptoms Associated with Sexual Abuse (SASA) Using Three Samples of Sexually Abused, Allegedly Abused, and Nonabused Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Robert; McCann, John; Adams, Joyce; Voris, Joan; Dahl, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    A study validated the use of a structured parent interview regarding emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms by comparing results among 22 sexually abused boys whose perpetrator confessed, 47 boys evaluated in a sexual abuse clinic but without a history of perpetrator confession, and 52 nonabused boys (ages 3-15). (Author/CR)

  7. Creating Indices from the Control Structure Interview Through Data Collapsing and Multidimensional Scaling: Approaches to Data Analysis in Project MITT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovick, Thomas D.

    This paper discribes the analysis of data in the Management Implications of Team Teaching Project (MITT). It touches on the interviews conducted with teachers and principals, presents the breadth of information obtained in the questionnaire, and explains how the data were aggregated and how issues were grouped. Information collected in the…

  8. A method of phenomenological interviewing.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    In this article I propose a method of interviewing for descriptive phenomenological research that offers an explicit, theoretically based approach for researchers. My approach enables application of descriptive phenomenology as a total method for research, and not one just focused on data analysis. This structured phenomenological approach to interviewing applies questions based on themes of experience contextualization, apprehending the phenomenon and its clarification. The method of questioning employs descriptive and structural questioning as well as novel use of imaginative variation to explore experience. The approach will help researchers understand how to undertake descriptive phenomenological research interviews.

  9. Orally administered grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Taudorf, E; Weeke, B

    1983-11-01

    In 1900 it was claimed that oral administration of ragweed could be used for the hyposensitization of hay fever patients. Several uncontrolled trials have been published, all showing an effect of oral hyposensitization. Only one study was controlled and showed no effect of oral hyposensitization. It was decided to undertake controlled clinical trials to determine the safety and effectiveness of orally administered enteric-coated grass pollen tablets in patients with hay fever. The actual grass pollen dose in the first trial was 30 times the dose that is normally recommended for preseasonal oral pollen hyposensitization using pollen aqueous solution or pollen powder. The safety study will be described here. Twelve young adults with a history of grass pollen hay fever positive skin prick test and positive nasal provocation test with extracts of timothy grass pollen were randomly allocated to one of the treatment groups with four patients in each group taking enteric-coated Conjuvac Timothy tablets or enteric-coated Whole Timothy pollen tablets or enteric-coated placebo tablets. The study was double blind. Preseasonally, the patients received 342,500 PNU and in total they received 4,500,000 PNU during 6 months. The patients receiving active treatment did not have any side effects. No significant changes were shown in the skin and nasal reactivity to grass pollen during the study. Neither were there any changes in timothy-specific IgE, IgG, total IgE nor histamine liberation from basophils.

  10. The Eating Disorder Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5): Development and Validation of a Structured Interview for Feeding and Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Glasofer, Deborah R.; Hildebrandt, Tom; Klimek, Patrycja; Mitchell, James E.; Berg, Kelly C.; Peterson, Carol B.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Existing measures for DSM-IV eating disorder diagnoses have notable limitations, and there are important differences between DSM-IV and DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders. This study developed and validated a new semi-structured interview, the Eating Disorders Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5). Method Two studies evaluated the utility of the EDA-5. Study 1 compared the diagnostic validity of the EDA-5 to the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) and evaluated the test-retest reliability of the new measure. Study 2 compared the diagnostic validity of an EDA-5 electronic application (“app”) to clinician interview and self-report assessments. Results In Study 1, the kappa for EDE and EDA-5 eating disorder diagnoses was 0.74 across all diagnoses (n= 64), with a range of κ=0.65 for Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED)/Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorder (USFED) to κ=0.90 for Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The EDA-5 test-retest kappa coefficient was 0.87 across diagnoses. For Study 2, clinical interview versus “app” conditions revealed a kappa of 0.83 for all eating disorder diagnoses (n=71). Across individual diagnostic categories, kappas ranged from 0.56 for OSFED/USFED to 0.94 for BN. Discussion High rates of agreement were found between diagnoses by EDA-5 and the EDE, and EDA-5 and clinical interviews. As this study supports the validity of the EDA-5 to generate DSM-5 eating disorders and the reliability of these diagnoses, the EDA-5 may be an option for the assessment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and BED. Additional research is needed to evaluate the utility of the EDA-5 in assessing DSM-5 feeding disorders. PMID:25639562

  11. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  12. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  13. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (Kid-SCID): first psychometric evaluation in a Dutch sample of clinically referred youths.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Muris, Peter; Braet, Caroline; Arntz, Arnoud; Beelen, Imke

    2015-06-01

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (Kid-SCID) is a semi-structured interview for the classification of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. This study presents a first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Kid-SCID in a Dutch sample of children and adolescents who had been referred to an outpatient treatment centre for mental health problems. Results indicated that the inter-rater reliability of the Kid-SCID classifications and the internal consistency of various (dimensional) criteria of the diagnoses were moderate to good. Further, for most Kid-SCID diagnoses, reasonable agreement between children and parents was found. Finally, the correspondence between the Kid-SCID and the final clinical diagnosis as established after the full intake procedure, which included the information as provided by the Kid-SCID, ranged from poor to good. Results are discussed in the light of methodological issues pertaining to the assessment of psychiatric disorders in youths. The Kid-SCID can generally be seen as a reliable and useful tool that can assist clinicians in carrying out clinical evaluations of children and adolescents.

  14. Competencies for Successful Self-Regulated Learning in Higher Education: Structural Model and Indications Drawn from Expert Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresel, Markus; Schmitz, Bernhard; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christine; Ziegler, Albert; Engelschalk, Tobias; Jöstl, Gregor; Klug, Julia; Roth, Anne; Wimmer, Bastian; Steuer, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    A global characteristic of higher education is the opportunity and necessity for students to self-regulate their learning. In contrast to considerable research focusing on self-regulated learning (SRL) from a behavioural perspective, little is known concerning the underlying competencies which enable students to succeed in SRL. A structural model…

  15. Effect of silver nanoparticles and hydroxyproline, administered in ovo, on the development of blood vessels and cartilage collagen structure in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Beck, Iwona; Hotowy, Anna; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kutwin, Marta; Jaworski, Sławomir; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    It has been considered that concentrations of certain amino acids in the egg are not sufficient to fully support embryonic development of modern broilers. In this study we evaluated embryo growth and development with particular emphasis on one of the major components of connective tissue, collagen. Experiments were performed on Ross 308 chicken embryos from 160 fertilised eggs. Experimental solutions of silver nanoparticles (Ag), hydroxyproline solution (Hyp) and a complex of silver nanoparticles with hydroxyproline (AgHyp) were injected into albumen, and embryos were incubated until day 20. An assessment of the mass of embryo and selected organs was carried out followed by measurements of the expression of the key signalling factors' fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Finally, an evaluation of collagen microstructure using scanning electron microscopy was performed. Our results clearly indicate that Hyp, Ag and AgHyp administered in ovo to chicken embryos did not harm embryos. Comparing to the control group, Hyp, Ag and the AgHyp complex significantly upregulated expression of the FGF-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Hyp, Ag and, in particular, the complex of AgHyp significantly increased blood vessel size, cartilage collagen fibre lattice size and bundle thickness. The general conclusion from this study is that AgHyp treatment may help to build a stronger and longer lasting form of collagen fibres.

  16. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kundakçi, Turgut; Sar, Vedat; Kiziltan, Emre; Yargiç, Ilhan L; Tutkun, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    A total of 34 consecutive patients with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified were evaluated using the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D). They were compared with a matched control group composed of 34 patients who had a nondissociative psychiatric disorder. Interrater reliability was evaluated by 3 clinicians who assessed videotaped interviews conducted with 5 dissociative and 5 nondissociative patients. All subjects who were previously diagnosed by clinicians as having a dissociative disorder were identified as positive, and all subjects who were previously diagnosed as not having a dissociative disorder were identified as negative. The scores of the main symptom clusters and the total score of the SCID-D differentiated dissociative patients from the nondissociative group. There were strong correlations between the SCID-D and the Dissociative Experiences Scale total and subscale scores. These results are promising for the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the SCID-D. However, as the present study was conducted on a predominantly female sample with very severe dissociation, these findings should not be generalized to male patients, to dissociative disorders other than dissociative identity disorder, or to broader clinical or nonclinical populations. PMID:24377970

  17. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kundakçi, Turgut; Sar, Vedat; Kiziltan, Emre; Yargiç, Ilhan L; Tutkun, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    A total of 34 consecutive patients with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified were evaluated using the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D). They were compared with a matched control group composed of 34 patients who had a nondissociative psychiatric disorder. Interrater reliability was evaluated by 3 clinicians who assessed videotaped interviews conducted with 5 dissociative and 5 nondissociative patients. All subjects who were previously diagnosed by clinicians as having a dissociative disorder were identified as positive, and all subjects who were previously diagnosed as not having a dissociative disorder were identified as negative. The scores of the main symptom clusters and the total score of the SCID-D differentiated dissociative patients from the nondissociative group. There were strong correlations between the SCID-D and the Dissociative Experiences Scale total and subscale scores. These results are promising for the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the SCID-D. However, as the present study was conducted on a predominantly female sample with very severe dissociation, these findings should not be generalized to male patients, to dissociative disorders other than dissociative identity disorder, or to broader clinical or nonclinical populations.

  18. Structured interviews examining the burden, coping, self-efficacy, and quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kay Chai Peter; Seow, Chuen Chai Dennis; Xiao, Chunxiang; Lee, Hui Min Julian; Chiu, Helen F K; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a global health issue and the effects on caregivers are substantial. The study aimed to examine the associations of burden, coping, self-efficacy with quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore. Structured interviews were conducted in a convenience sample of 84 family caregivers caring and seeking clinical care for the persons with dementia in an outpatient clinic of a public hospital in Singapore. The outcome measures included the Family Burden Interview Schedule, Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale - Brief Version. In general, significant correlations were observed between the quality of life scores with coping strategy and family burden scores, but not between the coping strategy and family burden scores. Compared to demographic factors such as caregiver age and household income, psychosocial factors including family burden, coping strategies, and self-efficacy demonstrated greater association with quality of life in the participants. However, the dynamics of these associations will change with an increasing population of persons with dementia, decreasing nuclear family size, and predicted changes in family living arrangements for the persons with dementia in future. As such, it necessitates continuous study examining the needs and concerns of family caregivers and the relevance of ongoing interventions specific to caregivers of persons with dementia.

  19. Distinguishing between multiple personality disorder (dissociative identity disorder) and schizophrenia using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, M; Cicchetti, D; Buchanan, J; Rakfeldt, J; Rounsaville, B

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe the systematic assessment of dissociative symptoms using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) in 50 psychiatric outpatients with a referring DSM-III-R diagnosis of either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N = 31) and subjects with multiple personality disorder (MPD [DSM-IV name change: dissociative identity disorder]; N = 19). Results indicate that patients with MPD experience significantly higher scores for five specific dissociative symptoms than patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. The range, severity, and nature of the five dissociative symptom areas evaluated by the SCID-D distinguish MPD from the occasional occurrence of dissociative symptoms which may be seen in schizophrenia. Systematic assessment of dissociative symptoms using the SCID-D can assist in accurate differential diagnosis of MPD and schizophrenia.

  20. Interview With Jean Laplanche.

    PubMed

    Laplanche, Jean; Danon, Gisèle; Lauru, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for this interview with Jean Laplanche is a question regarding the place of infantile sexuality within psychoanalysis today. Laplanche begins by underscoring the audaciousness of Freud's characterization of infantile sexuality and the significance of the expansion of the field of "the sexual" that this characterization entails. He goes on to outline his celebrated "general theory of seduction." In doing so he explains key terms associated with it, such as the "enigmatic message" and the "fundamental anthropological situation," and clarifies how the theory seeks to account for sexuality in the expanded sense. In particular, Laplanche stresses the intersubjective origins of "drive" sexuality in infancy, its chaotic evolution, its unique economic mode of functioning, and its subsequent conflict with innate "instinctual" sexual impulses that surge forth at puberty. He also positions the general theory of seduction in relation to the important advances made by attachment theory in the field of the adult-child relationship. Throughout the interview, the discussion touches on social contexts, and at points Laplanche outlines positions on topical concerns connected to education, media, and the law, and the importance of rethinking certain psychoanalytic paradigms in an age of new family structures that do not correspond to the nuclear unit. PMID:26485488

  1. Interview With Jean Laplanche.

    PubMed

    Laplanche, Jean; Danon, Gisèle; Lauru, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for this interview with Jean Laplanche is a question regarding the place of infantile sexuality within psychoanalysis today. Laplanche begins by underscoring the audaciousness of Freud's characterization of infantile sexuality and the significance of the expansion of the field of "the sexual" that this characterization entails. He goes on to outline his celebrated "general theory of seduction." In doing so he explains key terms associated with it, such as the "enigmatic message" and the "fundamental anthropological situation," and clarifies how the theory seeks to account for sexuality in the expanded sense. In particular, Laplanche stresses the intersubjective origins of "drive" sexuality in infancy, its chaotic evolution, its unique economic mode of functioning, and its subsequent conflict with innate "instinctual" sexual impulses that surge forth at puberty. He also positions the general theory of seduction in relation to the important advances made by attachment theory in the field of the adult-child relationship. Throughout the interview, the discussion touches on social contexts, and at points Laplanche outlines positions on topical concerns connected to education, media, and the law, and the importance of rethinking certain psychoanalytic paradigms in an age of new family structures that do not correspond to the nuclear unit.

  2. Interview with Sandra Thompson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview of Sandra Thompson on various topics relating to the Chinese language. The interview touches on conversational data on Chinese, the lack of morphological complexity in Mandarin Chinese, and the development of Chinese functionalism. (12 references) (CK)

  3. Teaching Effective Interviewing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Frankie

    Through careful preparation and followup, students can insure successful job interviews. If they evaluate their own skills and expectations and assess employer characteristics before interviews, they can increase their credibility with interviewers and make more effective job decisions. If they anticipate irrelevant or illegal questions on such…

  4. The Interview Process. SPEC Kit 260.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Heidi, Comp.; Nicholson, Shawn, Comp.; Dickson, Laura, Comp.; Miller, Terri Tickle, Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit reports results of a survey of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) that examined the nature and structure of the interview process at large research and academic libraries in the United States and Canada. By determining the nature and structure of the interview, it is hoped that candidates…

  5. Improve Your Interviewing Technique: Team Interviews Help To Reduce Bad Hiring Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Research shows that interviewers make hiring choices based on unconscious motivations and then rationalize the choice. Having three interviewers meet with each candidate separately and then discussing their reactions will assure that a hiring decision is based on objective criteria. Structured interviews and a limited focus on a maximum of six…

  6. Effects of orally administered tetracycline on the intestinal community structure of chickens and on tet determinant carriage by commensal bacteria and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, A S; Smith, J L; Idris, U; Lu, J; Sanchez, S; Purvis, L B; Hofacre, C; Lee, M D

    2005-10-01

    There is a growing concern that antibiotic usage in animal production has selected for resistant food-borne bacteria. Since tetracyclines are common therapeutic antibiotics used in poultry production, we sought to evaluate the effects of oral administration on the resistance of poultry commensal bacteria and the intestinal bacterial community structure. The diversity indices calculated from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons did not indicate significant changes in the cecal bacterial community in response to oxytetracycline. To evaluate its effects on cultivable commensals, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter spp. were isolated from the cecal droppings of broiler chickens. Enterococcus spp. and E. coli expressed tetracycline MICs of >8 microg/ml and harbored a variety of tet resistance determinants regardless of the tetracycline exposure history of the birds. The enterococcal isolates possessed tetM (61%), tetL (25.4%), and tetK (1.3%), as well as tetO (52.5%), the determinant known to confer a tetracycline resistance phenotype in Campylobacter jejuni. E. coli isolates harbored tetA (32.2%) or tetB (30.5%). Tetracycline MICs remained at <2 microg/ml for Campylobacter isolates before and after tetracycline treatment of the chickens, even though isolates expressing MICs of >16 mug/ml were commonly cultured from flocks that did not receive oxytetracycline. The results imply that complex ecological and genetic factors contribute to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance arising from resistance gene transfer in the production environment. PMID:16204498

  7. Impact of BPRS interview length on ratings reliability in a schizophrenia trial.

    PubMed

    Targum, Steven D; Cara Pendergrass, J; Toner, Chelsea; Zumpano, Laura; Rauh, Philip; DeMartinis, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Signal detection in clinical trials relies on ratings reliability. We conducted a reliability analysis of site-independent rater scores derived from audio-digital recordings of site-based rater interviews of the structured Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) in a schizophrenia study. "Dual" ratings assessments were conducted as part of a quality assurance program in a 12-week, double-blind, parallel-group study of PF-02545920 compared to placebo in patients with sub-optimally controlled symptoms of schizophrenia (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01939548). Blinded, site-independent raters scored the recorded site-based BPRS interviews that were administered in relatively stable patients during two visits prior to the randomization visit. We analyzed the impact of BPRS interview length on "dual" scoring variance and discordance between trained and certified site-based raters and the paired scores of the independent raters. Mean total BPRS scores for 392 interviews conducted at the screen and stabilization visits were 50.4±7.2 (SD) for site-based raters and 49.2±7.2 for site-independent raters (t=2.34; p=0.025). "Dual" rated total BPRS scores were highly correlated (r=0.812). Mean BPRS interview length was 21:05±7:47min ranging from 7 to 59min. 89 interviews (23%) were conducted in less than 15min. These shorter interviews had significantly greater "dual" scoring variability (p=0.0016) and absolute discordance (p=0.0037) between site-based and site-independent raters than longer interviews. In-study ratings reliability cannot be guaranteed by pre-study rater certification. Our findings reveal marked variability of BPRS interview length and that shorter interviews are often incomplete yielding greater "dual" scoring discordance that may affect ratings precision. PMID:25554563

  8. Factor structure and diagnostic validity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II with adult clinical inpatients: comparison to a gold-standard diagnostic interview.

    PubMed

    Subica, Andrew M; Fowler, J Christopher; Elhai, Jon D; Frueh, B Christopher; Sharp, Carla; Kelly, Erin L; Allen, Jon G

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) among adult clinical inpatients, a group at high risk for major depressive disorder (MDD). Data from 1,904 adult inpatients were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Cronbach's alpha, and Pearson's correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses evaluating MDD diagnostic performance were conducted with a subsample (n = 467) using a structured diagnostic interview for reference. CFA of 3 previous 2-factor oblique solutions, observed in adolescent and older adult inpatient clinical samples, and 3 corresponding bifactor solutions indicated that BDI-II common item variance was overwhelmingly accounted for by 1 general factor specified to all items, with minor additional variance contributed by 2 specific factors. Analyses revealed high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .93) and significant (p < .01) intercorrelations between the BDI-II total scale and Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24's Depression/Functioning (r = .79) and Overall (r = .82) subscales. ROC analyses generated low area under the curve (.695; 95% confidence interval [.637, .752]) and cutoff scores with poor sensitivity/specificity balance. BDI-II use as a screening instrument for overall depressive symptomology was supported, but MDD diagnostic performance was suboptimal. Clinicians are advised to use the BDI-II to gauge severity of depression and measure clinical changes to depressive symptomology over time but to be mindful of the limitations of the BDI-II as a diagnostic tool for adult inpatients.

  9. Gender In Interviewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Marquita L.; Robinson, Andrea

    The interview is a special case of interpersonal communication. It is a communication event with a serious and predetermined purpose with the basic mode of communication being the asking and answering of questions. People are engaged in interviews throughout their lives from the employment setting to the counseling setting. This annotated…

  10. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  11. Dietary Interviewing by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Warner V.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A computer based dietary interviewing program enhanced self awareness for overweight participants. In a three part interview designed for direct interaction between patient and computer, questions dealt with general dietary behavior and details of food intake. The computer assisted the patient in planning a weight reducing diet of approximately…

  12. Interview with Peggy Papp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Peggy Papp, a faculty member at the Ackerman Institute for the Family, where she is director of the Depression in Context Project. The Interview focuses on Papp's journey to becoming a marriage and family therapist and her role as a leader in field of feminist therapy. (GCP)

  13. The Dyadic Interview Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sincoff, Michael Z.

    2004-01-01

    Interviewing skills are essential for managers and would-be managers. In the interview assignment described in this article, students develop such skills as they also learn communication theories, test those theories in practical applications, think critically, relate new to old information, and have fun. In this assignment, students are required…

  14. Presterilization Interviewing: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Raymond G.

    1976-01-01

    The role of interviewing in diffusing possible harmful side effects of sterilization operations was evaluated in an acute general hospital. Two simultaneous field experiments were conducted with 50 vasectomy couples and 50 tubal-ligation couples. There were no significant differences between the interview and control groups. (Author)

  15. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  16. Interview with Octavio Solis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yowell, Bob

    This interview with Mexican-American, Octavio Solis, considers that many facets of his education and experience in the theater. Solis, interviewed by Bob Yowell, Northern Arizona University Theatre Department faculty member and that campus' producer of Solis' play "El Paso Blue," touches on the importance of his acting experience when writing…

  17. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  18. Strengths and weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data-loggers and semi-structured interviews for capturing fine-scale human mobility: findings from Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A; Reiner, Robert C; Morrison, Amy C; Stoddard, Steven T; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W; Elder, John P; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M

    2014-06-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80-100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50-80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n=101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of

  19. Strengths and Weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) Data-Loggers and Semi-structured Interviews for Capturing Fine-scale Human Mobility: Findings from Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Stoddard, Steven T.; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W.; Elder, John P.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80–100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50–80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n = 101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and

  20. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Conrad, Frederick G; Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data-fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information-than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey.

  1. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L.; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H. Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data—fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information—than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey. PMID:26060991

  2. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Conrad, Frederick G; Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data-fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information-than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey. PMID:26060991

  3. Development and validation of the Diagnostic Interview Adjustment Disorder (DIAD).

    PubMed

    Cornelius, L R; Brouwer, S; de Boer, M R; Groothoff, J W; van der Klink, J J L

    2014-06-01

    Adjustment disorders (ADs) are under-researched due to the absence of a reliable and valid diagnostic tool. This paper describes the development and content/construct validation of a fully structured interview for the diagnosis of AD, the Diagnostic Interview Adjustment Disorder (DIAD). We developed the DIAD by partly adjusting and operationalizing DSM-IV criteria. Eleven experts were consulted on the content of the DIAD. In addition, the DIAD was administered by trained lay interviewers to a representative sample of disability claimants (n = 323). To assess construct validity of the DIAD, we explored the associations between the AD classification by the DIAD and summary scores of the Kessler Psychological Distress 10-item Scale (K10) and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) by linear regression. Expert agreement on content of the DIAD was moderate to good. The prevalence of AD using the DIAD with revised criteria for the diagnosis AD was 7.4%. The associations of AD by the DIAD with average sum scores on the K10 and the WHODAS supported construct validity of the DIAD. The results provide a first indication that the DIAD is a valid instrument to diagnose AD. Further studies on reliability and on other aspects of validity are needed. PMID:24478059

  4. Risk Factors for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Brazilian Blood Donors; a Multicenter Case-Control Study Using Audio Computer-Assisted Structured-Interviews

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Goncalez, Thelma T.; Birch, Rebecca Jeffries; de Carvalho, Silvia Maia F.; Capuani, Ligia; Leão, Silvana Carneiro; Miranda, Carolina; Rocha, Pedro Capuani; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara; Johnson, Bryce R.; Wright, David J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Custer, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Although risk factors for HIV infection are known, it is important for blood centers to understand local epidemiology and disease transmission patterns. Current risk factors for HIV infection in blood donors in Brazil were assessed. Methods A case-control study was conducted at large public blood centers located in four major cities between April 2009 – March 2011. Cases were persons whose donations were confirmed positive by enzyme immunoassays followed by Western Blot confirmation. Audio computer-assisted structured-interviews (ACASI) were completed by all cases and controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results There were 341 cases, including 47 with recently-acquired infection, and 791 controls. Disclosed risk factors for both females and males were sex with an HIV-positive person (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 11.3, 95% CI [4.1, 31.7]) and being an IVDU or sexual partner of an IVDU (AOR 4.65 [1.8, 11.7]). For female blood donors, additional risk factors were having male sex partners who also are MSM (AOR 13.5 [3.1, 59.8]), and having unprotected sex with multiple sexual partners (AOR 5.19 [2.1, 12.9]). The primary risk factor for male blood donors was MSM activity (AOR 21.6 [8.8, 52.9.]). Behaviors associated with recently-acquired HIV were being a MSM or sex partner of MSM (13.82, [4.7, 40.3]), and IVDU (11.47, [3.0, 43.2]). Conclusion Risk factors in blood donors parallel those in the general population in Brazil. Identified risk factors suggest that donor compliance with selection procedures at the participating blood centers is inadequate. PMID:23517235

  5. Engaging New Migrants in Infectious Disease Screening: A Qualitative Semi-Structured Interview Study of UK Migrant Community Health-Care Leads

    PubMed Central

    Seedat, Farah; Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Migration to Europe - and in particular the UK - has risen dramatically in the past decades, with implications for public health services. Migrants have increased vulnerability to infectious diseases (70% of TB cases and 60% HIV cases are in migrants) and face multiple barriers to healthcare. There is currently considerable debate as to the optimum approach to infectious disease screening in this often hard-to-reach group, and an urgent need for innovative approaches. Little research has focused on the specific experience of new migrants, nor sought their views on ways forward. We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers to screening, acceptability of screening, and innovative approaches to screening for four key diseases (HIV, TB, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C). Participants unanimously agreed that current screening models are not perceived to be widely accessible to new migrant communities. Dominant barriers that discourage uptake of screening include disease-related stigma present in their own communities and services being perceived as non-migrant friendly. New migrants are likely to be disproportionately affected by these barriers, with implications for health status. Screening is certainly acceptable to new migrants, however, services need to be developed to become more community-based, proactive, and to work more closely with community organisations; findings that mirror the views of migrants and health-care providers in Europe and internationally. Awareness raising about the benefits of screening within new migrant communities is critical. One innovative approach proposed by participants is a community-based package of health screening combining all key diseases into one general health check-up, to lessen the associated stigma. Further research is needed to develop evidence-based community-focused screening

  6. Validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression among participants in a cohort study using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Schlatter, Javier; Ortuno, Felipe; Lahortiga, Francisca; Pla, Jorge; Benito, Silvia; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Background Depression assessment in population studies is usually based on depressive symptoms scales. However, the use of scales could lead to the choice of an arbitrary cut-off point depending on the sample characteristics and on the patient diagnosis. Thus, the use of a medical diagnosis of depression could be a more appropriate approach. Objective To validate a self-reported physician diagnosis of depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) as Gold Standard and to assess the factors associated to a valid self-reported diagnosis. Methods The SUN Project is a cohort study based on university graduates followed-up through postal questionnaires. The response to the question included in the questionnaire: Have you ever been diagnosed of depression by a physician? was compared to that obtained through the SCID-I applied by a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist. The percentages of confirmed depression and non-depression were assessed for the overall sample and according to several characteristics. Logistic regression models were fitted to ascertain the association between different factors and a correct classification regarding depression status. Results The percentage of confirmed depression was 74.2%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 63.3–85.1. Out of 42 participants who did not report a depression diagnosis in the questionnaire, 34 were free of the disease (%confirmed non-depression = 81.1%; 95% CI = 69.1–92.9). The probability of being a true positive was higher among ex-smokers and non-smokers and among those overweight or obese but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression in the SUN cohort is adequate. Thus, this question about depression diagnosis could be used in further investigations regarding this disease in this graduate cohort study. PMID:18558014

  7. Antisocial Personality Disorder Subscale (Chinese Version) of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II disorders: validation study in Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Tang, D Y Y; Liu, A C Y; Leung, M H T; Siu, B W M

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a risk factor for violence and is associated with poor treatment response when it is a co-morbid condition with substance abuse. It is an under-recognised clinical entity in the local Hong Kong setting, for which there are only a few available Chinese-language diagnostic instruments. None has been tested for its psychometric properties in the Cantonese-speaking population in Hong Kong. This study therefore aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the ASPD subscale of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis II Disorders (SCID-II) in Hong Kong Chinese. METHODS. This assessment tool was modified according to dialectal differences between Mainland China and Hong Kong. Inpatients in Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong, who were designated for priority follow-up based on their assessed propensity for violence and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study, were recruited. To assess the level of agreement, best-estimate diagnosis made by a multidisciplinary team was compared with diagnostic status determined by the SCID-II ASPD subscale. The internal consistency, sensitivity, and specificity of the subscale were also calculated. RESULTS. The internal consistency of the subscale was acceptable at 0.79, whereas the test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability showed an excellent and good agreement of 0.90 and 0.86, respectively. Best-estimate clinical diagnosis-SCID diagnosis agreement was acceptable at 0.76. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 0.91, 0.86, 0.83, and 0.93, respectively. CONCLUSION. The Chinese version of the SCID-II ASPD subscale is reliable and valid for diagnosing ASPD in a Cantonese-speaking clinical population.

  8. Engaging new migrants in infectious disease screening: a qualitative semi-structured interview study of UK migrant community health-care leads.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Farah; Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Migration to Europe - and in particular the UK - has risen dramatically in the past decades, with implications for public health services. Migrants have increased vulnerability to infectious diseases (70% of TB cases and 60% HIV cases are in migrants) and face multiple barriers to healthcare. There is currently considerable debate as to the optimum approach to infectious disease screening in this often hard-to-reach group, and an urgent need for innovative approaches. Little research has focused on the specific experience of new migrants, nor sought their views on ways forward. We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers to screening, acceptability of screening, and innovative approaches to screening for four key diseases (HIV, TB, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C). Participants unanimously agreed that current screening models are not perceived to be widely accessible to new migrant communities. Dominant barriers that discourage uptake of screening include disease-related stigma present in their own communities and services being perceived as non-migrant friendly. New migrants are likely to be disproportionately affected by these barriers, with implications for health status. Screening is certainly acceptable to new migrants, however, services need to be developed to become more community-based, proactive, and to work more closely with community organisations; findings that mirror the views of migrants and health-care providers in Europe and internationally. Awareness raising about the benefits of screening within new migrant communities is critical. One innovative approach proposed by participants is a community-based package of health screening combining all key diseases into one general health check-up, to lessen the associated stigma. Further research is needed to develop evidence-based community-focused screening

  9. Interview: Jurgen Olbert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francais dans le Monde, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This interview with Jurgen Olbert, who is prominent in French instruction in Germany, covers topics such as official educational policy with regard to language, and student attitudes and motivation towards learning French. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  10. Interview With Leland Melvin

    NASA Video Gallery

    Middle school student Molly Moore interviews NASA's Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin. She asks about his career as an engineer and astronaut and what it was like to live and wor...

  11. Group administration of the children's attributional style interview.

    PubMed

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Malecki, Christine Kerres

    2007-01-01

    Research testing the reformulated theory of learned helplessness has been limited by the psychometric properties of instruments used to measure children's attributional style. Thus, the goal of this investigation was to modify a relatively new measure of attributional style that has demonstrated strong psychometric properties with young children and test its psychometric properties in a group administration with a sample of 238 fifth- and sixth-grade children. Results revealed strong internal consistency and test-retest reliability, significant correlations with another measure of attributional style, depressive symptoms, optimism, learned helplessness, and a factor structure that was consistent with theory. Overall, these results provide initial support for the use of a modified paper-and-pencil version of the Children's Attributional Style Interview in a group-administered format for children as young as fifth and sixth grade. PMID:17658990

  12. Interviews and anecdotal reports.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Several interviews are presented with AIDS patients who have been successful at controlling their disease using supplements in combination with drug therapy. A brief anecdote of a breast cancer patient who experienced a substantial reduction in her breast tumor after taking NK911 is included. The first interview examines one patient's ability to reduce his viral load from 50,000 to non-detectable levels in 5 weeks using Naltrexone, ginger root, garlic, and coconut oil. The second interview discusses another patient's use of BHT in a lemon/olive oil drink to successfully combat CMV. The third interview reveals a patient's success at dropping HIV viral load and increasing CD4 counts using Naltrexone and NK911 and supplementing with coconut oil, garlic, and raw goat's milk. The final AIDS-related interview discusses a New York patient's switch from one triple combination therapy, from which there were complications, to the successful use of Naltrexone, garlic, and ginger root. A list of volunteer names, phone numbers, and their protocols is provided. PMID:11365012

  13. Basic Considerations in Interviewing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Rick L.

    This manual summarizes and highlights basic considerations in interviewing children. The relationship between interviewing for data collection and interviewing within the counseling or psychotherapeutic context is discussed. The Interviewer's Functional Checklist is presented to provide a method for self-evaluating interviewer behavior, and for…

  14. Interjections in interviews.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine; Ageneau, Carie

    2005-03-01

    A psycholinguistic hypothesis regarding the use of interjections in spoken utterances, originally formulated by Ameka (1992b, 1994) for the English language, but not confirmed in the German-language research of Kowal and O'Connell (2004 a & c), was tested: The local syntactic isolation of interjections is paralleled by their articulatory isolation in spoken utterances i.e., by their occurrence between a preceding and a following pause. The corpus consisted of four TV and two radio interviews of Hillary Clinton that had coincided with the publication of her book Living History (2003) and one TV interview of Robin Williams by James Lipton. No evidence was found for articulatory isolation of English-language interjections. In the Hillary Clinton interviews and Robin Williams interviews, respectively, 71% and 73% of all interjections occurred initially, i.e., at the onset of various units of spoken discourse: at the beginning of turns; at the beginning of articulatory phrases within turns, i.e., after a preceding pause; and at the beginning of a citation within a turn (either Direct Reported Speech [DRS] or what we have designated Hypothetical Speaker Formulation [HSF]. One conventional interjection (OH) occurred most frequently. The Robin Williams interview had a much higher occurrence of interjections, especially nonconventional ones, than the Hillary Clinton interviews had. It is suggested that the onset or initializing role of interjections reflects the temporal priority of the affective and the intuitive over the analytic, grammatical, and cognitive in speech production. Both this temporal priority and the spontaneous and emotional use of interjections are consonant with Wundt's (1900) characterization of the primary interjection as psychologically primitive. The interjection is indeed the purest verbal implementation of conceptual orality.

  15. Interjections in interviews.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine; Ageneau, Carie

    2005-03-01

    A psycholinguistic hypothesis regarding the use of interjections in spoken utterances, originally formulated by Ameka (1992b, 1994) for the English language, but not confirmed in the German-language research of Kowal and O'Connell (2004 a & c), was tested: The local syntactic isolation of interjections is paralleled by their articulatory isolation in spoken utterances i.e., by their occurrence between a preceding and a following pause. The corpus consisted of four TV and two radio interviews of Hillary Clinton that had coincided with the publication of her book Living History (2003) and one TV interview of Robin Williams by James Lipton. No evidence was found for articulatory isolation of English-language interjections. In the Hillary Clinton interviews and Robin Williams interviews, respectively, 71% and 73% of all interjections occurred initially, i.e., at the onset of various units of spoken discourse: at the beginning of turns; at the beginning of articulatory phrases within turns, i.e., after a preceding pause; and at the beginning of a citation within a turn (either Direct Reported Speech [DRS] or what we have designated Hypothetical Speaker Formulation [HSF]. One conventional interjection (OH) occurred most frequently. The Robin Williams interview had a much higher occurrence of interjections, especially nonconventional ones, than the Hillary Clinton interviews had. It is suggested that the onset or initializing role of interjections reflects the temporal priority of the affective and the intuitive over the analytic, grammatical, and cognitive in speech production. Both this temporal priority and the spontaneous and emotional use of interjections are consonant with Wundt's (1900) characterization of the primary interjection as psychologically primitive. The interjection is indeed the purest verbal implementation of conceptual orality. PMID:15991877

  16. 34 CFR 200.89 - MEP allocations; Re-interviewing; Eligibility documentation; and Quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., the re-interviewing process must include— (A) Selection of a sample of identified migratory children... independent re-interviewers (i.e., interviewers who are neither SEA or local operating agency staff members... operating agency staff members working to administer or operate the State MEP nor any other persons...

  17. 34 CFR 200.89 - MEP allocations; Re-interviewing; Eligibility documentation; and Quality control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., the re-interviewing process must include— (A) Selection of a sample of identified migratory children... independent re-interviewers (i.e., interviewers who are neither SEA or local operating agency staff members... operating agency staff members working to administer or operate the State MEP nor any other persons...

  18. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  19. Milton Friedman: "TECHNOS" Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TECHNOS, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This interview with Milton Friedman addresses his economic policies and how they might improve American public education. Highlights include teachers' unions and their negative impact on education, private schools and tax relief, the Edison Project, privatization of educational services, special needs students, California's Educational Freedom…

  20. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  1. Interviewing Children: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Interviewing children is a critical element of the education reporter's daily work. However, practices for gaining access and avoiding harm and embarrassment vary widely depending on the news organization and individual reporter in question. This document aims to provide journalists with broad guidelines, but it stops short of advocating for the…

  2. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  3. A General Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Edward D.

    This guide is divided into 11 sections, each containing a number of questions and suggestions for conducting successful folklore and oral history interviews. Section 1, "Settlement and Dwellings," deals with the physical environment, local inhabitants, houses and outbuildings, and public buildings. Section 2, "Livelihood and Household Support,"…

  4. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  5. Interviews to Assess Learners' Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana; Pearson, P. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents open-ended and semistructured interviews to assess reading comprehension. Highlights the potential value of interviews in aligning assessment practices with instruction and learning theory. (MG)

  6. The structure of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in three female trauma samples: A comparison of interview and self-report measures

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Christine D.; McCreary, Donald R.; Asmundson, Gordon J.G.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Empirical research increasingly suggests that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is comprised of four factors: re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal. Nonetheless, there remains some inconsistency in the findings of factor analyses that form the bulk of this empirical literature. One source of such inconsistency may be assessment measure idiosyncrasies. To examine this issue, we conducted confirmatory factor analyses of interview and self-report data across three trauma samples. Analyses of the interview data indicated a good fit for a four-factor model across all samples; analyses of the self-report data indicated an adequate fit in two of three samples. Overall, findings suggest that measure idiosyncrasies may account for some of the inconsistency in previous factor analyses of PTSD symptoms. PMID:18206346

  7. Diagnostic efficiency among psychiatric outpatients of a self-report version of a subset of screen items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II).

    PubMed

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L; Masthoff, Erik D; Trompenaars, Fons J W M; Hodiamont, Paul P G

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The psychometric properties were studied in a prospective validation study in a random sample of Dutch adult psychiatric outpatients, using the SCID-II interview as the gold standard. First, all patients completed the short questionnaire. One week later, they were interviewed with the full SCID-II. After another week, the short questionnaire was readministered. According to the scores obtained with the full SCID-II, 97 patients (50%) had a personality disorder. The set of 10 SCID-II items correctly classified 78% of all participants. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative power were 0.78, 0.78, 0.78, and 0.78, respectively. The results based on the retrospectively obtained data were rather similar to those obtained in the prospective validation study. Therefore, it is concluded that the set of 10 SCID-II items can be useful as a quick self-report personality disorder screen in a population of psychiatric outpatients.

  8. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Wolf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist David Wolf is seen during this preflight interview, where he first answers questions on his career path and role models. Other questions cover mission goals, ISS (International Space Station) Expedition 5 spacecrew, crew training, the S1 Truss and its radiators, the MBS (Mobile Base Structure), his experience onboard Mir, and his EVAs (extravehicular activities) on the coming mission. The EVAs are the subject of several questions. Wolf discusses his crew members, and elsewhere discusses Pilot Pamela Melroy's role as an IV crew member during EVAs. In addition, Wolf answers questions on transfer operations, the SHIMMER experiment, and his thoughts on multinational crews and crew bonding.

  9. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  10. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  11. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  12. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  13. 16 CFR 1000.2 - Laws administered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws administered. 1000.2 Section 1000.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.2 Laws administered. The Commission administers five acts: (a) The Consumer Product Safety Act...

  14. Does Interviewer Status Matter? An examination of Lay Interviewers and Medical Doctor Interviewers in an Epidemiological Study in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Richardson, Lisa; Acierno, Ron; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Gaboury, Mario T.; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, typhoon Xangsane disrupted a large-scale multi-agency mental health study of 4,982 individuals in the DaNang province of Vietnam. Following this disaster, 795 of the original 4,982 participants were randomly assigned to be re-interviewed by either a medical doctor or a lay interviewer using structured clinical interviews to determine prevalence of lifetime and post-typhoon post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (APA, 1994). The aim of the present study was to determine if prevalence of disorders differed by interviewer type. Bivariate analyses and multivariable analyses, as well as internal reliability estimates, all indicated no significant differences between the medical doctor interviewers versus the lay interviewers. This held for both lifetime prevalence as well as post-typhoon prevalence of disorders. This study has implications for epidemiologic studies, as it indicates that with adequate training, the use of lay interviewers may be a valid means of data collection. PMID:24683551

  15. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    PubMed

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  16. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    PubMed

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  17. The Clinical Interview and the Measurement of Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, George J.; Gertzog, William A.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the use of the clinical interview in assessing cognitive structure and in investigating conceptual change. They caution much more work is needed to increase the applicability and validity of the clinical interview method and point out that there is a lack of systematization in the analysis of interview transcripts. (Author/PB)

  18. Guidelines for the Interviewee in the Performance Appraisal Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stano, Michael

    To describe those behaviors leading to productive appraisal interviews of sales representatives, questionnaires were administered to 27 branch sales managers who supervised 160 sales representatives. Eleven managers received a preliminary questionnaire asking them to cite behaviors of the sales representatives that caused productive or…

  19. Factor Analysis of the 12-Item Zarit Burden Interview in Caregivers of Persons Diagnosed With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Camille; O'Connell, Megan E; Morgan, Debra Gail

    2016-05-01

    The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) is commonly used to measure dementia caregiver burden, but its factor structure is unclear. A two-factor structure for the 12-item ZBI, "personal strain" and "role strain," has been shown, but recent data suggest that an additional factor of "guilt" is embedded in the "role strain" items. The 12-item ZBI administered to 194 informal rural and urban caregivers of persons diagnosed with dementia was analyzed using exploratory factor analysis. A two-factor structure, with item loadings consistent with previously conceptualized constructs of "personal strain" and "role strain," was found. Moreover, this factor structure was invariant to caregiver subgroups. When the predictive value of these factors was explored, only "personal strain" was important in predicting caregiver psychological distress, measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory. However, "role strain," which included the hypothesized "guilt" items, did not appear to be an important predictor of caregiver distress. PMID:24652929

  20. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  1. Dietary Screener Questionnaire in the National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement 2010: Overview

    Cancer.gov

    The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement (CCS) is administered every five years and focuses on knowledge, attitudes, and practices in cancer-related health behaviors, screening, and risk assessment.

  2. Validation of the Portuguese self-administered computerised 24-hour dietary recall among second-, third- and fourth-grade children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methods for assessing children's dietary intake, such as interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall (24-h DR), are time consuming and resource intensive. Self-administered instruments offer a low-cost diet assessment method for use with children. The present study assessed the validity of ...

  3. An Interview with Ralph Tyler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Jeri Ridings

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Ralph Tyler. This interview will be of interest to those entering the field of education as well as for those who have made their home within the field for some time now. In the interview, Dr. Tyler discusses work in education and educational evaluation that spans over a half a century. He describes issues…

  4. Motivational interviewing and specialty pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Bruce A; Bertram, Carl T

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented in substance abuse and health care literature that motivational interviewing is an evidenced-based and effective intervention for influencing patient behaviors and associated positive health outcomes. The introduction of motivational interviewing training in specialty pharmacy has great potential to increase patient and pharmacist satisfaction, maximize adherence rates, and improve health outcomes. This commentary examines the need for effective approaches for improving patient adherence and outcomes and briefly describes the history and efficacy of motivational interviewing. Case studies using traditional approaches to patient care and motivational interviewing are analysed, and real-world experience using motivational interviewing is presented in the form of a specialty pharmacy case study.

  5. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  6. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  7. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  8. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  9. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  10. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of...

  11. Effectiveness of lorazepam-assisted interviews in an adolescent with dissociative amnesia: A case report★

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yuna; Shin, Mi-Hee; Kim, Sung-Gon; Kim, Ji-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate gathering information during a psychiatric interview, some psychiatrists advocate augmenting the interview using drugs. Rather than barbiturates, benzodiazepines have been used for drug-assisted interviews. Dissociative amnesia is one of the indications for these interviews. Herein, we present the case of a 15-year-old female who was diagnosed as having dissociative amnesia because of conflicts with her friends. She was administered a lorazepam-assisted interview to aid recovery of her memories. In this case, a small dose of lorazepam was sufficient to recover her memories without any adverse effects. PMID:25206490

  12. Effectiveness of lorazepam-assisted interviews in an adolescent with dissociative amnesia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yuna; Shin, Mi-Hee; Kim, Sung-Gon; Kim, Ji-Hoon

    2013-01-15

    To facilitate gathering information during a psychiatric interview, some psychiatrists advocate augmenting the interview using drugs. Rather than barbiturates, benzodiazepines have been used for drug-assisted interviews. Dissociative amnesia is one of the indications for these interviews. Herein, we present the case of a 15-year-old female who was diagnosed as having dissociative amnesia because of conflicts with her friends. She was administered a lorazepam-assisted interview to aid recovery of her memories. In this case, a small dose of lorazepam was sufficient to recover her memories without any adverse effects.

  13. 'Not Until I'm Absolutely Half-Dead and Have To:' Accounting for Non-Use of Antiretroviral Therapy in Semi-Structured Interviews with People Living with HIV in Australia.

    PubMed

    Newman, Christy E; Mao, Limin; Persson, Asha; Holt, Martin; Slavin, Sean; Kidd, Michael R; Post, Jeffrey J; Wright, Edwina; de Wit, John

    2015-05-01

    Current debates regarding the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to promote both individual- and population-level health benefits underscore the importance of understanding why a subpopulation of people with diagnosed HIV and access to treatment choose not to use it. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2012 and 2014 with 27 people living with HIV in Australia who were not using ART at the time of interview. Analytic triangulation permitted an appreciation of not only the varied personal reasons for non-use of treatment, but also underlying views on HIV treatment, and the ideal conditions imagined necessary for treatment initiation. Policy goals to increase the number of people with HIV using ART must recognize the diverse explanations for non-use of ART, which include concerns about the various impacts of committing to lifelong pharmaceutical treatment use. Our research identified distinctive subgroups among people who are not using antiretroviral therapy, with a range of individual and social needs that may affect treatment decisions. These findings challenge assumptions about treatment non-use in resource-rich settings, revealing persistent consumer fears about the potent and unknown effects of HIV medications that deserve greater recognition in policy debate on treatment uptake.

  14. ‘Not Until I'm Absolutely Half-Dead and Have To:’ Accounting for Non-Use of Antiretroviral Therapy in Semi-Structured Interviews with People Living with HIV in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Limin; Persson, Asha; Holt, Martin; Slavin, Sean; Kidd, Michael R.; Post, Jeffrey J.; Wright, Edwina; de Wit, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current debates regarding the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to promote both individual- and population-level health benefits underscore the importance of understanding why a subpopulation of people with diagnosed HIV and access to treatment choose not to use it. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2012 and 2014 with 27 people living with HIV in Australia who were not using ART at the time of interview. Analytic triangulation permitted an appreciation of not only the varied personal reasons for non-use of treatment, but also underlying views on HIV treatment, and the ideal conditions imagined necessary for treatment initiation. Policy goals to increase the number of people with HIV using ART must recognize the diverse explanations for non-use of ART, which include concerns about the various impacts of committing to lifelong pharmaceutical treatment use. Our research identified distinctive subgroups among people who are not using antiretroviral therapy, with a range of individual and social needs that may affect treatment decisions. These findings challenge assumptions about treatment non-use in resource-rich settings, revealing persistent consumer fears about the potent and unknown effects of HIV medications that deserve greater recognition in policy debate on treatment uptake. PMID:25806574

  15. Validation of a self-administered questionnaire for assessing occupational and environmental exposures of pregnant women

    SciTech Connect

    Eskenazi, B.; Pearson, K.

    1988-11-01

    The present investigation sought to determine whether a self-administered questionnaire could be used to obtain occupational information from pregnant women attending the obstetrical clinics at the University of California, San Francisco from July to November 1986. The authors compared the accuracy of responses of 57 women on the self-administered questionnaire with those obtained on a detailed clinical interview by an occupational health professional. The self-administered questionnaire and the clinical interview included information on the woman's job title, the type of company she worked for, the level of physical activity, her exposures on the job and at home, and her partner's occupation. The authors also examined whether the validity of the self-administered questionnaire could be improved on review by an industrial hygienist. The questionnaire took less than 20 minutes to complete, with over 90% of the women answering three-quarters of it. It was substantially accurate in obtaining information on number of hours worked during pregnancy, type of shift worked, and stress level in the workplace; exposure to radiation, video display terminals, fumes, gases, and cigarette smoke in the workplace; and exposure to pesticides, paint, and cigarette smoke at home. On those variables for which the responses on the self-administered questionnaire were less accurate, review by the industrial hygienist improved the level of accuracy considerably. These findings suggest that a self-administered questionnaire can be used to obtain valid information from pregnant women attending a prenatal clinic.

  16. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…

  17. Secretarial Administraton: The Interviewing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemesh, Anna

    1979-01-01

    Suggests classroom techniques to prepare business students for employment interviews and gives information on lawful and unlawful employment interview inquiries, as well as some fair employment legal requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1974, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Rehabilitation Act of 1973. (MF)

  18. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  19. An Interview with Mohja Kahf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Hilary E.; Zine, Jasmin; Taylor, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, an interview with Muslim author Mohja Kahf is presented. Kahf is the author of the novel "The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf" and "Emails from Scheherazad." During the interview, Kahf talked about how her religion has become the foremost factor in bringing her to her voice. She also related how she became dismayed with Islam being…

  20. An Interview with Jeremy Koester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jeremy Koester, an eighth grade math teacher and football coach at Alamo Heights Junior School in San Antonio, Texas. In this interview, Koester describes his use of technology in his classes and describes his dream of advancing Second Life (SL) as a distance education environment. SL is a "3-D virtual world…

  1. Enriching Social Studies with Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Describes how an interview project used in conjunction with a primary sources based curriculum enhanced history learning. Students were involved in gaining information from community citizens. Outlines the procedures involved in the interviewing process and discusses the benefits to students including increased content acquisition, skills, and…

  2. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  3. Close up on remote interviews.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Mike

    2014-10-21

    Embrace it or shy away from it, the march of technology moves onwards relentlessly. Job interviews, often seen as the most human part of the recruitment process, are increasingly moving to video conference or services such as Skype or FaceTime, especially for a first interview. PMID:25315571

  4. Nonverbal Behaviors in Presearch Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genova, Bissy

    This study to identify the nonverbal behaviors of librarians and library users that facilitate or impede information exchange in presearch interviews for computer-based literature searches was part of a larger research project that gathered data on 80 presearch interviews in seven medical libraries. The project also sought (1) to identify verbal…

  5. [Description and validity of Enedam test-retest. A structured interview for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's, multi-infarction dementias and dementias of other etiologies based on the CIE-10 and DSM-III-R].

    PubMed

    Moríñigo, A; Zaudig, M; Mittelhammer, J; Hiller, W; Pauls, A; Martín, J; González, S; Mateo, I; Noval, D

    1990-01-01

    The SIDAM, a new clinical structured interview for the diagnosis and measure of dementia according to DSM-III-R and ICD-10, is described. This instrument comprises a clinical overview, several cognitive tests, including the Mini-Mental State, and a section for clinical judgement and information coming from others. Every item relies on DSM-11-R and ICD-10 algorithms. The SIDAM has a hight test-retest reliability on the clinical diagnosis and the different diagnostic criteria. It is a brief (28 minutes), practical screening instrument. Good congruence is found between SIDEM, DSM-III-R and ICD-10, and the corresponding ICD-9 expert diagnosis. Furthermore the SIDAM Total Score (SISCO), allows a good measurement of low level of cognitive impairments and provides quantification of severity of cognitive disorders. The SIDAM has been translated and adapted into Spanish.

  6. Who Should Administer Energy-Efficiency Programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen L.

    2003-05-01

    The restructuring of the electric utility industry in the US created a crisis in the administration of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. Before restructuring, nearly all energy-efficiency programs in the US were administered by utilities and funded from utility rates. Restructuring called these arrangements into question in two ways. First, the separation of generation from transmission and distribution undermined a key rationale for utility administration. This was the Integrated Resource Planning approach in which the vertically integrated utility was given incentives to provide energy services at least cost. Second, questions were raised as to whether funding through utility rates could be sustained in a competitive environment and most states that restructured their electricity industry adopted a system benefits charge. The crisis in administration of energy-efficiency programs produced a variety of responses in the eight years since restructuring in the US began in earn est. These responses have included new rationales for energy-efficiency programs, new mechanisms for funding programs, and new mechanisms for program administration and governance. This paper focuses on issues related to program administration. It describes the administrative functions and some of the options for accomplishing them. Then it discusses criteria for choosing among the options. Examples are given that highlight some of the states that have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved. The conclusion attempts to summarize lessons learned.

  7. Perceived Interviewer Expertness and Attractiveness: Effects of Interviewer Behavior and Attire and Interview Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Barbara A.; Dell, Don M.

    1976-01-01

    Students (N=80) rated the interviewers on a counselor rating form. Only counselor role behavior significantly affected students' perceptions of interviewer attractiveness, while perceptions of expertness seemed to have been affected jointly by role and attire. The relative magnitude of expertness as compared to attractiveness ratings was…

  8. Conceptual Dynamics in Clinical Interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherin, Bruce; Lee, Victor R.; Krakowski, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    One of the main tools that we have for the study of student science conceptions is the clinical interview. Research on student understanding of natural phenomena has tended to understand interviews as tools for reading out a student's knowledge. In this paper, we argue for a shift in how we think about and analyze interview data. In particular, we argue that we must be aware that the interview itself is a dynamic process during which a sort of conceptual change occurs. We refer to these short time-scale changes that occur over a few minutes in an interview as conceptual dynamics. Our goal is to devise new frameworks and techniques for capturing the conceptual dynamics. To this end, we have devised a simple and neutral cognitive framework. In this paper, we describe this framework, and we show how it can be applied to understand interview data. We hope to show that the conceptual dynamics of interviews are complex, but that it nonetheless feasible to make them a focus of study.

  9. An Event-Related Potentials Study of Mental Rotation in Identifying Chemical Structural Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how mental rotation strategies affect the identification of chemical structural formulas. This study conducted event-related potentials (ERPs) experiments. In addition to the data collected in the ERPs, a Chemical Structure Conceptual Questionnaire and interviews were also admin-istered for data…

  10. An Interview with Will Hobbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Edgar H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Will Hobbs, author of novels for middle school and young adult readers, wherein he discusses his books "Ghost Canoe,""The Maze" and "Jason's Gold." Includes a review of "Jason's Gold." (NH)

  11. Interview Questions with Bentham Scientific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    John Mather answers questions for an interview for the Bentham Science Newsletter. He covers topics ranging from his childhood, his professional career and his thoughts on research, technology and today's scientists and engineers.

  12. Interviewing College Students in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersh, Jeffrey B.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a five-step model of a crisis interview and the special considerations in working with the suicidal and assaultive student for use by college counseling professionals. Discusses the special cases of suicidal and homocidal/assaultive potential. (LLL)

  13. BBB Interviews Wallace D. Muhammad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Books Bulletin, 1979

    1979-01-01

    In this interview, subjects covered include: changes in Islam, the spiritual greatness of America, Muslim businesses, interracial marriage, the World Community of Islam, and opening the doors of Islam to Caucasians. (WI)

  14. Improving training in motivational interviewing.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Mel

    Motivational interviewing (MI) can be applied to a range of clinical specialties and areas. Bournemouth University set up an accredited module for a wide range of practitioners, including nurses, to learn the technique of MI, with positive results.

  15. An Interview with Constance Reid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Constance Reid, a well-known author of books on mathematics and mathematicians, is interviewed at her home in San Francisco in July, 1979. She discusses her studies of the lives of Hilbert, Courant and other mathematicians. (MP)

  16. Psychometric Properties of an Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jeffery N.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2006-01-01

    Although research has been conducted to support the psychometric properties of rating scales used to assess ADHD in adults, little work has been published examining semi-structured interviews to assess ADHD in adults. The present study examined the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Conners Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for…

  17. Patients’ values and preferences of the expected efficacy of hip arthroscopy for osteoarthritis: a protocol for a multinational structured interview-based study combined with a randomised survey on the optimal amount of information to elicit preferences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Agoritsas, Thomas; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Alexander, Paul; Imam, Maha; Yoo, Daniel; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Thabane, Lehana; Schünemann, Holger; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling condition with up to a 25% cumulative lifetime risk. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is effective in relieving patients’ symptoms and improving function. It is, however, associated with substantial risk of complications, pain and major functional limitation before patients can return to full function. In contrast, hip arthroscopy (HA) is less invasive and can postpone THA. However, there is no evidence regarding the delay in the need for THA that patients would find acceptable to undergoing HA. Knowing patients’ values and preferences (VP) on this expected delay is critical when making recommendations regarding the advisability of HA. Furthermore, little is known on the optimal amount of information regarding interventions and outcomes needed to present in order to optimally elicit patients’ VP. Methods and analysis We will perform a multinational, structured interview-based survey of preference in delay time for THA among patients with non-advanced OA who failed to respond to conservative therapy. We will combine these interviews with a randomised trial addressing the optimal amount of information regarding the interventions and outcomes required to elicit preferences. Eligible patients will be randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either a short or a long format of health scenarios of THA and HA. We will determine each patient's VP using a trade-off and anticipated regret exercises. Our primary outcomes for the combined surveys will be: (1) the minimal delay time in the need for THA surgery that patients would find acceptable to undertaking HA, (2) patients’ satisfaction with the amount of information provided in the health scenarios used to elicit their VPs. Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been approved by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (HIREB13-506). We will disseminate our study findings through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations, and make them

  18. SCIENCE INTERVIEW: China's Leader Commits to Basic Research, Global Science.

    PubMed

    2000-06-16

    SCIENCE INTERVIEW:China's Leader Commits to Basic Research, Global Science In an exclusive interview with Science, President Jiang Zemin offers a glimpse of a new China that is encouraging young scientists to use the Internet for their work--and reveals his secret past as a nuclear engineer. Alternately tough, charming, charismatic, and personally warm, Jiang makes clear in this interview that he is a pragmatist and is committed to major structural change. His comments are edited for brevity and include written answers to questions submitted prior to the interview. PMID:17835103

  19. Discriminant validity of the adult attachment interview.

    PubMed

    Crowell, J A; Waters, E; Treboux, D; O'Connor, E O; Colon-Downs, C; Feider, O; Golby, B; Posada

    1996-10-01

    The Adult Attachment Interview is a semi-structured interview developed to investigate adults' attachment representations. Subjects are asked to describe their parents as caregivers, explain these descriptions, describe how their parents typically responded to distress, and discuss their current relationships with their parents. They are also asked to describe any significant losses and/or instances of abuse during childhood. Scoring focuses on the accessibility of early experiences to memory and the coherence and plausibility of the subject's narrative. Discriminant validity is always an important issue with such measures because IQ and other cognitively loaded variables offer plausible alternative interpretations or represent important correlates that should be treated as covariates when the measure is used. In addition, complex, multifaceted interviews always pose the risk of assessing general social adjustment rather than a more narrowly defined construct. This study examines the discriminant validity of the AAI vis(-)à-vis intelligence, social desirability, discourse style, and general social adjustment in a sample of 53 native-English-speaking, married women with preschool children. They were assessed with the AAI, a written IQ test, the Social Adjustment Scale, the Employment Experience Interview (discourse style), and a measure of social desirability. There were modest but significant correlations with IQ scores and social adjustment. There was no relation between AAI classifications and discourse style or social desirability. These results substantially strengthen the case for interpreting the AAI as an attachment-related measure.

  20. Teaching Students to Administer the WISC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Yost

    1977-01-01

    A college level psychology course is described in which students were trained by both traditional and experimental methods to administer individual intelligence tests. Comparative analysis of performance by each group indicates that student motivation and performance is not greatly influenced by teaching method and that videotape demonstrations…

  1. Changes in Medications Administered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Johnson, Shella; Roman, Jaclyn; Zimmerman, M. Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to determine if there have been changes in the type and number of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) medications administered in schools since the introduction of long-acting stimulants. A survey was sent to 1,000 school nurses randomly selected from the National Association…

  2. Preschoolers’ Observed Temperament and Psychiatric Disorders Assessed with a Parent Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Bufferd, Sara J.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Dyson, Margaret; Olino, Thomas M.; Durbin, C. Emily; Klein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports the role of temperament in the origins of psychiatric disorders. However, there are few data on associations between temperament and psychiatric disorders in early childhood. A community sample of 541 three-year old preschoolers participated in a laboratory temperament assessment, and caregivers were administered a structured diagnostic interview on preschool psychopathology. In bivariate analyses, temperamental dysphoria and low exuberance were associated with depression; fear, low exuberance, and low sociability were associated with anxiety disorders; and disinhibition and dysphoria were associated with oppositional defiant disorder. Although there were no bivariate associations between temperament and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, disinhibition emerged as a unique predictor in multivariate analyses. Findings indicate that the pattern of relations between temperament and psychopathology in older youth and adults is evident as early as age 3. PMID:21391025

  3. Interview Validity for Selecting Sales Clerks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvey, Richard D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined interviewer judgments, gender, and age data for individuals interviewing for seasonal retail sales positions in two separate years (total N=517). Matched job performance data with interviewer judgments. Results suggest usefulness of the interview in assessment. Females and older applicants received higher average interview evaluations and…

  4. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  5. Interview: Iceland's health care system. Interview by Susan Reeves.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, G

    1985-01-01

    Iceland has a well established system of socialized medicine and national health insurance. Its small homogeneous population has enabled Iceland to computerize and process data concerning quality of patient care, volume and type of drugs prescribed, and pertinent epidemiological information. In the following interview, Dr. Gudjon Magnusson discusses the development, maintenance, and operational costs of such a health care system.

  6. Effects of prenatally administered 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate on adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Kester, P A

    1984-10-01

    The study was designed to determine whether exogenous prenatal exposure to 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (Delalutin) affects male recreational interests in boyhood and adolescence and male psychosexual development and whether total dosage, duration, and time of exposure has an effect on the previously mentioned variables. Subjects included 25 prenatally Delalutin-exposed males and 25 closely matched unexposed males. Subjects were administered the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, the Draw-a-Person Test, the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study for Adolescents, the Embedded Figures Test, and the Forer Structured-Sentence Completion Test. Also, both subjects and their mothers were interviewed. Analysis of the data utilized raters to score subjective test instruments. Statistical analysis was conducted by t test, sign test, and multiple correlation. Only one significant difference was evident. Delalutin-exposed subjects spend significantly more time in the sedentary pursuit of watching television. However, there was no significant difference in their expressed interest in watching television or the type of television programs selected. The total dosage, duration, and period of gestation of drug administration had no significant effect in altering the findings. But a subtle difference was observed when the Delalutin regimen was not constant and when there was an interaction between psychological variables and the drug regimen. PMID:6517685

  7. An Interview with Fiona French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David

    2005-01-01

    In this interview Fiona French discusses her work and career with David Lewis. She describes early influences and stresses her lifelong love of colour and pattern. Amongst other themes she considers the factual basis of most of her books and her lack of interest in fantasy; her preference for clear, simple prose; her constant shifts in style and…

  8. Carole Anne Klonarides: An Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapaport, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with videographer Carole Anne Klonarides that explores her manipulation of space, time, and visual texture, which often results in an altered sense of history. Notes how her goal to create believable sequences together with her desire to move beyond the stereotypical uses and formats of contemporary television show the…

  9. Job Interviews: Keys for Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald S.; Catt, Stephen E.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many students seem disinterested in learning to handle employment interviews effectively. This article discusses students' motivation to become skilled interviewees and steps educators and counselors can take to increase students' interest in this crucial career activity. The article also discusses mistakes students frequently make during…

  10. Dale Gladden: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Dale Gladden, who has worked as emergency medical technician, paramedic, and emergency room nurse. Focuses on Gladden's experiences as paramedic and looks ahead to further studies he has since pursued. Gladden explains how he chose to become paramedic, describes what characteristics make a good paramedic, and discusses…

  11. International Book Review and Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; McTigue, Anna

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the book "Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives," edited by Todd V. Fletcher and Candace S. Bos (1999). An interview with Todd V. Fletcher is presented in which he discusses the importance of U.S. understanding and collaboration with Mexico. (CR)

  12. An Interview with Rebecca Bower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsen, Gladys

    1992-01-01

    Presents an interview with Rebecca Bower, principal trombonist with the Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) Symphony Orchestra. Reviews her career as a music student and performer and her experiences in battling sex stereotypes. Explains Bower's belief that students' instrument choices should have nothing to do with gender. Stresses her advice to female…

  13. Teaching Interviewing for Career Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Charles J.

    The purpose of this booklet is to aid high school and college instructors in designing and teaching units or courses in the fundamentals of informational and employment interviewing. The theory section of this work provides a definition of related communications principles, and an analysis of the dynamics of informational and employment…

  14. An Interview with Ilan Stavans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Jose

    2007-01-01

    This interview with Ilan Stavans addresses central experiences tied to the educational and immigrant experiences of Latinos in the United States. Culture, immigration, assimilation, and language are the prisms through which this experience is understood. Ilan Stavans responds to questions concerning cultural heterogeneity and cultural homogeneity.…

  15. An Interview with Karen Glover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Karen Glover of Georgia Tech, a key person behind the planning of the Access Services Conference held last fall, and now going into its second year. Glover started working in libraries as a part-time library assistant at her local public library during her high school years. She later became a Circulation…

  16. An Interview with Zarqa Nawaz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zine, Jasmin; Taylor, Lisa K.; Davis, Hilary E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Zarqa Nawaz. Born in Liverpool, raised in Toronto and now living in Regina with her husband and four children, Zarqa has worked as a freelance writer/broadcaster with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) radio, and in various capacities with CBC "Newsworld", CTV's Canada AM, and CBC's "The National". Her…

  17. Interview with Forrest J. Gerard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Focusing on the current policy, organization and direction of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this edited interview addressed such issues as BIA reorganization, delivery systems, PL 93-638, Indian Water Rights, Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs, PL 95-561 and Indian Education. (RTS)

  18. An Interview with Catherine Comet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Offers an interview with Catherine Comet, music director of the Grand Rapids (Michigan) Symphony. Reviews her childhood and early study in France and her experiences at the Julliard School of Music and on the contest circuit. Explains how she became a professional conductor. Discusses Comet's view of the importance that classical music can have…

  19. Interview with Joe F. Head

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joe F. Head, Dean of University Admissions and Enrollment Services at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia, who has more than 35 years of experience in admissions and enrollment services. After completing an M.Ed. in higher education at Georgia Southern University, Head immediately landed a position as…

  20. An Interview with Joseph Jastrab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    An interview with a counselor who leads wilderness vision-quests discusses risk-taking as an element of adolescent development, the development of a fear of death, recognition of the universal nature of that fear, the lack of rites of passage in modern society, and the ways in which wilderness experiences can foster self-discovery and spiritual…

  1. Divergent Thinking and Interview Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Mark; Rawles, Richard; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined divergent thinking (DT) test scores of applicants taking part in a selection procedure for an undergraduate psychology degree (N = 370). Interviewers made six specific (creative intelligence, motivation, work habits, emotional stability, sociability, and social responsibility) and one overall recommendation rating on each…

  2. Ralph Mero: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Ralph Mero, Executive Director of Compassion in Dying, Seattle (Washington)-based organization that has brought new voice to controversial issue of physician-assisted rational suicide. Mero explains how his years as minister watching people suffer with cancer or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome led him to work for…

  3. An Interview with Oliver Sacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Dale; Palo, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Presents an interview with Oliver Sachs. Discusses his approach to writing, including the physical pen-and-ink approach as opposed to using a word processor; his use of journals; his motivation for writing; his approach to revision; and his view of himself as a writer. (NH)

  4. Interviewing Teacher-Librarian Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yucht, Alice

    2004-01-01

    When recently asked by an administrator for some realistic questions and "recommended" responses to expect while interviewing candidates for school library positions, the author grouped the questions into three categories: library management, information skills and teaching skills. In this article are the questions she suggested, along with topics…

  5. Brief Report: Telephone Administration of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised--Reliability and Suitability for Use in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-King, Jessica; Cohen, Ira L.; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised is one of the "gold standard" diagnostic tools for autism spectrum disorders. It is traditionally administered face-to-face. Cost and geographical concerns constrain the employment of the ADI-R for large-scale research projects. The telephone interview is a reasonable alternative, but has not yet been…

  6. Disclosure of sensitive behaviors across self-administered survey modes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gnambs, Timo; Kaspar, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In surveys, individuals tend to misreport behaviors that are in contrast to prevalent social norms or regulations. Several design features of the survey procedure have been suggested to counteract this problem; particularly, computerized surveys are supposed to elicit more truthful responding. This assumption was tested in a meta-analysis of survey experiments reporting 460 effect sizes (total N =125,672). Self-reported prevalence rates of several sensitive behaviors for which motivated misreporting has been frequently observed were compared across self-administered paper-and-pencil versus computerized surveys. The results revealed that computerized surveys led to significantly more reporting of socially undesirable behaviors than comparable surveys administered on paper. This effect was strongest for highly sensitive behaviors and surveys administered individually to respondents. Moderator analyses did not identify interviewer effects or benefits of audio-enhanced computer surveys. The meta-analysis highlighted the advantages of computerized survey modes for the assessment of sensitive topics.

  7. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  8. Administering questionnaires to older people: rigid adherence to protocol may deny and disacknowledge emotional expression.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Kay; Leppa, Carol J; Sandford, Rosemarie; Vydelingum, Vasso

    2014-12-01

    This paper draws on data from a larger study conducted in care home facilities in: Seattle, USA; West Sussex and Surrey in the UK; and in the lower North Island in New Zealand. Two extracts from interactions between the researchers and an older person during the administration of The Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale in a care home facility in New Zealand were analysed following Houtkoop-Steenstra and using a Conversation Analysis (CA) approach. In the first extract the audio-recorded transcript was examined for events of institutional talk and rephrasing of questionnaire questions. We also examined the transcript for missed cues and the impact of closed questions when administrating questionnaires to older people living in care home facilities. We then present an extract where the researcher uses a conversational approach during the administration of the same questionnaire. We conclude that rigid adherence to interview protocols when administering questionnaires to older people who cannot complete these themselves disables the interviewer from interacting and engaging in a meaningful conversation or responding to cues that indicate distress or expressions of grief. The effect of this approach may deny and disacknowledge older persons' emotional experiences and for the older person the interview may not be a therapeutic encounter. Based on our analysis and experiences of conducting this research we support recommendations that a collaborative approach, allowing an interactional exchange between interviewer and respondent, be used when administering questionnaires to older people in care home facilities.

  9. Trials of intranasally administered rubella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hillary, I B

    1971-12-01

    No evidence of vaccine virus transmission was found in two studies where Wistar RA 27/3 rubella vaccine was administered intranasally. Vaccine was immunogenic in all of 23 vaccinated children in one study, while in the other only 5 of the 11 vaccinees developed antibody. The reduced seroconversion rate in the latter study appears to have been caused by one or a combination of factors, including the vaccination technique, the presence of infective nasal conditions in vaccinees and the titre of vaccine used.

  10. [Motivational interviewing in health care].

    PubMed

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Nitzan, Uri

    2011-09-01

    Harmful behaviors and low adherence to medical treatment significantly contribute to an increased rate of hospitalizations, mortality and morbidity. Leading health organizations worldwide are making great efforts to find and develop efficient strategies in order to recruit patients to adhere to medical treatment and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Motivational interviewing is an evidence-based approach that the physician can apply in numerous health care situations in order to increase patients' adherence to treatment. It is a patient-centered approach, based on principles of collaboration, autonomy and evocation. Research indicates that the patient's verbal commitment towards change is directly correlated to future behavioral change. Therefore, the approach includes learnable techniques which assist in allowing the patient to speak about the advantages of behavioral change and treatment. Thus, motivational interviewing helps patients adopt a healthier lifestyle while contributing to the professionalism of physicians and their sense of satisfaction from work. PMID:22026060

  11. Ocular toxicity from systemically administered xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The eye is considered as the most privileged organ because of the blood–ocular barrier that acts as a barrier to systemically administered xenobiotics. However, there has been a significant increase in the number of reports on systemic drug-induced ocular complications. If such complications are left untreated, then it may cause permanent damage to vision. Hence, knowledge of most recent updates on ever-increasing reports of such toxicities has become imperative to develop better therapy while minimizing toxicities. Areas covered The article is mainly divided into anterior and posterior segment manifestations caused by systemically administered drugs. The anterior segment is further elaborated on corneal complications where as the posterior segment is focused on optic nerve, retinal and vitreous complications. Furthermore, this article includes recent updates on acute and chronic ocular predicaments, in addition to discussing various associated symptoms caused by drugs. Expert opinion Direct correlation of ocular toxicities due to systemic drug therapy is evident from current literature. Therefore, it is necessary to have detailed documentation of these complications to improve understanding and predict toxicities. We made an attempt to ensure that the reader is aware of the characteristic ocular complications, the potential for irreversible drug toxicity and indications for cessation. PMID:22803583

  12. Discriminating among diagnostic categories using the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Ellason, Joan Weathersbee

    2005-04-01

    The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule was administered to 1,308 subjects in eight diagnostic categories, including 296 with dissociative identity disorder. The study tested three hypotheses: (1) the Mahalanobis distance between dissociative identity disorder and each of seven other diagnostic categories would be large, (2) the closest diagnostic category to dissociative identity disorder would be dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and (3) nondissociative diagnostic categories would be closer to each other than any one to dissociative identity disorder. All three hypotheses were confirmed by these data. The findings support the conclusion that dissociative identity disorder is a discrete category or taxon.

  13. Experiences of administering and receiving therapeutic touch in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Cox, C; Hayes, J

    1998-10-01

    This article describes the experiences of a practitioner who administered therapeutic touch (TT) to two patients in an intensive care unit and the experiences of the two patients who received TT. The experiences are presented as two case studies. Each of the patients presented in the case studies received either five or ten treatments of TT lasting five minutes each. Following each administration of TT the practitioner described what she sensed verbally and in writing. However, owing to the medical conditions of the patients, only brief interviews were conducted in which the patients were asked to describe their experiences of receiving TT. The experiences, which have been reflected in the case studies, indicate TT assists patients to relax, brings comfort and a sense of peace. Much like meditation, TT helps patients become more in touch with themselves. They come to understand more about themselves and reality. TT is recommended as a practice which could contribute to the psychological well-being of patients in intensive care as it promotes relaxation, comfort and a sense of peace.

  14. Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Tommy; Cook, Matt; Playle, John; Hallett, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses’ perceptions on administering aversion therapy for ‘sexual deviations’ This study aimed to examine the meanings that nurses attached to the ‘treatments’ administered to cure ‘sexual deviation’ (SD) in the UK, 1935–1974. In the UK, homosexuality was considered a classifiable mental illness that could be ‘cured’ until 1992. Nurses were involved in administering painful and distressing treatments. The study is based on oral history interviews with fifteen nurses who had administered treatments to cure individuals of their SD. The interviews were transcribed for historical interpretation. Some nurses believed that their role was to passively follow any orders they had been given. Other nurses limited their culpability concerning administering these treatments by adopting dehumanising and objectifying language and by focussing on administrative tasks, rather than the human beings in need of their care. Meanwhile, some nurses genuinely believed that they were acting beneficently by administering these distinctly unpleasant treatments. It is envisaged that this study might act to reiterate the need for nurses to ensure their interventions have a sound evidence base and that they constantly reflect on the moral and value base of their practice and the influence that science and societal norms can have on changing views of what is considered ‘acceptable practice’. PMID:23876127

  15. Absorption of orally administered amphotericin B lozenges.

    PubMed

    Ching, M S; Raymond, K; Bury, R W; Mashford, M L; Morgan, D J

    1983-07-01

    The systemic absorption of amphotericin B, administered as a 10 mg lozenge, was investigated in 14 patients with malignancies, who received three or four doses daily during chronic administration. The mean plasma amphotericin B concentration, measured 3 h after the morning dose on from 1-20 occasions over a 1-80 day period, ranged among subjects from 46 +/- 13 ng/ml (s.d., n = 20) to 136 +/- 25 ng/ml (n = 19). Using the previously reported intravenous clearance of the drug, the fraction of the dose absorbed was estimated at 8.3-9.9%. This is considerably greater than that estimated from earlier reports (0.2-0.9%), which used much higher oral doses (2-10 g/day). PMID:6882617

  16. The radiation dosimetry of intrathecally administered radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Evans, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation dose to the spine, spinal cord, marrow, and other organs of the body from intrathecal administration of several radiopharmaceuticals was studied. Anatomic models were developed for the spine, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spinal cord, spinal skeleton, cranial skeleton, and cranial CSF. A kinetic model for the transport of CSF was used to determine residence times in the CSF; material leaving the CSF was thereafter assumed to enter the bloodstream and follow the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical as if intravenously administered. The radiation transport codes MCNP and ALGAMP were used to model the electron and photon transport and energy deposition. The dosimetry of Tc-99m DTPA and HSA, In-111 DTPA, I-131 HSA, and Yb-169 DTPA was studied. Radiation dose profiles for the spinal cord and marrow in the spine were developed and average doses to all other organs were estimated, including dose distributions within the bone and marrow.

  17. An interview with Olivier Pourquie.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, James

    2010-02-01

    Olivier Pourquié is the new director of the Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology (IGBMC) in Strasbourg, France, and as of this month takes on another crucially important role in the developmental community - that of Development's new Editor in Chief. Recently, we asked James Briscoe, in his capacity as a director of the Company of Biologists, to interview Olivier and to discover more about his research career and interests and how they will shape the future content and directions of Development.

  18. Dynamics of Forensic Interviews with Suspected Abuse Victims Who Do Not Disclose Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkowitz, Irit; Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.; Sternberg, Kathleen J.; Horowitz, Dvora

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was designed to explore structural differences between forensic interviews in which children made allegations and those in which children did not make allegations. Methodology: Fifty forensic interviews of 4- to 13-year-old suspected victims of abuse who did not disclose abuse during the interview were compared with…

  19. Bifactor and Item Response Theory Analyses of Interviewer Report Scales of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reise, Steven P.; Ventura, Joseph; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Baade, Lyle E.; Gold, James M.; Green, Michael F.; Kern, Robert S.; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Seidman, Larry J.; Bilder, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A psychometric analysis of 2 interview-based measures of cognitive deficits was conducted: the 21-item Clinical Global Impression of Cognition in Schizophrenia (CGI-CogS; Ventura et al., 2008), and the 20-item Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS; Keefe et al., 2006), which were administered on 2 occasions to a sample of people with…

  20. Evaluation of the Brief Problem Checklist: Child and Caregiver Interviews to Measure Clinical Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorpita, Bruce F.; Reise, Steven; Weisz, John R.; Grubbs, Kathleen; Becker, Kimberly D.; Krull, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To support ongoing monitoring of child response during treatment, we sought to develop a brief, easily administered, clinically relevant, and psychometrically sound measure. Method: We first developed child and caregiver forms of a 12-item Brief Problem Checklist (BPC) interview by applying item response theory and factor analysis to…

  1. Training for International Development: A Summary of Faculty and Foreign Student Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, George; And Others

    To determine a basic design for training Colorado State University (CSU) faculty for assignment to international development programs, a written questionnaire and oral interview were administered to faculty with experience in international programs in Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. A subset of 10 selected from each geographical…

  2. Interview with Lisa Shipley. Interviewed by Lisa Parks.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Lisa Shipley is Vice President of Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism at Merck Research Laboratories. She is responsible for preclinical and clinical ADME activities and molecular biomarker assay development activities at all Merck research sites and support of all programs from discovery through to post-product launch. Prior to joining Merck in 2008, Shipley spent over 20 years at Eli Lilly and Company in roles of increasing responsibility, including the positions of executive director at Lean Six Sigma and vice president of Drug Disposition, PK/PD and Trial Simulations. Shipley obtained her undergraduate degree from McDaniel College and her doctoral degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. This interview was conducted by Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  3. A diagnostic interview module for anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence: preliminary evidence of reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Pope, Harrison G; Kean, Joseph; Nash, Adam; Kanayama, Gen; Samuel, Douglas B; Bickel, Warren K; Hudson, James I

    2010-06-01

    The syndrome of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) dependence, though well recognized, remains poorly studied. In this preliminary psychometric study, American and British investigators separately administered a structured diagnostic interview module, based on recently proposed criteria for AAS dependence, to 42 male AAS users in Middlesbrough, England. Another investigator, blinded to the diagnostic interview findings, assessed self-reported symptoms of "muscle-dysmorphia"; effects of AAS on various aspects of functioning; and maximum proportion of annual income spent on AAS. We also assessed demographic measures, history of other substance use, and performance on a hypothetical AAS-purchasing task. The interview module yielded very good interrater reliability (kappa = 0.76 and overall intraclass correlation = 0.79) and strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.77-0.87). Men diagnosed as AAS-dependent, when compared to nondependent men, reported significantly earlier onset of AAS use, longer duration and higher maximum doses of AAS used, more frequent use of other performance-enhancing drugs, and a somewhat larger maximum percentage of income spent on AAS. Dependent users also "bought" more AAS in the hypothetical purchase task, but rated significantly more negatively the effects of AAS on their mental health-findings all suggesting that the diagnosis of AAS dependence shows construct validity. As a group, AAS users showed high preoccupation with muscular appearance, but dependence per se was not significantly associated with this measure-suggesting that the diagnosis of AAS dependence shows some evidence of discriminant validity. Collectively, these findings suggest that AAS dependence may be diagnosed reliably, with preliminary evidence for construct and discriminant validity.

  4. Efficacy of intravenously administered ibandronate in postmenopausal Korean women with insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung Jin; Kim, Beom-Jun; Lim, Kyeong Hye; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Hong Kyu; Kim, Ghi Su; Koh, Jung-Min

    2012-09-01

    We investigated rates of insufficient and over-responsiveness to orally administered bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women, and tested the efficacy of intravenous ibandronate in patients with insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates. Postmenopausal women were treated with either alendronate (70 mg/week; n = 88) or risedronate (35 mg/week; n = 84) for 1 year, and their response to orally administered bisphosphonates was assessed using serum C-telopeptide (CTX) levels. Insufficient responders were changed to once-quarterly intravenous ibandronate 3 mg injection (n = 13) or maintained on orally administered bisphosphonates (n = 19), according to patients' preference, for an additional 1 year. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between two orally administered bisphosphonate groups except the bone mineral density values at the lumbar spine. Insufficient rate was higher in the risedronate group (19.0 %) than in the alendronate group (8.0 %), using the premenopausal serum CTX median as a cut-off (P = 0.043). The over-response rate among the alendronate group (59.1 %) was significantly higher than that in the risedronate group (38.1 %), based on a serum CTX cut-off value of 0.100 ng/ml (P = 0.006). Intravenous ibandronate suppressed serum CTX levels to a significantly greater degree at 7 days after the second dosing (0.191 ± 0.110 ng/mL; P < 0.001) and 3 months after the fourth dosing (0.274 ± 0.159 ng/mL; P = 0.004) among insufficient responders, compared with post-oral/pre-intravenous levels (0.450 ± 0.134 ng/mL). Rates of insufficient and over-responsiveness to orally administered bisphosphonates were considerable, and a change to intravenous bisphosphonates may be considered in patients showing an insufficient response to orally administered bisphosphonates.

  5. A comparison of audio computer-assisted self-interviews to face-to-face interviews of sexual behavior among perinatally HIV-exposed youth.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Curtis; Marhefka, Stephanie L; Santamaria, E Karina; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2012-04-01

    Computer-assisted interview methods are increasingly popular in the assessment of sensitive behaviors (e.g., substance abuse and sexual behaviors). It has been suggested that the effect of social desirability is diminished when answering via computer, as compared to an interviewer-administered face-to-face (FTF) interview, although studies exploring this hypothesis among adolescents are rare and yield inconsistent findings. This study compared two interview modes among a sample of urban, ethnic-minority, perinatally HIV-exposed U.S. youth (baseline = 148 HIV+, 126 HIV-, ages 9-16 years; follow-up = 120 HIV+, 110 HIV-, ages 10-19 years). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a sexual behavior interview via either Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) or FTF interview. The prevalence of several sexual behaviors and participants' reactions to the interviews were compared. Although higher rates of sexual behaviors were typically reported in the ACASI condition, the differences rarely reached statistical significance, even when limited to demographic subgroups--except for gender. Boys were significantly more likely to report several sexual behaviors in the ACASI condition compared to FTF, whereas among girls no significant differences were found between the two conditions. ACASI-assigned youth rated the interview process as easier and more enjoyable than did FTF-assigned youth, and this was fairly consistent across subgroup analyses as well. We conclude that these more positive reactions to the ACASI interview give that methodology a slight advantage, and boys may disclose more sexual behavior when using computer-assisted interviews.

  6. Expertise among professional magicians: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Olli; Pitkänen, Petteri; Juvonen, Antti; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to analyse interviews of highly regarded Finnish magicians. Social network analysis (N = 120) was used to identify Finland's most highly regarded magicians (N = 16). The selected participants' careers in professional magic and various aspects of their professional conduct were examined by relying on semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that cultivation of professional level competence in magic usually requires an extensive period of time compared with other domains of expertise. Magic is a unique performing art and it differs from other professions focusing on deceiving the audience. A distinctive feature of magical expertise is that the process takes place entirely through informal training supported by communities of magical practitioners. Three interrelated aspects of magical activity were distinguished: magic tricks, performance, and audience. Although magic tricks constitute a central aspect of magic activity, the participants did not talk about their tricks extensively; this is in accordance with the secretive nature of magic culture. The interviews revealed that a core aspect of the magicians' activity is performance in front of an audience that repeatedly validates competence cultivated through years of practice. The interviewees reported investing a great deal of effort in planning, orchestrating, and reflecting on their performances. Close interaction with the audience plays an important role in most interviewees' activity. Many participants put a great deal of effort in developing novel magic tricks. It is common to borrow magic effects from fellow magicians and develop novel methods of implementation. Because magic tricks or programs are not copyrighted, many interviewees considered “stealing” an unacceptable and unethical aspect of magical activity. The interviewees highlighted the importance of personality and charisma in the successful pursuit of magic activity. PMID:25566156

  7. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Altman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 crew Commander Scott D. Altman is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, which are all related to maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). After the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the HST, extravehicular activities (EVA) will be focused on several important tasks which include: (1) installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys; (2) installing a cooling system on NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer); (3) repairing the reaction wheel assembly; (4) installing additional solar arrays; (5) augmenting the power control unit; (6) working on the HST's gyros. The reaction wheel assembly task, a late addition to the mission, may necessitate the abandonment of one or more of the other tasks, such as the gyro work.

  8. Impact of Repeated Questioning on Interviewers: Learning From a Forensic Interview Training Project.

    PubMed

    Duron, Jacquelynn F; Cheung, Monit

    2016-01-01

    Forensic interviewers have a difficult job with high risk for career burnout and secondary trauma. Few studies have addressed how new forensic interviewers or trainees experience repeated questioning and multiple interviews. This study simulated the process of training new forensic interviewers through the creation of two interview videos in which social work graduate students participated as actors portraying the roles of interviewer and child. These films served as instructional aids preparing graduate social work students for professional child welfare roles while promoting research-based approaches to interviewing children about sexual abuse allegations. Qualitative data from two cohorts of student actors were collected to analyze interviewers' perspectives on repeated questioning and interviews in child sexual abuse cases. Two themes were extracted from the subjects' experiences: "It is emotionally taxing" and "Navigating the interviewer role is unexpectedly complex." Exposure to repeated questions and multiple interviews affected the performance and confidence of the interviewers. PMID:27266533

  9. Motivational Interviewing and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, C. C.; McMahon, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores commonalities between rehabilitation counseling and the counseling approach known as motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported, clientcentered, directive counseling approach designed to promote client motivation and reduce motivational conflicts and barriers to change. The underpinnings…

  10. Informing Learning through the Clinical Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Madeleine J.; Ben-Hur, Meir

    1991-01-01

    Described is an alternative way for classroom teachers to assess students' performance in mathematics. The interview process is presented in stages: initiating the interview, the questioning stage, formulating and testing hypotheses, and intervention. (KR)

  11. Using Joint Interviews to Add Analytic Value.

    PubMed

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Joint interviewing has been frequently used in health research, and is the subject of a growing methodological literature. We review this literature, and build on it by drawing on a case study of how people make decisions about taking statins. This highlights two ways in which a dyadic approach to joint interviewing can add analytic value compared with individual interviewing. First, the analysis of interaction within joint interviews can help to explicate tacit knowledge and to illuminate the range of often hard-to-access resources that are drawn upon in making decisions. Second, joint interviews mitigate some of the weaknesses of interviewing as a method for studying practices; we offer a cautious defense of the often-tacit assumption that the "naturalness" of joint interviews strengthens their credibility as the basis for analytic inferences. We suggest that joint interviews are a particularly appropriate method for studying complex shared practices such as making health decisions. PMID:25850721

  12. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1201 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota § 147.1201 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Minnesota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and...

  17. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  18. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee to comply with...

  19. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  20. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  1. 47 CFR 97.509 - Administering VE requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Each examination for an amateur operator license must be administered by a team of at least 3 VEs at an... examination. The administering VEs are responsible for the proper conduct and necessary supervision of each examination. The administering VEs must immediately terminate the examination upon failure of the examinee...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  3. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  4. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  5. 40 CFR 147.2351 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia § 147.2351 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for the State of Virginia, including all Indian lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40...

  6. Career Magnets: Interviews with Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heebner, Amy; And Others

    Seventy students and 62 teachers and administrators in New York City career magnet and comprehensive schools were interviewed to learn why the career magnets were successful. A statistical analysis of student outcome data for the interview sites verified they were at least as effective as the typical magnet school. Interviews with students…

  7. The Emotionally Challenging, Open-Ended Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    For most job candidates, the interview experience is "an emotionally challenging endeavor." To succeed in interviews, candidates must understand the emotional labor needed to "manage their feelings" as they "create a publicly observable facial and bodily display." This is particularly true when recruiters use open-ended interviews that are not…

  8. 14 CFR § 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  9. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  10. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  11. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  12. Interviewing Child Victims of Sexual Exploitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, William

    The interviewing of the child victim of sexual exploitation is one of the first and most important steps in solving and prosecuting a case of child exploitation and is the topic of this document. The first chapter discusses the interviewer's role, focusing on improving communication, dealing with emotion, the interviewer's response, male or female…

  13. An Interview with Jose Eustaquio Romao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordao, Clarissa Menezes

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of the European Union (EU) Year of Intercultural Dialogue, 2008, Clarissa Menezes Jordao interviewed Jose Eustaquio Romao, Director of the Paulo Freire Institute in Brazil. Her edited translation of that interview is presented here. In the interview Romao, guided by the legacy of Brazilian educator, Paulo Freire, discusses the…

  14. Telephone Interviewing Practices within Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Debra; Robbins, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the use of telephone interviews within academic libraries by surveying the 112 academic institutional members of the Association of Research Libraries to identify how telephone interviews are utilized. By comparing the literature to the research results, the authors conclude with best practices for telephone interviews.…

  15. Use of Team Interviews in Selecting Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vann, Allan S.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, Elmwood (New York) Public Schools initiated a new procedure for interviewing candidates for all instructional and noninstructional positions: the team interview. This article describes team composition for various positions, team interview procedures, contrasts with former practice, advantages, and disadvantages. Despite time demands,…

  16. The Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5 (AUDADIS-5): procedural validity of substance use disorders modules through clinical re-appraisal in a general population sample

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Greenstein, Eliana; Aivadyan, Christina; Stohl, Malka; Aharonovich, Efrat; Saha, Tulshi; Goldstein, Rise; Nunes, Edward V.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the procedural validity of the substance disorder modules of the lay-administered Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Version (AUDADIS-5) through clinician re-appraisal re-interviews. Methods The study employed a test-retest design among 712 respondents from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III). A clinician-administered, semi-structured interview, the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders, DSM-5 version (PRISM-5) was used as the re-appraisal. Kappa coeffients indicated concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and PRISM-5 for DSM-5 substance use disorder diagnoses, while intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) indicated concordance on dimensional scales indicating the DSM-5 criteria count for each disorder. Results With few exceptions, concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and the PRISM-5 for DSM-5 diagnoses of substance use disorders ranged from fair to good (κ=0.40–0.72). Concordance on dimensional scales was excellent (ICC≥0.75) for the majority of DSM-5 SUD diagnoses, and fair to good (ICC=0.43–0.72) for most of the rest. Conclusions As indicated by concordance with a semi-structured clinician-administered re-appraisal, the procedural validity of the AUDADIS-5 DSM-5 substance use disorder diagnoses found in this study indicates that these AUDADIS-5 diagnoses are useful tools in epidemiologic studies. The considerably stronger concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and PRISM-5 dimensional DSM-5 SUD measures supports a current movement to place more emphasis on dimensional measures of psychopathology, and suggests that such measures may be more informative than binary diagnoses for research, and possibly for clinical purposes as well. PMID:25595052

  17. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  18. Nurses and subordination: a historical study of mental nurses' perceptions on administering aversion therapy for 'sexual deviations'.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Tommy; Cook, Matt; Playle, John; Hallett, Christine

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the meanings that nurses attached to the 'treatments' administered to cure 'sexual deviation' (SD) in the UK, 1935-1974. In the UK, homosexuality was considered a classifiable mental illness that could be 'cured' until 1992. Nurses were involved in administering painful and distressing treatments. The study is based on oral history interviews with fifteen nurses who had administered treatments to cure individuals of their SD. The interviews were transcribed for historical interpretation. Some nurses believed that their role was to passively follow any orders they had been given. Other nurses limited their culpability concerning administering these treatments by adopting dehumanising and objectifying language and by focussing on administrative tasks, rather than the human beings in need of their care. Meanwhile, some nurses genuinely believed that they were acting beneficently by administering these distinctly unpleasant treatments. It is envisaged that this study might act to reiterate the need for nurses to ensure their interventions have a sound evidence base and that they constantly reflect on the moral and value base of their practice and the influence that science and societal norms can have on changing views of what is considered 'acceptable practice'.

  19. Motivational interviewing in adolescent treatment.

    PubMed

    Naar-King, Sylvie

    2011-11-01

    This paper briefly reviews the research literature on motivational interviewing (MI) and behaviour change in adolescents and then discusses the implications of adolescent cognitive and social-emotional developmental processes for the relational and technical components of MI. Research suggests that MI is efficacious in improving substance use in adolescents. Research has been slower to emerge in other behaviours, but available randomized controlled trials suggest that MI has great promise for improving mental and physical health outcomes in this developmental period. The relational and technical components of MI are highly relevant for the adolescent developmental period, and studies have shown that these components are related to outcomes in this population. There are several ways to include MI in clinical interventions for adolescents, ranging from MI in brief settings to using MI as a platform from which all other treatments are offered. Future research is necessary to test the effects of MI in adolescent group settings and the full integration of MI into other adolescent treatment approaches. PMID:22114919

  20. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Linnehan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Richard M. Linnehan is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his lifelong desire to become an astronaut and his career path, which included becoming a zoo veterinarian. He gives details on the Columbia Orbiter mission, which has as its main purpose the maintenance and augmentation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As MS3, his primary role in the mission pertains to EVAs (Extravehicular Activities) 1, 3, and 5. During EVA 1, Linnehan and another crewmember will replace one of two flexible solar arrays on the HST with a smaller, more efficient rigid solar array. The second solar array will be replaced on EVA 2 by other crewmembers. EVA 3 will involve the replacement of the Power Control Unit (PCU), and will require the first complete powering down of HST since its deployment. The possibility of a serious problem occurring is greatest during this portion of the mission because the original PCU was not built to be replaced. In EVA 5, Linnehan and another crewmember will install a replacement cooling system on NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer), which has not been operational. Linnehan discusses his role during the mission as well as that of his crewmates, and provides an abbreviated timeline, including possible contingencies.

  1. The accuracy of a patient or parent-administered bleeding assessment tool administered in a paediatric haematology clinic.

    PubMed

    Lang, A T; Sturm, M S; Koch, T; Walsh, M; Grooms, L P; O'Brien, S H

    2014-11-01

    Classifying and describing bleeding symptoms is essential in the diagnosis and management of patients with mild bleeding disorders (MBDs). There has been increased interest in the use of bleeding assessment tools (BATs) to more objectively quantify the presence and severity of bleeding symptoms. To date, the administration of BATs has been performed almost exclusively by clinicians; the accuracy of a parent-proxy BAT has not been studied. Our objective was to determine the accuracy of a parent-administered BAT by measuring the level of agreement between parent and clinician responses to the Condensed MCMDM-1VWD Bleeding Questionnaire. Our cross-sectional study included children 0-21 years presenting to a haematology clinic for initial evaluation of a suspected MBD or follow-up evaluation of a previously diagnosed MBD. The parent/caregiver completed a modified version of the BAT; the clinician separately completed the BAT through interview. The mean parent-report bleeding score (BS) was 6.09 (range: -2 to 25); the mean clinician report BS was 4.54 (range: -1 to 17). The mean percentage of agreement across all bleeding symptoms was 78% (mean κ = 0.40; Gwet's AC1 = 0.74). Eighty percent of the population had an abnormal BS (defined as ≥2) when rated by parents and 76% had an abnormal score when rated by clinicians (86% agreement, κ = 0.59, Gwet's AC1 = 0.79). While parents tended to over-report bleeding as compared to clinicians, overall, BSs were similar between groups. These results lend support for further study of a modified proxy-report BAT as a clinical and research tool.

  2. Computer-Based Interview for Screening Blood Donors for Risk of HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Locke, S.E.; Kowaloff, H.; Safran, C.; Slack, W.V.; Cotton, D.; Hoff, R.; Popovsky, M.; McGuff, J.; Page, P.

    1990-01-01

    Concern about the safety of the nation's blood supply continues to grow because of the expanding number of HIV-infected persons in the potential donor pool. Furthermore, the proportion of HIV-infected persons who engage in high-risk activities but who test seronegative may be higher than previously recognized. Despite improvements in HIV testing, it is doubtful that such testing alone will ever be adequate to eliminate transfusion-associated AIDS. Blood donation by recently infected persons must be reduced through improved donor screening, including direct questioning of donors about high risk behaviors. We have developed a computer-based interview that queries blood donors about factors that increase the risk of HIV transmission via blood donation. The interview was administered to 64 donors during a scheduled rest period after completing their blood donation. The interview required about nine minutes to complete. Results were analyzed to determine the donor reactions to the interview. Subjects enjoyed taking the interview, thought it was a good method for screening donors, and trusted the confidentiality of the interview. Donors believed they would be more honest with the computer interview than with a human interviewer. If automated blood donor screening helps to discourage donation by high-risk persons the rate of transfusion-associated AIDS will be reduced.

  3. Exploratory Assessments of Child Abuse: Children's Responses to Interviewer's Questions across Multiple Interview Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Tess; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study extends field research on interviews with young children suspected of having been abused by examining multiple assessment interviews designed to be inquisitory and exploratory, rather than formal evidential or forensic interviews. Methods: Sixty-six interviews with 24 children between the ages of 3 and 6 years who were…

  4. Interview with Irving W Wainer.

    PubMed

    Wainer, Irving W

    2013-08-01

    Irving W Wainer, Senior Investigator in the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute on Aging/NIH received his PhD degree in chemistry from Cornell University and did postdoctoral doctoral studies in molecular biology (University of Oregon) and clinical pharmacology (Thomas Jefferson Medical School). He worked for the US FDA and held positions at St Jude's Children's Research Hospital, at McGill University as Professor in the Department of Oncology, and as a Professor of Pharmacology at Georgetown University. Wainer has published over 350 scientific papers, 10 books, 25 book chapters and holds 11 patents. His awards include: 'A.J.P. Martin Medal' presented by the Chromatographic Society; Doctor HonorisCausa awarded by the Medical University of Gdansk (Gdansk, Poland, 2006), Doctor HonorisCausa awarded by the Department of Medicine, University of Liege (Liege, Belgium, 2012), and the 2013 Eastern Analytical Symposium Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Fields of Analytical Chemistry. Wainer's research includes the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of congestive heart failure, cancer, pain and depression, many of which are in the later stages of drug development. His laboratory has also continued the development of cellular membrane affinity chromatography technology, and recent work includes the development of columns containing immobilized forms of the breast cancer resistance protein found in cellular and nuclear membranes and mitochondrial membrane columns. Wainer's laboratory has also continued its study of the effect of disease progression and aging on drug metabolism in critically ill and terminal patients. Interview was conducted by Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  5. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    -99% pure population of leukocytes. Viability was assessed using Trypan blue histological analysis. We successfully isolated and labeled ~25-30 x 10{sup 7} CD34+ lymphocytes in cytokine mobilized progenitor cell apharesis harvests. Cells were also subjected to a stat gram stain to look for bacterial contamination, stat endotoxin LAL to look for endotoxin contamination, flow cytometry for evaluation of the purity of the cells and 14-day sterility culture. Colony forming assays confirm the capacity of these cells to proliferate and function ex-vivo with CFU-GM values of 26 colonies/ 1 x 10{sup 4} cells plated and 97% viability in cytokine augmented methylcellulose at 10-14 days in CO{sub 2} incubation. We developed a closed-processing system for the product labeling prior to infusion to maintain autologous cell integrity and sterility. Release criteria for the labeled product were documented for viability, cell count and differential, and measured radiolabel. We were successful in labeling the cells with up to 500 uCi/10{sup 8} cells, with viability of >98%. However, due to delays in getting the protocol approved by the FDA, the cells were not infused in humans in this location (although we did successfully use CD34+ cells in humans in a study in Australia). The approach developed should permit labeling of progenitor cells that can be administered to human subjects for tracking. The labeling approach should be useful for all progenitor cell types, although this would need to be verified since different cell lines may have differential radiosensitivity.

  6. Who should administer energy efficiency programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen

    2003-08-01

    The restructuring of the U.S. electricity industry created a crisis for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. This paper briefly describes the reasons for the crisis and some of its consequences. Then the paper focuses on issues related to program administration and discusses the relative merits of entities-utilities, state agencies, and non-profit corporations-that might be administrators. Four criteria are developed for choosing among program administration options: Compatibility with public policy goals, effectiveness of the incentive structure, ability to realize economies of scale and scope, and contribution to the development of an energy-efficiency infrastructure. We examine one region, the Pacific Northwest, and three states, New York, Vermont, and Connecticut, which have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved.We observe that no single administrative structure for energy-efficiency programs has yet emerged in the US that is clearly superior to all of the other alternatives. We conclude that this is not likely to happen soon for three reasons. First, policy environments differ significantly among the states. Second, the structure and regulation of the electric utility industry differs among the regions of the US. Third, market transformation and resource acquisition, two program strategies that were once seen as alternatives, are increasingly coming to be seen as complements. Energy-efficiency programs going forward are likely to include elements of both strategies. But, the administrative arrangements that are best suited to support market transformation may be different from the arrangements that are best for resource acquisition.

  7. Assessing the Effectiveness of the NICHD Investigative Interview Protocol when Interviewing French-Speaking Alleged Victims of Child Sexual Abuse in Quebec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Mireille; Lamb, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The study was designed to assess the effectiveness of the flexibly structured NICHD Investigative Interview Protocol for child sexual abuse (CSA) investigative interviews by police officers and mental health workers in Quebec. The NICHD Protocol was designed to operationalize "best practice" guidelines and to help forensic interviewers…

  8. An interview with Karl Steinbrugge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1985-01-01

    He has served on numerous national and international committees on earthquake hazards, and he is now a consulting structural engineer, specializing in earthquake hazard evaluation. At the present moment he is chairman of an independent panel of the Federal Emergency Management Agency that is reviewing the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. Henry Spall recently asked Steinbrugge some questions about his long career. 

  9. Clinical tasks of the dynamic interview.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Perry, J Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We examined psychodynamic interview tasks and techniques to identify clinical actions that improve or impede exploration of subjects' emotional responses, conflicts, defenses, and central relationship themes. This article extends previous quantitative studies (Perry, Fowler, & Greif, unpublished; Perry, Fowler, & Semeniuk, 2005) by examining interview vignettes in 50-minute psychodynamic research interviews. We conducted qualitative analyses on 72 dynamic research interviews given by 26 subjects to delineate categories of tasks and interventions. Results indicated five broad tasks of the dynamic interview: 1) Frame Setting; 2) Offering Support; 3) Exploring Affect; 4) Offering Trial Interpretations; and 5) Providing a Formulation and Feedback of relationship themes and conflicts. We further selected two interviews each from 10 subjects, in which there was a difference of one standard deviation or greater on the Overall Dynamic Interview Adequacy scale (Perry, 1999), and interviewer errors from the Therapeutic Alliance Analogue scale (Perry, Brysk, & Cooper, 1989). We utilized excerpts from these interviews to highlight the importance of these tasks and techniques in deepening discussion of dynamically meaningful material.

  10. Clinical tasks of the dynamic interview.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Perry, J Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We examined psychodynamic interview tasks and techniques to identify clinical actions that improve or impede exploration of subjects' emotional responses, conflicts, defenses, and central relationship themes. This article extends previous quantitative studies (Perry, Fowler, & Greif, unpublished; Perry, Fowler, & Semeniuk, 2005) by examining interview vignettes in 50-minute psychodynamic research interviews. We conducted qualitative analyses on 72 dynamic research interviews given by 26 subjects to delineate categories of tasks and interventions. Results indicated five broad tasks of the dynamic interview: 1) Frame Setting; 2) Offering Support; 3) Exploring Affect; 4) Offering Trial Interpretations; and 5) Providing a Formulation and Feedback of relationship themes and conflicts. We further selected two interviews each from 10 subjects, in which there was a difference of one standard deviation or greater on the Overall Dynamic Interview Adequacy scale (Perry, 1999), and interviewer errors from the Therapeutic Alliance Analogue scale (Perry, Brysk, & Cooper, 1989). We utilized excerpts from these interviews to highlight the importance of these tasks and techniques in deepening discussion of dynamically meaningful material. PMID:16599399

  11. THE BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEW, A METHOD TO EVALUATE ACGME COMPETENCIES IN RESIDENT SELECTION: A PILOT PROJECT

    PubMed Central

    Easdown, L. Jane; Castro, Peter L.; Shinkle, Erin P.; Small, Leah; Algren, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Interviews are a key part of the recruiting process in resident selection. Most programs use an unstructured resume-based interview. In 1999, the ACGME endorsed six competencies including behaviors as well as knowledge. Studies of interviews in the business community which use structured, behavioral interviews show more validity in future job success when essential job related behaviors are required. The premise of the behavioral interview is that past behavior is predictive of future behavior For this reason we introduced in the 2003-2004 recruiting season a behavioral interview to assess four ACGME competencies in the resident candidate- Professionalism, Patient Care, Communication Skills and System Based Practice. Provided in this report is a description of the process used to create the interview questions, the rating system, how it was introduced to candidates and faculty and its acceptance in the recruiting process for anesthesiology residents. PMID:27175425

  12. Skype interviewing: The new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing. PMID:24746247

  13. Diagnosis and Characterization of DSM-5 Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder Using the Clinician-Administered Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder Index.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Kim L; Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Chapman, Alexander L; Tull, Matthew T

    2015-10-01

    Despite the inclusion of nonsuicidal self-injury disorder (NSSID) in the DSM-5, research on NSSID is limited and no studies have examined the full set of DSM-5 NSSID diagnostic criteria. Thus, this study examined the reliability and validity of a new structured diagnostic interview for NSSID (the Clinician-Administered NSSI Disorder Index; CANDI) and provides information on the clinical characteristics and features of DSM-5 NSSID. Data on the interrater reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity of the CANDI and associated characteristics of NSSID were collected in a community sample of young adults (N = 107) with recent recurrent NSSI (≥10 lifetime episodes of NSSI, at least one episode in the past year). Participants completed self-report measures of NSSI characteristics, psychopathology, and emotion dysregulation, as well as diagnostic interviews of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and lifetime mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. The CANDI demonstrated good interrater reliability and adequate internal consistency. Thirty-seven percent of participants met criteria for NSSID. NSSID was associated with greater clinical and diagnostic severity, including greater NSSI versatility, greater emotion dysregulation and psychopathology, and higher rates of BPD, bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, and alcohol dependence. Findings provide support for the reliability, validity, and feasibility of the CANDI.

  14. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  15. An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…

  16. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  17. The employment interview. Avoiding discriminatory questioning.

    PubMed

    Poteet, G W

    1984-04-01

    The potential for legal action against health care institutions for unlawful preemployment interviews has never been greater. This article shows how to avoid discriminatory questions when interviewing job applicants in the health care setting. The author presents guidelines for helping nursing administrators obtain necessary information without violating the basic rights of the potential employee.

  18. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  19. 8 CFR 322.4 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interview. 322.4 Section 322.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS CHILD BORN OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES; REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATE OF CITIZENSHIP § 322.4 Interview. The U.S. citizen parent and...

  20. Interviewing the Interpretive Researcher: An Impressionist Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the use of debriefing interviews for interviewing the interpretive researcher. Further, we demonstrate the value of using debriefing questions as part of a qualitative research study, specifically, one doctoral student's dissertation study. We describe the reflexivity process of the student in her study and the…

  1. Interview with Stella Ting-Toomey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luisa Perez Canado, Maria

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Stella Ting-Toomey, an author of several books and articles on communicative interaction. Ting-Toomey's interview focuses on the factors that play in the relationship between culture and communication. She also talks about the role of conflict in culture, the underlying characteristics of international…

  2. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  3. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  4. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  5. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  6. Interviewing Techniques Used in Selected Organizations Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Marguerite P.

    2008-01-01

    Businesses continue to use the job interview as a final determinant of the applicant's good fit for the company and its culture. Today, many companies are hiring less and/or are taking longer to find just the right person with the right skills for the right job. If an applicant is asked to come for an interview, the general feeling is that the…

  7. 8 CFR 343b.3 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interview. 343b.3 Section 343b.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.3 Interview. When the application presents a prima facie case, USCIS...

  8. 8 CFR 343b.3 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interview. 343b.3 Section 343b.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.3 Interview. When the application presents a prima facie case, USCIS...

  9. 8 CFR 343b.3 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interview. 343b.3 Section 343b.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.3 Interview. When the application presents a prima facie case, USCIS...

  10. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

  11. Interviewing Child Witnesses: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saywitz, Karen; Camparo, Lorinda

    1998-01-01

    Reviews suggestions derived from the clinical and experimental literatures for interviewing child witnesses to abuse. Guidelines for questioning children are provided and phases of a forensic interview are outlined in a step-by-step fashion. The suggestions presented highlight a developmental perspective designed to facilitate children's memory…

  12. An Interview with Dr. Maurizio Andolfi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cron, Elyce A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Maurizio Andolfi, M.D., professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Rome. He currently heads one of the most prestigious centers for training family therapists in Europe. The interview focuses on Andolfi's continuing professional and personal journeys. (GCP)

  13. Interviewing in Twenty-Six Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, John S.

    This booklet outlines an efficient and profitable method of interviewing a candidate for a position in a business firm. The method outlined here depends upon two propositions: (1) Past behavior is the best guide to future performance; and (2) The interviewer is more likely to conduct a search effectively if he has clearly fixed in his mind what it…

  14. 24 CFR 982.51 - PHA authority to administer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false PHA authority to administer program. 982.51 Section 982.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... PHA Plan for Administration of Program § 982.51 PHA authority to administer program. (a) The PHA...

  15. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  16. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  17. 40 CFR 147.150 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.150 Section 147.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  20. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  2. 40 CFR 147.1200 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1200 Section 147.1200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Minnesota §...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1650 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1650 Section 147.1650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York §...

  4. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  5. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  6. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  7. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  8. 7 CFR 634.30 - Appeals in USDA administered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeals in USDA administered projects. 634.30 Section 634.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... RCWP Contracts § 634.30 Appeals in USDA administered projects. The participant in a...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2350 - State-administered program. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.2350 Section 147.2350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Virginia §...

  13. 49 CFR 7.22 - Who administers this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who administers this subpart? 7.22 Section 7.22 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Availability of Reasonably Described Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 7.22 Who administers this subpart? (a) A Chief FOIA Officer is appointed...

  14. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the... Utah. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and..., Ute Mountain Ute, and All Other New Mexico Tribes § 147.3000 EPA-administered program. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1550 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register on June 25, 1984. (1) Water Pollution Control Act, New Jersey Statutes... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New Jersey § 147.1550 State-administered program. The UIC program for all classes of wells in the State of New Jersey,...

  17. Assessing Treatment-Resistant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: The Emory Treatment Resistance Interview for PTSD (E-TRIP)

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Kaye, Joanna L.; Youngner, Cole; Rothbaum, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who fail to respond to established treatments are at risk for chronic disability and distress. Although treatment-resistant PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a common clinical problem, there is currently no standard method for evaluating previous treatment outcomes. Development of a tool that could quantify the degree of resistance to previously provided treatments would inform research in patients with PTSD. We conducted a systematic review of PTSD treatment trials to identify medication and psychotherapy interventions proven to be efficacious for PTSD. We then developed a semi-structured clinician interview called the Emory Treatment Resistance Interview for PTSD (E-TRIP). The E-TRIP includes clinician-administered questions to assess the adequacy and benefit derived from past treatment trials. For each adequately delivered treatment to which the patient failed to respond, a score is assigned depending on the strength of evidence supporting the treatment’s efficacy. The E-TRIP provides a comprehensive assessment of prior PTSD treatments that should prove valuable for researchers studying TR-PTSD and evaluating the efficacy of new treatments for patients with PTSD. The E-TRIP is not intended to guide treatment; rather, the tool quantifies the level of treatment resistance in patients with PTSD in order to standardize TR-PTSD in the research domain. PMID:25494488

  18. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question.

  19. Self-administered acupuncture as an alternative to deliberate self-harm: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Susan; Bell, Diana; Irvine, Fiona; Tranter, Richard

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this mixed methods feasibility study was to demonstrate the acceptability, practicality, and safety of training patients who regularly use deliberate self harm (DSH) to self-administer acupuncture as an alternative coping skill for emotional distress. Ten adult patients with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder who regularly self-harmed were recruited to the study following baseline assessment by a psychiatrist. An acupuncturist taught participants to self-acupuncture. During the 6-week intervention participants recorded their emotional distress, coping behaviors, thoughts, and feelings in a diary. Face-to-face interviews were used to explore participants' motives for DSH and their experience of acupuncture. Framework analysis was conducted on interview transcripts and diary entries to identify common themes. Mood at baseline and six weeks was measured using the BDI and changes in the use of coping behaviors and acupuncture were measured using diary entries. Subjects used acupuncture regularly through the six-week intervention and over this period there was a reduction in the frequency of DSH. Qualitative analysis identified two broad themes relating to the process and the effects of acupuncture. There was wide variation in the effects experienced by subjects which broadly mapped onto to the wide range of motives behind DSH. BDI scores showed a near significant reduction (p = 0.055) from 44.4. to 34.4 over the 6-week intervention. Patients presenting with deliberate self harm can be safely trained to self-administer acupuncture as an alternative coping skill. Acceptability and effectiveness may vary between patients depending on the complex motives underlying their self-harming behavior. While the pilot study was designed to explore the feasibility of the intervention, results from this limited sample suggest that use of self-administered acupuncture may reduce the frequency of self harming behavior and reduce emotional distress as

  20. Consistency across repeated eyewitness interviews: contrasting police detectives' beliefs with actual eyewitness performance.

    PubMed

    Krix, Alana C; Sauerland, Melanie; Lorei, Clemens; Rispens, Imke

    2015-01-01

    In the legal system, inconsistencies in eyewitness accounts are often used to discredit witnesses' credibility. This is at odds with research findings showing that witnesses frequently report reminiscent details (details previously unrecalled) at an accuracy rate that is nearly as high as for consistently recalled information. The present study sought to put the validity of beliefs about recall consistency to a test by directly comparing them with actual memory performance in two recall attempts. All participants watched a film of a staged theft. Subsequently, the memory group (N = 84) provided one statement immediately after the film (either with the Self-Administered Interview or free recall) and one after a one-week delay. The estimation group (N = 81) consisting of experienced police detectives estimated the recall performance of the memory group. The results showed that actual recall performance was consistently underestimated. Also, a sharp decline of memory performance between recall attempts was assumed by the estimation group whereas actual accuracy remained stable. While reminiscent details were almost as accurate as consistent details, they were estimated to be much less accurate than consistent information and as inaccurate as direct contradictions. The police detectives expressed a great concern that reminiscence was the result of suggestive external influences. In conclusion, it seems that experienced police detectives hold many implicit beliefs about recall consistency that do not correspond with actual recall performance. Recommendations for police trainings are provided. These aim at fostering a differentiated view on eyewitness performance and the inclusion of more comprehensive classes on human memory structure.

  1. Interviews with widows following fatal farming incidents.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, A; Brandt, V

    2001-05-01

    Farm families have been identified traditionally with a strong family bond resulting from both living and working together. When a farming fatality occurs, surviving family members are left to deal with not only the tragedy of losing a loved one, but also the loss of a coworker. Although every family experiencing a loss will deal with bereavement issues, farm families are faced with additional challenges that differentiate them from other family situations. A qualitative research methodology was employed to understand the complex mix of challenges facing farm families after the death of a family member. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with farming widows in Kentucky to explore the stresses and challenges related to the farm business, family relationships, and the mental health of the individual members. Becoming the primary decision maker for the farm and household was a difficult role for the widows. Economic issues were an underlying consideration in many aspects of the experiences and changes they encountered. The need to make economic decisions almost immediately while continuing the necessary chores to maintain crops and livestock was very stressful and left little time for bereavement. Often the support from family, friends, and neighbors went beyond emotional comforting to providing help with farm chores and guidance on financial decisions. In developing resources for farm families in similar circumstances, it is important to understand how intertwined their lives are with their environment and the economics of the business. PMID:11465387

  2. Teaching Interview Skills without Full-Fledged Interviewing: An Alternate Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kathryn Sue; Bernum, Belinda A.

    For an instructor who feels the need to teach interviewing skills in the basic course, it is sometimes difficult to fit interviewing into a course that already covers many types of public speaking. An activity is presented that allows instructors to teach interviewing skills in either a one or one-half week time frame (two 50-minute class periods…

  3. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  4. Correlation between administered treatment and patient’s living will

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, B; Goldhirsch, A; Orecchia, R; Venturino, M; Spirito, R; Tadini, L; Corbellini, C; Bertani, E; Veronesi, U

    2009-01-01

    Respecting the wishes of an adequately informed patient should be a priority in any health structure. A patient with advanced or terminal cancer should be allowed to express their will during the most important phases of their illness. Unfortunately, this is seldom the case, and in general instructions regarding an individual’s medical care preferences, i.e., their ‘living will’, expressed when healthy, often change with the onset of a serious illness. At the European Institute of Oncology (IEO), a clinical study is ongoing to verify whether, during clinical practice, the patient is adequately informed to sign an ‘informed consent’, in a fully aware manner, that will allow the patient and doctor to share in the decisions regarding complex treatment strategies (living will). A further aim of the study is to verify if health workers, both in hospital and at home, respect the patient’s will. The observational study ‘Respecting the patient’s wishes: Correlation between administered treatment and that accepted by the patient in their Living Will’ was approved by the IEO Ethical Committee in April 2008. PMID:22276019

  5. STS-96 Crew Interview: Tamara Jernigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Jernigan became an astronaut, the events that led to her interest, and her career path. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Jernigan mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, her scheduled space walk with Daniel T. Barry, plans for the supply and equipment transfers, and a fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS.

  6. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Steven Smith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Brown became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed is Smith's responsibility during any of the planned space walks scheduled for this mission.

  7. The Fitness to stand trial Interview Test: how four professions rate videotaped fitness interviews.

    PubMed

    Roesch, R; Jackson, M A; Sollner, R; Eaves, D; Glackman, W; Webster, C D

    1984-01-01

    The results of this study provide some preliminary support for the use of the FIT as a method for providing structure to interviewers. The FIT may be particularly useful as a guide for making initial decisions about fitness. It was suggested that a screening evaluation based on the FIT could be completed by any properly trained individual with some professional background. The more difficult cases can be referred for lengthier evaluations. Of course, further research on the use of the FIT with actual defendants in real assessments will need to occur before such a procedure can be used as a matter of routine. Finally, the FIT promises to be an effective research tool for isolating professional group differences in definitions of fitness and the importance of different aspects of it, from both a legal and a mental health perspective.

  8. Does the Cognitive Interview Promote the Coherence of Narrative Accounts in Children with and without an Intellectual Disability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentle, Mia; Milne, Rebecca; Powell, Martine B.; Sharman, Stefanie J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether the cognitive interview (CI) procedure enhanced the coherence of narrative accounts provided by children with and without intellectual disabilities (ID), matched on chronological age. Children watched a videotaped magic show; one day later, they were interviewed using the CI or a structured interview (SI). Children interviewed…

  9. Brief report: telephone administration of the autism diagnostic interview--revised: reliability and suitability for use in research.

    PubMed

    Ward-King, Jessica; Cohen, Ira L; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J A

    2010-10-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview--revised is one of the "gold standard" diagnostic tools for autism spectrum disorders. It is traditionally administered face-to-face. Cost and geographical concerns constrain the employment of the ADI-R for large-scale research projects. The telephone interview is a reasonable alternative, but has not yet been examined for reliability with face-to-face administration. In this study, participants were interviewed both face-to-face and on the telephone using the complete ADI-R interview. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the algorithm scores or the diagnoses arrived at for face-to-face and telephone administrations. Reliability statistics across the two modalities were very good and indicate that telephone interviews using the ADI-R are a viable option for researchers.

  10. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  11. People Interview: Engineering beats Pisa's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    INTERVIEW Engineering beats Pisa's problem John Burland has been professor of soil mechanics at Imperial College London for 20 years and is recognized as a distinguished figure in geotechnical engineering. David Smith talks to him about his work.

  12. People Interview: The science behind the 'magic'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    INTERVIEW The science behind the 'magic' Grand Illusions is a website dedicated to science-based phenomena, fun and games, and optical illusions. David Smith speaks to two of its key members—Hendrik Ball and Tim Rowett.

  13. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... endanger the health or safety of the interviewer, or would probably cause serious unrest or disturb the... of audio, video, and film equipment or number of media personnel entering the institution if...

  14. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... endanger the health or safety of the interviewer, or would probably cause serious unrest or disturb the... of audio, video, and film equipment or number of media personnel entering the institution if...

  15. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... endanger the health or safety of the interviewer, or would probably cause serious unrest or disturb the... of audio, video, and film equipment or number of media personnel entering the institution if...

  16. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... endanger the health or safety of the interviewer, or would probably cause serious unrest or disturb the... of audio, video, and film equipment or number of media personnel entering the institution if...

  17. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... endanger the health or safety of the interviewer, or would probably cause serious unrest or disturb the... of audio, video, and film equipment or number of media personnel entering the institution if...

  18. An Interview with Sir Keith Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education: Forward Trends, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The interview with Britain's Secretary of State for Education focuses on special education policies, includng such topics as the role of microelectronics, parent participation, services for integrated students, and curriculum development for children with moderate learning difficultties. (CL)

  19. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  20. A Telephone Interview with Carol Matas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ed

    2002-01-01

    Presents a telephone interview with Carol Matas. Describes how her stories are full of opportunities for the characters to wrestle with themselves and the choices they have to make. Discusses how she has been influenced by the Holocaust. (SG)

  1. Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D. J.; Rivera, J. J.; Mateycik, Fran; Jennings, Sybillyn

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

  2. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Scripting a Virtual Patient

    PubMed Central

    Villaume, William A.; Berger, Bruce A.; Barker, Bradford N.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This article describes a written assignment for a first-year professional communication course to facilitate the understanding and mastery of motivational interviewing in dealing with patient ambivalence and resistance. The goal was to immerse students in how motivational interviewing differs from traditional biomedical counseling with regard to phrasing individual responses to the patient and managing the flow of interaction. Methods Students were required to write a script for a working prototype of the Auburn University Virtual Patient. The script had to specify the text for the virtual patient's comments, 2-5 possible responses for the student pharmacist to choose from, and multiple interactional paths representing motivational interviewing, biomedical counseling, and a mix of the 2. Results Student feedback and test results are reported. Qualitative analysis of written student feedback indicated that (1) the project took too much time because of the complexities of the computer procedures resulting from the Virtual Patient being a prototype, and (2) the computer procedures deflected attention from the critical thinking involved in writing the script. Quantitative item analysis of final examination results indicated that students scored an average one full-letter grade better on the questions about motivational interviewing than on the questions covering other topics. Conclusion The scriptwriting assignment is a challenging exercise in assimilating the verbal skills necessary for using motivational interviewing in patient counseling. Many students exhibited greater interest in motivational interviewing, greater knowledge of why motivational interviewing is successful, greater facility with wording responses, and greater confidence in their ability to use motivational interviewing in the future. Because almost all students had negative reactions to the difficulty and time involved in making their scripts actually work with the virtual patient

  3. An interview with Bruce A. Bolt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1987-01-01

    Professor Bruce Bolt was educated in Australia and first came to the United States in 1960 on a Fulbright Fellowship to the Lamont Geological Observatory of Columbia University. In 1963 he was appointed Director of the Seismographic Stations at the University of California at Berkeley. In June 1988, he steps down as Director but his association will continue as Professor of Seismology. Henry Spall interviewed him again 10 years after a 977 interview published in the Earthquake Information Bulletin. 

  4. Implementing Motivational Interviewing (MI) in a Non-MI World: A MI Knowledge Adoption Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ambrosio, Ryan; Laws, Katherine E.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Hromco, Joe; Kelly, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The Oregon Practice Improvement Collaborative (OPIC) facilitated the implementation of motivational interviewing (MI) in two community-based substance abuse treatment agencies. "The Change Book: A Blueprint for Technology Transfer" was used to structure and support the implementation of motivational interviewing. As part of the implementation…

  5. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 154 - Guidelines for Conducting Prenomination Personal Interviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be structured to insure the interviewee his full rights under the Constitution of the United States... Interviews F Appendix F to Part 154 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE...—Guidelines for Conducting Prenomination Personal Interviews A. Purpose. The purpose of......

  6. Rater Perceptions of Bias Using the Multiple Mini-Interview Format: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alweis, Richard L.; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Donato, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) format appears to mitigate individual rater biases. However, the format itself may introduce structural systematic bias, favoring extroverted personality types. This study aimed to gain a better understanding of these biases from the perspective of the interviewer. Methods: A sample of MMI…

  7. Impression Management in the Psychiatric Interview: Quality, Style, and Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Mark; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The ability of 24 Veterans Administration Day Treatment Center psychiatric outpatients to vary intentionally their degree of apparent psychopathology during structured interviews was studied. Patients defined as sick presenters behaved in a significantly more pathological manner during an interview preceded by "fake sick" instructions than they…

  8. 40 CFR 147.1651 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Indian lands, is administered by EPA. The program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR... Seneca Indian Tribe is June 25, 1984. The effective date for the UIC program for the lands of the...

  9. Findings from Survey Administered to Weatherization Training Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian; Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes results of a survey administered to directors of weatherization training centers that receive funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The survey presents results related to questions on training offered and future plans.

  10. The McGill Illness Narrative Interview - MINI: translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Portuguese.

    PubMed

    Leal, Erotildes Maria; Souza, Alicia Navarro de; Serpa, Octavio Domont de; Oliveira, Iraneide Castro de; Dahl, Catarina Magalhães; Figueiredo, Ana Cristina; Salem, Samantha; Groleau, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the process of translation and cultural adaptation into Portuguese of the McGill Illness Narrative Interview - MINI, an interview protocol that is used to research meanings and modes of narrating illness experiences, tested, in the Brazilian context, for psychiatric and cancer-related problems. Two translations and their respective back-translations were developed. In addition, semantic equivalence was evaluated, a synthesis version and a final version were prepared, and two pre-tests were administered to the target populations (people with auditory verbal hallucinations or breast cancer). A high degree of semantic equivalence was found between the original instrument and the translation/back-translation pairs, and also in the perspective of referential and general meanings. The semantic and operational equivalence of the proposed modifications was confirmed in the pre-tests. Therefore, the first adaptation of an interview protocol that elicits the production of narratives about illness experiences has been provided for the Brazilian context. PMID:27557013

  11. A diagnostic interview for acute stress disorder for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alisa; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Reich, Wendy; Saxe, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a semistructured clinical interview for assessing acute stress disorder (ASD) in youth and test its psychometric properties. Youth (N = 168) with an acute burn or injury were administered the acute stress disorder module of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents (DICA-ASD). The DICA-ASD demonstrated strong psychometric properties, including high internal consistency (alpha = .97) and perfect diagnostic interrater agreement (kappa = 1.00). Participants diagnosed with ASD scored significantly higher than those not diagnosed on validated traumatic stress symptomatology measures but not on other symptomatology measures, providing evidence of convergent and discriminant validity. Preliminary evidence supports the reliability and validity of the first semistructured clinical interview for diagnosing ASD in youth.

  12. Motivational interviewing: experiences of primary care nurses trained in the method.

    PubMed

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Wadensten, Barbro; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    Motivational interviewing is a person-centered counseling style used to promote behavioral change regarding a wide variety of lifestyle problems. Use of motivational interview is growing worldwide and among many different healthcare professions, including primary care nursing. The study aim was to describe motivational interview trained nurses' experiences of motivational interviewing in primary care settings. The study had a qualitative descriptive design. It was carried out in Swedish primary care settings in two county council districts, with 20 primary care nurses trained in motivational interviewing. Half of them used the method in their work, half did not. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The nurses experienced that openness to the approach and an encouraging working climate are required to overcome internal resistance and to increase use of motivational interviewing. They also experienced mutual benefit: motivational interviewing elicits and develops abilities in both nurses and patients. For the nurses using it, motivational interviewing is perceived to facilitate work with patients in need of lifestyle change. Lack of training/education, support, interest and appropriate work tasks/patients are reasons for not using motivational interviewing.

  13. Emotional intelligence and clinical interview performance of dental students.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Annette; Lim, Bee T; Ayers, Kathryn M S

    2009-09-01

    One hundred and sixteen third-year dental students participating in a consultation skills course in Dunedin, New Zealand, completed a standardized psychometric Social Skills Inventory (SSI) and were assessed by tutors, simulated patients, and themselves. Students with higher social skills abilities obtained higher performance scores and demonstrated better interview structure. Patients reported being more likely to return to students for a dental consultation following the second interview, and students' consultation skills were rated (by tutors, patients, and students) higher at the end of the course than the beginning. Female students had higher global social skills abilities and were more emotionally expressive and sensitive than male students, while the latter had better emotional control. Female students performed better in the first interview than male students, but there was no significant gender difference in the second interview. Tutor and simulated patient ratings suggested that a consultation skills course can increase the ability of students in general, and English as a second language students in particular, to relate to their patients, manage anxiety, identify ethical issues, and recognize significant psychosocial issues that lead to more accurate diagnosis and treatment processes, ensuring the effective delivery of patient-centered dental education.

  14. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  15. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  16. STS-99 Crew Interviews: Mamoru Mohri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Mohri became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, his career path, and then finally, his selection by NASDA as an astronaut. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the purpose for the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Specific interest is on the importance of this SRTM flight, the knowledge that we will gain from the 3D topographic map of the Earth, and the reason why this 3D data is being recorded instead of down-linked. The two antennas that will be taking the pictures, the involvement of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), and EARTHCAM, a student-controlled camera on the Endeavour Orbiter, Mohri's responsibility during this 24 hour mission, and his secondary experiments with high definition TV cameras are also discussed.

  17. STS-97 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Bloomfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is shown. The interview addresses many different questions including why Bloomfield became interested in the space program, the events and people that influence him and ultimately led to his interest, and his vigorous training in the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-97 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), and its delivery of the first set of U.S.-provided solar arrays, batteries, and radiators. Bloomfield briefly discusses his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as during the scheduled space-walks.

  18. STS-96 Crew Interview: Dan Barry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Barry became an astronaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Barry mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, his scheduled space walk with Tamara E. Jernigan, plans for the supply and equipment transfers, and his responsibility during this transfer. A fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS, and the deployment of the Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment (STARSHINE) are also discussed.

  19. STS-96 Crew Interview: Ellen Ochoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Ochoa became an astronaut, the events that led to her interest, and her career path through research and engineering. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Ochoa mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, her role during the scheduled space walk with Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry, and plans for the supply and equipment transfers. Ochoa also discusses her involvement in a Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA) experiment to remove contaminants from the water, the undocking of the spacecraft from the ISS, and a fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS.

  20. Motivational Interviewing and Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Stéphanie; Menon, Usha; Szalacha, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article focuses on design, training, and delivery of MI in a longitudinal randomized controlled trial intended to assess the efficacy of two separate interventions designed to increase colorectal screening when compared to a usual care, control group. One intervention was a single-session, telephone-based motivational interview (MI), created to increase colorectal cancer screening within primary care populations. The other was tailored health counseling. We present the rationale, design, and process discussions of the one-time motivational interview telephone intervention. We discuss in this paper the training and supervision of study interventionists, in order to enhance practice and research knowledge concerned with fidelity issues in motivational interview interventions. Methods To improve motivational interview proficiency and effectiveness, we developed a prescribed training program adapting MI to a telephone counseling session. Results The four interventionists trained in MI demonstrate some MI proficiency assessed by the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale. In the post-intervention interview, 20.5% of the MI participants reported having had a CRC screening test, and another 19.75% (n = 16) had scheduled a screening test. Almost half of the participants (43%) indicated that the phone conversation helped them to overcome the reasons why they had not had a screening test. Conclusions Ongoing supervision and training (post MI workshop) are crucial to supporting MI fidelity. The trajectory of learning MI demonstrated by the interventionists is consistent with the eight stages of learning MI. The MI roadmap created for the interventionists has shown to be more of a distraction than a facilitator in the delivery of the telephone intervention. MI can, however, be considered a useful tool for health education and warrants further study. Practice Implications MI training should include consistent training and process evaluation. MI can

  1. Pioneer profiles: An interview with Don Baer

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    This is an interview with Donald M. Baer. The interview includes discussion of his education at the University of Chicago, his work at the University of Washington and the University of Kansas, events that influenced his career, and his perspectives on various issues. His accomplishments include developing the standards for the practice of applied behavior analysis, creating an empirical research base for language training for people with severe disabilities, initiating procedures that led to generalized imitation, formulating experimental designs for applied behavioral research, and devising procedures for generalization and maintenance of behavior. PMID:22478382

  2. [Uses and disturbing effect of videodocumentation of diagnostic interviews].

    PubMed

    Neuser, J

    1984-11-01

    Videorecording of diagnostic interviews is reviewed with respect to its effects upon patient behaviour. If this behaviour is to be a model of the behaviour outside the diagnostic situation, videorecording should not essentially alter behaviour. It can be derived from psychological findings that due to the patient's necessary consent to videorecording, but also by the recording situation itself, patient behaviour is modified. The advantage of audiovision compared to audiorecording to reach a more objective judgement is limited by the very few possibilities of evaluation of nonverbal behaviour. Empirical studies comparing the relative effects of video- and audiorecording have shown that videorecording has more disturbing effects on patients. If these disturbances do have differential effects at certain problems and personality structures of patients using the artifacts of videorecording should be a possibility for the efficient employment of videorecording diagnostic interviews.

  3. Enterprise Data Analysis and Visualization: An Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Kandel, S; Paepcke, A; Hellerstein, J M; Heer, J

    2012-12-01

    Organizations rely on data analysts to model customer engagement, streamline operations, improve production, inform business decisions, and combat fraud. Though numerous analysis and visualization tools have been built to improve the scale and efficiency at which analysts can work, there has been little research on how analysis takes place within the social and organizational context of companies. To better understand the enterprise analysts' ecosystem, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 35 data analysts from 25 organizations across a variety of sectors, including healthcare, retail, marketing and finance. Based on our interview data, we characterize the process of industrial data analysis and document how organizational features of an enterprise impact it. We describe recurring pain points, outstanding challenges, and barriers to adoption for visual analytic tools. Finally, we discuss design implications and opportunities for visual analysis research. PMID:26357201

  4. Determinants of nurses' intention to administer opioids for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H E; Nash, R E; Najman, J M; Yates, P M; Fentiman, B J; Dewar, A; Walsh, A M; McDowell, J K; Skerman, H M

    2001-09-01

    A statewide cross-sectional survey was conducted in Australia to identify the determinants of registered nurses' intention to administer opioids to patients with pain. Attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control, the key determinants of the Theory of Planned Behavior, were found to independently predict nurses' intention to administer opioids to these patients. Perceived control was the strongest predictor. Nurses reported positive overall attitudes towards opioids and their use in pain management. However, many negative attitudes were identified; for example, administering the least amount of opioid and encouraging patients to have non-opioids rather than opioids for pain relief. The findings related to specific attitudes and normative pressures provide insight into registered nurses' management of pain for hospitalized patients and the direction for educational interventions to improve registered nurses' administration of opioids for pain management.

  5. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  6. How Do 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Students' Categories of Cognitive Reflections in Interviews on Derivational Morphology Compare to Their Upper Level Spelling Inventory Orthographic Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Darcie D.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-seven 4th, 5th and 6th grade students were administered the "Derivational Relatedness Interview" (DRI) (Templeton, Smith, Moloney, Van Pelt, & Ives, 2009). The purpose of this instrument is to explore students' understanding of derivational morphology. During the same week, the subjects were also administered an Upper…

  7. Sources of motivation and frustration among healthcare workers administering antiretroviral treatment for HIV in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, C.; Scott, K.; Madenhire, C.; Nyamukapa, C.; Gregson, S.

    2012-01-01

    The roll-out of accessible and affordable antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for people living with HIV in low-income countries is drastically changing the nature of HIV-related healthcare. The Zimbabwean Ministry of Health has renewed efforts to make antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV free and publically available across the country. This paper describes the findings from a multi-method qualitative study including interviews and a focus group with healthcare workers (mostly nurses), totalling 25 participants, and field notes from over 100 hours of ethnographic observation in three rural Zimbabwean health centres. These health centres began providing free ARV drugs to HIV-positive people over one year prior to the research period. We examined sources of motivation and frustration among nurses administering ART in these resource-poor health centres. The findings suggest that healthcare workers administering ART in challenging circumstances are adept at drawing strength from the dramatic physical and emotional recoveries made possible by ART and from their personal memories of the suffering caused by HIV/AIDS among close friends or family. However, healthcare staff grappled with extreme resource shortages, which led to exhaustion and frustration. Surprisingly, only one year into ART provision, healthcare workers did not reference the professional challenges of their HIV work before ART became available, suggesting that medical breakthroughs such as ART rapidly come to be seen as a standard element of nursing. Our findings provide a basis for optimism that medical breakthroughs such as ART can reinvigorate healthcare workers in the short term. However, we caution that the daily challenges of nursing in poor environments, especially administering an ongoing and resource-intensive regime such as ART, must be addressed to enable nurses to continue delivering high-quality ART in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21400319

  8. Systemic Effects of Vaginally Administered Estrogen Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Megan; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Richter, Holly E.; Snyder, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone Therapy (HT) was considered the standard of care prior to the publication of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). After the study was published, the use of systemic HT dramatically decreased resulting in an increased incidence of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and dyspareunia experienced by women. Use of vaginal estrogen offers women a unique alternative for relief of these symptoms. This article reviews the systemic effects of vaginally administered estrogen. Effects on serum hormone levels, vasomotor symptoms, lipid profiles and use in women with breast cancer are reviewed. An accompanying review examines the local effects of vaginally administered estrogen. PMID:22453284

  9. Developing Employment Interview and Interviewing Skills in Small-group Project Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindle, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the value of communications skills in geographical education. Describes the use of realistic interviews that were a part of small-group project work. Explains that students wrote job specifications, a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and conducted interview panels. (CMK)

  10. Teacher Interviews, Student Interviews, and Classroom Observations in Combinatorics: Four Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caddle, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This research consists of teacher interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations, all based around the mathematical content area of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a part of discrete mathematics concerning the ordering and grouping of distinct elements. The data are used in four separate analyses. The first provides evidence that…

  11. Hearing as Touch in a Multilingual Film Interview: The Interviewer's Linguistic Incompetence as Aesthetic Key Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimberger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the author's embodied experience of linguistic incompetence in the context of an interview-based, short, promotional film production about people's personal connections to their spoken languages in Glasgow, Scotland/UK. The article highlights that people's right to their spoken languages during film interviews and the…

  12. Characteristic Interviews, Different Strategies: Methodological Challenges in Qualitative Interviewing among Respondents with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten

    2014-01-01

    Conducting qualitative research interviews among individuals with intellectual disabilities, including cognitive limitations and difficulties in communication, presents particular research challenges. One question is whether the difficulties that informants encounter affect interviews to such an extent that the validity of the results is weakened.…

  13. Empowering Interviews: Narrative Interviews in the Study of Information Literacy in Everyday Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckerdal, Johanna Rivano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents a way to design and conduct interviews, within a sociocultural perspective, for studying information literacy practices in everyday life. Methods: A framework was developed combining a socio-cultural perspective with a narrative interview was developed. Interviewees were invited to participate by talking and using…

  14. Securing Trustworthy Data from an Interview Situation with Young Children: Six Integrated Interview Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Debra D.

    2001-01-01

    Explores how six integrated interview strategies provoke and influence expression of children's thinking about a pen pal project with preservice teachers. Describes the interdependence of the strategies and emphasizes the match between researchers' desire for valid data and children's need for developmentally appropriate interview strategies.…

  15. Excessive Interviews: Listening to Maternal Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willink, Kate

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author revisits an interview with Ava Montalvo--a mother of two living in Albuquerque, New Mexico--which initially confounded her interpretive resources. This reflexive, performative article examines the role of excess as an analytical lens through which to understand maternal subjectivity and elaborates the methodological…

  16. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  17. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  18. John A. Scigliano Interviews Allan B. Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, John A.

    2000-01-01

    This interview with Allan Ellis focuses on a history of computer applications in education. Highlights include work at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; the New England Education Data System; and efforts to create a computer-based distance learning and development program called ISVD (Information System for Vocational Decisions). (LRW)

  19. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  20. Virtual Ethnography: Interactive Interviewing Online as Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crichton, Susan; Kinash, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    Recognizing the power of the Internet to connect people, regardless of place or time, we explore the notion of a virtual form of ethnography, suggesting online, textual interactive interviews are worthy of research consideration. This paper reports on three research projects, drawing examples from almost ten years in the evolution of Internet…

  1. Interviews with Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Maria; Nasman, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how research practices may simultaneously follow principles of children's citizenship rights to participation and principles of protection and support when children exposed to violence are informants. The article focuses upon organisation of interview processes and interactions between adult researchers and child…

  2. Pewter Embossing: An Interview with Elitia Hart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with a South African artist, Elitia Hart, who uses the technique called pewter embossing. Focuses on her background, why she began using the pewter technique, the history of this technique, and teaching. Includes a project about how to create a decorated bottle. (CMK)

  3. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  4. Motivational interviewing in the health care setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol use disorders are related to many negative health, emotional, societal, and economic consequences. These disorders are often difficult to treat because individuals suffering from them tend to be ambivalent about and resistant to change. Motivational interviewing (MI) provides healthcare prov...

  5. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  6. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  7. Another Perspective: An Interview with David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ruth A.; Johnson, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    To provide another perspective on evaluation within nonformal settings, "New Directions for Evaluation" recently interviewed David Smith, the coordinator of the Professional Learning to Close the Achievement Gap program for the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, who has extensive background in education and educational research. He formerly held…

  8. An Interview with Dr. Deborah W. Proctor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2007-01-01

    In an interview, Dr. Deborah W. Proctor, eCurriculum Director for Academic Innovations/ Minnesota Online and Co-Chair for the MERLOT International Conference, outlines her academic path that led to her current position and interests. As e-Curriculum Director for Academic Innovations in the Office of the Chancellor she works with system…

  9. Bertrand Russell Speaks: The BBC Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Woodrow

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts from 13 interviews with Bertrand Russell conducted for British television in 1959. The discussion covers the nature and purpose of philosophy, religion, war and pacifism, communism and capitalism, ethics and morality, personal and economic power, happiness, nationalism, individualism, fanaticism, and tolerance. (AM)

  10. Author Profile: An Interview with Rosemary Wells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marantz, Sylvia; Marantz, Ken

    1999-01-01

    This interview with author and illustrator Rosemary Wells focuses on her picture books for children. Topics include reading aloud, saving and retelling the classics, influences on her work, page-design preferences, emotional content, the development process, working with other illustrators, and material from other cultures. (LRW)

  11. Survey Interviews for Interactive Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, George; Gregory, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A survey-interview exercise is described as it evolved through English-as-a-second-language students' efforts to develop better spoken language skills. The exercise provided students with experience in using spoken English in interaction, learning first-hand about local ideas and attitudes, and reflecting on and discussing the experience in the…

  12. Dimensions of Satisfaction in the Supervision Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Elizabeth L.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    While supervisory research focuses on trainee performance in counseling situations as the primary outcome criterion, few instruments have been developed for evaluating behavior in the supervision interview. To develop a scale that reflects critical factors in the supervisory relationship, the Supervisor Personal Reaction Scale (SPRS) and the…

  13. An Interview with an Occupational Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Sharon Crane is a pediatric occupational therapist with over 20 years of experience working with children and families. "Zero to Three" interviews her to discuss how occupational therapy may move beyond a strictly therapeutic orientation toward services that address wellness and prevention. Crane has created programs for parents and…

  14. An Interview with G. N. Getman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Therapy, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The interview with G. N. Getman, a developmental optometrist specializing in learning problems and disabilities, focuses on vision's impact on learning, the role of the vision specialist in the remediation of learning problems and disabilities, early screening programs, and visual training programs. (DLS)

  15. The Black Scholar Interviews: Alex Haley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Robert L.

    1976-01-01

    A native of Henning, Tennessee, Alex Haley taught himself to write during a twenty year career in the U.S. Coast Guard. After retiring from that service, in 1959, he became a magazine writer and interviewer, and has spent 12 years researching and writing "Roots" (Doubleday, 1976), the epic drama of his family from the abduction of his ancestor…

  16. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Public Affairs, or his/her designee, are authorized to speak for the Agency in an official capacity..., provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and the... may be made by NASA with consent of the interviewee. (h) NASA employees are not required to speak...

  17. Israel Scheffler Interviewed by Harvey Siegel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this interview with Harvey Siegel, Israel Scheffler reflects on his career in philosophy of education. Beginning with his unusual entry into the field, he discusses the connections between his own early projects and that of R. S. Peters and Paul Hirst to make philosophy a central part of teacher education programmes, and articulates his view of…

  18. The Use of Paraphrasing in Investigative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Angela D.; Roberts, Kim P.; Price, Heather L.; Stefek, Candyce P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Young children's descriptions of maltreatment are often sparse thus creating the need for techniques that elicit lengthier accounts. One technique that can be used by interviewers in an attempt to increase children's reports is "paraphrasing," or repeating information children have disclosed. Although we currently have a general…

  19. Motivational Interviewing and the Social Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the article by Miller and Rose (September 2009). As Miller and Rose opened "the black box of treatment to examine linkages between processes of delivery and client outcomes" (p. 529) in motivational interviewing (MI), it is important that their model include factors from the social context that may explain conditions that enhance or…

  20. Assessment Measures: The Reflective Judgment Interview (RJI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews King and Kitchener's "Reflective Judgment Interview" ("RJI"). On the "RJI" website Patricia King notes that a widely espoused outcome of college is the ability to draw reasonable conclusions about complex issues based on incomplete and/or conflicting information. Drawing on the works of Dewey, Piaget, and Perry,…

  1. What Can Motivational Interviewing Do for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a promising 25-year-old therapeutic approach that integrates relationship-building principles and more directive strategies to move clients toward behavioral change. A large and expanding number of controlled research studies of MI have demonstrated its efficacy for addictive behaviors ranging from use of alcohol,…

  2. Communication Theory's Role in the Reference Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glogoff, Stuart

    1983-01-01

    Notes the applicability of communication science theory to the reference process, particularly in areas involving human behavior, and discusses the roles of both verbal and nonverbal communication (body language, paralanguage, proxemics, and environmental factors) in the reference interview. Forty-one references are provided. (EJS)

  3. Complete Interview Procedures for Hiring School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon Jr, William L.

    2003-01-01

    Most school districts do not have a full time human resources administrator to conduct interviews and this important task most often becomes the responsibility of the building principal or a department head. Here is a guide designed for hiring employees, both professional staff as well as non-professional, in public, parochial, or private schools.…

  4. Philosophy, Rhetoric, Literacy Criticism: (Inter)views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A., Ed.

    In addition to a foreword by Clifford Geertz and an introduction by Patricia Bizzell, this book features 12 essays by rhetoric and composition scholars responding to interviews with prominent scholars outside the discipline. The commentaries in the book entertain a range of topics, including language, rhetoric, philosophy, feminism and literary…

  5. Analyzing Storytelling in TESOL Interview Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Gabriele; Prior, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographic research interviews have become an accepted and valued method of qualitative inquiry in TESOL and applied linguistics more broadly. In recent discussions surrounding the epistemological treatment of autobiographic stories, TESOL researchers have increasingly called for more attention to the ways in which stories are embedded in…

  6. Dropout Interviews: Summer, 1982, Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    In the summer of 1982, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) conducted a survey of dropouts. Dropouts are defined in this study as students who withdrew from AISD schools prior to receiving their high school diploma and are not known to have attended other schools. The dropouts were interviewed to…

  7. Phyllis R. Silverman: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Phyllis Silverman, who developed concept of Widow-to-Widow Program and directed research project that first demonstrated its effectiveness. Silverman discusses her views on grief, the Widow-to-Widow program, peer support, gender differences in peer support for bereavement, and the Child Bereavement Study. (NB)

  8. Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The widely disseminated clinical method of motivational interviewing (MI) arose through a convergence of science and practice. Beyond a large base of clinical trials, advances have been made toward "looking under the hood" of MI to understand the underlying mechanisms by which it affects behavior change. Such specification of outcome-relevant…

  9. People Interview: Continuing Einstein's great work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    INTERVIEW Continuing Einstein's great work Dr Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist, bestselling author and popularizer of science. He is the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory) and continues Einstein's search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory. David Smith speaks to him about inspiration and education.

  10. Interviewing in Educational Research: A Bibliographic Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Felix T.

    Different types of interviews serve different purposes; however, they all share a common goal of collecting data in different situations. The data may be factual in generating quantitative input for a research project, attitudinal in gauging public acceptance of a proposed educational policy, or used in gaining a better understanding of a certain…

  11. Thinking Visually: An Interview with Scott Bennett.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Scott Bennett, an artist of abstract art and traditional craft. Focuses on issues such as the role of art in his life, how his art has developed over time, and his process of creating his works of art. Includes directions for a glazing project. (CMK)

  12. Your Biggest Game: Interview with Dave Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Interviews Dave Ellis, president of the Brande Foundation, who promotes life coaching to help leaders become more creative and effective by making them happier, more satisfied human beings. It provides an opportunity for people to look at all areas of their lives, determine what they want in these areas, and have the coach help them develop…

  13. Conversational Style in Language Proficiency Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Compares conversational styles of intermediate and advanced learners of English as a Second Language in language proficiency interviews. The article describes differences in amount of talk and rate of speaking, extent of context dependence and ability to construct and sustain narratives, but not in frequency of initiation of new topics nor…

  14. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  15. Campus Interviews: Some Challenges to Conventional Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBell, Camille; Dinger, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    Examined the questions that 33 corporate recruiters asked during 128 campus screening interviews. Analyses revealed that most questions addressed college experience, work experience, strengths and weaknesses, and biographical background. Significant relationships were found among type of company, gender of recruiter, and type of question. Results…

  16. The art of interviewing your next CEO.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David W; Thompson, Nancie Noie

    2003-02-01

    If conducted properly, an interview is a highly effective tool for evaluating managers at any level of an organization. Broad, general questions, gently put, elicit sincere behavior from others, allowing them the freedom to respond as they wish. Their responses tell us what they typically focus on. Moreover, the interviewee is inclined to find us "safe" to talk to. This reduces their fear or discomfort, which should be any interviewer's goal. Probing often elicits the most spontaneous, hence truest, behavior revealing who this person is and how he or she will respond in a particular position or situation. Good probes, which should be used frequently in any conversation, also convey the message that we care about the interviewee and his or her views. Interviewing means focusing on others. It should be an integral part of the board's repertoire of skills. It is also an integral part of being a good manager. Few people are emotionally capable of implementing the principles described here. It is incumbent on the board, therefore, to select those members who can conduct in-depth interviews for a new CEO.

  17. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  18. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  19. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  20. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  1. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  2. A Mobile Platform for Administering Questionnaires and Synchronizing Their Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginardi, Maria Germana; Lanzola, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a platform for administering questionnaires on smart-phones and tablets. The project arises from the need of acquiring data for monitoring the outcomes of different homecare interventions. First a model has been defined for representing questionnaires, able to support adaptivity in the dialog with the user and enforce some…

  3. 40 CFR 282.88 - Pennsylvania State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Bureau of Land Recycling and Waste Management, Storage Tank Program, Rachel Carson State Office Building... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.88 Pennsylvania State-Administered Program. (a) The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's underground storage...

  4. 40 CFR 147.2300 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Underground Water Source Protection Program Pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act and 40 CFR 145... was approved by the Director of the Federal Register July 6, 1984. (1) Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10... are part of the approved State-administered program: (1) Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10, sections 1251...

  5. 40 CFR 147.2300 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Underground Water Source Protection Program Pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act and 40 CFR 145... was approved by the Director of the Federal Register July 6, 1984. (1) Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10... are part of the approved State-administered program: (1) Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10, sections 1251...

  6. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Minnesota obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minnesota State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73...

  7. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Minnesota obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minnesota State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73...

  8. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Minnesota obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minnesota State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73...

  9. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  10. 40 CFR 282.78 - Nevada State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Nevada obtains approval for the revised... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The state's program, as administered by the Nevada... of Subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and...

  11. 40 CFR 282.78 - Nevada State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Nevada obtains approval for the revised... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The state's program, as administered by the Nevada... of Subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and...

  12. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  13. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  14. 40 CFR 282.78 - Nevada State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Nevada obtains approval for the revised... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The state's program, as administered by the Nevada... of Subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and...

  15. 40 CFR 282.78 - Nevada State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Nevada obtains approval for the revised... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The state's program, as administered by the Nevada... of Subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and...

  16. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  17. 40 CFR 282.66 - Kansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Kansas obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as administered by the Kansas... subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory...

  18. 40 CFR 282.78 - Nevada State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Nevada obtains approval for the revised... 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The state's program, as administered by the Nevada... of Subtitle I of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and...

  19. Microcomputer-Administered Research: What it Means for Educational Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig W.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the microcomputer offers advantages for behavioral science and educational research. Among the potentials of microcomputer use are enhanced capacities for precise replication and extension, measurement, and experimental control and randomization, and the relative economy that microcomputer-administered experimental treatments…

  20. 40 CFR 282.94 - Utah State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Utah obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Utah State-Administered Program. 282.94 Section 282.94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID...

  1. 40 CFR 282.61 - Hawaii State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Hawaii obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii State-Administered Program. 282.61 Section 282.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID...

  2. 40 CFR 282.61 - Hawaii State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Hawaii obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hawaii State-Administered Program. 282.61 Section 282.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1100 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 147.1100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS..., except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Massachusetts Department of... Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on August 18,...

  4. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...

  5. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...

  6. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...

  7. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...

  8. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U... Pollution Control and Ecology, 8001 National Drive, Little Rock, AR 72219-8913. (1) State statutes...

  9. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  10. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  11. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  12. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  13. 24 CFR 511.51 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM State Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true State-administered program. 511.51 Section 511.51 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  14. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  15. 40 CFR 282.96 - Virginia State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Virginia State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.96...

  16. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the.... The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which..., except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted the Navajo Nation primacy......

  17. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the.... The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which..., except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted the Navajo Nation primacy......

  18. 40 CFR 147.3000 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. (The term “Indian lands” is defined at 40 CFR 144.3.) The Navajo Indian lands are in the.... The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which..., except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted the Navajo Nation primacy......

  19. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any..., including those on Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted... administered by EPA. The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian......

  20. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any..., including those on Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted... administered by EPA. The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian......

  1. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any..., including those on Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted... administered by EPA. The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian......

  2. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any..., including those on Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian lands for which EPA has granted... administered by EPA. The UIC program for Navajo Indian lands, except for Class II wells on Navajo Indian......

  3. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  4. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  5. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  6. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  7. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority to administer oaths. 637.11 Section 637.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1450 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be... of Nevada, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Nevada Division of... Protection Agency, Region IX, 215 Fremont Street, San Francisco, California 99105, or at the...

  9. Teaching Auction Strategy Using Experiments Administered Via the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asker, John; Grosskopf, Brit; McKinney, C. Nicholas; Niederle, Muriel; Roth, Alvin E.; Weizsacker, Georg

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an experimental design used to teach concepts in the economics of auctions and implications for e-Business procurement. The experiment is easily administered and can be adapted to many different treatments. The chief innovation is that it does not require the use of a lab or class time. Instead, the design can be implemented on…

  10. 40 CFR 147.1300 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program. 147.1300...) Opinion Letter No. 63 and attached Memorandum Opinion, signed by Attorney General of Missouri, March 16, 1982; (2) Addendum to Opinion Letter No. 63 (1982), signed by Attorney General of Missouri, October...

  11. Evaluation of coagulation via thromboelastography in healthy horses administered dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Jenna; Wagg, Catherine R.; Boysen, Søren R.; Leguillette, Renaud; Mizen, Kyle; Roy, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone was administered to healthy horses daily for 7 days. Blood samples were collected at 3 time points from both treatment and non-treatment groups, and analyzed via thromboelastography (TEG). There were no significant differences in TEG parameters between treated and untreated horses, or within treatment groups over time. PMID:26677262

  12. 8 CFR 337.8 - Oath administered by the courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... naturalization not subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of 8 CFR 310.2(d) must notify USCIS at the time of the... from the list of eligible persons as provided in 8 CFR 335.5 and the court will not administer the oath... naturalization not subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of 8 CFR 310.3(d) who has elected to have......

  13. 40 CFR 147.950 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Drilling Mud and Salt Water Generated from Drilling and Production of Oil and Gas Wells..., 1985 and January 20, 1986; (3)(i) Statewide Order Governing the Drilling for and Producing of Oil and... State-administered program. The UIC program for Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells in the State...

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Disorder in Oxaliplatin-administered Rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Taste disorder is one of the adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy resulting in a loss of appetite, leading to malnutrition and a decrease in the quality of life of the patient. Oxaliplatin, a platinum anticancer drug, has a critical role in colon cancer chemotherapy and is known to induce taste disorder. Here, we evaluated the taste functions in oxaliplatin-administered rats. Among the taste receptors, expression levels of T1R2, one of the sweet receptor subunits, increased in the circumvallate papillae of the oxaliplatin-administered rats. In a brief-access test, i.e., behavioral analysis of the taste response, oxaliplatin-administered rats showed a decreased response to sweet taste. However, we did not detect any differences in the plasma levels of zinc, number of taste cells, or morphology of taste buds between control and oxaliplatin-administered rats. In conclusion, the decreased response to sweet taste by oxaliplatin administration may be due to the upregulation of T1R2 expression. PMID:27374965

  15. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona § 147.151 EPA... the Navajo Nation primacy for the SDWA Class II UIC program (as defined in § 147.3400), is... for which EPA has granted the Navajo Nation primacy for the SDWA Class II UIC program, consists of...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...-administered program: (1) N.C. ADMIN. CODE, Title 15, r. 02L.0100 et seq. Groundwater Classification...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...-administered program: (1) N.C. ADMIN. CODE, Title 15, r. 02L.0100 et seq. Groundwater Classification...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1700 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...-administered program: (1) N.C. ADMIN. CODE, Title 15, r. 02L.0100 et seq. Groundwater Classification...

  19. 40 CFR 147.2500 - State-administered program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the OFR in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... Disposal of Liquid Industrial Wastes and By-Products, Wisconsin Administrative Code §§ 214.03 and 214.08... State-administered program: (1) Chapter 144, Water, Sewage, Refuse, Mining and Air Pollution,...

  20. Systemically Administered, Target Organ-Specific Therapies for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and other agents that could potentially enhance tissue regeneration have been identified, but their therapeutic value in clinical medicine has been limited for reasons such as difficulty to maintain bioactivity of locally applied therapeutics in the protease-rich environment of regenerating tissues. Although human diseases are treated with systemically administered drugs in general, all current efforts aimed at enhancing tissue repair with biological drugs have been based on their local application. The systemic administration of growth factors has been ruled out due to concerns about their safety. These concerns are warranted. In addition, only a small proportion of systemically administered drugs reach their intended target. Selective delivery of the drug to the target tissue and use of functional protein domains capable of penetrating cells and tissues could alleviate these problems in certain circumstances. We will present in this review a novel approach utilizing unique molecular fingerprints (“Zip/postal codes”) in the vasculature of regenerating tissues that allows target organ-specific delivery of systemically administered therapeutic molecules by affinity-based physical targeting (using peptides or antibodies as an “address tag”) to injured tissues undergoing repair. The desired outcome of targeted therapies is increased local accumulation and lower systemic concentration of the therapeutic payload. We believe that the physical targeting of systemically administered therapeutic molecules could be rapidly adapted in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26437400