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Sample records for administration 023 workplace violence

  1. 75 FR 8096 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-023...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Security Administration--023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office..., ``Department of Homeland Security/Transportation Security Administration--023 Workplace Violence Prevention... and maintain records on their Workplace Violence Prevention Program. Additionally, the Department...

  2. Workplace Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... assaultive behaviors, including a way to pass on information from one shift to another. Implement a violence prevention plan to develop strategies to deal with possibly violent patients. A safer ...

  3. Violence in the Workplace: Avoiding Institutional Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Ranaye J.; Hall, Bradley H.

    This document is intended to provide career and technical education faculty and administrators with information on institutional liability relating to workplace violence as documented in court cases. The major legislation regarding violence in schools is summarized. Seventeen warning signs of violence are presented along with simple steps…

  4. Underreporting of Workplace Violence

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark J.; Russell, Jim; Essenmacher, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    This study examined differences between self-report and actual documentation of workplace violence (WPV) incidents in a cohort of health care workers. The study was conducted in an American hospital system with a central electronic database for reporting WPV events. In 2013, employees (n = 2010) were surveyed by mail about their experience of WPV in the previous year. Survey responses were compared with actual events entered into the electronic system. Of questionnaire respondents who self-reported a violent event in the past year, 88% had not documented an incident in the electronic system. However, more than 45% had reported violence informally, for example, to their supervisors. The researchers found that if employees were injured or lost time from work, they were more likely to formally report a violent event. Understanding the magnitude of underreporting and characteristics of health care workers who are less likely to report may assist hospitals in determining where to focus violence education and prevention efforts. PMID:26002854

  5. Workplace Violence in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Edward D.

    2003-01-01

    Addresses workplace violence prevention, beginning by defining violence, why people become violent, and the cycle of violence. Then discusses steps in prevention, including pre-incident planning, an incident management team, threat management, assessment, post-incident response, and training. (EV)

  6. The Alert Collector. Workplace Violence: Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Janice S., Ed.; Stankus, Tony, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses workplace violence with a focus on disgruntled employees and library violence; reviews recent reports and recommended training. Highlights include workplace violence in general and violence in libraries. An annotated bibliography on workplace violence includes print indexes; electronic resources; journals and newsletters; and videotapes.…

  7. Mobbing: Workplace Violence in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, Jeanmarie; McDermott, J. Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Incidents of workplace violence are becoming all too common at colleges and universities. Generally, one thinks of shootings and assaults in relation to campus workplace violence. However, mobbing and bullying of faculty by other faculty are types of workplace violence that, while very common, are rarely discussed or reported. This article raises…

  8. Workplace violence: a study of Turkish workers.

    PubMed

    Aytac, Serpil; Bozkurt, Veysel; Bayram, Nuran; Yildiz, Selver; Aytac, Mustafa; Akinci, Fusun Sokullu; Bilgel, Nazan

    2011-01-01

    This research was conducted to address the experience of workplace violence of Turkish workers from different sectors and to investigate the impact of the exposed violence on their psychological well-being. Data were collected anonymously with printed questionnaires from the volunteer participants and depended on self-reporting. The response rate was 79.0% (1708/2161). The prevalence of workplace violence was found to be 44.8%. The most common type was verbal violence together with mobbing (bullying). Victims of physical violence were mostly males, whereas females were found to be victims of verbal, psychological and sexual violence. Most cases did not result in legal action and the victims remained silent. Psychological well-being of exposed workers in terms of depression, anxiety and stress seemed to deteriorate. Workplace violence remains a silent epidemic in Turkey. Preventive measures against workplace violence and social support for violated workers do not exist. PMID:22152504

  9. Legal liability and workplace violence.

    PubMed

    Brakel, S J

    1998-01-01

    Workplace violence is a growing social problem. Some of this growth may be perceptual, reflecting our new awareness of what constitutes violence in the workplace. Furthermore, much of what falls under its current rubric does not correspond to the classic image of worker-on-worker or worker-on-employer mayhem. Nevertheless, the total number of incidents is alarmingly large; the problem is real. It is natural to consider law (i.e., legal liability) as a potential solution. Aiming the liability threat at the employer may be the most effective and efficient strategy. There are ample theories to choose from: negligence (tort) law, agency law, contract, civil rights, and regulatory law. Judges and juries appear eager to hold employers accountable for violent incidents in the workplace, sometimes in the face of other, more logical constructions of the facts or theory. One's best hope is that the fear this strikes in the hearts of employers will make for maximum preventive results. PMID:9894212

  10. Murder-suicide in workplace violence.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2014-08-01

    In an analysis of 105 incidents of workplace violence in the USA from 1982 to 2002, the murderers who killed themselves after the incident killed more victims than those arrested. The workplace violence occurring at schools resulted in significantly more injured victims, but not more deceased victims. PMID:25153948

  11. When Violence Threatens the Workplace: Personnel Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses violence in the workplace and suggests a three-tier approach to dealing with violence in libraries that focuses on personnel issues: (1) preventive measures, including applicant screening, supervisory training, and employee assistance programs; (2) threat management, including policy formation and legal action; and (3) crisis/post-trauma…

  12. Report of workplace violence by Hispanic nurses.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cheryl; Parish, Melinda

    2003-07-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against nursing professionals is common. This pilot study explored the association between WPV and victim characteristics including the interpersonal risk factor of prior childhood or adult violence and gender characteristics among 90 Hispanic nurses practicing in Texas. Personal factors such as the nurses' age, clinical setting worked, years of experience, and basic education were not found to be associated with WPV. Gender and a history of violence were found to be significantly associated with WPV. Recommendations include recognition of history of childhood and/or adult violence and gender as risk factors in orientation and health care-training programs for violence prevention. PMID:12861926

  13. Antecedents of Medical Workplace Violence in South China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Wenzhi; Deng, Ling; Liu, Meng; Yu, Min

    2011-01-01

    It has been noted that workplace violence most frequently occurs in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore antecedents of workplace violence in south China. The authors conducted face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with 30 hospital staff who had experienced at least one incident of workplace violence from patients during…

  14. Perceptions of managerial support after workplace violence.

    PubMed

    Christie, Wanda

    2015-11-01

    Workplace violence against nurses perpetrated by patients is a global problem, and healthcare organisations must take steps to ensure that staff feel safe at work and supported when incidents occur. A study was undertaken in a US teaching hospital to determine nurses' perceptions of management support following violent workplace incidents. This article describes the study and reports the results, which suggest that nurses want better implementation and enforcement of anti-violence policies, as well as more visible and immediate support from managers. PMID:26508071

  15. When Violence Threatens the Campus Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Bob

    1994-01-01

    A combination of economic and societal stresses contributes to workplace violence in higher education. College human resources professionals must become knowledgeable about its causes, implications, prevention, and appropriate responses. A three-tiered plan includes a preventive program, threat-management plan and team, and crisis management team.…

  16. Rape aggression defense and workplace violence prevention.

    PubMed

    Wells, Sarah Steelman

    2012-01-01

    An R.A.D. Basic Physical Defense program for women employees, launched by a health system's corporate security department, has proven to be a popular low cost method of workplace violence prevention, according to the author, one of the program's instructors. The initial investment in equipment and certification is negligible compared to the benefits and potential benefits it brings, she reports. PMID:22423524

  17. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences. PMID:18793089

  18. Workplace violence: a primer for critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Alexy, Eileen M; Hutchins, Joseph A

    2006-09-01

    This review illustrates the various types of workplace violence nurses can encounter in critical care settings. Lack of a clear definition of workplace violence impedes research on the topic; however, the typology offered by the UIIPRC provides a framework to guide further studies of physical and nonphysical workplace violence. Further investigation of individual and organizational factors will assist nurses and agencies in identifying effective methods to manage, prevent, educate, and respond to each type of workplace violence. Fear, burnout, anxiety, depression, and acute and posttraumatic stress disorders are some of the sequelae that can occur after an incident of workplace violence. Debriefing strategies should be a fundamental component of workplace violence policies to prevent the development of longterm consequences. Additional research is needed on all types of workplace violence, as well as research addressing the needs of specialized setting, such as critical care unit. Critical care nurses have valuable insights regarding the risks they face on their units and should be part of a multidisciplinary team developing policies and workplace violence prevention and education programs. PMID:16962452

  19. Violence against female student nurses in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Hinchberger, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Violence, harassment, and bullying in the workplace are not new phenomena. However, the growing epidemic of violence in the health sector workplace is raising great concern among workers, employers, and governmental agencies across Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. National and international literature reveals that the prevalence of violence experienced by graduate and undergraduate female nursing students in the college and workplace settings is largely unknown. Moreover, the prevalence of violence is now recognized as a major health priority by the World Health Organization, the International Council of Nurses, and Public Services International. Even so, the number of nursing personnel affected by this problem continues to rise. A modified self-report online survey was used to ascertain the level of violence experienced by nursing students in their clinical placements. One hundred percent of those surveyed had experienced some type of workplace violence and the perpetrators were most often other staff members followed closely by patients. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement recommends that all faculty prepare nurses to recognize and prevent all forms of violence in the workplace. This research seeks to develop practical approaches to better understand and prevent this global public health issue. PMID:19187052

  20. Workplace violence against nurses in Chinese hospitals: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Mingli; Ning, Ning; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Cui, Yu; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong; Hao, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of workplace violence that Chinese nurses have encountered, identify risk factors and provide a basis for future targeted interventions. Setting Heilongjiang, a province in northeast China. Methods A cross-sectional survey. Participants A total of 588 nurses provided data. There were also in-depth interviews with 12 nurses, 7 hospital administrators and 6 health officials. Results A total of 7.8% of the nurses reported physically violent experiences and 71.9% reported non-physically violent experiences in the preceding year. Perpetrators were patients or their relatives (93.5% and 82%, respectively), and 24% of nurses experienced non-physical violence that involved Yi Nao (gangs specifically targeting hospitals). Inexperienced nurses were more likely to report physical (13.2%) or non-physical (89.5%) violence compared with experienced nurses. Graduate-level nurses were more likely to perceive and report non-physical violence (84.6%). Nurses who worked rotating shifts were 3.668 times (95% CI 1.275 to 10.554) more likely to experience physical violence, and 1.771 times (95% CI 1.123 to 2.792) more likely to experience non-physical violence compared with nurses who worked fixed day shifts. Higher anxiety levels about workplace violence and work types were associated with violence. Interviewees perceived financial burdens, unsatisfactory treatment outcomes and miscommunications as influencing factors for workplace violence. Conclusions Preplacement education should focus on high-risk groups to reduce workplace violence. Increased awareness from the public and policymakers is necessary to develop effective control strategies at individual, hospital and national levels. PMID:25814496

  1. Application and Implementation of the Hazard Risk Matrix to Identify Hospital Workplaces at Risk for Violence

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Aranyos, Deanna; Upfal, Mark J.; Luborsky, Mark; Russell, Jim; Essenmacher, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    Background A key barrier to preventing workplace violence injury is the lack of methodology for prioritizing the allocation of limited prevention resources. The hazard risk matrix was used to categorize the probability and severity of violence in hospitals to enable prioritization of units for safety intervention. Methods Probability of violence was based on violence incidence rates; severity was based on lost time management claims for violence-related injuries. Cells of the hazard risk matrix were populated with hospital units categorized as low, medium, or high probability and severity. Hospital stakeholders reviewed the matrix after categorization to address the possible confounding of underreporting. Results Forty-one hospital units were categorized as medium or high on both severity and probability and were prioritized for forthcoming interventions. Probability and severity were highest in psychiatric care units. Conclusions This risk analysis tool may be useful for hospital administrators in prioritizing units for violence injury prevention efforts. PMID:25223739

  2. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Workplace violence increases in medical settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript061316.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Workplace violence increases in medical settings : 06/13/2016 ... use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. Workplace violence in health care settings is increasingly common ...

  3. Workplace violence: the dark side of organisational life.

    PubMed

    Speedy, Sandra

    2006-05-01

    This paper draws on a diverse range of research literature addressing workplace violence, which constitutes one component of the dark side of organisational life. This selective review of the literature has been drawn from the disciplines of nursing, management, psychology and organisational culture. The paper focuses bullying and mobbing in the workplace, addressing its types, causes, the characteristics of bullies and targets and the generalised impact of bullying and mobbing. It also examines whether there are gender issues pertinent to the health care sector. Consideration will also be given to the impact on the individual, group and organization, given the apparent epidemic proportions workplace violence has reached. Ultimately, the question will arise: how can the workplace violence be abolished, specifically within the health care sector, given that we live in a global environment characterised by international bullying (Crawford 1999)? This is a challenge because workplace violence is perpetuated within organisations, due either to cultures of acceptance, or fear of retribution should it be acknowledged and acted upon (or both). PMID:16696606

  4. Translational models of workplace violence in health care.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Michael Russell; Bowen, Bob; Bowie, Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Decision makers have little time to study literature on the prevention and management of workplace violence (WPV). In a health care workplace setting, identifying the person, stimulus, and environmental interactions that can lead to violence is a complicated process. Those in positions of leadership make decisions that affect many individuals, agencies, and communities. Often, they come from different professional backgrounds yet need ways of rapidly understanding concepts of violence that transcend their profession, training, or experience. Translational models (TMs) in WPV visually summarize and interprofessionally facilitate this understanding of concepts, enhancing the chances of more effective collaborative solutions to WPV. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how TM can be used in interprofessional settings to find effective solutions to reduce WPV. PMID:25929143

  5. Assessment and Analysis of Workplace Violence in a Greek Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Mantzouranis, George; Fafliora, Eleftheria; Bampalis, Vasileios G; Christopoulou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess workplace violence in a Greek tertiary hospital for the first time. The authors conducted a descriptive study with 175 participants and examined the characteristics of violent episodes, the responses of victims and the administration, and the perception of workplace safety in addition to the implications of these incidents. The vast majority of employees (83.4%) had experienced work-related violence; however, half of them (52%) had not reported the incident to the hospital administration. Verbal violence was the most common type of incident (98.6%). Nurses and other health care staff reported feeling safer than physicians (odds ratio [OR] = 4.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.94-10.28 and OR = 2.80, 95% CI: 1.64-8.74, respectively). A large proportion of victims (72.6%) suffered psychological consequences following the violent incident. This study reveals the high prevalence of workplace violence in a Greek tertiary hospital and underscores its negative impact on health care workers. PMID:24456571

  6. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts. PMID:27625721

  7. The Impact of Domestic Violence in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Jennifer C. D.; MacQuarrie, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: When workers experience domestic violence (DV) at home, impacts are felt in the workplace; however, little research is available on this topic. Methods: We conducted an online survey regarding the impacts of DV at work. Results: A total of 8429 people completed the survey. More than a third of respondents reported experiencing DV; among them, more than a third reported that DV affected their ability to get to work, and more than half reported that it continued at or near work. Most reported that DV negatively affected their performance. Almost all respondents, regardless of DV experience, believed that it impacts victims' work lives. Conclusions: This research identifies the scope and impact of DV on workers and workplaces. The data should assist governments, unions, and employers to enact and evaluate proactive practices to address the impact of DV in the workplace. PMID:26147553

  8. A workplace violence educational program: a repeated measures study.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Gordon L; Farra, Sharon L; Gates, Donna M

    2014-09-01

    Violence against healthcare employees is a profound problem in the emergency department worldwide. One strategy to reduce the risk of violence is prevention focused education. The purpose of this paper was to report the learning outcomes of a workplace violence educational prevention program tailored to the needs of emergency department employees. A quasi-experimental design was used to determine the knowledge retention of program content following a hybrid (online and classroom) educational intervention. One hundred twenty emergency department employees that completed the workplace violence prevention program participated in the study. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to determine if individual test scores increased significantly between baseline, posttest, and six month posttest periods. The results indicated a significant time effect, Wilk's Λ = .390, F (2, 118) = 26.554, p < .001, η2 = .310. Follow-up polynomial contrasts indicated a significant linear effect with means increasing over time, F (1, 119) = 53.454, p < .001, η2 = .310, while individual test scores became significantly higher over time. It was concluded that the use of a hybrid modality increases the probability that significant learning outcomes and retention will be achieved. PMID:24932754

  9. Workplace violence in long haul trucking: occupational health nursing update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Debra Gay

    2004-01-01

    Almost 2 million workdays and millions of dollars are lost annually because of non-fatal assaults suffered at the workplace (NIOSH, 1996). Twenty workers, on average, are murdered each week in the United States and an estimated 18,000 workers per week are victims of non-fatal assault (NIOSH, 2001). Violence and stress are two interrelated issues that affect the work force. In-depth studies of these issues have not been conducted with long haul truckers in general, or with women in non-traditional, male dominated fields such as the long haul trucking industry. Epidemiological data related to violence and stress experienced by these under-studied populations are needed to plan effective interventions to reduce occupational risks. Studies employing both qualitative and quantitative methods are needed to articulate risk and protective factors related to violence against workers (Runyan, 2001). Occupational health nurses are qualified to participate in the development and implementation of research and intervention studies to improve worker safety related to violence at the workplace for men and women in both traditional and non-traditional occupational roles. PMID:14740866

  10. Workplace violence: theories of causation and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Olson, N K

    1994-10-01

    1. Occupational violence is a multi-causal phenomenon that continues to escalate and significantly impact worker health and safety as well as productivity and morale. 2. The available data sources provide only a "tip of the iceberg" glimpse of the problem. The occupational health nurse can contribute to a greater understanding of workplace violence by collecting and disseminating statistics on non-fatal injuries accompanied by accurate occupational titles. 3. The occupational health nurse is the critical link between management and workers. Using the public health model of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, the occupational health nurse can create and implement a company wide policy aimed at preventing occupational violence from all causes. PMID:7945579

  11. Managing Workplace Violence With Evidence-Based Interventions: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel Johann Solorzano

    2016-09-01

    Workplace violence in health care settings is an occupational issue concerning nurses and other health care professionals. Patient aggression against nurses is often the most common form of violence in clinical settings, occurring in emergency departments, inpatient psychiatric settings, and nursing homes. Physical and verbal assaults are the major forms of workplace violence encountered by nurses. Current research has identified staff, environmental, and patient risk factors as the major precursors of workplace violence initiated by patients. Nurses often experience significant physical and psychological negative consequences after an episode of workplace violence. A review of the evidence was conducted to identify current evidence-based interventions that can help nurses minimize the incidence of workplace violence. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 31-36.]. PMID:27576226

  12. Engaging men and women as allies: a workplace curriculum module to challenge gender norms about domestic violence, male bullying and workplace violence and encourage ally behavior.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K C; Yates, Diane; Walcott, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    This post-hoc analysis discusses a replicable workplace behavior change module called Men and Women As Allies, that was designed and implemented by a team of labor, management and community anti-violence educators at a private sector telecommunications employer. A job site-specific educational seminar linked issues of domestic violence to male bullying and workplace violence. It challenged social stereotypes about gender, taught skills to engage ally peer behavior and provided information on how to seek assistance from union, workplace and external community resources. PMID:22635154

  13. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric staff

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, Marilyn; Lanza, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Hartley, Dan; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Amandus, Harlan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A study by Hesketh et al. found that 20% of psychiatric nurses were physically assaulted, 43% were threatened with physical assault, and 55% were verbally assaulted at least once during the equivalent of a single work week. From 2005 through 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that mental health occupations had the second highest average annual rate of workplace violence, 21 violent crimes per 1,000 employed persons aged 16 or older. OBJECTIVE An evaluation of risk factors associated with patient aggression towards nursing staff at eight locked psychiatric units. PARTICIPANTS Two-hundred eighty-four nurses in eight acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration throughout the United States between September 2007 and September 2010. METHODS Rates were calculated by dividing the number of incidents by the total number of hours worked by all nurses, then multiplying by 40 (units of incidents per nurse per 40-hour work week). Risk factors associated with these rates were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with a Poisson model. RESULTS Combining the data across all hospitals and weeks, the overall rate was 0.60 for verbal aggression incidents and 0.19 for physical aggression, per nurse per week. For physical incidents, the evening shift (3 pm – 11 pm) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of aggression than the day shift (7 am – 3 pm). Weeks that had a case-mix with a higher percentage of patients with personality disorders were significantly associated with a higher risk of verbal and physical aggression. CONCLUSION Healthcare workers in psychiatric settings are at high risk for aggression from patients. PMID:24894691

  14. The language used when reporting interfemale violence among nurses in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Hockley, C

    2000-10-01

    Violence appears to be ignored among nurses, in part, because of the metaphors and euphemisms used to identify this significant phenomenon. Nurses rarely use the term 'violence' and may use metaphors and euphemisms or generally ignore the terms usually associated with violence, such as victim, perpetrator, horizontal violence, bullying and mobbing when discussing violent behaviour among, and with, their female colleagues. The reluctance to use unequivocal language when discussing workplace violence contributes to the issue remaining poorly recognised and poorly addressed; and increases the negative impact of workplace violence on the health and wellbeing of the individual. Moreover, the language that is used to describe violence among female nurses often carries with it different connotations from those that may be common in general society. This paper draws upon data from the author's doctoral research study to report the language used to describe interfemale violence in the workplace; and the consequences of using that language. PMID:11858308

  15. Workplace violence mitigation: the three-year model.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In presenting a three-year model for workplace violence mitigation in this article, the author sees it as providing a way to gauge the maturity of the program. This model, he says, functions similarly to a high performing security awareness program where certain themes need to be repeated on a routine basis just so situational awareness does not fall by the wayside. While the program outlined here is not a guaranteed formula for success, it is a framework to work within to ensure you have a roadmap upon which to build success. PMID:26978958

  16. US report on violence in the medical workplace may hold lessons for Canadian MDs.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D

    1995-01-01

    Concern about the growing incidence of violence against health care professionals has prompted the Young Physicians Section of the American Medical Association to research and develop a publication designed to raise physicians' awareness. Violence in the Medical Workplace. Prevention Strategies provides some commonsense precautions that could minimize the possibility a physician will fall victim to violence at the hands of a patient. PMID:7489559

  17. Using database reports to reduce workplace violence: Perceptions of hospital stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Aranyos, Deanna; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J.; Luborsky, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Documented incidents of violence provide the foundation for any workplace violence prevention program. However, no published research to date has examined stakeholders’ preferences for workplace violence data reports in healthcare settings. If relevant data are not readily available and effectively summarized and presented, the likelihood is low that they will be utilized by stakeholders in targeted efforts to reduce violence. OBJECTIVE To discover and describe hospital system stakeholders’ perceptions of database-generated workplace violence data reports. PARTICIPANTS Eight hospital system stakeholders representing Human Resources, Security, Occupational Health Services, Quality and Safety, and Labor in a large, metropolitan hospital system. METHODS The hospital system utilizes a central database for reporting adverse workplace events, including incidents of violence. A focus group was conducted to identify stakeholders’ preferences and specifications for standardized, computerized reports of workplace violence data to be generated by the central database. The discussion was audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, processed as text, and analyzed using stepwise content analysis. RESULTS Five distinct themes emerged from participant responses: Concerns, Etiology, Customization, Use, and Outcomes. In general, stakeholders wanted data reports to provide “the big picture,” i.e., rates of occurrence; reasons for and details regarding incident occurrence; consequences for the individual employee and/or the workplace; and organizational efforts that were employed to deal with the incident. CONCLUSIONS Exploring stakeholder views regarding workplace violence summary reports provided concrete information on the preferred content, format, and use of workplace violence data. Participants desired both epidemiological and incident-specific data in order to better understand and work to prevent the workplace violence occurring in their hospital system. PMID

  18. Workplace Violence Experienced by Substitute (Daeri) Drivers and Its Relationship to Depression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong-Uk; Roh, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence is related to various health effects including mental illness such as anxiety or depression. In this study, the relationship between the experience of workplace violence and depression in substitute drivers in Korea, namely, daeri drivers, was investigated. To assess workplace violence, questions regarding types and frequency of the experience of violence over the past year were asked to the daeri drivers. In order to assess the risk of depression, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale was used. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals of depression were estimated using multiple logistic regression analysis. All of the daeri drivers had experienced instance of verbal violence while driving and 66 of the drivers (34.1%) had been in such a situation more than once in the past quarter of a year. Sixty-eight daeri drivers (42.2%) had experienced certain type of physical violence over the past year. Compared to daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence less than 4 times and who had not experienced workplace physical violence over the past year, higher odds ratio was observed in daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence or physical violence, more than 4 times and more than one time respectively, after adjustment. Experience of verbal or physical type of workplace violence over the past year increased the risk of depression in the daeri drivers. Because violence against drivers can compromise the safety of the driver, the customer, and all the passengers, it is imperative that the safety and health of daeri drivers be highlighted. PMID:26713049

  19. Workplace Violence Experienced by Substitute (Daeri) Drivers and Its Relationship to Depression in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Pil Kyun; Won, Jong-Uk; Roh, Jaehoon; Lee, June-Hee; Seok, Hongdeok; Lee, Wanhyung; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Workplace violence is related to various health effects including mental illness such as anxiety or depression. In this study, the relationship between the experience of workplace violence and depression in substitute drivers in Korea, namely, daeri drivers, was investigated. To assess workplace violence, questions regarding types and frequency of the experience of violence over the past year were asked to the daeri drivers. In order to assess the risk of depression, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale was used. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals of depression were estimated using multiple logistic regression analysis. All of the daeri drivers had experienced instance of verbal violence while driving and 66 of the drivers (34.1%) had been in such a situation more than once in the past quarter of a year. Sixty-eight daeri drivers (42.2%) had experienced certain type of physical violence over the past year. Compared to daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence less than 4 times and who had not experienced workplace physical violence over the past year, higher odds ratio was observed in daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence or physical violence, more than 4 times and more than one time respectively, after adjustment. Experience of verbal or physical type of workplace violence over the past year increased the risk of depression in the daeri drivers. Because violence against drivers can compromise the safety of the driver, the customer, and all the passengers, it is imperative that the safety and health of daeri drivers be highlighted. PMID:26713049

  20. Predictors of workplace violence among female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Katsulis, Yasmina; Durfee, Alesha; Lopez, Vera; Robillard, Alyssa

    2015-05-01

    For sex workers, differences in rates of exposure to workplace violence are likely influenced by a variety of risk factors, including where one works and under what circumstances. Economic stressors, such as housing insecurity, may also increase the likelihood of exposure. Bivariate analyses demonstrate statistically significant associations between workplace violence and selected predictor variables, including age, drug use, exchanging sex for goods, soliciting clients outdoors, and experiencing housing insecurity. Multivariate regression analysis shows that after controlling for each of these variables in one model, only soliciting clients outdoors and housing insecurity emerge as statistically significant predictors for workplace violence. PMID:25091980

  1. A study on workplace violence and its effect on quality of life among medical professionals in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siying; Lin, Shaowei; Li, Huangyuan; Chai, Wenli; Zhang, Qiaohui; Wu, Yihai; Zhu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate workplace violence and to examine how it is associated with quality of life (QOL) among medical professionals in China. A total of 2,464 medical professionals were selected from Fujian Province and Henan Province by using stratified cluster-sampling method. A Chinese version of the workplace violence scale was used to measure the incidence of workplace violence. The Short Form-36 Health Survey was employed to assess their QOL. Approximately 50% of the participants reported at least one type of workplace violence occurring in the previous 12 months. The multivariate analysis demonstrated workplace violence as a significant predictor for QOL among medical professionals, after controlling for other potential predictors. It suggests that the implementation of violence prevention policies and strategies to reduce workplace violence may improve QOL of medical professionals in China. PMID:24205959

  2. Barriers to Effective Implementation of Programs for the Prevention of Workplace Violence in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Blando, James; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hartley, Daniel; Casteel, Carri

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace violence (WPV) prevention programs are essential, yet challenging to implement in healthcare. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers to implementation of effective violence prevention programs. After reviewing the related literature, the authors describe their research methods and analysis and report the following seven themes as major barriers to effective implementation of workplace violence programs: a lack of action despite reporting; varying perceptions of violence; bullying; profit-driven management models; lack of management accountability; a focus on customer service; and weak social service and law enforcement approaches to mentally ill patients. The authors discuss their findings in light of previous studies and experiences and offer suggestions for decreasing WPV in healthcare settings. They conclude that although many of these challenges to effective implementation of workplace violence programs are both within the program itself and relate to broader industry and societal issues, creative innovations can address these issues and improve WPV prevention programs. PMID:26807016

  3. Barriers to Effective Implementation of Programs for the Prevention of Workplace Violence in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blando, James; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hartley, Daniel; Casteel, Carri

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace violence (WPV) prevention programs are essential, yet challenging to implement in healthcare. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers to implementation of effective violence prevention programs. After reviewing the related literature, the authors describe their research methods and analysis and report the following seven themes as major barriers to effective implementation of workplace violence programs: a lack of action despite reporting; varying perceptions of violence; bullying; profit-driven management models; lack of management accountability; a focus on customer service; and weak social service and law enforcement approaches to mentally ill patients. The authors discuss their findings in light of previous studies and experiences and offer suggestions for decreasing WPV in healthcare settings. They conclude that although many of these challenges to effective implementation of workplace violence programs are both within the program itself and relate to broader industry and societal issues, creative innovations can address these issues and improve WPV prevention programs. PMID:26824256

  4. Midwifery student exposure to workplace violence in clinical settings: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Evidence indicates that nurses regularly experience bullying within the workplace which has the potential for health and social effects, as well as worker attrition. Literature suggests that nursing students are exposed to workplace violence during clinical placements including from health professionals and mentors, however little is known about midwifery students. This study sought to examine undergraduate midwifery students' experiences of workplace violence during clinical placements. A cross-sectional approach using a paper-based survey, the Paramedic Workplace Questionnaire, was used to solicit the information. Students were exposed to workplace violence with the main act being intimidation (30%), verbal abuse (17%), physical abuse (3%), and sexual harassment (3%). In more than three-quarters of the incidents the students had some level of apprehension or were frightened as a result of the violence. Students responded to the acts of violence with changes to emotions, self-confidence, and a desire to "give up". This paper demonstrates ways in which midwifery students are vulnerable to potential workplace violence from various sources. Support mechanisms need to be developed to ensure this can be minimised. PMID:26672901

  5. Part of the Job? Workplace Violence in Massachusetts Social Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelnick, Jennifer R.; Slayter, Elspeth; Flanzbaum, Beth; Butler, Nanci Ginty; Domingo, Beryl; Perlstein, Judith; Trust, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Workplace violence is a serious and surprisingly understudied occupational hazard in social service settings. The authors of this study conducted an anonymous, Internet-based survey of Massachusetts social service agencies to estimate the incidence of physical assault and verbal threat of violence in social service agencies, understand how social…

  6. Workplace Violence in the Emergency Department: Giving Staff the Tools and Support to Report

    PubMed Central

    Stene, Julie; Larson, Erin; Levy, Maria; Dohlman, Michon

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence is increasing across the nation’s Emergency Departments (EDs) and nurses often perceive it as part of their job. Through a quality-improvement project, reporting processes were found to be inconsistent and nurses often did not know what acts constitute violence. As a result, nurses were under-reporting violence in the ED, and as a direct result resources were not recognized or provided. A staff nurse-led workgroup developed an initial survey to assess the perception and occurrence of violence within the ED in nurses and patient care assistants. This workgroup evaluated the survey responses and identified a need for the development of a brief, concise reporting tool and an educational program. A reporting tool was created and education was provided in multiple venues and modalities. A follow-up process and support were given from nursing leadership. A posteducation survey was completed by nurses and patient care assistants to assess their comprehension of acts of workplace violence, and found their perception that workplace violence was part of their job was reduced by half, along with increased knowledge about acts constituting workplace violence, and what is reportable to law enforcement. As a result of the education, the reporting of the violent acts has increased, and staff perceive the ED to be a safer environment. With the appropriate education, reporting tool, and leadership support, ED nurses can create a culture with a zero-tolerance policy for violence within the department, creating a safer environment for staff and patients. PMID:25902352

  7. Nurses exposure to workplace violence in a large teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohammad; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Hakimzadeh, Seyyed Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses’ exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. Methods: We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO), the International Health Organization (IHO), the International Council of Nurses (ICN), and the Public Services International (PSI). Finally, in order to analyze the relationships among different variables in the study, T-test and Chi-Square test were used. Results: Three hundred and one nurses responded to the questionnaire (a response rate of 73%). Over 70% of the nurses felt worried about workplace violence. The participants reported exposure to verbal abuse (64% CI: 59-70%), bullying-mobbing (29% CI: 24-34%) and physical violence (12% CI: 9-16%) at least once during the previous year. Relatives of hospital patients were responsible for most of the violence. Nurses working in the emergency department and outpatient clinics were more likely to report having experienced violence. Nurses were unlikely to report violence to hospital managers, and 40% of nurses were unaware of any existing policies within the hospital for reducing violence. Conclusion: We observed a considerable level of nurse exposure to workplace violence. The high rate of reported workplace violence demonstrates that the existing safeguards that aim to protect the staff from abusive patients and relatives are inadequate. PMID:25396205

  8. Workplace Violence and Gender Bias in Unorganized Fisheries of Udupi, India.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, P; Tiwari, R; Kamath, R

    2016-07-01

    Fisheries industry in India is an unorganized sector of occupation where considerable proportion of workers is female. However, the prevalent gender inequality in terms of task allocation, wages, and other welfare facilities makes the men as dominant workforce. Furthermore, there are occasions when incidents of workplace violence take place. The present study was conducted to find the prevalence of workplace violence at worksite and study gender bias in such events. In a cross-sectional study 171 fishermen and fisherwomen were interviewed to collect information about workplace violence. The overall prevalence of workplace violence reported was 14.6%. This included 2 (8%) cases of physical assault, 1 (4%) case of sexual harassment of fisherwoman by her colleague and 22 (88%) cases of verbal abuse. A significant (p=0.002) association was found between gender and verbal abuse at the workplace. In conclusion, this study highlighted the occurrence of workplace violence among fishery workers in India. There was a gender bias towards females that can be attributed to male dominance in this occupation. PMID:27393325

  9. Female sex workers and the social context of workplace violence in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Katsulis, Yasmina; Lopez, Vera; Durfee, Alesha; Robillard, Alyssa

    2010-09-01

    Gender-based violence in the workplace impacts the physical and emotional wellbeing of sex workers and may lead to other health problems, such as PTSD and depression, drug abuse, and a greater likelihood of sexually transmitted infections. This study examines the social context of workplace violence and risk avoidance in the context of legal regulations meant to reduce harms associated with the industry. Ethnographic research, including 18 months of extended field observations and interviews with 190 female sex workers, is used to illustrate how sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico, experience and manage workplace violence. Multiple subthemes emerge from this analysis, including deciding where to work, working with a third party, avoiding theft, and dealing with police. These findings support the idea that the risk of violence is part of a larger "hierarchy of risk" that can result in a "tradeoff" of harms. PMID:20949840

  10. Quality of work life and its association with workplace violence of the nurses in emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Eslamian, Jalil; Akbarpoor, Ali Akbar; Hoseini, Sayed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses as the major group of health service providers need to have a satisfactory quality of work life in order to give desirable care to the patients. Workplace violence is one of the most important factors that cause decline in the quality of work life. This study aimed to determine the quality of work life of nurses in selected hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its relationship with workplace violence. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-correlational study. A sample of 186 registered nurses was enrolled in the study using quota sampling method. The research instrument used was a questionnaire consisting of three parts: Demographic information, quality of work life, and workplace violence. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by SPSS version 16. Results: The subjects consisted of 26.9% men and 73.1% women, whose mean age was 33.76 (7.13) years. 29.6% were single and 70.4% were married. About 76.9% of the subjects were exposed to verbal violence and 26.9% were exposed to physical violence during past year. Mean score of QNWL was 115.88 (30.98). About 45.7% of the subjects had a low level of quality of work life. There was an inverse correlation between the quality of work and the frequency of exposures to workplace violence. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, it is suggested that the managers and decision makers in health care should plan strategies to reduce violence in the workplace and also develop a program to improve the quality of work life of nurses exposed to workplace violence. PMID:25709691

  11. Workplace violence and gender discrimination in Rwanda's health workforce: Increasing safety and gender equality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Workplace violence has been documented in all sectors, but female-dominated sectors such as health and social services are at particular risk. In 2007-2008, IntraHealth International assisted the Rwanda Ministries of Public Service and Labor and Health to study workplace violence in Rwanda's health sector. This article reexamines a set of study findings that directly relate to the influence of gender on workplace violence, synthesizes these findings with other research from Rwanda, and examines the subsequent impact of the study on Rwanda's policy environment. Methods Fifteen out of 30 districts were selected at random. Forty-four facilities at all levels were randomly selected in these districts. From these facilities, 297 health workers were selected at random, of whom 205 were women and 92 were men. Researchers used a utilization-focused approach and administered health worker survey, facility audits, key informant and health facility manager interviews and focus groups to collect data in 2007. After the study was disseminated in 2008, stakeholder recommendations were documented and three versions of the labor law were reviewed to assess study impact. Results Thirty-nine percent of health workers had experienced some form of workplace violence in year prior to the study. The study identified gender-related patterns of perpetration, victimization and reactions to violence. Negative stereotypes of women, discrimination based on pregnancy, maternity and family responsibilities and the 'glass ceiling' affected female health workers' experiences and career paths and contributed to a context of violence. Gender equality lowered the odds of health workers experiencing violence. Rwandan stakeholders used study results to formulate recommendations to address workplace violence gender discrimination through policy reform and programs. Conclusions Gender inequality influences workplace violence. Addressing gender discrimination and violence simultaneously should

  12. Patterns of perceptions of workplace violence in the Portuguese health care sector

    PubMed Central

    Ferrinho, Paulo; Biscaia, André; Fronteira, Inês; Craveiro, Isabel; Antunes, Ana Rita; Conceição, Claudia; Flores, Isabel; Santos, Osvaldo

    2003-01-01

    This article characterizes the problem of violence against health professionals in the workplace (VAHPITWP) in selected settings in Portugal. It addresses the questions of what types of violence are most frequent and who are the most affected health professionals. Three methodological approaches were followed: (i) documentary studies, (ii) a questionnaire-based hospital and health centre (HC) complex case study and (iii) semi-structured interviews with stakeholders. Of the different types of violence, all our study approaches confirm that verbal violence is the most frequent. Discrimination, not infrequent in the hospital, seems to be underestimated by the stakeholders interviewed. Violence seems much more frequent in the HC than in the hospital. In the HC, all types of violence are also most frequently directed against female health workers and, in the hospital, against male workers. These studies allow us to conclude that violence is frequent but underreported. PMID:14613526

  13. The American Organization of Nurse Executives and Emergency Nurses Association Guiding Principles on Mitigating Violence in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Violence in the workplace, including violence toward staff from patients and families as well as lateral violence, has become a serious safety issue for hospitals in the United States. Concerned about this issue, the Emergency Nurses Association and the American Organization of Nurse Executives convened a Day of Dialogue to discuss ways to mitigate violence in the workplace. The result of the discussion was the development of guiding principles and a toolkit to assist nurse leaders in systemically reducing lateral violence and patient and family violence in hospitals. PMID:26204376

  14. Prevalence and determinants of workplace violence of health care workers in a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Kung, Shou-Mei; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Wang, Jung-Der

    2008-01-01

    Workplace violence, a possible cause of job stress, has recently become an important concern in occupational health. This study determined the prevalence of workplace violence and its risk factors for employees at a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan. A questionnaire developed by ILO/ICN/WHO/PSI was first translated and validated. It was then used to survey the prevalence of workplace violence in the last 12 months experienced by all nursing aides, nurses, and clerks at the hospital. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to discover the determinants of violence. A total of 222 out of 231 surveyed workers completed a valid questionnaire. The one-year prevalence rates of physical violence (PV), verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 35.1, 50.9, 15.8, 9.5, and 4.5%, respectively. The prevalence of PV at this hospital was higher than that reported by other countries for the health sector. A high anxiety level was associated with the occurrence of PV. These results need to be corroborated by future investigation. A training program may be required for high risk groups to reduce workplace violence. PMID:18408350

  15. Workplace violence prevention for nurses on-line course: Program development1

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Daniel; Ridenour, Marilyn; Craine, John; Morrill, Allison

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many entry-level and experienced healthcare professionals have not received training in workplace violence prevention strategies. OBJECTIVE This paper describes the development, content, and initial qualitative evaluation of an on-line course designed to give healthcare workers an opportunity to acquire free workplace violence prevention training while earning free continuing education units. METHODS A group of healthcare violence prevention researchers worked via email and face-to-face meetings to decide appropriate content for the course. Educational strategies used in the course include: text; video re-enactments of real-life workplace violence incidents; and videos of nurses discussing incidents of violence. Initial evaluation involved a focus group of nurses to discuss the course content and navigation. RESULTS The on-line course has thirteen units that take approximately 15 minutes each to complete. The focus group participants liked the “resume-where-you-left-off” technology that enables the user to complete any portion of the course, leave to do something, and return to the course where they left off. Participants viewed the “Nurses’ Voices” videos as relevant illustrations of violence that nurses face in their workplaces. CONCLUSIONS The focus group participants considered the course to be an effective learning tool for people new to the profession and for those with seniority. PMID:24939112

  16. Workplace Violence and Job Performance among Community Healthcare Workers in China: The Mediator Role of Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Quan; Wu, Jiang; Yuan, Le-Xin; Zhang, Sheng-Chao; Jing, Meng-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Luo, Jia-Li; Lei, Yi-Xiong; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the impact of workplace violence on job performance and quality of life of community healthcare workers in China, especially the relationship of these three variables. Methods: From December 2013 to April 2014, a total of 1404 healthcare workers were recruited by using the random cluster sampling method from Community Health Centers in Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The workplace violence scale, the job performance scale and the quality of life scale (SF-36) were self-administered. The structural equation model constructed by Amos 17.0 was employed to assess the relationship among these variables. Results: Our study found that 51.64% of the respondents had an experience of workplace violence. It was found that both job performance and quality of life had a negative correlation with workplace violence. A positive association was identified between job performance and quality of life. The path analysis showed the total effect (β = −0.243) of workplace violence on job performance consisted of a direct effect (β = −0.113) and an indirect effect (β = −0.130), which was mediated by quality of life. Conclusions: Workplace violence among community healthcare workers is prevalent in China. The workplace violence had negative effects on the job performance and quality of life of CHCs’ workers. The study suggests that improvement in the quality of life may lead to an effective reduction of the damages in job performance caused by workplace violence. PMID:26610538

  17. Coping with Workplace Violence in Healthcare Settings: Social Support and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siqi; Liu, He; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Li, Ye; Hao, Yanhua; Sun, Yihua; Gao, Lijun; Hong, Sun; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Qiao, Hong

    2015-11-01

    A cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from 19 hospitals in six cities of Heilongjiang Province, China was conducted. This study had two objectives: (1) to examine the factors influencing healthcare workers' opinions of strategies to prevent workplace violence, using social support theory, and (2) to encourage healthcare organisations and the larger society to offer greater support to healthcare workers. The respondents exposed to workplace violence expected to receive organisational and social support. Those exposed to psychological violence had a strong opinion of the need for target training to strengthen their competence in responding to violence (OR = 1.319, 95% CI: 1.034-1.658) and enacting workplace violence legislation (OR = 1.968, 95% CI: 1.523-2.543).Those exposed to physical violence thought it might be useful to reinforce staff with back-up support (OR = 3.101, 95% CI: 1.085-8.860). Those exposed to both types of violence and those with high anxiety levels need greater support at both the organisational and societal levels. PMID:26580633

  18. Coping with Workplace Violence in Healthcare Settings: Social Support and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Siqi; Liu, He; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Li, Ye; Hao, Yanhua; Sun, Yihua; Gao, Lijun; Hong, Sun; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Qiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from 19 hospitals in six cities of Heilongjiang Province, China was conducted. This study had two objectives: (1) to examine the factors influencing healthcare workers’ opinions of strategies to prevent workplace violence, using social support theory, and (2) to encourage healthcare organisations and the larger society to offer greater support to healthcare workers. The respondents exposed to workplace violence expected to receive organisational and social support. Those exposed to psychological violence had a strong opinion of the need for target training to strengthen their competence in responding to violence (OR = 1.319, 95% CI: 1.034–1.658) and enacting workplace violence legislation (OR = 1.968, 95% CI: 1.523–2.543).Those exposed to physical violence thought it might be useful to reinforce staff with back-up support (OR = 3.101, 95% CI: 1.085–8.860). Those exposed to both types of violence and those with high anxiety levels need greater support at both the organisational and societal levels. PMID:26580633

  19. Workplace violence in the emergency department: giving staff the tools and support to report.

    PubMed

    Stene, Julie; Larson, Erin; Levy, Maria; Dohlman, Michon

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence is increasing across the nation's Emergency Departments, and nurses often perceive it as part of their job. Reporting processes were inconsistent, and nurses often did not know what acts constitute violence and underreported it. A staff nurse-led workgroup developed an initial survey and a reporting tool, and education was provided. A posteducation survey documented the reporting of violent acts has increased, and staff perceived the Emergency Department to be a safer environment. PMID:25902352

  20. Workplace Homicides Among U.S. Women: The Role of Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Tiesman, Hope M.; Gurka, Kelly K.; Konda, Srinivas; Coben, Jeffrey H.; Amandus, Harlan E.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an important public health issue with serious consequences for the workplace. Workplace homicides occurring to U.S. women over a 6-year period, including those perpetrated by an intimate partner, are described. METHODS Workplace homicides among U.S. women from 2003 to 2008 were categorized into type I (criminal intent), type II (customer/client), type III (co-worker), or type IV (personal relations) events using the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. Fatality rates were calculated and compared among workplace violence (WPV) types, occupations, and characteristics including location of homicide, type of workplace, time of day, and weapon used. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2008, 648 women were feloniously killed on the job. The leading cause of workplace homicide for U.S. women was criminal intent, such as robbing a store (n = 212; 39%), followed by homicides perpetrated by a personal relation (n= 181; 33%). The majority of these personal relations were intimate partners (n = 142; 78%). Over half of workplace homicides perpetrated by intimate partners occurred in parking lots and public buildings (n = 91; 51%). CONCLUSIONS A large percentage of homicides occurring to women at work are perpetrated by intimate partners. WPV prevention programs should incorporate strategies to prevent and respond to IPV. PMID:22463843

  1. The organizational context of non-lethal workplace violence: its interpersonal, temporal, and spatial correlates.

    PubMed

    Warren, J; Brown, D; Hurt, S; Cook, S; Branson, W; Jin, R

    1999-07-01

    This article examines 993 violent incidents involving faculty, students, and staff that occurred at a highly ranked teaching and research university and its affiliated medical center. Violent incidents were included in the sample if they involved faculty, students, or staff, regardless of their specific location or context (i.e., whether they occurred on campus and/or off-campus and whether they occurred within the context of work or some other activity). The theoretical goal of the project was to compare work-related incidents with non-work-related incidents of interpersonal violence occurring in a single, multifunctioning, and professionally hierarchical organization. Data were collected over a 7-year period from three police departments (city, county, and university), university records, and criminal history records obtained from the state police. The coding protocol was developed to capture crime-scene information pertinent to each of the incidents. This included information about the victim, the perpetrator, the relationship between the victim and perpetrator, and the violent incident. The data were examined using nonparametric statistics and logistic regression to model predictive differences between the workplace and non-workplace incidents. The results suggest that the workplace incidents of violence differ from the non-workplace incidents according to their time, victim age, degree of victim injury, and whether the workplace is a medical location. The authors conclude that these differences are better explained by the movement of people in and out of the workplace who bring societal violence with them, rather than by a category or type of workplace violence. PMID:10412098

  2. Domestic Violence and the Workplace: Developing a Company Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Pamela R.; Gardner, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Domestic violence affects employers of victims in several ways, including lost productivity and potential liability. Proactive company responses include security and safety measures and employee counseling. (SK)

  3. Working Women Making It Work: Intimate Partner Violence, Employment, and Workplace Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Macke, Caroline; Logan, TK

    2007-01-01

    Partner violence may have significant consequences on women's employment, yet limited information is available about how women cope on the job with perpetrators' tactics and the consequences of her coping methods on employment status. This article investigates whether there is an association between workplace disclosure of victimization and…

  4. A Systematic Literature Review: Workplace Violence Against Emergency Medical Services Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Pourshaikhian, Majid; Abolghasem Gorji, Hassan; Aryankhesal, Aidin; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davood; Barati, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Context In spite of the high prevalence and consequences of much workplace violence against emergency medical services personnel, this phenomenon has been given insufficient attention. A systematic review can aid the development of guidelines to reduce violence. Objectives The research question addressed by this paper is, “What are the characteristics and findings of studies on workplace violence against emergency medical services personnel”? Data Sources A systematic literature review was conducted using online databases (PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Magiran) with the help of experienced librarians. Study Selection Inclusion criteria comprised studies in the English or Persian language and researcher’s access to the full text. There was no limit to the entry of the study design. Exclusion criteria included lack of access to the full text of the article, studies published in unreliable journals or conferences, and studies in which the results were shared with other medical or relief groups and there was no possibility of breaking down the results. Data Extraction A “Data extraction form” was designed by the researchers based on the goals of the study that included the title and author(s), study method (type, place of study, sample size, sampling method, and data collection/analysis tool), printing location, information related to the frequency of types of violence, characteristics of victims /perpetrators, and related factors. Results The papers reviewed utilized a variety of locations and environments, methods, and instrument samplings. The majority of the studies were performed using the quantitative method. No intervention study was found. Most studies focused on the prevalence of violence, and their results indicated that exposure to violence was high. The results are presented in six major themes. Conclusions Workplace violence and injuries incurred from it are extensive throughout the world. The important causes of violence include the

  5. Concern about Workplace Violence and Its Risk Factors in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kai; Zhang, Xue; Jiao, Mingli; Cui, Yu; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jinghua; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuchong; Zhao, Yanming; Li, Ye; Liang, Libo; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence in Chinese township hospitals is a major public health problem. We identified the risk factors of healthcare workers' worry about experiencing workplace violence in 90 Chinese township hospitals and determined specific measures for differing stages of violence (based on crisis management theory). Participants were 440 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from Heilongjiang Province, China (response rate 84.6%). One hundred and six (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Regarding psychological violence, the most common type reported was verbal abuse (46.0%). While most (85.2%) respondents had some degree of worry about suffering violence, 22.1% were worried or very worried. Ordinal regression analysis revealed that being ≤35 years of age, having a lower educational level, having less work experience, and working night shifts were all associated with worry about workplace violence. Furthermore, those without experience of such violence were more likely to worry about it. Respondents' suggested measures for controlling violence included "widening channels on medical dispute solutions," "improving doctor-patient communication," and "advocating for respect for medical workers via the media." Results suggest the target factors for reducing healthcare workers' worry by according to the type of education and training and possible measures for limiting workplace violence in township hospitals. PMID:27517949

  6. Concern about Workplace Violence and Its Risk Factors in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhang, Xue; Jiao, Mingli; Cui, Yu; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jinghua; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuchong; Zhao, Yanming; Li, Ye; Liang, Libo; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence in Chinese township hospitals is a major public health problem. We identified the risk factors of healthcare workers’ worry about experiencing workplace violence in 90 Chinese township hospitals and determined specific measures for differing stages of violence (based on crisis management theory). Participants were 440 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from Heilongjiang Province, China (response rate 84.6%). One hundred and six (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Regarding psychological violence, the most common type reported was verbal abuse (46.0%). While most (85.2%) respondents had some degree of worry about suffering violence, 22.1% were worried or very worried. Ordinal regression analysis revealed that being ≤35 years of age, having a lower educational level, having less work experience, and working night shifts were all associated with worry about workplace violence. Furthermore, those without experience of such violence were more likely to worry about it. Respondents’ suggested measures for controlling violence included “widening channels on medical dispute solutions,” “improving doctor-patient communication,” and “advocating for respect for medical workers via the media.” Results suggest the target factors for reducing healthcare workers’ worry by according to the type of education and training and possible measures for limiting workplace violence in township hospitals. PMID:27517949

  7. Hospital staff responses to workplace violence in a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Wang, Jung-Der

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed 222 nurses, nursing assistants, and clerks at a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan on responses to workplace violence, treatment of violent patients, and reporting behavior. Staff reported 78 incidents of physical violence (PV), 113 of verbal abuse (VA), 35 of bullying/ mobbing (BM), 21 of sexual harassment (SH), and 10 of racial harassment (RH) over the course of one year. Among affected staff, only 31% of those experiencing PV and < 10% of those experiencing other categories of violence completed a formal report. Highest levels of reporting to senior staff were among those affected by SH. Patients who were physically violent were more likely to be injected with medication than patients showing other violent behaviors. More VA-affected staff considered the incident not important enough to report. Other reasons for not reporting the incident were fear of negative consequences, especially for BM, and shame for SH. Reliable systems for responding to and reporting patient violence should be developed. PMID:19496484

  8. Workplace Violence in Early Childhood Settings: A Counter Narrative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, Jennifer

    Noting that portrayals of early childhood settings as communities of care distinguish them from other education contexts, this paper presents a counter-narrative that focuses on workplace tensions experienced by an Australian preschool teacher. The counter-narrative was informed by informal interviews held 4 times yearly over a period of 7 years…

  9. Workplace Violence, Hate Crime and Free Speech: A Proactive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romas, Ted; Parmer, Harry

    For community colleges, crime on campus is a complex and pressing issue since most maintain open campuses with no physical security features, such as entry control points or fencing. Workplace crimes can take the form of robbery or other violent crimes, domestic and misdirected affection cases, employer-directed situations, terrorism, and hate…

  10. Frequency and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric nurses and its impact on their quality of life in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiao-Ying; An, Feng-Rong; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Qi, Yun-Ke; Ungvari, Gabor S; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Yu, Liu-Yang; Ding, Yan-Ming; Tang, Wai-Kwong; Wu, Ping-Ping; Hou, Zhi-Jiaolong; Chiu, Helen F K

    2013-12-15

    This study examined the frequency of violence on nurses in Chinese psychiatric hospitals and explored its risk factors and impact on nurses' quality of life (QOL). A survey was conducted with 387 frontline psychiatric nurses in China. Information about experience of workplace violence in the past 6 months, type of workplace violence, and demographic characteristics was collected by a questionnaire. Altogether 319 (82.4%) of 387 nurses reported having experienced at least one type of violent event in the past 6 months. The prevalence of sexual assault, physical and verbal harassment was 18.6%, 61.5% and 78.6%, respectively. Compared to those with no exposure to violence, nurses who were exposed to violence had lower QOL in both the physical and mental domains. Significant predictors of violence against nurses are male sex, receiving college level or higher education and working on rotating duty were independently associated with high risk of violence. Workplace violence against psychiatric nurses commonly occurs in China. Considering the deleterious effects of violence, comprehensive strategies from the perspective of nursing education and training, organizational policy, patient care and staff support are recommended to promote occupational safety in psychiatric settings in China. PMID:23850435

  11. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on nursing staffs caring for chronic psychiatric patients in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Sun, Yu-Hua; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2009-11-01

    This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence. PMID:20049226

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Sun, Yu-Hua; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2009-01-01

    This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence. PMID:20049226

  13. [Violence and discrimination in the workplace. The effects on health and setting-related approaches to prevention and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Albert; Drechsel-Schlund, Claudia; Schambortski, Heike; Schablon, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Violence in the workplace is a widespread problem that manifests itself in very different forms. The consequences for victims and companies are equally diverse. Sexual harassment is a special form of violence at the workplace. Violence may come from external perpetrators (attacks on cashiers) or from persons inside a company or establishment (colleagues, patients, people in care). Statutory accident insurance institutions in Germany (UV, "Unfallversicherungsträger") receive approximately 16,000 occupational injury reports per year that resulted from violence and led to extended incapacity to work. The numbers are increasing steadily. Particularly affected by violence are people working in healthcare and social welfare. Both psychological and physical violence can lead to severe disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To avoid violence, technical, organisational, and personal protective measures are needed. The training of de-escalation officers in the areas affected can be helpful. For victims of psychological and physical violence in the workplace, the UV offers special psychotherapeutic support and recommends the training of first-aiders. PMID:26497815

  14. 28 CFR 0.23a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 0.23a Section 0.23a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 2-Office of Legal Policy § 0.23a...

  15. 28 CFR 0.23 - General functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General functions. 0.23 Section 0.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 2-Office of Legal Policy § 0.23 General functions. The Office of Legal Policy shall be headed by an Assistant...

  16. What every healthcare facility should do now to reduce the potential for workplace violence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and growth of violence in healthcare facilities has now been recognized by government and regulatory agencies, the author reports, but there continues to be a general lack of understanding and support of security and safety by some hospital administrators. In this article he presents the options that should be considered for reducing violence and outlines the steps which can be taken to reduce the number of violent incidents and effectively respond if they do occur. PMID:26978956

  17. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-06-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36-2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136-1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21-4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13-2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself. PMID:26086703

  18. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H.; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36–2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136–1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21–4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13–2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself. PMID:26086703

  19. Racial and ethnic differences in factors related to workplace violence victimization.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Bushra; St Vil, Noelle M; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Fitzgerald, Sheila; Kub, Joan; Agnew, Jacqueline

    2015-02-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) is a significant public health concern affecting all racial or ethnic groups. This study examined whether different racial/ethnic groups differed in vulnerability to WPV exposure and utilization of resources at the workplace. This cross-sectional research focused on White, Black, and Asian nursing employees (N = 2,033) employed in four health care institutions in a mid-Atlantic U.S. metropolitan area. Whereas childhood physical abuse was significantly related to risk of WPV among workers from all racial/ethnic backgrounds, intimate partner abuse was a significant factor for Asians and Whites. Blacks and Asians were found to be less likely than Whites to be knowledgeable about WPV resources or use resources to address WPV. Services to address past trauma, and education and training opportunities for new workers may reduce risk of WPV and promote resource utilization among minority workers. PMID:24658287

  20. Workplace assessment of targeted violence risk: the development and reliability of the WAVR-21.

    PubMed

    Meloy, J Reid; White, Stephen G; Hart, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    This study describes the development of the WAVR-21, a structured professional judgment guide for the assessment of workplace targeted violence, and presents initial interrater reliability results. The 21-item instrument codes both static and dynamic risk factors and change, if any, over time. Five critical items or red flag indicators assess violent motives, ideation, intent, weapons skill, and pre-attack planning. Additional items assess the contribution of mental disorder, negative personality factors, situational factors, and a protective factor. Eleven raters each rated 12 randomly assigned cases from actual files of workplace threat scenarios. Summary interrater reliability correlation coefficients (ICCs) for overall presence of risk factors, risk of violence, and seriousness of the violent act were in the fair to good range, similar to other structured professional judgment instruments. A subgroup of psychologists who were coders produced an ICC of 0.76 for overall presence of risk factors. Some of the individual items had poor reliability for both clinical and statistical reasons. The WAVR-21 appears to improve the structuring and organizing of empirically based risk-relevant data and may enhance communication and decision making. PMID:23865721

  1. Workplace violence against emergency versus non-emergency nurses in Mansoura university hospitals, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Abd-El-Raouf, Samar E; Abd-Elmouty, Samia Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Rabab El-Sayed Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against nurses is a common but neglected problem in Egypt. The objectives are to estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors of different types of violence against nurses working in the emergency hospital compared with those working in non-emergency clinics, circumstances of violence, type of perpetrators, and victims' response. This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospitals, Egypt, during January 2013. The data were collected through the adapted version of a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Office/International Council of Nurses/World Health Organization/Public Services International on WPV in the health sector. All types of WPV are common among nurses. Precipitating factors for violent incidents identified by respondents are emergency specialty, having work shift, and younger age. Violent incidents result in work dissatisfaction and consequently impair work productivity. Nurses working in emergency hospital experienced a higher level of different types of WPV. There is an urgent need to formulate and implement a policy for dealing with violent events. PMID:24970863

  2. Workplace Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Learn how to recognize, avoid, or diffuse potentially violent situations by attending personal safety training programs. s Alert ... medical evaluation and treatment after the incident. s Report violent incidents to the local police promptly. s Inform victims ...

  3. The missing link: using emotional intelligence to reduce workplace stress and workplace violence in our nursing and other health care professions.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Because of our poor emotionally intelligent responses and interactions, many nurses and other health care staff have become scarred emotionally from abusive, demoralizing, or hostile acts inflicted on one another. Rude, disruptive behavior among health care professionals can pose a serious threat to patient safety and the overall quality of care. The expectation of regulating bodies is that health care professionals focus on effects disruptive behavior has on a culture of safety for both patients and staff. Relatively recent research in training and development, and behavior change, specifically on emotional intelligence, suggests that it is possible to improve the emotional competence of adults. I posit it is possible to increase emotional competence to reduce health workplace stress and workplace violence. PMID:23158199

  4. Employee Health in the Mental Health Workplace: Clinical, Administrative, and Organizational Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jai L; Kapoor, Reena; Cole, Robert; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-04-01

    Issues of mental health and employee health have risen to increasing prominence in recent years. However, there have been few explorations of the clinical and administrative challenges that these issues raise, particularly in settings that are themselves mental health workplaces. In order to identify and understand such challenges, a brief case of acute employee illness in a mental health workplace is described followed by a discussion of salient clinical, administrative, and organizational considerations. The case raises questions about medicolegal responsibilities and relationships between clinicians and patients in mental health settings, illuminates tensions between clinical staff and human resources processes, and draws attention to the need for illness prevention and mental health promotion initiatives in the workplace. Increased awareness of these issues, complications, and potential solutions would benefit clinicians, administrators, and mental health institutions. PMID:25091269

  5. The Exploding Spark: Workplace Violence in an Infectious Disease Hospital—A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Workplace violence (WV) is an important occupational hazard for healthcare workers (HCWs). Methods. A longitudinal study was carried out on HCWs from an infectious disease hospital. Work-related stress, anxiety, and depression were measured at baseline in 2003, and they were reassessed in 2005, along with the assaults that occurred in the previous year. Results. One-year prevalences of 6.2% and 13.9% were reported for physical and verbal aggressions, respectively. Perpetrators were mainly patients. The professional groups most frequently attacked were physicians, followed by nurses. Workers with job strain at baseline had a significant risk of being subject to aggression (OR 7.7; CI 95%, 3.3–17.9) in the following year. The relationship between job strain and subsequent WV remained significant even after correction for anxiety, depression, and other confounders. Conversely, experiencing WV was associated with a high risk of job strain and effort-reward imbalance in the following year. The final levels of anxiety and depression were predicted using regression models that included physical aggression among predictive variables. Conclusions. WV is the spark that sets off a problematic work situation. Effective prevention of WV can only be achieved within the framework of an overall improvement in the quality of work. PMID:23936789

  6. Status limbo: analysis of nurse faculty member reports of administrator response to workplace bullying complaints.

    PubMed

    Dzurec, Laura Cox

    2013-01-01

    Increasing concern about bullying among adults in workplaces is notable internationally. Unlike blatant physical bullying, workplace bullying often involves bullies' dismissive, demeaning, and typically surreptitious, one-on-one communications with their intended victims. These communications challenge recognition when they are examined beyond the interpersonal margins of the bully-victim dyad. Thus, they tend to elude formal, administrative reproach, despite the negative, long-term outcomes they herald for workplace employees--those immediately involved as victims and those who are bystanders--and for employing organizations and the consumers they serve. This article offers a hermeneutic analysis of workplace bullying victims' narrative reports of administrator responses to their complaints of having been bullied at work. Analysis demonstrated respondent perceptions of the variability and unevenness of administrative responses to their reports and, more broadly, respondents' collective sense of administrative abandonment. That sense is characterized in this report as status limbo, a term employed by Facebook users to represent a state of perceived neglect and oblivion. PMID:24075266

  7. Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe Forum, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Highlighting the issue of violence, this Forum issue contains 12 essays. Titles and authors are: "Passivity in the Face of Violence" (Henri Laborit); "Democratisation without Violence?" (Friedrich Hacker); "Ritualised Violence in Sport" (Christian Bromberger); "Violence in Prisons" (Luige Daga); "Racial Aggression" (Geoffrey Bindman); "Violence in…

  8. Coping with Workplace Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Heilongjiang Province, China: Social Supports and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Gao, Lijun; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Libo; Zhao, Yanming; Wu, Qunhong

    2016-01-01

    The study’s objectives were to: 1) use social support theory to examine factors influencing healthcare workers’ opinions about workplace violence (WPV) prevention strategies, and 2) to determine the types of support that general practitioners (GPs) and general nurses sought and expected to use after WPV exposure. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess a sample of 448 GPs and 412 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China. Results revealed that workers exposed to physical, psychological or both WPV types had a strong opinion about the necessity of improving diagnosis/treatment competence, developing violence prevention guidelines and plans, using protective equipment, and reinforcing staff by providing back-up support. The last two strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers in our previous study. In addition, workers with high anxiety selected the following prevention strategies as most effective: improving doctor-patient communication skills; installing cameras on wards; keeping work areas bright; improvements in violence reporting, statistics, and interventions; security patrols in the key departments; reinforcing staff; and correcting inaccurate media perspectives and reports. The last four strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers. All respondents expected to receive organisational and social support. In conclusion, these prevention strategies should be tailored to the different requirements of specific populations. Furthermore, it is necessary for organisations, the public, and policymakers to provide powerful support in WPV prevention. PMID:27326460

  9. Coping with Workplace Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Heilongjiang Province, China: Social Supports and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siqi; Qu, Lijun; Liu, He; Gao, Lijun; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Libo; Zhao, Yanming; Wu, Qunhong

    2016-01-01

    The study's objectives were to: 1) use social support theory to examine factors influencing healthcare workers' opinions about workplace violence (WPV) prevention strategies, and 2) to determine the types of support that general practitioners (GPs) and general nurses sought and expected to use after WPV exposure. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess a sample of 448 GPs and 412 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China. Results revealed that workers exposed to physical, psychological or both WPV types had a strong opinion about the necessity of improving diagnosis/treatment competence, developing violence prevention guidelines and plans, using protective equipment, and reinforcing staff by providing back-up support. The last two strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers in our previous study. In addition, workers with high anxiety selected the following prevention strategies as most effective: improving doctor-patient communication skills; installing cameras on wards; keeping work areas bright; improvements in violence reporting, statistics, and interventions; security patrols in the key departments; reinforcing staff; and correcting inaccurate media perspectives and reports. The last four strategies were also selected by tertiary hospital workers. All respondents expected to receive organisational and social support. In conclusion, these prevention strategies should be tailored to the different requirements of specific populations. Furthermore, it is necessary for organisations, the public, and policymakers to provide powerful support in WPV prevention. PMID:27326460

  10. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Workplace violence increases in medical settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... now confronting steadily increasing rates of crime, including violent crimes such as assault, rape, and homicide' (end ... and less productivity among staff members after a violent incident occurs. Phillips notes the victims of workplace ...

  11. 75 FR 7978 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence... Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records and this proposed... a new system of records under the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) titled, DHS/TSA-023 Workplace...

  12. 28 CFR 0.23 - General functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 2-Office of Legal Policy § 0.23 General functions. The Office of Legal Policy shall be headed by an Assistant Attorney... addition, the Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal Policy, shall: (a) Examine and study...

  13. Workplace violence: an overview of patterns of risk and the emotional/stress consequences on targets.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Claire; Chappell, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    Violence at work (VAW) is a frequent precursor to mental ill health, and to a lesser degree physical injury, among those exposed to this occupational hazard. In this paper an overview is provided of the nature and prevalence of such violence, of the risk factors involved, and of the impact upon victims. The paper examines the definition of VAW which includes both physical and psychological violence. Attention is given to the influential involvement of the UN affiliated International Labour Organisation in setting benchmarks for defining, preventing and responding to VAW. Evidence about the incidence and severity of VAW on a global basis is examined. It is noted that the reliability of information about VAW is quite variable, especially in non-industrialised countries. The available evidence indicates that psychological aggression is widespread across all sectors of employment and physical violence, although far less common, remains a significant problem. Risks of becoming a victim of VAW vary according to numbers of factors including job category, the nature of the work being performed, gender, age and experience. The paper also focuses on research regarding the effects upon persons experiencing or witnessing VAW. This research indicates that the health related consequences of psychological violence can be as severe as those from physical violence. The paper concludes that VAW is a major occupational health and safety hazard in all nations, regardless of their state of development. A reduction or elimination of this violence, and the health problems it creates, requires concerted and integrated strategies, together with rigorous evaluation of preventive measures. PMID:17628681

  14. Drivers' and conductors' views on the causes and ways of preventing workplace violence in the road passenger transport sector in Maputo City, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Workplace violence (WPV) is an occupational health hazard in both low and high income countries. To design WPV prevention programs, prior knowledge and understanding of conditions in the targeted population are essential. This study explores and describes the views of drivers and conductors on the causes of WPV and ways of preventing it in the road passenger transport sector in Maputo City, Mozambique. Methods The design was qualitative. Participants were purposefully selected from among transport workers identified as victims of WPV in an earlier quantitative study, and with six or more years of experience in the transport sector. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews. Seven open questions covered individual views on causes of WPV and its prevention, based on the interviewees' experiences of violence while on duty. Thirty-two transport professionals were interviewed. The data were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. Results The triggers and causes of violence included fare evasion, disputes over revenue owing to owners, alcohol abuse, overcrowded vehicles, and unfair competition for passengers. Failures to meet passenger expectations, e.g. by-passing parts of a bus route or missing stops, were also important. There was disrespect on the part of transport workers, e.g. being rude to passengers and jumping of queues at taxi ranks, and there were also robberies. Proposals for prevention included: training for workers on conflict resolution, and for employers on passenger-transport administration; and, promoting learning among passengers and workers on how to behave when traveling collectively. Regarding control and supervision, there were expressed needs for the recording of mileage, and for the sanctioning of workers who transgress queuing rules at taxi ranks. The police or supervisors should prevent drunken passengers from getting into vehicles, and drivers should refuse to go to dangerous, secluded neighborhoods. Finally

  15. From Fistfights to Gunfights: Preparing Teachers and Administrators To Cope with Violence in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, H. Woodrow

    Issues facing educators today include drug traffic and abuse, crime and delinquency, gangs, weapons, violence, vandalism, schoolyard bullying, and crisis management. Teachers and administrators require special skills to cope with potentially explosive situations and violent students, yet training in those skills is not being received in university…

  16. HEALTH CARE PERSONNEL AND WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS OF A VOLATILE METROPOLIS: RESULTS FROM KARACHI, PAKISTAN

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Waleed; Siddiqui, Emaduddin; Ejaz, Kiran; Shehzad, Muhammad Umer; Khan, Uzma Rahim; Jamali, Seemin; Razzak, Junaid A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Workplace violence (WPV) is an important challenge faced by health care personnel in the emergency department (ED). Study Objectives To determine the prevalence and nature of WPV reported by physicians and nurses working in the EDs of four of the largest tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan and to understand the mental health impact of experiencing WPV. Methods This cross-sectional survey was conducted between September and November 2008 using a widely used questionnaire developed by the World Health Organization. Overall, 266 (86% response rate) questionnaires were included in this study. Results A total of 44 (16.5%) physicians and nurses said they had been physically attacked, and 193 (72.5%) said that they had experienced verbal abuse in the last 12 months. Among those who reported physical attack, 29.6% reported that the last incident involved a weapon, and in 64% of cases the attacker was a patient’s relative. Eighty-six percent thought that the last attack could have been prevented, and 64% said that no action was taken against the attacker. After adjusting for covariates, physicians were less likely than nurses to report physical attack (odds ratio [OR] 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2–1.0), and personnel with greater work experience (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.0–11.7) and those who said that there were procedures to report WPV in their workplace (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.6–6.5) were more likely to report verbal abuse. WPV was associated with mental health effects in the form of bothersome memories, super-alertness, and feelings of avoidance and futility. Conclusion WPV is an important challenge in the EDs of large hospitals in Karachi. A majority of respondents feel that WPV is preventable, but only a minority of attackers face consequences. PMID:24011477

  17. Chapter 4: Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions of the Saber-Tooth Project Reform and of Their Changing Workplace Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutis, Panayiotis; Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Describes changing workplace conditions encountered by middle school physical education teachers and administrators engaged in the Saber-Tooth Project, sharing data from interviews about their perspectives of this project. Findings are organized around the themes of collegiality, planning and assessment, and professionalism, all of which empowered…

  18. The Competitive Edge: Sharpening Your Skills in the Workplace. Administrator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Elaine

    This guide is intended to be used as a companion to "The Competitive Edge: Sharpening Your Skills in the Workplace" curricular materials--the student editions and instructors' guides. It can also stand alone as a reference for individuals just starting to implement or beginning to plan a workplace skills enhancement program in their organization.…

  19. 46 CFR 164.023-15 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking. 164.023-15 Section 164.023-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-15 Marking. (a) General. The manufacturer must ensure that each...

  20. 75 FR 31273 - Social Security Administration Implementation of OMB Guidance for Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is consolidating all Federal regulations concerning drug-free workplace requirements for recipients of financial assistance. Accordingly, we are removing our regulation on this subject currently located within title 20 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and issuing a new regulation to adopt the OMB guidance at 2 CFR part 182. The new regulation......

  1. Trauma Nurses' Experience of Workplace Violence and Threats: Short- and Long-Term Consequences in a Swedish Setting.

    PubMed

    Avander, Karin; Heikki, Anna; Bjerså, Kristofer; Engström, My

    2016-01-01

    Violence in health care is increasing globally and Sweden is no exception. Still, this topic is sparsely studied in the Swedish trauma care setting. This focus group study examined nurses' experience of violence and threats, and their consequences. The content analysis revealed two main categories, threatening situations and consequences, which led to a change in priorities in nursing care in order to avoid a potential violent situation. Furthermore, negative stress among the staff and greater vigilance and unwillingness to be near the patient resulted in altered communication and, in the end, a decreased quality of nursing care. PMID:26953531

  2. 28 CFR 0.23b - Office of Asylum Policy and Review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Deputy Attorney General delegates pursuant to 28 CFR 0.15(f) or otherwise assigns to it. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office of Asylum Policy and Review. 0.23b Section 0.23b Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...

  3. Stress and Violence in the Workplace and on Campus: A Growing Problem for Business, Industry and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Matthew L.; Hughey, Aaron W.; Burke, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Levels of stress and violence at work have been increasing globally for the past few decades. Whether the setting is business and industry or a college campus, this disturbing trend affects a growing number of people, including those who do not work directly in these environments. In this paper the authors describe the relationship between stress…

  4. 46 CFR 160.023-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Container. 160.023-6 Section 160.023-6 Shipping COAST... Container. (a) General. The container for storing the signals on lifeboats and liferafts is not required to be of a special design or be approved by the Coast Guard. The container must meet the requirements...

  5. Violence in New South Wales emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Lyneham, J

    In 1999 the International Council of Nurses recognised workplace violence as a significant issue in nursing. During the same year the Australian Institute of Criminology reported that health was the most violent industry. This study examined the nature and extent of violence in NSW hospital emergency departments. Emergency nurses experienced violent incidents in their department, in the wards and outside the hospital setting. Every respondent (n=266) experienced some form of violence at least weekly. Ninety-two incidents involved lethal weapons. Ninety-two percent of perpetrators were patients or their relatives, however other staff members were also implicated. Non-reporting of violence is an issue as over 70% of incidents were not referred to authorities. Drugs, alcohol and emergency department waiting times are the most significant predisposing factors. Most emergency nurses are not satisfied with the response of administration to violent incidents within hospitals. PMID:11878501

  6. 46 CFR 160.023-2 - Type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-2 Type. (a) Hand combination flare and smoke distress signals specified by this subpart shall be of the type described...

  7. 46 CFR 160.023-2 - Type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-2 Type. (a) Hand combination flare and smoke distress signals specified by this subpart shall be of the type described...

  8. 46 CFR 160.023-2 - Type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-2 Type. (a) Hand combination flare and smoke distress signals specified by this subpart shall be of the type described...

  9. 46 CFR 160.023-2 - Type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-2 Type. (a) Hand combination flare and smoke distress signals specified by this subpart shall be of the type described...

  10. 46 CFR 160.023-2 - Type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-2 Type. (a) Hand combination flare and smoke distress signals specified by this subpart shall be of the type described...

  11. Analysis of workplace compliance measurements of asbestos by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (1984-2011).

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Cheng, Thales J; Ground, Matthew; Sahmel, Jennifer; Varughese, Allysha; Madl, Amy K

    2015-08-01

    The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) maintains the Chemical Exposure Health Data (CEHD) and the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) databases, which contain quantitative and qualitative data resulting from compliance inspections conducted from 1984 to 2011. This analysis aimed to evaluate trends in workplace asbestos concentrations over time and across industries by combining the samples from these two databases. From 1984 to 2011, personal air samples ranged from 0.001 to 175 f/cc. Asbestos compliance sampling data associated with the construction, automotive repair, manufacturing, and chemical/petroleum/rubber industries included measurements in excess of 10 f/cc, and were above the permissible exposure limit from 2001 to 2011. The utility of combining the databases was limited by the completeness and accuracy of the data recorded. In this analysis, 40% of the data overlapped between the two databases. Other limitations included sampling bias associated with compliance sampling and errors occurring from user-entered data. A clear decreasing trend in both airborne fiber concentrations and the numbers of asbestos samples collected parallels historically decreasing trends in the consumption of asbestos, and declining mesothelioma incidence rates. Although air sampling data indicated that airborne fiber exposure potential was high (>10 f/cc for short and long-term samples) in some industries (e.g., construction, manufacturing), airborne concentrations have significantly declined over the past 30 years. Recommendations for improving the existing exposure OSHA databases are provided. PMID:25985714

  12. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place. PMID:27575350

  13. 46 CFR 164.023-15 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... symbol; (2) The unique style, part, or model number of the thread; (3) The size of the thread; (4) The composition of the thread; and (5) The lot number of the thread. (b) Non-standard thread. In addition to the...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-15 Marking. (a)...

  14. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.023-11 Section 164.023-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-11 Acceptance tests. (a) Performance testing. Manufacturers shall ensure that the performance tests described in § 164.023-7 (a) or...

  15. Violence against Teachers: Prevalence and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Catherine M.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Lyon, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Data collected from 731 teachers were used to examine the consequences of violence directed toward teachers while in the workplace. Analyses showed that the majority of respondents (n = 585, 80.0%) had experienced school-related violence--broadly defined--at one point in their careers. Serious violence (actual, attempted, or threatened physical…

  16. Schoolplace Violence Prevention. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinna, Kelly A.

    This training manual begins with a graph depicting trends in schoolplace violence from 1993-1999. Next is a table displaying the parallels between workplace and schoolplace violence. A list of the elements included in a psychological profile of schoolplace violent offenders is provided. The four types of students involved in schoolplace violence…

  17. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.023-11 Section 164.023-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-11 Acceptance tests. (a... submitted for acceptance. (b) Identification testing. Manufacturers shall ensure that the...

  18. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.023-11 Section 164.023-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-11 Acceptance tests. (a... submitted for acceptance. (b) Identification testing. Manufacturers shall ensure that the...

  19. 46 CFR 164.023-5 - Performance; standard thread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance; standard thread. 164.023-5 Section 164.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-5 Performance; standard thread. (a) Use Codes 1, 2,...

  20. 46 CFR 164.023-5 - Performance; standard thread.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance; standard thread. 164.023-5 Section 164.023... MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-5 Performance; standard thread. (a) Use Codes 1, 2, 3, 4BC, 4RB, 5 (any). Each thread which complies with all...

  1. 46 CFR 160.023-4 - Approval and production tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approval and production tests. 160.023-4 Section 160.023... Signals § 160.023-4 Approval and production tests. (a) Approval tests. The approval tests are those tests... independent laboratory accepted by the Commandant under § 159.010 of this chapter. (b) Production...

  2. Anger Management in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazak, Daniel L.

    This presentation offered counselors and therapists an opportunity to comment on the invisible aspects of anger in the workplace. An argument is made that anxiety is a foundational construct that supports rage, violence, and anger. An audience of 35 participants were asked to describe the one situation that best illustrated the most anger observed…

  3. [Violence against health personnel].

    PubMed

    Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2014-01-20

    Health personnel are at risk of threats and violence, especially when young and inexperienced. Also, working in emergency departments, psychiatric wards, and eldercare bears a risk. The phenomenon is reported from all over the world and may originate in intoxication, confusion or frustration during long waiting hours and uncertainty of treatment and prognosis. Experiences of threats and violence result in decreased well-being, anger, helplessness and thoughts about change of workplace or quitting the job. Training in communication and teamwork may prevent threats and violence. PMID:24629677

  4. Administrators Mandating Mediation: Tools of Institutional Violence Cloaked in the Discourse of Reconciliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on a critical incident, the practice of administrators mandating mediation as a means to resolve institutional conflicts is explored. The case is made that in relegating conceptual critique and disagreement to a psychologized space, individuals become the sites for change instead of the institution. The analysis is in keeping with…

  5. Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Johnson, Ryan; Silverstein, Rustin

    This report describes seven categories of violent crime in Phoenix, Arizona, and provides causes, facts, preventative programs, and lessons learned pertaining to each category of violence. The categories are: (1) prenatal and early childhood; (2) families; (3) individual youth; (4) schools; (5) neighborhood and community; (6) workplace; and (7)…

  6. 28 CFR 83.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 83.635 Section 83.635 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site...

  7. 28 CFR 83.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 83.635 Section 83.635 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site...

  8. 28 CFR 83.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 83.635 Section 83.635 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site...

  9. 28 CFR 83.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 83.635 Section 83.635 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site...

  10. 28 CFR 83.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 83.635 Section 83.635 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site...

  11. Violence in the Schools: How To Proactively Prevent and Defuse It. Roadmaps to Success: The Practicing Administrator's Leadership Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curcio, Joan L.; First, Patricia F.

    Research has confirmed what educators have long suspected, namely, that violence in schools is increasing. A 1991 Federal Bureau of Investigation report indicated that violent crime involving juveniles from 10 to 17 years old had risen rapidly in the 1980s and continued to do so. This book explores a wide range of areas of violence in schools. The…

  12. The Violence Prevention Community Meeting: A Multi-Site Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Marilyn; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Schmidt, Satu; Lovelace, Jeff; Amandus, Harlan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Violence Prevention Community Meeting (VPCM) is a specialized form of community meeting in which avoiding violence and promoting non-violent problem solving and interpersonal civility are focal points. A nationwide study to assess the VPCM as an effective intervention to reduce workplace violence was undertaken. Participants Seven acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) throughout the United States participated in the study. Methods All patients and all staff on the seven in-patient locked psychiatry units participated in the intervention (VPCM) or as a control (treatment as usual). The study was 21 weeks at each site. The three time periods were pre-treatment weeks 1 – 3, treatment weeks 4 – 18, and post-treatment weeks 19 – 21. The VPCM was conducted during the treatment weeks. Results Overall rates of aggression declined by 0.6% (95%CI: −5.6%, 6.5%; nonsignificant) per week in the intervention hospitals and by 5.1% (95%CI: 0.4%, 9.6%; significant) per week for the control hospitals. Conclusions Aggression decreased for both the intervention and control hospitals which could be due to enrollment in a research study and thus being more aware of their ability to address workplace violence at their site. PMID:27256945

  13. Student Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Edward

    This report discusses student violence within the framework of causes, issues, and false and true solutions. The author decries the abdication of responsibilities by both college administrators, who have permitted students to "do their thing," and leftwing students, who crusade thoughtlessly against educational institutions. Some true solutions…

  14. Occupational and demographic factors associated with violence in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Gates, Donna; Gillespie, Gordon; Kowalenko, Terry; Succop, Paul; Sanker, Maria; Farra, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Violence against health care workers is a serious and growing problem. The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to (a) describe the frequency of workplace violence (WPV) against emergency department (ED) workers; (b) identify demographic and occupational characteristics related to WPV; and (c) identify demographic and occupational characteristics related to feelings of safety and level of confidence when dealing with WPV. Survey data were collected from 213 workers at 6 hospital EDs. Verbal and physical violence was prevalent in all 6 EDs. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of violence for age, job title, patient population, and hospital location. Sexual harassment was the only category of violence affected by gender with females having a greater frequency. Feelings of safety were positively related to the frequency of WPV. Females were significantly more likely to feel unsafe and have less confidence in dealing with WPV. The study findings indicate that all ED workers are at risk of violence, regardless of personal and occupational characteristics. Feelings of safety are related to job satisfaction and turnover. Violence has serious consequences for the employers, employees, and patients. It is recommended that administration, managers, and employees collaborate to develop and implement prevention strategies to reduce and manage the violence. PMID:22075681

  15. State Employment Protection Statutes for Victims of Domestic Violence: Public Policy's Response to Domestic Violence as an Employment Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; Ojha, Mamta U.; Macke, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that domestic violence has negative consequences on victims' employment; yet employers lag in recognizing this as a workplace issue. To address the problem, some states have established several policy solutions. To understand the scope of the public sector's response to domestic violence as a workplace issue, a content analysis…

  16. Workplace Spirituality and Organizational Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Zamor, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    Examines workplace spirituality in an historical context and compares it to religious beliefs and to established ethical theories and moral principles. Suggests how managers and administrators in both the public and private sectors can use workplace spirituality to increase performance and develop ethical organizations. (Contains 54 references.)…

  17. 46 CFR 164.023-9 - Samples submitted for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Samples submitted for acceptance. 164.023-9 Section 164.023-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND... submitted for acceptance. Application samples. A product sample submitted for acceptance as required...

  18. 46 CFR 160.023-5 - Labeling and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Labeling and marking. 160.023-5 Section 160.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  19. 46 CFR 160.023-5 - Labeling and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Labeling and marking. 160.023-5 Section 160.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  20. 46 CFR 160.023-5 - Labeling and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Labeling and marking. 160.023-5 Section 160.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  1. 46 CFR 160.023-5 - Labeling and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Labeling and marking. 160.023-5 Section 160.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  2. 46 CFR 160.023-7 - Procedure for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedure for approval. 160.023-7 Section 160.023-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  3. 46 CFR 160.023-5 - Labeling and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Labeling and marking. 160.023-5 Section 160.023-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  4. 46 CFR 160.023-7 - Procedure for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedure for approval. 160.023-7 Section 160.023-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  5. 46 CFR 160.023-7 - Procedure for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedure for approval. 160.023-7 Section 160.023-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  6. 46 CFR 160.023-7 - Procedure for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedure for approval. 160.023-7 Section 160.023-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  7. 46 CFR 160.023-7 - Procedure for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedure for approval. 160.023-7 Section 160.023-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals §...

  8. Safety in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Addresses workplace safety needs and tips for helping an organization achieve a high level of safety. Tips include showing administration commitment, establishing retribution-free reporting of safety problems and violations, rewarding excellent safety effort, and allowing no compromises in following safety procedures. (GR)

  9. 41 CFR 105-74.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 105... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  10. 20 CFR 439.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 439.635 Section 439.635 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for...

  11. 41 CFR 105-74.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 105... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  12. 41 CFR 105-74.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 105... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  13. 41 CFR 105-74.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 105... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  14. 41 CFR 105-74.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 105... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  15. Fighting Violence without Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowicki, Mark A.; Martin, William C.

    Violence is becoming the number one problem in United States schools. Approximately 20 percent of high school students regularly carry guns and other weapons. Several nonviolent measures are appropriate to reduce violence in schools; but only the implementation of multiple ideas and measures, not "quick fix" solutions, will curb violence. Peer…

  16. 46 CFR 160.023-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-1... specifications MIL-S-18655 C, 3 May 1971—Signal, Smoke and Illumination, Marine, Mark 13, Mod 0. (b) The...

  17. 46 CFR 160.023-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-1... specifications MIL-S-18655 C, 3 May 1971—Signal, Smoke and Illumination, Marine, Mark 13, Mod 0. (b) The...

  18. 46 CFR 160.023-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-1... specifications MIL-S-18655 C, 3 May 1971—Signal, Smoke and Illumination, Marine, Mark 13, Mod 0. (b) The...

  19. 46 CFR 160.023-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-1... specifications MIL-S-18655 C, 3 May 1971—Signal, Smoke and Illumination, Marine, Mark 13, Mod 0. (b) The...

  20. 46 CFR 160.023-1 - Incorporation by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination Flare and Smoke Distress Signals § 160.023-1... specifications MIL-S-18655 C, 3 May 1971—Signal, Smoke and Illumination, Marine, Mark 13, Mod 0. (b) The...

  1. Wellness in the Workplace: Building a More Productive Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crazy Bull, Cheryl; Prue, Alex Sr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the challenges unique to Native Americans in the workplace. Asserts that the effects of high rates of poverty, health problems, and violence in Native communities are often visible at the office. Offers suggestions for using cultural healing strategies in the workplace to create an environment of respect and support. (NB)

  2. Sexual assault in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Linda H

    2011-01-01

    Women are sexually assaulted at an alarming rate, and the workplace is a frequent arena for assault. However, in recent decades, attention has been given to improving responses to sexual assault. Sexual assault is a frequent cause of injury and death for women in the United States. One in five American women admit they have experienced a completed rape during their lifetime. These estimates are conservative because sexual assault and sexual violence are both underreported and underprosecuted. Fear of job loss and discrimination are frequent reasons women do not report sexual assault in the workplace. Women are entering the workplace in greater numbers due in part to more single parent families and the depressed economy. Also, women are entering work environments that have traditionally been the domain of male workers: corporate headquarters, semi trucks, health care providers' offices, rural farms, and rural factories. Employers must have a plan to protect female employees and effectively address any incidents of sexual assault or violence. Occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners can assist both employees and employers to prevent sexual assault and resolve the aftermath of sexual assault. However, to accomplish this goal, occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners must be trained in sexual assault and violence response as well as preventive interventions. PMID:21175106

  3. Preventing Classroom Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druck, Ken; Kaplowitz, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Violence affects one in every five teenagers. Everyday 160,000 students miss school because they fear attack, intimidation, or bullying. While tragedies such as school shootings are rare, many youngsters feel threatened. School officials and administrators take steps to make school safer, yet many teachers remain frustrated. Violence prevention…

  4. Violence in Prisons, Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toch, Hans; Kupers, Terry A.

    2007-01-01

    A close review of prison violence makes it obvious that a disproportionate amount of such violence is related to the mental health problems of prisoners, and that, in the U.S. at least, this appears to have become increasingly the case. One reason for the trend is that prison administrators have been routinely relegating disturbed disruptive…

  5. Conflict in the Workplace: Social Workers as Victims and Perpetrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringstad, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Conflict and violence in the workplace have emerged as a real but inadequately explored concern in the social work profession. The present study surveyed a national random sample of 1,029 NASW members about their experiences with client violence and with physical and psychological assault in relationship to practice setting, age, gender, and…

  6. Will the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Proposed Standards for Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Reduce Workplace Risk?

    PubMed

    Dudley, Susan E; Morriss, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is developing regulations to amend existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica by establishing a new permissible exposure limit as well as a series of ancillary provisions for controlling exposure. This article briefly reviews OSHA's proposed regulatory approach and the statutory authority on which it is based. It then evaluates OSHA's preliminary determination of significant risk and its analysis of the risk reduction achievable by its proposed controls. It recognizes that OSHA faces multiple challenges in devising a regulatory approach that reduces exposures and health risks and meets its statutory goal. However, the greatest challenge to reducing risks associated with silica exposure is not the lack of incentives (for either employers or employees) but rather lack of information, particularly information on the relative toxicity of different forms of silica. The article finds that OSHA's proposed rule would contribute little in the way of new information, particularly since it is largely based on information that is at least a decade old--a significant deficiency, given the rapidly changing conditions observed over the last 45 years. The article concludes with recommendations for alternative approaches that would be more likely to generate information needed to improve worker health outcomes. PMID:25808427

  7. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, Nouf; Afify, Ayman AM; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting. Objective To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data. Results A total 123 health care workers (45.6%) experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5%) and nonphysical violence (99.2%), including verbal violence (94.3%) and intimidation (22.0%). Offenders were patients (71.5%) in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%), or both (3.3%). Almost half (48.0%) of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence. Conclusion Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care workers, efficient reporting system, and zero tolerance policies need to be implemented to minimize workplace violence against health workers. PMID:27330300

  8. Workplace Measurements by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration since 1979: Descriptive Analysis and Potential Uses for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background : Inspectors from the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have been collecting industrial hygiene samples since 1972 to verify compliance with Permissible Exposure Limits. Starting in 1979, these measurements were computerized into the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS). In 2010, a dataset of over 1 million personal sample results analysed at OSHA’s central laboratory in Salt Lake City [Chemical Exposure Health Data (CEHD)], only partially overlapping the IMIS database, was placed into public domain via the internet. We undertook this study to inform potential users about the relationship between this newly available OSHA data and IMIS and to offer insight about the opportunities and challenges associated with the use of OSHA measurement data for occupational exposure assessment. Methods : We conducted a literature review of previous uses of IMIS in occupational health research and performed a descriptive analysis of the data recently made available and compared them to the IMIS database for lead, the most frequently sampled agent. Results : The literature review yielded 29 studies reporting use of IMIS data, but none using the CEHD data. Most studies focused on a single contaminant, with silica and lead being most frequently analysed. Sixteen studies addressed potential bias in IMIS, mostly by examining the association between exposure levels and ancillary information. Although no biases of appreciable magnitude were consistently reported across studies and agents, these assessments may have been obscured by selective under-reporting of non-detectable measurements. The CEHD data comprised 1 450 836 records from 1984 to 2009, not counting analytical blanks and erroneous records. Seventy eight agents with >1000 personal samples yielded 1 037 367 records. Unlike IMIS, which contain administrative information (company size, job description), ancillary information in the CEHD data is mostly analytical. When the IMIS and

  9. Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slagle, Sinda

    1991-01-01

    Washoe High School in Reno, Nevada, is reaching out into the community by establishing literacy classes in the workplace. The high school furnishes tutors and textbooks; employers contribute classroom space, inexpensive work materials, and students. (MLF)

  10. Common ground, not a battle ground. Violence prevention at a detoxification facility.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Mary A; Vincent, Audrey A; Cundiff, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    This article evaluates the results of a workplace violence prevention program implemented in a Colorado detoxification facility. The program interventions are modeled after federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and use theories from both nursing and criminology for philosophy and direction. Serving as its own control, the detoxification facility shares data measured over a 4-year period, demonstrating a sharp decline in assault rates after program implementation. The importance of administrative controls, environmental adjustments, recordkeeping and evaluation, and education and training are emphasized as key components of success. PMID:19681519

  11. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea023.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Bosman, Alexis; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli; Peura, Teija

    2016-03-01

    The Genea023 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea023 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressed Nanog, 98% Oct4, 55% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 42.76, Novelty of 1.23, demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346015

  12. Worker-to-Worker Violence in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Lydia E.; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Ager, Joel; Upfal, Mark; Luborsky, Mark; Russell, Jim; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Worker-to-worker (Type III) violence is prevalent in health care settings and has potential adverse consequences for employees and organizations. Little research has examined perpetrator characteristics of this type of violence. The current study is a descriptive examination of the common demographic and work-related characteristics of perpetrators of Type III workplace violence among hospital workers. Analysis was based on documented incidents of Type III violence reported within a large hospital system from 2010 to 2012. Nurses were involved as either the perpetrator or target in the five most common perpetrator–target dyads. Incidence rate ratios revealed that patient care associates and nurses were significantly more likely to be perpetrators than other job titles. By examining characteristics of perpetrators and common worker dyads involved in Type III workplace violence, hospital stakeholders and unit supervisors have a starting point to develop strategies for reducing conflict between workers. PMID:26450899

  13. 46 CFR 164.023-13 - Production tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... otherwise specified in the referenced test procedure) on each lot of thread: (1) Breaking strength. One... strength. At least quarterly, one sample in each of the lightest and darkest colors accepted must be tested....023-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION,...

  14. 46 CFR 164.023-13 - Production tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... otherwise specified in the referenced test procedure) on each lot of thread: (1) Breaking strength. One... strength. At least quarterly, one sample in each of the lightest and darkest colors accepted must be tested....023-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION,...

  15. 46 CFR 164.023-13 - Production tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... otherwise specified in the referenced test procedure) on each lot of thread: (1) Breaking strength. One... strength. At least quarterly, one sample in each of the lightest and darkest colors accepted must be tested....023-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION,...

  16. 46 CFR 164.023-13 - Production tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... otherwise specified in the referenced test procedure) on each lot of thread: (1) Breaking strength. One... strength. At least quarterly, one sample in each of the lightest and darkest colors accepted must be tested....023-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION,...

  17. 46 CFR 164.023-13 - Production tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production tests and inspections. 164.023-13 Section 164... Production tests and inspections. (a) Manufacturer's test equipment and facilities. The manufacturer shall provide the following test equipment and facilities for use in production tests and inspections: (1)...

  18. When Working Becomes Hazardous. Punching, Spitting, Swearing, Shooting: Violence at Work Goes Global.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Workplace violence has gone global, crossing borders, work settings, and occupational groups. A report from the International Labor Organization points out high-risk occupations and indicates that women are especially vulnerable. It highlights the problem and provides ways for policymakers to remove violence from the workplace. (JOW)

  19. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    Domestic violence is a type of abuse. It usually involves a spouse or partner, but it can also ... a child, elderly relative, or other family member. Domestic violence may include Physical violence that can lead to ...

  20. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    Domestic violence is a type of abuse. It usually involves a spouse or partner, but it can also be ... child, elderly relative, or other family member. Domestic violence may include Physical violence that can lead to ...

  1. Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    These four papers are from a symposium on changing workplaces. "Women Entrepreneurs: Maintaining Business Success through Human Resource Development" (Dominic G. Kamau , Gary N. McLean, Alexander Ardishvili) investigates contributions of human resource development (HRD) to business success and reports the following: (1) women can be successful in…

  2. State employment protection statutes for victims of domestic violence: public policy's response to domestic violence as an employment matter.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Ojha, Mamta U; Macke, Caroline

    2012-02-01

    Evidence indicates that domestic violence has negative consequences on victims' employment; yet employers lag in recognizing this as a workplace issue. To address the problem, some states have established several policy solutions. To understand the scope of the public sector's response to domestic violence as a workplace issue, a content analysis of state-level employment protection policies for domestic violence victims (N = 369) was conducted. Results indicate three broad policy categories: (a) policies that offer work leave for victims; (b) policies that aim to reduce employment discrimination of domestic violence victims; and (c) policies that aim to increase awareness and safety in the workplace. Subcategories emerged within each of these three categories. Implementation of employment protection policies varies significantly across states. Implications for workplaces, practitioners, and policy leaders are discussed. PMID:22203636

  3. Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures.

    PubMed

    Timpka, T; Eriksson, H; Holm, E; Strömgren, M; Ekberg, J; Spreco, A; Dahlström, Ö

    2016-07-01

    Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10·6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics. PMID:26847017

  4. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide...

  5. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide...

  6. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide...

  7. School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, William G., Ed.; Henry, Stuart, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume presents papers from a 1998 conference on school violence in Valparaiso, Indiana. The papers include: "What is School Violence? An Integrated Definition" (Stuart Henry); "Violence in Schools: Rage against a Broken World" (J. Scott Staples); "Listening to What the Streets Say: Vengeance as Ideology?" (Ralph Cintron); "School Violence:…

  8. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ083 WOMEN’S HEALTH Domestic Violence • What is domestic violence? • What are the types of abuse? • How can ... available to help abused women? What is domestic violence? Domestic violence is a pattern of threatening or ...

  9. Workplace Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Anthropometric Source Book was developed based on Johnson Space Center project of anthropometry, the study of the size, shape and motion characteristics of the human body. Designed primarily for use by NASA, the military services and aerospace contractors, the book was also intended to help non-aerospace engineers, architects, and others engaged in design of clothing, equipment and workplaces. An example of its use by Eastman Kodak Company is the company's application of the data to design efficient, productive and comfortable workplaces for employees in the Rochester, NY processing laboratories. The sourcebook was used to determine such dimensions as leg space, work surface height and thickness, employee reach distances, proper height for computer terminal screen, seat height and knee space.

  10. 14 CFR 1267.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1267.635 Section 1267.635 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.635 Drug-free workplace....

  11. 13 CFR 147.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 147.635 Section 147.635 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.635 Drug-free workplace....

  12. 13 CFR 147.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 147.635 Section 147.635 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.635 Drug-free workplace....

  13. 14 CFR 1267.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Drug-free workplace. 1267.635 Section 1267.635 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.635 Drug-free workplace....

  14. 13 CFR 147.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 147.635 Section 147.635 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.635 Drug-free workplace....

  15. 14 CFR 1267.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1267.635 Section 1267.635 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.635 Drug-free workplace....

  16. 14 CFR 1267.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1267.635 Section 1267.635 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.635 Drug-free workplace....

  17. 13 CFR 147.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 147.635 Section 147.635 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.635 Drug-free workplace....

  18. 13 CFR 147.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 147.635 Section 147.635 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.635 Drug-free workplace....

  19. Violence against women: the physician's role.

    PubMed

    Schmuel, E; Schenker, J G

    1998-10-01

    Violence against women is one reflection of the unequal power relationship between men and women in societies. Reflections of this inequality include marriage at a very young age, lack of information or choice about fertility control and forced pregnancy within marriage. The different forms of violence against women are: domestic violence and rape, genital mutilation or, gender-based violence by police and security forces, gender-based violence against women during armed conflict, gender-based violence against women refugees and asylum-seekers, violence associated with prostitution and pornography, violence in the workplace, including sexual harassment. Violence against women is condemned, whether it occurs in a societal setting or a domestic setting. It is not a private or family matter. The FIGO Committee for the Study of Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction released statements to physicians treating women on this issue. Physicians are ethically obliged to inform themselves about the manifestations of violence and recognize cases, to treat the physical and psychological results of violence, to affirm to their patients that violent acts toward them are not acceptable and to advocate for social infrastructures to provide women the choice of seeking secure refuge and ongoing counselling. PMID:9846677

  20. Physical violence against health care workers: A nationwide study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Najafi, Fereshteh; Ghazanfari, Nahid; Tamizi, Zahra; Afshani, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Workplace violence is a serious and problematic phenomenon in health care settings. Research shows that health care workers are at the highest risk of such violence. The aim of this study was to address the frequency of physical violence against Iranian health personnel, their response to such violence, as well as the contributing factors to physical violence. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011, in which 6500 out of 57,000 health personnel working in some teaching hospitals were selected using multi-stage random sampling. Data were collected using the questionnaire of “Workplace Violence in the Health Sector” developed by the International Labor Organization, the International Council of Nurses, the World Health Organization, and the Public Services International. Results: The findings revealed that 23.5% of the participants were exposed to physical violence in the 12 months prior to the study. Nurses were the main victims of physical violence (78%) and patients' families were the main perpetrators of violence (56%). The most common reaction of victims to physical violence was asking the aggressor to stop violence (45%). Lack of people's knowledge of employees' tasks was the most common contributing factor to physical violence (49.2%). Conclusions: Based on the results, legislating appropriate laws in order to prevent and control violence in the workplace is necessary. Moreover, developing educational programs to manage the incidence of physical violence should be on health centers' agenda. PMID:27186199

  1. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized. PMID:26902445

  2. Critical partners in domestic violence advocacy- a unique collaboration.

    PubMed

    Goba, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the reality of domestic violence and its impact on the workplace, the Police and Security Staff of a leading hospital launched a team effort to protect and empower abused employees and break the cycle of violence. In this article, the author describes how the team was formed, how it operates, and the results it has achieved. PMID:26978955

  3. Reporting School Violence. Legal Series Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Justice Programs.

    Violence and crime in schools affect students and their families, school employees and administrators, law enforcement and criminal justice officials, policymakers, and communities. Enactment of strong, concise school violence reporting laws is a crucial first step on the road to making schools safe and violence free. This bulletin provides an…

  4. Violence against surgical residents.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, C B; Rizzo, A G

    1997-01-01

    Violence against hospital personnel is underreported (less than one in five assaults), and accurate statistics as to the rate of violence against hospital personnel are thus difficult to establish. In the psychiatric discipline, an abundance of information has been published regarding violence in the health care setting, but few studies have examined violence outside psychiatric hospitals or by patients not diagnosed with psychiatric ailments. Using a survey that elicits information about workplace violence, we sought to gauge the prevalence of violent acts affecting general hospital workers who treat victims of violence on a daily basis. The survey was completed by a cohort of surgical staff nationwide (475 responses from 57 residency programs). Two hundred and eighty residents reported having witnessed one or more physical attacks, and 179 reported having been attacked. Violent acts were more likely to be committed in a public hospital than a private institution (P = 0.05). As shown in previous research, most attacks occurred in the emergency room (P = 0.01); the wards and parking lot were next in frequency. Women residents were more likely than men to call hospital security to intervene in a potentially violent situation (P = 0.04), and junior residents (postgraduate years 1-4) were more likely to be attacked than senior residents (> or = 5 years) (P = 0.04). The attacker was most likely to be a young black male between ages 19 and 30 (P = 0.01). We found no statistical relationship between the attacker and the victim regarding sex or race. Of the 475 respondents, 470 reported that they carry a gun themselves or know someone in the hospital environment who carries a gun. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291743

  5. Aggression and Violence in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Adults who work in positions of authority with young people must be prepared for the possibility of conflict, which could lead to aggressive behavior. Incorrect handling of a crisis will produce a conflict cycle, the four stages of which are described. Legal issues surrounding physical intervention (in the United Kingdom) are summarized, and…

  6. 28 CFR 83.230 - How and when must I identify workplaces?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How and when must I identify workplaces... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 83.230 How and when must I identify workplaces? (a) You must identify all known workplaces under each...

  7. Violence on Campus: Defining the Problems, Strategies for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.; Schuh, John H., Ed.; Fenske, Robert H., Ed.

    This book addresses issues in dealing with campus violence, including types of violence on campuses, trends in campus violence, effects of increasing concerns about campus violence, and appropriate actions by student affairs and academic administrators to ensure campus safety. The chapters are: (1) "Violent Crime in American Society" (Fernando M.…

  8. Emerging aspects of psychosocial risks: violence and harassment at work.

    PubMed

    Gilioli, R; Campanini, P; Fichera, G P; Punzi, S; Cassitto, M G

    2006-01-01

    In the last twenty years, psychosocial risks have become crucial in Occupational Health. Particularly, there is an increasing interest about psychological and physical violence at the workplaces. Psychological violence (mobbing or workplace bullying) is described as a situation in which the person has been the victim of negative acts directed to the person and work, with offences, discriminations and isolation. Physical violence at work, still underestimated in many parts of the world, is becoming a topical subject both for its frequency and its pathogenic potential and consist of violence among workers (internal violence) and between workers and external persons (external violence). Examples of external violence are bank robberies, which are prevalent in many European countries, particulary in Italy. The costs of psychological and physical workplace violence are very high at all levels; individual, for the implication of violence for health and quality of life as well as organizational, for the increase of absenteeism, turnover and health care demands and claims. The Medical Centre for Occupational Stress and Harassment (CDL) of the "Clinica de Lavoro Luigi Devoto" was set up in 1996 with a day-hospital service for the diagnosis, rehabilitation and prevention of work related psychological diseases. From its opening, about 5000 patients have been examined. PMID:17017341

  9. Understanding patient-to-worker violence in hospitals: a qualitative analysis of documented incident reports

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J.; Ager, Joel; Luborsky, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore catalysts to, and circumstances surrounding, patient-to-worker violent incidents recorded by employees in a hospital system database. Background Violence by patients towards healthcare workers (Type II workplace violence) is a significant occupational hazard in hospitals worldwide. Studies to date have failed to investigate its root causes due to a lack of empirical research based on documented episodes of patient violence. Design Qualitative content analysis. Methods Content analysis was conducted on the total sample of 214 Type II incidents documented in 2011 by employees of an American hospital system with a centralized reporting system. Findings The majority of incidents were reported by nurses (39·8%), security staff (15·9%) and nurse assistants (14·4%). Three distinct themes were identified from the analysis: Patient Behaviour, Patient Care and Situational Events. Specific causes of violence related to Patient Behaviour were cognitive impairment and demanding to leave. Catalysts related to patient care were the use of needles, patient pain/discomfort and physical transfers of patients. Situational factors included the use/presence of restraints; transitions in the care process; intervening to protect patients and/or staff; and redirecting patients. Conclusions Identifying catalysts and situations involved in patient violence in hospitals informs administrators about potential targets for intervention. Hospital staff can be trained to recognize these specific risk factors for patient violence and can be educated in how to best mitigate or prevent the most common forms of violent behaviour. A social–ecological model can be adapted to the hospital setting as a framework for prevention of patient violence towards staff. PMID:25091833

  10. Domestic violence

    MedlinePlus

    Domestic violence is when a person uses abusive behavior to control a partner or other family member. The ... of any age, sex, culture, or class. When domestic violence is aimed at a child, it is called ...

  11. Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents of Teens Crime, Teens, and Trauma Assault Bullying and Harassment Child Sexual Abuse Dating Violence Sexual ... Parents of Teens Crime, Teens, and Trauma Assault Bullying and Harassment Child Sexual Abuse Dating Violence Sexual ...

  12. Teen Violence

    MedlinePlus

    Teen violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young ... death. An important risk factor for violence in teens is the behavior of their friends and classmates. ...

  13. [Psychological violences].

    PubMed

    Leray, M

    2014-12-01

    Among the various forms of violence inflicted on a child, psychological violence holds a significant place in terms of frequency, diversity and damage done, as serious and pervasive consequences can be observed on the child's development. This article highlights and assesses the psychological consequences provoked by psychological violences perpetrated by parents, teachers or other children in different situations, such as domestic violence, divorce and school bullying. It also gives some indications for intervention and prevention in those situations. PMID:25449447

  14. Workplace Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. It is a short guide to workplace health and safety issues, laws, and regulations, especially in Massachusetts. Topics covered include the following: (1) safety issues--workplace ergonomics, the…

  15. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects. PMID:10904203

  16. School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Irvin Sam

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is threefold. First, the chapter summarizes what is known about the prevalence of violence and weapons in U.S. schools. Second, the chapter examines theories that bear on school violence and the empirical evidence linked to those theories. Third, the chapter looks at attempts to prevent school violence and,…

  17. 77 FR 14378 - Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters and Supportive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters and Supportive Services/Grants to States AGENCY: Family and Youth... governs the proposed award of mandatory grants under the Family Violence Prevention and Services...

  18. Facing Up to Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordovensky, Pat

    1993-01-01

    Recent U.S. Education Department surveys find a crime perception gap between administrators and teachers. More teachers than principals say they have problems with student violence, weapons, robberies, verbal and physical abuse, vandalism, and racial tension. National Crime Survey statistics report 16,000 daily thefts and violent crimes on school…

  19. [Workplace mobbing].

    PubMed

    Soljan, Ivana; Josipović-Jelić, Zeljka; Jelić Kis, I Anita

    2008-03-01

    Workplace mobbing is a hostile and unethical communication, systematically aimed from one or more individuals towards mostly one individual, who are forced into a helpless position and are held in it by constant bullying. This article describes some of the most important characteristics of mobbing: offensive behaviour, organizational and non-organizational causes of this behaviour, the victim and the consequences. Modern business environment is complex, dynamic, volatile, and requires better ability to adjust. Constant changes are a part of organizational reality, but they also produce an ideal environment for all kinds of conflicts. Conflicts are inevitable in every organization, but the task of its management is to identify them and resolve before they affect the workforce, productivity and costs. The idea is to avert psychological abuse and aberrant behaviour such as mobbing which that may cause physical and mental disorders. Mobbing is a problem of the modern society; as a violation of human rights it is relatively new and unrecognised in Croatia. Abuse is mostly psychological: it affects the victim's health and life, quality of work, productivity, profitability, and may lead to significant economic losses in the community. Mobbing can be averted by joint forces that would involve employee and management, medical and legal professionals, and even community as a whole. The more an organization pursues excellence based on trust and business ethics, the higher the probability that mobbing will be averted or stopped. PMID:18411493

  20. Drug consumption and violence in female work Zapallal--Lima/Peru.

    PubMed

    Musayón, Yesenia; Caufield, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The study design was descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional, and qualitative. The objective was to identify sociodemographic and labor risk factors for drug consumption and types of violence in the workplace related to drug consumption, as well as to understand the perception of female workers regarding the relationship between drug consumption and workplace violence. We surveyed 125 women workers of four slums in the area of Zapallal, Lima, Peru, interviewing 16 women who experienced workplace violence. Among the participants, 52.8% consumed alcohol and 6.4% illegal drugs. Catholic women were at risk for consuming alcohol, while participants under 20 years of age were at risk for consuming illicit drugs. In this group, 17.6% of the women experienced verbal violence, 9.6% physical violence and 1.6% were sexually harassed in the workplace. Women victims of verbal violence have a risk for consuming illicit drugs. These women perceived themselves as a vulnerable group for violence in the workplace and weak for defending themselves. They expressed fear or shame in reporting cases of violence. PMID:16501791

  1. Unions and Workplace Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Bruce, Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this book focus on "The New American Workplace" and assess its adequacy or inadequacy as a guide for the U.S. labor movement in relation to new work systems. "Unions and Workplace Reorganization" (Bruce Nissen) introduces the subject. "The New American Workplace: A Labor Perspective" (AFL-CIO Committee on the Evolution of Work,…

  2. Constituting the Workplace Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper advances some bases for a workplace curriculum. These are premised on conceptions of curriculum as intents directed to individual's progression towards full and effective workplace performance, yet whose enactment is shaped by workplace factors and is ultimately experienced by workers as learners. So whether the intentions will be…

  3. Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  4. Virtual Violence.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, exposure to media violence is becoming an inescapable component of children's lives. With the rise in new technologies, such as tablets and new gaming platforms, children and adolescents increasingly are exposed to what is known as "virtual violence." This form of violence is not experienced physically; rather, it is experienced in realistic ways via new technology and ever more intense and realistic games. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to be concerned about children's exposure to virtual violence and the effect it has on their overall health and well-being. This policy statement aims to summarize the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the effects of virtual violence on children's attitudes and behaviors and to make specific recommendations for pediatricians, parents, industry, and policy makers. PMID:27432848

  5. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  6. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus FORC_023 isolated from raw fish storage water.

    PubMed

    Chung, Han Young; Na, Eun Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yoon, Hyunjin; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Kim, Heebal; Choi, Sang Ho; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticusis a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that causes food-borne gastroenteritis in humans who consumeV. parahaemolyticus-contaminated seafood.The FORC_023 strain was isolated from raw fish storage water, containing live fish at a sashimi restaurant. Here, we aimed to sequence and characterize the genome of the FORC_023 strain. The genome of the FORC_023 strain showed two circular chromosomes, which contained 4227 open reading frames (ORFs), 131 tRNA genes and 37 rRNA genes. Although the genome of FORC_023 did not include major virulence genes, such as genes encoding thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), it contained genes encoding other hemolysins, secretion systems, iron uptake-related proteins and severalV. parahaemolyticusislands. The highest average nucleotide identity value was obtained between the FORC_023 strain and UCM-V493 (CP007004-6). Comparative genomic analysis of FORC_023 with UCM-V493 revealed that FORC_023 carried an additional genomic region encoding virulence factors, such as repeats-in-toxin and type II secretion factors. Furthermore,in vitrocytotoxicity testing showed that FORC_023 exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity toward INT-407 human epithelial cells. These results suggested that the FORC_023 strain may be a food-borne pathogen. PMID:27073252

  7. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-05-30

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  8. How Organizations Should Respond to Rape in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ellen; Kleiner, Brian H.

    2003-01-01

    Each year approximately 51,000 incidents of rape and sexual assault occur in the workplace. If an incident of rape occurs in the workplace, management can adopt several procedures for both the assaulted victim and the organization. This article highlights those procedures, as well as administrative controls and environmental designs that function…

  9. Domestic violence.

    PubMed

    2016-03-30

    Essential facts Domestic violence and abuse includes any incident or repeated incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between family members or intimate partners (including former partners). It can involve psychological, physical, sexual, financial and emotional abuse, as well as 'honour'-based violence and forced marriage. According to the Office for National Statistics, at least 1.4 million women and 700,000 men aged between 16 and 59 experienced domestic abuse in England and Wales in 2013/14 - equivalent to 8.5% of women and 4.5% of men. PMID:27027171

  10. Occupational injuries due to violence.

    PubMed

    Hales, T; Seligman, P J; Newman, S C; Timbrook, C L

    1988-06-01

    Each year in the United States, an estimated 800 to 1,400 people are murdered at work, and an unknown number of nonfatal injuries due to workplace violence occur. Based on Ohio's workers' compensation claims from 1983 through 1985, police officers, gasoline service station employees, employees of the real estate industry, and hotel/motel employees were found to be at the highest risk for occupational violent crime (OVC) injury and death. Grocery store employees, specifically those working in convenience food stores, and employees of the real estate industry had the most reported rapes. Four previously unidentified industries at increased risk of employee victimization were described. Identification of industries and occupations at high risk for crime victimization provides the opportunity to focus preventive strategies to promote employee safety and security in the workplace. PMID:3392614

  11. 76 FR 42003 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register, 75 FR 7978, February 23, 2010, proposing to... published concurrently in the Federal Register, 75 FR 8096, February 23, 2010, and comments were invited on... of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration--023 Workplace Violence...

  12. Global Trends in Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2012-01-01

    The paradigm of human resource development has shifted to workplace learning and performance. Workplace can be an organization, an office, a kitchen, a shop, a farm, a website, even a home. Workplace learning is a dynamic process to solve workplace problems through learning. An identification of global trends of workplace learning can help us to…

  13. 28 CFR 0.122 - Office on Violence Against Women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this area. (b) Departmental regulations set forth in 28 CFR part 61, appendix D, applicable to the... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Office on Violence Against Women. 0.122...-Office on Violence Against Women § 0.122 Office on Violence Against Women. (a) The Director, Office...

  14. 28 CFR 0.122 - Office on Violence Against Women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this area. (b) Departmental regulations set forth in 28 CFR part 61, Appendix D, applicable to the... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office on Violence Against Women. 0.122...-Office on Violence Against Women § 0.122 Office on Violence Against Women. (a) The Director, Office...

  15. 28 CFR 0.122 - Office on Violence Against Women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this area. (b) Departmental regulations set forth in 28 CFR part 61, Appendix D, applicable to the... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office on Violence Against Women. 0.122...-Office on Violence Against Women § 0.122 Office on Violence Against Women. (a) The Director, Office...

  16. 28 CFR 0.122 - Office on Violence Against Women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... this area. (b) Departmental regulations set forth in 28 CFR part 61, Appendix D, applicable to the... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office on Violence Against Women. 0.122...-Office on Violence Against Women § 0.122 Office on Violence Against Women. (a) The Director, Office...

  17. 28 CFR 0.122 - Office on Violence Against Women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this area. (b) Departmental regulations set forth in 28 CFR part 61, Appendix D, applicable to the... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Office on Violence Against Women. 0.122...-Office on Violence Against Women § 0.122 Office on Violence Against Women. (a) The Director, Office...

  18. 41 CFR 105-74.230 - How and when must I identify workplaces?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identify workplaces? 105-74.230 Section 105-74.230 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Services Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 105-74.230 How and when must I identify workplaces?...

  19. 13 CFR 147.230 - How and when must I identify workplaces?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... workplaces? 147.230 Section 147.230 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 147.230 How and when must I identify workplaces? (a) You must identify all known...

  20. 36 CFR 1212.230 - How and when must I identify workplaces?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... workplaces? 1212.230 Section 1212.230 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 1212.230 How and when must I identify workplaces? (a)...

  1. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials. PMID:9568012

  2. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all ... ABOUT The Attorney General Budget & Performance Strategic Plans History AGENCIES BUSINESS Business Opportunities Small & Disadvantaged Business Grants ...

  3. Teen Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... an offender, or a witness to the violence. Violent acts can include Bullying Fighting, including punching, kicking, ... of weapons such as guns or knives Some violent acts can cause more emotional harm than physical ...

  4. Following the trend for a comprehensive healthy workplace in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruey-Yu; Yu, Li-Hui

    2016-03-01

    To promote workers' health and boost corporate productivity and national competitiveness, workplace health promotion is an international trend and a vital part of national policies. Prior to 2000, Taiwan's workplace issues focused on industrial hygiene and safety improvements. Since 2003, the Health Promotion Administration (HPA) at the Ministry of Health and Welfare has established coaching centers for workplace health promotion and dispatched trained experts for teaching health promotion skills; including promoting the tobacco control program, preventing important chronic diseases, driving comprehensive programs, advocating workplace health promotion with the Ministry of Labor, establishing certification mechanisms for workplace health promotion, recognizing outstanding health-promoting workplaces, and conducting a nationwide survey for monitoring the practices of healthy behaviors and health conditions of workers. Through 2014, 12,439 workplaces have been accredited.Since 2003, the efforts of the HPA in workplace health promotion projects has shifted society's focus on workplace health from occupational diseases and injury prevention to workplace health promotion, resulting in the revision of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 2013 by the Ministry of Labor to detail employers' responsibilities in protecting and promoting employees' health and well-being. PMID:27199016

  5. 77 FR 14385 - Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters/Grants to Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters/Grants to Native American Tribes (Including Alaska Native Villages) and... Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) to Native American Tribes (including Alaska...

  6. Campus Violence: Kinds, Causes, and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Leighton C., Ed.; Pollard, Jeffrey W., Ed.

    This volume offers 14 papers on the types, sources, and possible cures of violence on college campuses from prominent workers in higher education. Following a preface the titles are: (1) "Conceptualizing Campus Violence: Definitions, Underlying Factors, and Effects" by Mary L. Roark; (2) "Administrative Perspectives on Disruptive Student Conduct"…

  7. A Student Perspective on Young Adolescent Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Holly J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes responses of four southern U.S. middle schools to increased potential for violence. Teachers and administrators viewed the cause of school violence to reside outside the school, whereas students saw the cause resting firmly within a school environment in which students were permitted or even expected to be cruel to one another. (KB)

  8. Patterns of Violence Against Women: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E.; Messing, Jill T.; Petras, Hanno; Fowler, Barbara; La Flair, Lareina; Kub, Joan; Agnew, Jacqueline; Fitzgerald, Sheila; Bolyard, Richelle; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined patterns of nine types of violence against women (VAW) and associated mental health problems. The following self-reported, lifetime violence victimization was examined among 1424 employed women: (1) childhood physical abuse, (2) childhood sexual abuse, (3) physical abuse between parents/guardians during childhood, (4) psychological intimate partner violence (IPV), (5) physical IPV, (6) sexual IPV, (7) adult physical or sexual assault by a non-intimate partner, (8) physical workplace violence, and (9) psychological workplace violence. Latent class analysis was used to identify homogenous patterns, called “classes,” of women's “yes/no” responses to experiencing these types of violence. The best model consisted of 4-classes characterized by the following probabilities: low violence (class 1: 63.1%), high psychological and physical IPV (class 2: 15.6%), high physical and psychological workplace violence (class 3: 12.4%), and moderate to high childhood abuse (class 4: 9.0%). When compared to class 1 (low violence), membership in classes 2 (IPV) and 4 (childhood abuse) was associated with screening positive for depression in the past week at baseline after controlling for the influence of demographic characteristics on class membership. Also, when compared to class 1 (low all), membership in class 2 (IPV) was associated with greater odds of screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder in the past month at the six month follow-up assessment. Findings document distinct patterns of VAW and associated proximal and distal mental health outcomes. Implications for interventions aimed to improve employed women's health are discussed. PMID:22662284

  9. Industry Leader Perceptions of Workplace Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Erik Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of workplace safety held by industry leaders who were near completion of a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. This was a qualitative study that utilized interpretivism as the theoretical framework. The study sought to answer four research questions. (1) How do participants conceptualize…

  10. Combating Workplace Ageism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Sanders-Reio, Joanne

    1999-01-01

    Age discrimination in the workplace is widespread and often based on stereotypes. Research has demonstrated that older workers learn and perform well. Adult educators should eliminate ways in which educational practices perpetuate ageism, raise awareness of it in the workplace, and help older workers continue learning. (SK)

  11. Developing Workplace Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing/delivering workplace education programs, explains the process of developing a functional context workplace education curriculum. Discussed first are the following: the types of information needed to develop a functional context…

  12. Intervention as Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkjaer, Bente; Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how workplace interventions may benefit from a simultaneous focus on individuals' learning and knowledge and on the situatedness of workplaces in the wider world of changing professional knowledge regimes. This is illustrated by the demand for evidence-based practice in health care.…

  13. Workplace Education Guide, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston.

    These eight chapters share diverse experiences, lessons, and tips gleaned by the Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium. "Workplace Needs Analysis (WNA)" (Harneen Chernow, Emily Singer, Jenny Lee Utech) focuses on the Worker Education Program's (WEP's) strategy, including tools, access, interviews and focus groups, presenting findings to the…

  14. Proactive Copyright: Workplace Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rebecca P.; Parker, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Oftentimes, copyright is addressed in the workplace only after a blatant infringement is discovered or a cease-and-desist letter is received. Then, too, some workplaces may feel that they are immune to copyright issues due to their educational nature; while private organizations, businesses, and industry may feel that the term "fair use" will…

  15. Canadian Chefs' Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier-MacBurnie, Paulette; Doyle, Wendy; Mombourquette, Peter; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs' learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured…

  16. Sexual violence.

    PubMed

    Tavara, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Gender-based violence is related to the power imbalance between men and women that is present, to a greater or lesser degree, in all societies. It was recognized as a human rights problem by the United Nations relatively recently. It includes emotional, physical and sexual violence. Sexual violence is the extreme form of gender-based violence, usually accompanied by the other types of violence. Its prevalence is difficult to determine, but it is likely to affect at least one-third of women at some time in their life. It has multiple effects on women's physical and gynaecological health, and these depend greatly on the quality of care that women receive immediately after the assault. Unfortunately, most emergency health services, including those in women's hospitals, are not prepared to provide the correct care for these women. Care should be multidisciplinary and should involve crisis treatment, meticulous clinical examination with complementary auxiliary methods, treatment of physical lesions, prevention of pregnancy and transmission of sexually transmitted infections, and follow-up for at least 6 months after the assault. PMID:16564226

  17. Physical Violence against General Practitioners and Nurses in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Ma, Hongkun; Qiao, Hong; Hao, Yanhua; Li, Ye; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Hong; Kang, Zheng; Liang, Libo; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors of physical violence in Chinese township hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in a sample of 442 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from 90 township hospitals located in Heilongjiang province, China (response rate = 84.8%). Results A total of 106 of the 840 (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Most perpetrators were the patients’ relatives (62.3%), followed by the patient (22.6%); 73.6% of perpetrators were aged between 20 and 40 years. Of the physical violence incidents, about 56.6% (n = 60) resulted in a physical injury, and 45.4% of respondents took two or three days of sick leave. Reporting workplace violence in hospitals to superiors or authorities was low (9.4%). Most respondents (62.8%) did not receive training on how to avoid workplace violence. Logistic regression analyses indicated that general nurses, aged 35 years or younger, and with a higher-level professional title were more likely to experience physical violence. Healthcare workers with direct physical contact (washing, turning, lifting) with patients had a higher risk of physical violence compared to other health care workers. Procedures for reporting workplace violence were a protective factor for physical violence; when in place, reporting after psychological violence (verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, harassment, and threats) was more protective than waiting until an instance of physical violence (beating, kicking, slapping, stabbing, etc.). Conclusions Physical violence in Chinese township hospitals is an occupational hazard of rural public health concern. Policies, procedures, and intervention strategies should be undertaken to manage this issue. PMID:26571388

  18. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students. PMID:19631065

  19. Television Violence: Implications for Violence Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jan N.; Hasbrouck, Jan E.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the scientific and public-opinion debate on the impact television violence in America has on aggression and violence. Research supports the view that television violence contributes to children's level of aggressiveness and subsequent violence and criminality. Describes attempts to improve the quality of television programming for children…

  20. Corporate liability: security and violence--Part I.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1996-03-01

    Violence in the workplace is becoming one of the nation's top killers. It is like an Equal Opportunity Employer--it does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age, sex, national origin, disability or sexual orientation. A few regulatory agencies and legislators are requiring health care facilities to take steps to improve safety and security. PMID:8700481

  1. Assaultive Violence in the U.S. Post Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Vern; Margavio, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that degradation of labor associated with automation and downsizing produces employee stress and frustration and leads to workplace violence. Concludes that violent incidents in the U.S. Post Office result when work experience degrades a person's identity or sense of control in a time of rapid change. (SK)

  2. Identification of Violence in Turkish Health Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayranci, Unal; Yenilmez, Cinar; Balci, Yasemin; Kaptanoglu, Cem

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the contributing factors to and frequency of violence against health care workers (HCWs) working in western Turkey. The population is composed of a random sample of 1,209 HCWs from 34 health care workplaces. Written questionnaires were given to HCWs at all sites, where staff were instructed to register all types of…

  3. Cumulative Effects of Multiple Forms of Violence and Abuse on Women.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Judith; Wuest, Judith; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how patterns of workplace bullying contribute to the negative effects of lifetime violence. Analysis of longitudinal data from a study of women's health after separating from an abusive partner revealed that 76% of 229 women had experienced workplace bullying. Workplace bullying was associated with child sexual abuse, adult sexual assault, and ongoing partner abuse. Timing was critical, with those experiencing past workplace bullying having poorer health and fewer personal and social resources than those experiencing none, ongoing, or past and ongoing bullying. Lifetime sexual harassment (54%) was associated with higher posttraumatic stress disorder symptomology and greater likelihood of leaving workplaces and physical bullying (16%) with poorer health and personal, social, and economic resources. These findings highlight the importance of including bullying in studying lifetime violence. PMID:26118269

  4. Employer's Guide: A Time for Action on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace = Guide de L'Employeur: Les Enjeux du Harcelement Sexuel au Travail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Women's Directorate, Toronto.

    Harassment, like other forms of violence against women, is not a new problem. It is not a problem that will just go away, but it can be stopped. This guide is designed for use by organizations and employers to help them develop policies and implement programs in their workplace that address workplace sexual harassment. It focuses on Canadian…

  5. Worker-to-Worker Violence in Hospitals: Perpetrator Characteristics and Common Dyads.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Lydia E; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Ager, Joel; Upfal, Mark; Luborsky, Mark; Russell, Jim; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-02-01

    Worker-to-worker (Type III) violence is prevalent in health care settings and has potential adverse consequences for employees and organizations. Little research has examined perpetrator characteristics of this type of violence. The current study is a descriptive examination of the common demographic and work-related characteristics of perpetrators of Type III workplace violence among hospital workers. Analysis was based on documented incidents of Type III violence reported within a large hospital system from 2010 to 2012. Nurses were involved as either the perpetrator or target in the five most common perpetrator-target dyads. Incidence rate ratios revealed that patient care associates and nurses were significantly more likely to be perpetrators than other job titles. By examining characteristics of perpetrators and common worker dyads involved in Type III workplace violence, hospital stakeholders and unit supervisors have a starting point to develop strategies for reducing conflict between workers. PMID:26450899

  6. Mental Health and Mass Violence: Evidence-Based Early Psychological Intervention for Victims/Survivors of Mass Violence. A Workshop To Reach Consensus on Best Practices (Warrenton, Virginia, October 29-November 1, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Americans have been exposed to increased levels of mass violence during the past decade. School violence, shootings in the workplace, and terrorist acts both here and abroad--all have affected individuals, families, communities, and our country. This report addresses the urgent need to evaluate the various psychological interventions that are…

  7. Psychological Violence in the Health Care Settings in Iran: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Najafi, Fereshteh; Ghazanfari, Nahid; Tamizi, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Hatam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychological violence is the most common form of workplace violence that can affect professional performance and job satisfaction of health care workers. Although several studies have been conducted in Iran, but there is no consensus regarding current status of such violence. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of psychological violence among healthcare workers employed at teaching hospitals in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 5874 health professionals were selected using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Organization, International Council of Nurses, World Health Organization, and Public Services International. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: It was found that 74.7% of the participants were subjected to psychological violence during the past 12 months. Totally, 64.5% of psychological violence was committed by patients’ families, but 50.9% of participants had not reported the violence, and 69.9% of them believed that reporting was useless. Conclusions: The results are indicative of high prevalence of psychological violence against healthcare workers. Considering non-reporting of violence in more than half of participants, use of an appropriate reporting system and providing training programs for health professionals in order to prevent and manage workplace violence are essential. PMID:25830157

  8. Understanding School Violence: Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, an estimated 55 million students are enrolled in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Another 15 million students attend colleges and universities across the country. While U.S. schools remain relatively safe, any amount of violence is unacceptable. Parents, teachers, and administrators expect schools to be safe havens of…

  9. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  10. Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dating violence can cause serious harm to your body and your emotions. If you are in an abusive relationship, get help. Leaving an abusive dating relationship See a doctor or nurse to take care of any physical problems. And reach out for support for your emotional ...

  11. Employers' Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence among a Diverse Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Carrie; Weinstein, Marc; Moss, Helen; Glass, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant global public health concern, affecting 5.3 million US individuals annually. An estimated 1 in 3 women globally are abused by an intimate partner in their lifetime, and the effects carry over into the workplace. This article examines employers' perceptions of IPV in the workplace, targeting supervisors of Latina employees. Methods Fourteen employers and supervisors of small service-sector companies in Oregon were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interpretive description was used to identify themes. These qualitative interviews preceded and helped to formulate a larger workplace intervention study. Results The following themes were found and are detailed: (1) factors associated with recognizing IPV in the workplace, (2) effects of IPV on the work environment and (3) supervisors' responses to IPV-active vs. passive involvement. Also, supervisors' suggestions for addressing IPV in the workplace are summarized. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the need for more IPV-related resources in the workplace to be available to supervisors as well as survivors and their coworkers. The needs of supervisors and workplaces vary by site, demonstrating the need for tailored interventions, and culturally appropriate workplace interventions are needed for Latinas and other racially and ethnically diverse populations. PMID:22953209

  12. MRSA and the Workplace

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH MRSA and the Workplace Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... infections from their healthcare provider Other FAQs About MRSA Signs and Symptoms What does a staph or ...

  13. 41 CFR 105-74.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 105-74.210 Section 105-74.210 Public Contracts and Property... Regional Offices-General Services Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE... distribute my drug-free workplace statement? You must require that a copy of the statement described in §...

  14. 41 CFR 105-74.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... my drug-free workplace statement? 105-74.205 Section 105-74.205 Public Contracts and Property... Regional Offices-General Services Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE... my drug-free workplace statement? You must publish a statement that— (a) Tells your employees...

  15. Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... dating violence prevention initiative seeks to reduce dating violence and increase healthy relationships in high-risk urban communities through comprehensive, multisector prevention. Division of Adolescent ...

  16. Workplace in fluency management: factoring the workplace into fluency management.

    PubMed

    Cassar, M C; Neilson, M D

    1997-01-01

    This article addresses competency-based standards and guidelines for the involvement of speech-language pathologists in the workplace of clients who stutter. It advocates broadening customary practices in stuttering treatment and suggests that speech-language pathologists should extend their scope of service delivery to the workplace. It presents a sequence for the collaborative involvement of the employer and other workplace members and proposes strategies for evaluating workplace based fluency programs. Issues of fluency management, transfer, maintenance, and efficacy are discussed in the workplace context. Also addressed is workplace communication as well as such factors as stereotypes, discrimination, and resistance to change which may impinge on workplace intervention. It is argued that structured intervention, transfer, and generalization within a collaborative workplace framework facilitates best practice for the fluency clinician and more appropriate outcomes for the diversity of clients who stutter. PMID:9434336

  17. [Workplace-related anxiety, workplace phobia and disorders of participation].

    PubMed

    Muschalla, B; Linden, M

    2009-06-01

    Work is an important domain of life. It is therefore clear that problems at the workplace and mental disorders will have negative interactions. Job-related anxieties are of special importance as any workplace causes or intensifies anxiety by its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general and workplace-related anxieties in particular is workplace phobia. Similarly to agoraphobia, it is characterised by panic when approaching or even thinking of the stimulus, in this case the workplace. Workplace phobia has serious negative consequences for the further course of illness. It impairs the ability to work, and can lead to sick leave and early retirement. It requires special therapeutic interventions. This paper describes workplace-related anxieties and workplace phobia and gives a conceptual framework for their understanding. PMID:19544717

  18. ASASSN-16bx: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in CGCG 280-023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Cruz, I.; Kiyota, S.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.

    2016-02-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy CGCG 280-023.

  19. 46 CFR 164.023-3 - Specifications and standards incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...)—164.023-11. (2) Method 4100, Strength and Elongation, Breaking; and Tenacity; of Thread and Yarn... paragraph (b) of this section, notice of change must be published in the Federal Register and the material...., Washington, DC 20593-7509. The material is also available from the sources indicated in paragraph (c) of...

  20. 46 CFR 164.023-3 - Specifications and standards incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; Yards Per Pound (m/kg)—164.023-11. (2) Method 4100, Strength and Elongation, Breaking; and Tenacity; of... paragraph (b) of this section, notice of change must be published in the Federal Register and the material... paragraph (c) of this section. For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call...

  1. 46 CFR 164.023-3 - Specifications and standards incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; Yards Per Pound (m/kg)—164.023-11. (2) Method 4100, Strength and Elongation, Breaking; and Tenacity; of... paragraph (b) of this section, notice of change must be published in the Federal Register and the material... paragraph (c) of this section. For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call...

  2. 46 CFR 164.023-3 - Specifications and standards incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; Yards Per Pound (m/kg)—164.023-11. (2) Method 4100, Strength and Elongation, Breaking; and Tenacity; of... paragraph (b) of this section, notice of change must be published in the Federal Register and the material... paragraph (c) of this section. For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call...

  3. 46 CFR 164.023-3 - Specifications and standards incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...)—164.023-11. (2) Method 4100, Strength and Elongation, Breaking; and Tenacity; of Thread and Yarn... paragraph (b) of this section, notice of change must be published in the Federal Register and the material...., Washington, DC 20593-7509. The material is also available from the sources indicated in paragraph (c) of...

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Aeromonas hydrophila Strain M023 from Freshwater.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chang, Chien-Yi; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a well-known waterborne pathogen that recently was found to infect humans. Here, we report the draft genome of a freshwater isolate from a Malaysian waterfall, A. hydrophila strain M023, which portrays N-acylhomoserine lactone-dependent quorum sensing. PMID:25700404

  5. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  6. Adolescent to Parent Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Claire Pedrick; Gelles, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the extent of violence toward parents by adolescent children in relation to: (1) sex and age of the child; (2) the likelihood that mothers, more than fathers, are victims of children's violence; (3) social factors that may influence child to parent violence; and (4) stress as a factor in family violence. (Author/MJL)

  7. Waging War on Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Closing the Gap, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Focusing on the theme of violence, this newsletter issue includes information about resources for violence information, a list of funding and grant agencies, conference information, and the following brief articles: (1) Waging War on Violence; (2) Minority Health Perspective (Clay Simpson); (3) Inmates Learn Alternatives to Violence; (4) National…

  8. Violence and Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter

    This article examines violence, socialization, and implications for art educators. Section 1 discusses violence as learned behavior within Lonnie Athens' notion of "violentization" or socialization to violence. In this framework, violent individuals first undergo "brutalization," a period during which they experience or witness violence, followed…

  9. Sexuality and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanctuary, Gerald

    The author examines specific manifestations of violence in relation to sexuality: (1) forcible rape rate; (2) war atrocities; (3) sexual violence in prisons; and (4) pornography. Drawing much from Hannah Arendt's book on violence, he views sexual violence as symptomatic of a lack of sexual power, not a sign of its possession. The causes are seen…

  10. An Inquiry into Workplace Incivility: Perceptions of Working Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ashley E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential mixed methods study was to examine and determine the level of incivility in the workplace as a growing problem from the perceptional views of graduate students enrolled in accelerated degree programs for graduate studies in Business Administration, Criminal Justice Administration, Gerontology, Health Management, and…

  11. Workplace Safety: Indoor Environmental Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Indoor Environmental Quality Health Hazard Evaluation ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  12. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  13. Medical Marijuana in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Targino, Marcelo C.; Fanciullo, Gilbert J.; Martin, Douglas W.; Hartenbaum, Natalie P.; White, Jeremy M.; Franklin, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Although possession and use of marijuana is prohibited by federal law, legalization in four states (Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington) and allowance for palliation and therapy in 19 others may reposition the drug away from the fringes of society. This evolving legal environment, and growing scientific evidence of its effectiveness for select health conditions, requires assessment of the safety and appropriateness of marijuana within the American workforce. Although studies have suggested that marijuana may be used with reasonable safety in some controlled environments, there are potential consequences to its use that necessitate employer scrutiny and concern. Several drug characteristics must be considered, including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC, or THC) concentration, route of administration, dose and frequency, and pharmacokinetics, as well as the risks inherent to particular workplace environments. PMID:25951421

  14. A Systematic Review of the Correlates of Violence Against Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Deering, Kathleen N.; Amin, Avni; Shoveller, Jean; Nesbitt, Ariel; Garcia-Moreno, Claudia; Duff, Putu; Argento, Elena; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review in June 2012 (updated September 2013) to examine the prevalence and factors shaping sexual or physical violence against sex workers globally. We identified 1536 (update = 340) unique articles. We included 28 studies, with 14 more contributing to violence prevalence estimates. Lifetime prevalence of any or combined workplace violence ranged from 45% to 75% and over the past year, 32% to 55%. Growing research links contextual factors with violence against sex workers, alongside known interpersonal and individual risks. This high burden of violence against sex workers globally and large gaps in epidemiological data support the need for research and structural interventions to better document and respond to the contextual factors shaping this violence. Measurement and methodological innovation, in partnership with sex work communities, are critical. PMID:24625169

  15. A systematic review of the correlates of violence against sex workers.

    PubMed

    Deering, Kathleen N; Amin, Avni; Shoveller, Jean; Nesbitt, Ariel; Garcia-Moreno, Claudia; Duff, Putu; Argento, Elena; Shannon, Kate

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a systematic review in June 2012 (updated September 2013) to examine the prevalence and factors shaping sexual or physical violence against sex workers globally. We identified 1536 (update = 340) unique articles. We included 28 studies, with 14 more contributing to violence prevalence estimates. Lifetime prevalence of any or combined workplace violence ranged from 45% to 75% and over the past year, 32% to 55%. Growing research links contextual factors with violence against sex workers, alongside known interpersonal and individual risks. This high burden of violence against sex workers globally and large gaps in epidemiological data support the need for research and structural interventions to better document and respond to the contextual factors shaping this violence. Measurement and methodological innovation, in partnership with sex work communities, are critical. PMID:24625169

  16. Collaborative Workplace Development: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folinsbee, Sue; Jurmo, Paul

    This booklet, which is intended for educators, human resource specialists, and others responsible for training and education and workplace development, presents principles of good practice and steps for planning and implementing collaborative workplace development initiatives. A collaborative method of workplace development is detailed that…

  17. The Changing American Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranard, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    An examination is made of the increasing educational demands of the modern workplace during a time when the makeup of an already shrinking workforce is becoming more composed of minorities, women, and immigrants. Articles in this newsletter issue discuss which jobs will grow and which will decline; the new educational demands and skills required…

  18. Workplace Diversity Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on workplace diversity issues. "Expanding Theories of Career Development: Adding the Voices of African American Women in the White Academy" (Mary V. Alfred) questions the validity of existing career development models for women and minority groups and examines the professional development of five…

  19. Marketing Manual: Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe Coll., Strathroy (Ontario).

    This manual applies marketing concepts and methods, selling techniques and principles to the workplace literacy program for the purpose of assisting individuals involved in promoting and selling these programs. Part I provides a rationale for marketing and discusses the following: the role of the sponsor in marketing, market versus marketing,…

  20. Mathematics in Masons' Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Darlinda; Pardal, Eugénia

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents masons' professional practices, which are related to mathematics. It aims to contribute to the area of adult mathematics education and to enlarge knowledge about how mathematics is used at the workplace. Methodologically it was followed an ethnographic approach. The key informants of the study were four masons aged between 40…

  1. Diversity in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains three papers presented at a symposium on diversity in the workplace moderated by Sandra Johnson at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Diversity and Development: An Assessment of Equal Opportunities and the Role of HRD in the Police Service" (Rashmi Biswas, Penny Dick) examines aspects…

  2. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  3. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  4. Workplace Counseling Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Woody, Connie; Burns, Naomi; Howard, Sherrie; Rice, Misty

    This publication describes counseling approaches supervisors and human resource professionals can use to help marginal employees become better adjusted and more productive in the workplace. Three case studies are also provided for training purposes. The counseling tools are as follows: (1) Adlerian counseling, involving the belief that humans'…

  5. Contributions of Work Stressors, Alcohol, and Normative Beliefs to Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Genevieve M.; Cunradi, Carol B.; Duke, Michael; Todd, Michael; Chen, Meng-Jinn

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A body of research has established that lower socioeconomic populations, including blue-collar workers, are at higher risk for problem drinking and intimate partner violence. This study of married/cohabiting construction workers and their spouses/partners describes how work stressors, hazardous drinking, and couple characteristics interact to influence normative beliefs around partner violence and, thereafter, its occurrence. Method: Our survey respondents from a sample of 502 dual-earner couples were asked about drinking patterns, past-year partner violence, normative beliefs about partner violence, work-related stressors, impulsivity, and childhood exposure to violence and other adverse events. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 81 workers on context of work stress, partner violence, and drinking. Results: Analyses of data revealed that men’s and women’s normative beliefs about partner violence were positively related to male-to-female partner violence; female partner violence normative beliefs were associated with female-to-male partner violence. Both partners’ levels of impulsivity were directly associated with male-to-female and female-to-male partner violence, and male partner’s frequency of intoxication mediated the association between level of impulsivity and male-to-female partner violence. Female partner’s adverse childhood experience was directly associated with male-to-female partner violence. Both survey and qualitative interviews identified individual and work-related factors that influence the occurrence of violence between men and women. Discussion: These findings provide guidelines for prevention of partner violence that can be implemented in the workplace with attention to hazardous drinking, job stress, treatment, education, and work culture. PMID:23384367

  6. Reported Occurrence and Perceptions of Violence in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob; McGee, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document and compare rates of reported and perceived crime and violence within schools. With highly publicized acts of school violence prevalent in the minds of the American public, there is a perception that schools are unsafe. Reports of school crime and violence from teachers, administrators, and students differ…

  7. [Violence in conjugal relations: concealing and taking sexual violence for granted].

    PubMed

    Dantas-Berger, Sônia Maria; Giffin, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative study of women who had filed complaints of domestic violence, situating gender relations in a broader context. The authors focus on the meaning ascribed to sexual coercion in violent relations, suggesting that conjugal sexual violence is related to the perverse effects of changes in the sexual division of labor and the aggravated double demands on women from housework and the workplace, in relation to the dismantling of the male's role as provider in situations of poverty. In this context, women's refusal to engage in sex (a form of resistance which expresses their desire to be sexual protagonists and communicates disappointment with their partners) can be seen as contributing to the exacerbation of conjugal violence. In their partial position of "subjects of resistance", these women reveal a situation of oppression which is rarely referred to as violence: feelings of disgust and repulsion following sexual relations conceded as "conjugal rights" are similar to those manifested by victims of rape by strangers (which, in contrast, is generally recognized as "sexual violence"). PMID:15905904

  8. 28 CFR 501.3 - Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administrative Remedy Program, 28 CFR part 542. (f) Other appropriate officials of the Department of Justice... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prevention of acts of violence and... MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.3 Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. (a)...

  9. 28 CFR 501.3 - Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administrative Remedy Program, 28 CFR part 542. (f) Other appropriate officials of the Department of Justice... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prevention of acts of violence and... MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.3 Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. (a)...

  10. 28 CFR 501.3 - Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administrative Remedy Program, 28 CFR part 542. (f) Other appropriate officials of the Department of Justice... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prevention of acts of violence and... MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.3 Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. (a)...

  11. 28 CFR 501.3 - Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administrative Remedy Program, 28 CFR part 542. (f) Other appropriate officials of the Department of Justice... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prevention of acts of violence and... MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.3 Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. (a)...

  12. 28 CFR 501.3 - Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. 501.3 Section 501.3 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.3 Prevention of acts of violence and terrorism. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General,...

  13. School Personnel Responses to Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenemore, Thomas; Lynch, John; Mann, Kimberly; Steinhaus, Patricia; Thompson, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Authors explored the experiences of school personnel in their responses to children's exposure to violence. Thirty-one school personnel, including administrators, teachers, counselors, school social workers, and psychologists, were interviewed to obtain data on their experiences related to violence exposure in their schools and the surrounding…

  14. Language for Preventing and Defusing Violence in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Richard; Grubaugh, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Describes the types of violence found in school and classroom contexts and recommends guidelines to form proactive and reactive strategies for teachers and administrators. Demonstrates the language for rules to establish order and deter violence and to use with students exhibiting violent behavior. (FMW)

  15. Delivery of Workplace Know-How Skills to Secondary Education Students in Kalamazoo County. An Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frybarger, Malinda J.

    A study examined the delivery of workplace know-how skills training to secondary-level students in Kalamazoo County, Michigan. A total of 16 teachers, administrators, and counselors from the county's schools were interviewed regarding existing mechanisms for delivering training in 23 workplace know-how skills that a group of local employers had…

  16. 20 CFR 439.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 439.210 Section 439.210 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  17. 20 CFR 439.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 439.205 Section 439.205 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  18. 49 CFR 219.4 - Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE General § 219.4 Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program. (a) General. A...

  19. 49 CFR 219.4 - Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE General § 219.4 Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program. (a) General. A...

  20. 49 CFR 219.4 - Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE General § 219.4 Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program. (a) General. A...

  1. 49 CFR 219.4 - Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE General § 219.4 Recognition of a foreign railroad's workplace testing program. (a) General. A...

  2. Domestic violence shelter partnerships and veterinary student attitudes at North American veterinary schools and colleges.

    PubMed

    Creevy, Kate E; Shaver, Stephanie L; Cornell, Karen K

    2013-01-01

    Animal abuse and domestic violence are linked issues, and pet ownership is reported to play a crucial role in the choice to leave an abusive situation. Although veterinarians witness the effects of abuse and violence over the course of their careers, they have limited training regarding these issues. One mechanism for educating veterinary students while providing a service for victims of domestic violence is the creation of partnerships between domestic violence shelters and veterinary schools. These extracurricular programs can provide both care for pets belonging to victims of domestic violence and an educational platform for student participants. The goals of this study were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of domestic violence shelter partnerships (DVSPs) at North American veterinary teaching hospitals and to determine whether the presence of a DVSP was associated with increased awareness among veterinary students regarding animal abuse and domestic violence. Nine of 33 veterinary schools surveyed described a DVSP program. Students at schools with DVSPs associated with their veterinary teaching hospitals were significantly more likely to indicate that their awareness of the link between animal abuse and domestic violence had increased during veterinary school. Most veterinary students reported that they felt poorly prepared to handle domestic violence and animal abuse issues in the workplace. This study indicates that extracurricular DVSPs are a viable means of educating veterinary students regarding domestic violence and animal abuse. A need for improved education on these topics in veterinary schools across North America is identified. PMID:23697544

  3. 75 FR 8088 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-023 Personnel Security Management System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Management System of Records (74 FR 3084, January 16, 2009) for the collection and maintenance of records... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL--023 Personnel... to update and reissue Department of Homeland Security/ALL--023 Personnel Security Management...

  4. Learning in the Workplace. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    Research on changes and issues in workplace learning in Australia over the past 6 years was reviewed. Special attention was paid to four topics: importance of learning in the workplace; nature of workplace learning; factors affecting the quality of workplace learning; and recognition of workplace learning. Selected findings were as follows: (1)…

  5. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  6. Violence against Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... sexual violence can lead to unintended pregnancies, induced abortions, gynaecological problems, and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. ... are also twice as likely to have an abortion. Intimate partner violence in pregnancy also increases the ...

  7. 28 CFR 83.225 - What actions must I take concerning employees who are convicted of drug violations in the workplace?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employees who are convicted of drug violations in the workplace? 83.225 Section 83.225 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS... are convicted of drug violations in the workplace? There are two actions you must take if an...

  8. Defining workplace bullying behaviour professional lay definitions of workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Paula; Huynh, Amy; Goodman-Delahunty, Jane

    2007-01-01

    As is commonly the case in new areas of research, workplace bullying researchers and practitioners have struggled to establish a single agreed-upon definition of this phenomenon. As a consequence, there are numerous definitions of workplace bullying currently in use around the world to investigate this serious workplace issue, to educate the workforce about this form of harassment and to assess claims involving allegations of workplace bullying. Additionally, little is known about how employees and people in general define workplace bullying behaviour, and whether current researcher, practitioner and legal definitions coincide with lay definitions of bullying. To compare researcher, practitioner and legal definitions of workplace bullying with lay definitions, the content of definitions composed by adults from diverse personal and professional backgrounds (N=1095) was analysed. Results confirmed that components commonly used by researchers and practitioners, including the occurrence of harmful and negative workplace behaviours, were frequently cited by participants as central defining components of bullying behaviour. In addition, lay definitions often included themes of fairness and respect. The emergence of these themes has important consequences for organisations responding to, and attempting to prevent the occurrence of workplace bullying behaviour in that organisations in which bullying is tolerated may violate both local laws as well as their ethical responsibility to provide employees with a safe, professional and respectful workplace. PMID:17692375

  9. Violence: a glossary

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alison; Zwi, Anthony B; Grove, Natalie J; Butchart, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Violence has been explicitly identified as a significant public health problem. This glossary clarifies widely used definitions and concepts of violence within the public health field, building on those promoted through the 2002 World Report on Violence and Health. We provide definitions and concepts that can be usefully applied to identify points for public health intervention to prevent the social and health impacts of violence. PMID:17630364

  10. Violence: a glossary.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alison; Zwi, Anthony B; Grove, Natalie J; Butchart, Alexander

    2007-08-01

    Violence has been explicitly identified as a significant public health problem. This glossary clarifies widely used definitions and concepts of violence within the public health field, building on those promoted through the 2002 World Report on Violence and Health. We provide definitions and concepts that can be usefully applied to identify points for public health intervention to prevent the social and health impacts of violence. PMID:17630364

  11. Transcultural perspectives in nursing administration.

    PubMed

    Andrews, M M

    1998-11-01

    Population demographics are reshaping the healthcare work force with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, handicap, disability, and related factors as national sensitivity to various forms of diversity grows. Given the demographic trends, it is inevitable that nurse administrators will need skill in transcultural administration as they manage diversity and identify the cultural origins of conflict in the multicultural workplace. Culture influences the manner in which administrators, staff and patients perceive, identify, define and solve problems. In this article, the complex and interrelated factors that influence workplace diversity are examined. PMID:9824983

  12. [Workplace related anxiety and phobia].

    PubMed

    Linden, M; Muschalla, B

    2007-01-01

    Work is an important aspect of life. Problems at the workplace must therefore have negative consequences on the mental status and mental problems will interfere with the working place. The relation between anxiety and the workplace is especially important because the workplace causes anxiety due to its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general, and work related anxieties in particular, are workplace phobias, with panic when approaching or even thinking of the workplace. This is a serious complication with negative consequences for the further course of illness. It makes special therapeutic intervention necessary. This paper describes the phenomenon of workplace related anxieties and phobia and provides a conceptual framework for their understanding. PMID:17106728

  13. Violence in the Family Therapist's Workplace: Prevention Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Gary L.; Brende, Joel O.; McBride, J. LeBron

    1999-01-01

    Study of marriage and family therapists reports that 44% had experienced a physical or psychological assault from a client and that 30% had feared for their lives. Describes basic preventive, assessment, management, and coping measures for working with violent clients. Emphasizes the importance of training and continuing education in the…

  14. Children and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, David, Ed.; And Others

    This volume documents the rise in violence in our communities and explores its impact on children's physical, psychological, and social development. Focal themes are: the necessity for better information about the kinds of violence to which children are exposed, the necessity of beginning to build intervention strategies aimed at violence, and the…

  15. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  16. Schools, Violence, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.

    The seeming increase of violence in American society and its schools has become a pressing issue. Some researchers argue that the American education system mirrors the dynamics of society. The articles in this book address the following issues: the extent of violence in American schools; the forms that violence takes; its root causes; the effects…

  17. A Nation of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Richard M.; Chalker, Donald M.

    1999-01-01

    The United States leads the developed world in youth violence, with the highest homicide and suicide rates among young people. Exposure starts early. To reduce violence in U.S. schools, we must control handguns, abolish television violence, isolate violent students, and change the ways that juvenile offenders are punished. (MLH)

  18. Firearms and family violence.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, A; Heron, S

    1999-08-01

    Firearms contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in family violence. This article discusses the debate on gun use for protection and guns in the home. Weapons-related risks in the setting of intimate partner violence are closely reviewed. Recommendations for physicians are discussed in the context of firearms and family violence. PMID:10516848

  19. Alternatives to Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that our capacity to diffuse conflict rests in our ability to recognize and verbalize feelings, develop empathy, and think of alternatives to violence. Explores the influence of role models and culture on violence and how the media can use violent images effectively in helping us confront a culture of violence. (HTH)

  20. Violence and the Prevention of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Leonore Loeb, Ed.; Denmark, Florence L., Ed.

    Contributors to this collection put forth many contemporary theoretical ideas about violence in society. All agree that finding ways to prevent violence is critical and that living in peace means acceptance of diversity. The following chapters are included: (1) "Motivational Approach to Violent Behavior: A Cross-Cultural Perspective: (Sergei V.…

  1. Violence against metropolitan bus drivers and fare collectors in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, Ada Ávila; de Medeiros, Adriane Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the correlation between sociodemographic factors and working conditions of bus workers in a metropolitan area and violence against them. METHODS This cross-sectional study used a nonprobabilistic sample estimated according to the number of workers employed in bus companies located in three cities in the Belo Horizonte metropolitan region in 2012 (N = 17,470). Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a digital questionnaire. The factors associated with violence were analyzed in two stages using Poisson regression, according to each level. The magnitude of the association was evaluated using prevalence ratios with robust variance and a statistical significance of 5%, and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. RESULTS The study sample comprised 782 drivers and 691 fare collectors; 45.0% participants reported at least one act of violence in the workplace in the last 12 months, with passengers being predominantly responsible. The age of the bus workers was inversely associated with violence. Chronic diseases, sickness absenteeism, and working conditions were also associated with violence. CONCLUSIONS The findings on the correlation between violence and working conditions are essential for implementing prevention strategies by transportation service managers. PMID:25741657

  2. Violence against metropolitan bus drivers and fare collectors in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ada Ávila; Medeiros, Adriane Mesquita de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the correlation between sociodemographic factors and working conditions of bus workers in a metropolitan area and violence against them. METHODS This cross-sectional study used a nonprobabilistic sample estimated according to the number of workers employed in bus companies located in three cities in the Belo Horizonte metropolitan region in 2012 (N = 17,470). Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a digital questionnaire. The factors associated with violence were analyzed in two stages using Poisson regression, according to each level. The magnitude of the association was evaluated using prevalence ratios with robust variance and a statistical significance of 5%, and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. RESULTS The study sample comprised 782 drivers and 691 fare collectors; 45.0% participants reported at least one act of violence in the workplace in the last 12 months, with passengers being predominantly responsible. The age of the bus workers was inversely associated with violence. Chronic diseases, sickness absenteeism, and working conditions were also associated with violence. CONCLUSIONS The findings on the correlation between violence and working conditions are essential for implementing prevention strategies by transportation service managers. PMID:25741657

  3. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  4. Violence against Primary Health Care Workers in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; El-Wehady, Adel; Amr, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    This self-report questionnaire study was carried out in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia to highlight the magnitude, predictors, and circumstances of workplace violence against primary health care (PHC) workers. A total of 1,091 workers completed a self-administered questionnaire. About 28% were exposed to at least one violent event during the past year.…

  5. The Effects and Costs of Intimate Partner Violence for Work Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Carol; OLeary-Kelly, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the productivity-related effects and costs of intimate partner violence (IPV) on the workplace. Specifically, it explores whether IPV victims and nonvictims differ in the number of work hours missed due to absenteeism, tardiness, and work distraction and the costs for employers from these missed work hours. The research…

  6. Experienced Teachers' Informal Workplace Learning and Perceptions of Workplace Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Annemarieke; Korthagen, Fred; Brekelmans, Mieke; Beijaard, Douwe; Imants, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in detail how teachers' perceptions of workplace conditions for learning are related to their informal workplace learning activities and learning outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: From a sample of 32 teachers, a purposeful sampling technique of maximal variation was used to select two cases…

  7. Workplace English: From Literature Classics to Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Krauss, Lisbeth; McClanahan, Linda

    This paper explains the rationale and methods for integrating workplace literacy with English literature instruction for high school or adult students. The workplace literacy/English literature activities presented include: (1) a newsletter format reporting on the major historical periods in English literature; (2) a business project report used…

  8. Ideology and Violence Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Steven

    1988-01-01

    Interpersonal violence is a major problem in US society in terms of the death and destruction it causes, the fear it generates, and the attention it receives. A recent trend has been to regard the problem of violence as an epidemic and to shape ideas of violence prevention according to public-health formulations. This process does not take into account the ideological nature of the proposed violence-prevention measures. Problems arise because this ideology is relevant to the potential effectiveness of violence prevention. This paper delineates several ideological issues involved in violence prevention and discusses how they interact with frequently employed public-health prevention strategies. Based upon this discussion, a general perspective for violence prevention is proposed and guiding principles that emerge from this perspective are presented. PMID:3404554

  9. Athena's Daughters: Women's Perceptions of Mentoring and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Christine F.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Egan's theory of women's mentoring styles, and related attitudes toward mentoring and the workplace, generalize to women in higher education administration and to women of color. Egan's theory of women's mentoring, based upon the epistemologies conceptualized by Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger, and…

  10. Knowledge and Skills Transfer between MBA and Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Melvin; Burns, David; Lu, Xinyi; Winsor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to use goal-setting theory to explain the transfer of knowledge and skills between master of business administration (MBA) and the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Data were obtained by an online survey of MBA students enrolled in at four US graduate business schools. These were a public and private institution in…

  11. A Safe and Welcoming Place?: Workplace Progression for Women Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Jean; O'Rourke, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with seven women lecturers and five administrative/library staff at Leeds University uncovered the following: differential career paths for women and men; a link between the extent of career progression and working full or part time; and few opportunities for gender issues to be openly discussed in the academic workplace. (SK)

  12. Violence against women: theoretical reflections.

    PubMed

    Casique, Leticia Casique; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Violence appears in different forms and circumstances and involves distinct kinds of violent acts against children, women, elderly and other defenseless persons. This serious problem, which degrades women's integrity, is denoted by terms like domestic violence, gender violence and violence against women. Gender violence can appear as physical, psychological, sexual, economic violence, as well as violence at work. Violence against women committed by their intimate partners can be analyzed through the Ecological Model, which explains the close relation between individuals and their environment. Factors influencing people's behavior towards this violence should be analyzed with a view to establishing help programs. PMID:17294031

  13. Black Boxes in Workplace Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julian; Wake, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    We ground Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) in studies of workplace practices from a mathematical point of view. We draw on multiple case study visits by college students and teacher-researchers to workplaces. By asking questions that "open boxes", we "outsiders and boundary-crossers" sought to expose contradictions between College and…

  14. Communication Skills for Workplace Assessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Deborah

    This document is designed to help develop the communication skills of individuals training for the position of workplace assessor in Australia's National Training Framework and practicing workplace assessors who require additional assistance with on-the-job communication skills. The document consists of 11 units of study that each contain some or…

  15. Ohio Workplace Education Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest ABLE Resource Center, Toledo, OH.

    This manual is designed for adult basic education programs to use as a resource for workplace education (WE). It begins with a section of introductory materials, including a WE definition, scope of work, and survey results. The next section contains a program profile; director/coordinator profile; instructor profiles; Ohio ABLE workplace site…

  16. Workplace Literacy: A Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmino, Lucy Madsen; Byran, Valerie C.

    This resource book provides information on developing a workplace literacy program, descriptions of Florida Workplace Literacy Programs, and an annotated bibliography of resources. An introduction discusses the problem of basic skills deficiencies, projections that indicate the problem will increase, the Florida context, and benefits realized when…

  17. Experience, Competence and Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paloniemi, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job-competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the variety of conceptions related to experience, competence and workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on interview data from six Finnish small and…

  18. Union Roles in Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Stephen Michael

    1993-01-01

    Discusses roles for labor unions in resolving workforce deficiencies, suggesting that labor, management, and government must work together to develop cooperative training initiatives. Describes labor's historic role in basic and workplace literacy training, lists skills workers need in the "new" workplace, describes exemplary union-management…

  19. Adult Learning in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on adult learning in the workplace. "The Relationship between Workplace Learning and Employee Satisfaction in Small Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden, Shamsuddin Ahmad) reports the results of a study of the nature and extent of HRD, level of job satisfaction among workers, and correlation between HRD…

  20. The Toll of Workplace Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Bullying may be more common than most people think. According to a study commissioned by the Workplace Bullying Institute, one in three employees experience bullying in the workplace either as a victim or as a witness suffering collateral damage. Bullying is a serious problem. Directors, managers, and staff members need to ensure that it does not…

  1. Workplace incivility: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Abolfazl Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the meaning of the concept 'workplace incivility' and promote consistency in its application in nursing research and practice. The methodology introduced by Walker and Avant was used to analyze this concept. A total number of 50 studies that had essentially addressed the concept of incivility in employees' work environment was selected. Ambiguous intent, violation of mutual respect, low intensity and lack of physical assault were identified as the defining attributes of workplace incivility. The necessary antecedent of workplace incivility consisted of the presence of two or more people, with one or more as the source of the incivility, and another or others as its target in the workplace. Moreover, certain individual and organisational factors were the potential antecedents of workplace incivility. Possible negative outcomes for victims, witnesses, organisations, society and perpetrators of such behaviours, such as increased cost for the organisation, reduced citizenship performance, psychological distress and anxiety were identified as outcomes of workplace incivility. Results of the current concept analysis can guide nurse managers to design interventions so that the occurrence of workplace incivility can be reduced. Further studies can focus on testing the psychometric properties of the existing workplace incivility scales, especially uncivil behaviours experienced by nurses across different societies or cultures. PMID:26213258

  2. Workplace Literacy: A Labour Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Tom

    The policies and practices of Canadian labor unions in the area of workplace literacy were examined through a comprehensive literature review and site visits to an unspecified number of labor-initiated workplace literacy programs representing different geographic areas, industries and types of occupations, levels of participation of equity groups,…

  3. The Workplace and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Karin Domnick

    1986-01-01

    Findings of the Canadian Mental Health and the Workplace Project are that (1) the quality of interpersonal relations in the workplace is a major factor in emotional well-being and (2) work must be balanced with other parts of one's life. These findings imply the need for social support networks and alternative work patterns. (SK)

  4. Preventing interpersonal violence in emergency departments: practical applications of criminology theory.

    PubMed

    Henson, Billy

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two decades, rates of violence in the workplace have grown significantly. Such growth has been more prevalent in some fields than others, however. Research shows that rates of violence against healthcare workers are continuously among the highest of any career field. Within the healthcare field, the overwhelming majority of victims of workplace violence are hospital employees, with those working in emergency departments (EDs) experiencing the lion's share of violent victimization. Though this fact is well-known by medical researchers and practitioners, it has received relatively little attention from criminal justice researchers or practitioners. Unfortunately, this oversight has severely limited the use of effective crime prevention techniques in hospital EDs. The goal of this analysis is to utilize techniques of situational crime prevention to develop an effective and easily applicable crime prevention strategy for hospital EDs. PMID:20712151

  5. Exposure of mental health nurses to violence associated with job stress, life satisfaction, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth.

    PubMed

    Itzhaki, Michal; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Barnoy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Bluvstein, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence towards health workers in hospitals and in mental health units in particular is increasing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of exposure to violence, job stress, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth (PTG) on the life satisfaction of mental health nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of mental health nurses (n = 118) working in a large mental health centre in Israel. Verbal violence by patients was reported by 88.1% of the nurses, and 58.4% experienced physical violence in the past year. Physical and verbal violence towards nurses was correlated with job stress, and life satisfaction was correlated with PTG and staff resilience. Linear regression analyses indicated that life satisfaction was mainly affected by PTG, staff resilience, and job stress, and less by exposure to verbal and physical violence. The present study is the first to show that, although mental health nurses are frequently exposed to violence, their life satisfaction is affected more by staff resilience, PTG, and job stress than by workplace violence. Therefore, it is recommended that intervention programmes that contribute to PTG and staff resilience, as well as those that reduce job stress among mental health nurses, be explored and implemented. PMID:26257307

  6. Workplace discrimination and cancer.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Maureen A; Fabian, Ellen; Hurley, Jessica E; McMahon, Brian T; West, Steven L

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Integrated Mission System database were analyzed with specific reference to allegations of workplace discrimination filed by individuals with cancer under ADA Title One. These 6,832 allegations, filed between July 27, 1992 and September 30, 2003, were compared to 167,798 allegations from a general disability population on the following dimensions: type of workplace discrimination; demographic characteristics of the charging parties (CPs); the industry designation, location, and size of employers; and the outcome or resolution of EEOC investigations. Results showed allegations derived from CPs with cancer were more likely than those in the general disability population to include issues involving discharge, terms and conditions of employment, lay-off, wages, and demotion. Compared to the general disability group, CPs with cancer were more likely to be female, older, and White. Allegations derived from CPs with cancer were also more likely to be filed against smaller employers (15-100 workers) or those in service industries. Finally, the resolution of allegations by CPs with cancer were more likely to be meritorious than those filed from the general disability population; that is, actual discrimination is more likely to have occurred. PMID:18057571

  7. The violence of disablism.

    PubMed

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    This article addresses the multi-faceted nature of violence in the lives of disabled people, with a specific focus on the accounts of disabled children and their families. Traditionally, when violence and disability have been considered together, this has emphasised the disabled subject whom inevitably exhibits violent challenging behaviour. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to violence experienced by disabled people, most notably in relation to hate crime. This article embraces theories that do not put the problems of disablism or violence back onto disabled people but magnify and expose processes of disablism that are produced in the relationships between people, which sometimes involve violence. This, we argue, means taking seriously the role of social relationships, institutions and culture in the constitution of violence. Disabled children, we argue, are enculturated by the violence of disablism. We follow Žižek's advice to step back from the obvious signals of violence to 'perceive the contours of the background which generates such outbursts', and identify four elements of the violence of disablism which we define as real, psychoemotional, systemic and cultural. We come to the conclusion that violence experienced by disabled children and their families says more about the dominant culture of disablism than it does of the acts of a few seemingly irrational, unreasonable, mean or violent individuals. We conclude that there is a need for extensive cultural deconstruction and reformation. PMID:21226732

  8. 28 CFR 90.10 - Description of STOP (Services • Training • Officers • Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program. 90.10 Section 90.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN The STOP (Services ⢠Training ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program § 90.10 Description...

  9. 28 CFR 90.10 - Description of STOP (Services • Training • Officers • Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program. 90.10 Section 90.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN The STOP (Services ⢠Training ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program § 90.10 Description...

  10. 28 CFR 90.10 - Description of STOP (Services • Training • Officers • Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program. 90.10 Section 90.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN The STOP (Services ⢠Training ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program § 90.10 Description...

  11. 28 CFR 90.10 - Description of STOP (Services • Training • Officers • Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program. 90.10 Section 90.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN The STOP (Services ⢠Training ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program § 90.10 Description...

  12. 28 CFR 90.10 - Description of STOP (Services • Training • Officers • Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program. 90.10 Section 90.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN The STOP (Services ⢠Training ⢠Officers ⢠Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program § 90.10 Description...

  13. 3 CFR - Establishing a Working Group on the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities Presidential... Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities Memorandum... Administration. However, gender-based violence and gender-related health disparities cannot be ignored...

  14. Violence exposure and teen dating violence among African American youth.

    PubMed

    Black, Beverly M; Chido, Lisa M; Preble, Kathleen M; Weisz, Arlene N; Yoon, Jina S; Delaney-Black, Virginia; Kernsmith, Poco; Lewandowski, Linda

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the relationships between exposure to violence in the community, school, and family with dating violence attitudes and behaviors among 175 urban African American youth. Age, gender, state support and experiences with neglect, school violence, and community violence were the most significant predictors of acceptance of dating violence. Experiences with community violence and age were important predictors of dating violence perpetration and victimization. Findings highlight the importance of planning prevention programs that address variables affecting attitudes and behaviors of high-risk youth who have already been exposed to multiple types of violence. PMID:25287413

  15. [Act No. 19.023 of 26 December 1990 establishing the National Women's Service].

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    Chile's law 19.023 of January 3, 1991, creates the National Service for Women as a decentralized public service linked to the Ministry of Planning and Cooperation. Title 1 defines the nature, objectives, functions, and location of the National Service for Women, which will be the entity charged with collaborating with the Executive in study and proposal of plans and measures leading to equality of women with men in rights and opportunities in the process of political, social, economic, and cultural development of the country. Title 2 specifies organizational aspects, including the functions of the director, subdirector, and council. Title 3 establishes regional offices throughout Chile. Title 4 indicates the resources to be available to the National Service for Women, and title 5 describes its personnel and their requirements and remuneration. Title 6 authorizes the National Director to obtain needed information from other governmental entities. The final title contains articles pertaining to initial operation of the Service. PMID:12222187

  16. Understanding Youth Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... protective factors. Step 3: Develop and test prevention strategies Using information gathered in research, CDC develops and evaluates strategies to prevent youth violence. Step 4: Ensure widespread ...

  17. Understanding Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... this question. Step 3: Develop and test prevention strategies Using information gathered in research, CDC develops and evaluates strategies to prevent violence. Step 4: Ensure widespread adoption ...

  18. Dentistry preventing family violence.

    PubMed

    Mouden, L D

    1996-01-01

    Dentistry has a long history of dealing with one form of family violence, child maltreatment. However, a recent national survey shows that dentists are not living up to their legal and ethical obligations to report suspected child victims. Dentistry needs to be equally concerned with adult victims of family violence--the victims of spousal abuse and elder abuse and neglect. Successful child abuse prevention programs need to expand to cover all of family violence. All health care professionals need education and awareness training to help develop the necessary attitudes to deal with all victims of family violence. PMID:9564320

  19. Violence: Safeguarding Our Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This adaptation of the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) booklet "Safeguarding Your Children" discusses cooperative efforts of communities, schools, and homes to protect children from violence. (SM)

  20. Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form) for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support) model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors. PMID:22551645

  1. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education. PMID:25102477

  2. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  3. Workplace bullying: the effectiveness of a workplace program.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Sharon J; Sheridan, Daniel J; Jones, Ruth A; Speroni, Karen Gabel

    2013-08-01

    Workplace bullying can not only cost thousands of dollars to replace an affected nurse, but also have detrimental economic effects on health care organizations. Occupational health nurses can provide leadership in preventing or eliminating workplace bullying. This pilot study determined that attendance at a cognitive rehearsal program decreased workplace bullying. The study used an Internet-based survey administered 6 months after nurses completed the 2-hour cognitive rehearsal program. Half of the nurses reported witnessing bullying behaviors since attending the program; 70% of the nurses reported changing their own behaviors following the course; and 40% of the nurses reported a decrease in bullying behaviors during the past 6 months. Although 70% of the nurses believed they could intervene in bullying situations, only 16% reported they responded to bullying at the time of occurrence. This study illuminates the need to continue searching for other effective methods to prevent and manage workplace bullying. PMID:23875566

  4. Patient Violence Towards Counselors in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Programs: Prevalence, Predictors, and Responses.

    PubMed

    Bride, Brian E; Choi, Y Joon; Olin, Ilana W; Roman, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence disproportionately impacts healthcare and social service providers. Given that substance use and abuse are documented risk factors for the perpetration of violence, SUD treatment personnel are at risk for patient-initiated violence. However, little research has addressed SUD treatment settings. Using data nationally representative of the U. S., the present study explores SUD counselors' experiences of violent behaviors perpetrated by patients. More than half (53%) of counselors personally experienced violence, 44% witnessed violence, and 61% had knowledge of violence directed at a colleague. Counselors reported that exposure to violence led to an increased concern for personal safety (29%), impacted their treatment of patients (15%), and impaired job performance (12%). In terms of organizational responses to patient violence, 70% of organizations increased training on de-escalation of violent situations, and 58% increased security measures. Exposure to verbal assault was associated with age, minority, tenure, recovery status, 12-step philosophy, training in MI/MET, and higher caseloads of patients with co-occurring disorders. Exposure to physical threats was associated with age gender, minority, tenure, recovery status, and higher caseloads of patients with co-occurring disorders. Exposure to physical assault was associated with age, gender, and sample. Implications of these findings for organizations and individuals are discussed. PMID:26025921

  5. Are Interpersonal Violence Rates Higher Among Young Women in College Compared With Those Never Attending College?

    PubMed

    Coker, Ann L; Follingstad, Diane R; Bush, Heather M; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2016-05-01

    Estimates of sexual violence and partner violence rates among young women are generated primarily from college samples. Few studies have data to compare rates among similar-aged women attending college with those who never attended college. This study aims to estimate rates of partner violence by type (sexual, physical, and psychological) and severity (mild, moderate, severe), sexual harassment, and knowing or suspecting that someone put a drug in a drink (drugged drink) among a national sample of 959 young women aged 18 to 24 in an intimate relationship in the past 12 months who were either currently in college (college;n= 272) or never attended college (non-college;n= 687). After adjusting for demographic differences between these two groups, no significant differences were found in rates of sexual partner violence (28.4% non-college, 23.5% college), physical partner violence (27.9% non-college, 26.3% college), psychological partner violence (Mscore: 6.10 non-college, 5.59 college), sexual harassment (15.5% non-college, 14.1% college), or drugged drink (8.5% non-college, 7.8% college). Finding high rates of interpersonal violence among young women who are and are not currently attending college indicates the need to target all young adults with violence prevention interventions in educational, workplace, and other community-based settings. PMID:25604971

  6. AIDS Education for the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Sun Life in Wellesley, Massachusetts, has an ongoing education program about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) that provides employees with facts and works to change attitudes about the implications of AIDS for the workplace. (SK)

  7. Family Violence and Violence against Children. Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghate, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the research literature on physical violence against children, including disciplinary tactics and abusive violence. Considers the incidence and prevalence of violence against children, key themes in research on causes, correlates and consequences of this violence, and future research needs. (JPB)

  8. Stress within the academic workplace.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole A; Pressler, Jana L

    2014-01-01

    Many new nursing leaders assuming deanships, assistant deanships, or interim deanships have limited education, experience, or background to prepare them to deal with workplace stress. To assist new deans and those aspiring to be deans, the authors of this department offer survival tips based on their personal experiences and insights. They address common issues such as time management, handling workplace bullying, and negotiating deadlines and assignments. The authors welcome counterpoint discussions with readers. PMID:24743171

  9. LGBT Workplace Climate in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Danner, R.; Dixon, W. V.; Henderson, C. B.; Kay, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS Working Group on LGBTIQ Equality (WGLE) held a town hall meeting at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage to explore the workplace climate for LGBTIQ individuals working in Astronomy and related fields. Topics of discussion included anti-discrimination practices, general workplace climate, and pay and benefit policies. Four employment sectors were represented: industry, the federal government, private colleges, and public universities. We will summarize and expand on the town hall discussions and findings of the panel members.

  10. Visual ergonomics in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Anshel, Jeffrey R

    2007-10-01

    This article provides information about visual function and its role in workplace productivity. By understanding the connection among comfort, health, and productivity and knowing the many options for effective ergonomic workplace lighting, the occupational health nurse can be sensitive to potential visual stress that can affect all areas of performance. Computer vision syndrome-the eye and vision problems associated with near work experienced during or related to computer use-is defined and solutions to it are discussed. PMID:17969539

  11. Witnessing Interparental Violence and Acceptance of Dating Violence as Predictors for Teen Dating Violence Victimization.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Marie E; Temple, Jeff R; Weston, Rebecca; Le, Vi Donna

    2016-04-01

    We examined the association between witnessing interparental violence, attitudes about dating violence, and physical and psychological teen dating violence (TDV) victimization. Participants were 918 teens with dating experience. Witnessing interparental violence and acceptance of dating violence were significant predictors of TDV victimization. Acceptance of dating violence was also a partial mediator between witnessing interparental violence and TDV victimization. Witnessing mother-to-father violence and acceptance of female-perpetrated violence were the most consistent predictors. TDV programs aiming to prevent victimization could benefit from targeting youth exposed to father-to-mother and mother-to-father violence, targeting attitudes about violence, and tailoring interventions to gender-specific risk factors. PMID:26452379

  12. Work-related violence and incident use of psychotropics.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ida E H; Burr, Hermann; Diderichsen, Finn; Pejtersen, Jan H; Borritz, Marianne; Bjorner, Jakob B; Rugulies, Reiner

    2011-12-15

    Although the mental health consequences of domestic violence are well documented, empirical evidence is scarce regarding the mental health effects of violence in the workplace. Most studies have used data from small occupation-specific samples, limiting their generalizability. This article examines whether direct exposure to work-related violence is associated with clinically pertinent mental health problems, measured by purchases of psychotropics (antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics), in a cross-occupational sample of 15,246 Danish employees free from using psychotropics at baseline. Self-reported data on work-related violence were merged with other data on purchases of medications through a national registry to estimate cause-specific hazard ratios during 3.6 years (1,325 days) of follow-up in the years 1996-2008. Outcomes were examined as competing risks, and analyses were adjusted for gender, age, cohabitation, education, income, social support from colleagues, social support from supervisor, and influence and quantitative demands at work. Work-related violence was associated with purchasing antidepressants alone (hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.75) or in combination with anxiolytics (hazard ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 2.70) but not with purchasing anxiolytics or hypnotics only. The frequency of violent episodes and risk of caseness were unrelated. Work-related violence is associated with increased risk of clinically pertinent mental health problems. Reducing levels of work-related violence may help to prevent mental disorders in the working population. PMID:22038105

  13. School Violence: Psychologists' Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eeden, R. van; And Others

    Conflict is part of human interaction. A review of some of the literature on the history, as well as on the educational and psychological impact of violence in South African schools, is provided here. It is suggested that intervention and prevention strategies to deal with the effect of violence include training to provide market-related skills to…

  14. Preventing School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    School violence has mushroomed into a devastating epidemic and is deteriorating the basic foundation of education. In this article, the author will present several teaching strategies for preventing school violence from becoming an arduous enigma within the classroom and school environments, and focus on assessment and reflection in order to…

  15. Violence against women.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Y C; Haile-Mariam, T

    1999-08-01

    Violence against women has received increasing public attention over the past 20 years. The past two decades have highlighted the problem of intimate partner violence as a major cause of intentional injury to women. Many of these women present themselves to emergency departments where emergency physicians have a unique opportunity to intervene. PMID:10516841

  16. Saving Youth from Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechinger, Fred M.

    1994-01-01

    Nearly one million adolescents between the ages of 12 and 19 are victims of violent crimes each year, and this has been true since at least 1985. Children are becoming involved in violence at ever younger ages, both as victims and as perpetrators. The threat of firearms is the greatest concern in adolescent violence, but no single factor can be…

  17. Understanding and Controlling Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earls, Felton

    1991-01-01

    The magnitude of societal violence, issues surrounding organizational and scientific approaches to its control, emerging strategies that promise to advance knowledge of its causes, and the relationships between socioeconomic factors and interpersonal violence are reviewed. An agenda for public and science policy, professional practice, and basic…

  18. [Violence in Sports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degelman, Charles, Ed.; Hayes, Bill, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This teaching resource presents articles that draw on young people's natural interest in sports to stimulate their involvement in law-related education. An article on violence in sports explores the causes of this violence--the physical contact inherent in many sports, the desire to win at all costs, the urging of coaches, and the negligence of…

  19. Violence in America's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet is concerned with the issue of school violence. The introductory section provides examples of violence in schools and notes that the Centers for Disease Control state that 1 student in 5 takes a weapon to school and 1 in 20 carries a gun. It is further noted that urban schools in the major metropolitan areas have the greatest risk of…

  20. [Violence against children].

    PubMed

    Daher, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The Convention of Human Rights defines violence as "all forms of physical or mental violence, injury and abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse". Violence against children cuts across boundaries of geography, race, class, religion and culture. It occurs in homes, schools and streets ; in places of work and entertainment, and in care and detention centers. Perpetrators include parents, family members, teachers, caretakers, law enforcement authorities and other children. Some children are particularly vulnerable because of gender, race, ethnic origin, disability or social status. And no country is immune, whether rich or poor. Although the consequences of violence for children may vary according to its nature and severity, the short- and long-term repercussions are very often grave and damaging. Violence may result in greater susceptibility to lifelong social, emotional, and cognitive impairments and to health-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse and early initiation of sexual behavior. Governments are ultimately responsible for the protection of children. It is therefore up to governments to act now, to fulfill their human rights obligations and other commitments, to ensure the protection of children from all forms of violence. Violence against children is never justifiable. Nor is it inevitable. After providing a global picture of violence against children, we propose recommendations to prevent and respond to this issue. PMID:17966730

  1. Alcohol and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Leslie A., Comp.

    This document reports on the relationship between alcohol abuse and battering. Several theories, e.g., the disinhibition, disavowal, and learned behavior theories concerning the relationship between alcohol abuse and family violence are discussed. Literature on the relationship between alcohol and family violence is reviewed. Five intervention and…

  2. Counseling Victims of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra L.

    This book provides counselors with a look at the effects of violence and offers strategies for assisting victims and survivors of that violence to cope, recover, and grow. Chapter 1 tells the story of a victim of sexual abuse. Chapter 2 examines the psychodynamics of trauma, including posttraumatic stress. Chapter 3 discusses effective therapies…

  3. HIV-related violence.

    PubMed

    Abdale, F

    1999-10-01

    Statistics are seldom recorded on the incidence of HIV-related verbal or physical abuse. The New York Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project (AVP), and San Francisco's Community United Against Violence are the only known programs to recognize and collect data on HIV-related violence. Psychological abuse, physical battery, harassment, and rape are all signs of domestic violence. Reluctance to report bias crimes is thought to stem from fear of discrimination and further violence. In addition, some community members are concerned that partner notification laws may foster more household violence, or discourage people from being tested. The repercussions of violence against people with HIV is evident, often resulting in depression, lack of sleep, and non-adherence to medication. Those victimized by violent situations can seek assistance in New York from AVP, which provides resources, counseling, legal aid and advocacy for victims. AVP also provides guidance and support through the process of criminal prosecution, and formulating a safety plan. A list of organizations that can assist victims of violence is provided, which includes contact information for each. PMID:11366876

  4. A Date with Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Robert; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Teen dating violence is common but preventable. A survey of Texas high schoolers showed that half of respondents had been victims of dating violence. A majority of both sexes believed that certain behaviors justified being hit by their dating partners. It is important to raise the awareness of school personnel, parents, and students. Peer…

  5. The War on Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinnon, Richard

    1970-01-01

    Controversial article that attempts to cover everything from the definition of violence ( violence is not gentleness; it is not friendly persuasion;...") to the Warren Commission Report ( Study of this chapter..suggests that they might as well have consulted the entrials of sheep.") (MF)

  6. Rural Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protective Orders Effective in Stopping or Reducing Partner Violence , they examine urban and rural differences in the community context of ... The impact of civil protective orders on reducing violence and abuse did not differ ... women. Community-level barriers to enforce civil protective ...

  7. Violence in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Donald L.

    Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

  8. The Worst School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author recalls many acts of school violence. He states that while the dramatic school killings at Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999 and at Minnesota's Red Lake Reservation in 2005 were tragic, the most horrific school violence in history, measured by loss of life, occurred nearly a half century ago at Our Lady of the…

  9. Preadolescent Violence among Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    This research study explored preadolescent girl-to-girl violence based on the perceptions of the victim at 14 years of age and those of her family. Using a heuristic research design (Moustakas, 1990), this constant comparative analysis of multiple data sources found (a) a clearly delineated progression of girl-to-girl violence, (b) blindness…

  10. Various Viewpoints on Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, Bonita; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents four articles addressing various aspects of violence in the context of children's everyday life: video game violence, gun play, violent children's television programming, and war play. Proposes possible developmentally appropriate solutions. Urges teachers, parents, and the community in general to actively work to provide a safer, saner…

  11. [Violence against children].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhain, Ute; Künster, Anne Katrin; Besier, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Violence against children is a widespread phenomenon. Interpersonal violence within the family context is typical in childhood, whereas violence occurs more frequently in the leisure and peer context during adolescence, often involving new media. The risk for experiencing violence is associated with many different factors, for example the age, psychosocial context, and cultural background of a child. Data on the prevalence of violence vary by country, depending on the available documentation systems. It is estimated that the number of unreported cases is high. Meta-analyses comprising mainly retrospective self-report studies indicate prevalence estimates between 12 and 19% for neglect, physical, and sexual abuse. Emotional child abuse is reported far more often, with a prevalence as high as 36.3%. German studies, however, weren't able to replicate these international findings. Here, child emotional abuse is reported less often. Violence against children has many negative consequences for physical, emotional, and psychosocial development. Violence prevention therefore comprises different international and national programs and strategies, which are able to successfully reduce violence against children. Programs focusing on the promotion of adequate parenting behavior show especially promising results. PMID:26519329

  12. Children and Television Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Timothy P.

    1973-01-01

    The question of whether violence depicted on television causes viewers to act aggressively is meaningless because it implies a simple "yes" or "no" response. Effects of mass media depend on the types of viewers and content as well as the conditions of message reception. Television violence can affect the behavior of children on some occasions.…

  13. Researching Television Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtzel, Alan; Lometti, Guy

    1984-01-01

    Two officals from the American Broadcasting Companies (ABC) (1) review a 1982 National Institute of Mental Health Study on television and violence, and (2) summarize the broadcast standards, practices, policies, and procedures employed by the network regarding the depiction of violence. (GC)

  14. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  15. School Violence. Web Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    In answer to the concerns about school violence in the United States (especially since the tragedy in 1999 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado), this Internet curriculum offers lessons and resources that address the topic of school violence and its causes, as well as the search for solutions. The curriculum presents four world wide web…

  16. Town and Country Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingrey, P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A study of 1,004 eighth and tenth grade students from 23 small central Texas communities indicates that violence and drug use are prevalent in rural schools. Because risk taking is the common link between drug use and violence, intervention should identify high-risk behaviors and teach safety skills. (nine references) (MLF)

  17. Examining School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Barry, Ed.; Dobry, Diane, Ed.; Andrews, Heather, Ed.; Reznik, Deidre, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document considers school violence by reviewing the school environment, assessing the difficulties and causes of violence, and offering solutions to the problems. One study describes risk factors for aggressive behavior among middle school students and presents steps that can be taken to prevent the development of such behavior. Several…

  18. Kids and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCart, Linda

    This volume presents three papers commissioned by the National Governors' Association on children and violence. "Risk Factors for Youth Violence" (Terence P. Thornberry) discusses findings from longitudinal studies conducted over the last decade about children and violent behavior. Nine significant risk factors for violent behavior are identified:…

  19. Magnetic Behavior of Nanostructured Mn0.23TaS2 Near Ferromagnetic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooling, Corey; Shand, Paul; Boyle, K. R.; Kidd, Tim; Strauss, Laura

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the ferromagnetic transition for tantalum disulfide intercalated with 23% manganese. The material was grown in the form of nanotube/nanowire structures with diameters ranging from 30nm to several hundred nanometers. These nanotube structures give the material a high anisotropy. The material was studied through Curie-Weiss analysis, dc magnetization, and ac susceptibility measurements. The ferromagnetic transition for Mn0.23TaS2 occurs around 85K and varies with the applied dc magnetic field. The ferromagnetic transition is characterized by a peak in the ac susceptibility. Analysis of the susceptibility peaks revealed atypically high critical exponent values when compared to other disordered ferromagnetic systems. The large exponents may be due to the existence of two transitions in close proximity. The first transition (at a higher temperature) is to a ferromagnetic state; the second is to a disordered magnetic state. Arrott-Noakes plotting provided further justification of a multicritical transition. Further work includes taking measurements on a bulk crystalline sample of similar concentration and comparing its properties to those of the nanostructured sample. C. Cooling was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1206530.

  20. Accountability Issues in School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Bataineh, Adel T.

    This paper examines various reasons that would account for school violence and considers ways educators can help eliminate violence from schools. The negative impact of violence in the media and easy access to guns are mentioned as probable causes of violence in youth. Students who do not feel part of the school community often resort to violence…

  1. Intimate Partner Violence. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as violence between two people in a close relationship, including current and former spouses and dating partners. IPV occurs on a continuum from a single episode to ongoing battering and can include physical violence, sexual violence, threats, emotional…

  2. The Anatomy of School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canady, Linda

    To stop violence, school professionals should apply both reactive and proactive methods. Schools that focus on the psychological and sociological causes of youth violence have greater chances of success. This document presents the different aspects of school violence in order to bring about a better understanding of the violence and in turn…

  3. Violence and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira F.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Violence, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, has been associated with physical health outcomes including cardiovascular disease. However, the consistency of the existing literature has not been evaluated. Evidence acquisition In 2013, the authors conducted a PubMed and Web of Science review of peer reviewed articles published prior to August 2013 on the relation between violence exposure, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, and cardiovascular outcomes. To meet inclusion criteria, articles had to present estimates for the relation between violence exposure and cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, blood pressure, stroke, coronary disease, or myocardial infarction) adjusted for demographic factors. Articles focusing on violence from TV, video games, natural disasters, terrorism, or war were excluded. Evidence synthesis The initial search yielded 2,273 articles; after removing duplicates and applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 articles were selected for review. A consistent positive relation was noted on the association between violence experienced during childhood and cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood (i.e., hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). Associations across genders with varying types of violence exposure were also noted. By contrast, findings were mixed on the relation between adult violence exposure and cardiovascular outcome. Conclusions Despite varying definitions of violence exposure and cardiovascular endpoints, a consistent relation exists between childhood violence exposure, largely assessed retrospectively, and cardiovascular endpoints. Findings are mixed for the adult violence–cardiovascular health relation. The cross-sectional nature of most adult studies and the reliance of self-reported outcomes can potentially be attributed to the lack of findings among adult violence exposure studies. PMID:25599905

  4. A Systematic Review of Training Interventions Addressing Sexual Violence against Marginalized At-Risk Groups of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouta, Christiana; Pithara, Christalla; Zobnina, Anna; Apostolidou, Zoe; Christodoulou, Josie; Papadakaki, Maria; Chliaoutakis, Joannes

    2015-01-01

    Women from marginalized groups working in occupations such as domestic work are at increased risk for sexual violence. Scarce evidence exists about training interventions targeting such groups. The article aims to identify community and workplace-based training interventions aiming to increase capacity among marginalized at-risk women to deal with…

  5. Lead (in the Workplace)

    MedlinePlus

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  6. Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Yeong; Shin, Sae-Mi; Ham, Miran; Lim, Cheol-Hong; Byeon, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to assess exposure to and the risk caused by biphenyl in the workplace. Biphenyl is widely used as a heat transfer medium and as an emulsifier and polish in industry. Vapor or high levels of dust inhalation and dermal exposure to biphenyl can cause eye inflammation, irritation of respiratory organs, and permanent lesions in the liver and nervous system. In this study, the workplace environment concentrations were assessed as central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure and were shown to be 0.03 and 0.12 mg/m3, respectively. In addition, the carcinogenic risk of biphenyl as determined by risk assessment was 0.14 × 10−4 (central tendency exposure) and 0.56 × 10−4 (reasonable maximum exposure), which is below the acceptable risk value of 1.0 × 10−4. Furthermore, the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure hazard quotients were 0.01 and 0.06 for oral toxicity, 0.05 and 0.23 for inhalation toxicity, and 0.08 and 0.39 for reproduction toxicity, respectively, which are all lower than the acceptable hazard quotient of 1.0. Therefore, exposure to biphenyl was found to be safe in current workplace environments. Because occupational exposure limits are based on socioeconomic assessment, they are generally higher than true values seen in toxicity experiments. Based on the results of exposure monitoring of biphenyl, the current occupational exposure limits in Korea could be reviewed. PMID:25985312

  7. Domestic violence and employment: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Logan, T K

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study sought to gather detailed information about how domestic violence affects women's employment, specifically to identify the types of job interference tactics used by abusers and their consequences on women's job performance; identify and understand the context associated with disclosure about victimization to employers and coworkers; and identify the supports offered to employees after disclosure. Qualitative analyses, guided by grounded theory, revealed that perpetrators exhibited job interference behaviors before, during, and after work. Abuser tactics reduced women's job performance as measured by absenteeism, tardiness, job leavings, and terminations. Among women who disclosed victimization to employers, informal and formal job supports were offered. Workplace supports led to short-term job retention, but fear and safety issues mitigated employers' attempts to retain workers. PMID:15656717

  8. Racial/Ethnic Workplace Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Laura J.; Ornelas, India J.; Lyles, Courtney R.; Williams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Experiences of discrimination are associated with tobacco and alcohol use, and work is a common setting where individuals experience racial/ethnic discrimination. Few studies have evaluated the association between workplace discrimination and these behaviors, and none have described associations across race/ethnicity. Purpose To examine the association between workplace discrimination and tobacco and alcohol use in a large, multistate sample of U.S. adult respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey Reactions to Race Module (2004–2010). Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated cross-sectional associations between self-reported workplace discrimination and tobacco (current and daily smoking) and alcohol use (any and heavy use, and binge drinking) among all participants and stratified by race/ethnicity, adjusting for relevant covariates. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Among respondents, 70,080 completed the workplace discrimination measure. Discrimination was more common among black non-Hispanic (21%), Hispanic (12%), and other race respondents (11%) than white non-Hispanics (4%) (p<0.001). In the total sample, discrimination was associated with current smoking (risk ratio [RR]=1.32, 95% CI=1.19, 1.47), daily smoking (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.24, 1.61), and heavy drinking (RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01, 1.22), but not binge or any drinking. Among Hispanics, workplace discrimination was associated with increased heavy and binge drinking, but not any alcohol use or smoking. Workplace discrimination among black non-Hispanics and white Non-Hispanics was associated with increased current and daily smoking, but not alcohol outcomes. Conclusions Workplace discrimination is common, associated with smoking and alcohol use, and merits further policy attention given the impact of these behaviors on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25441232

  9. A subarcsecond study of the hot molecular core in G023.01-00.41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Cesaroni, R.; Moscadelli, L.; Zhang, Q.; Menten, K. M.; Molinari, S.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; De Buizer, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Searching for disk-outflow systems in massive star-forming regions is a key to assessing the main physical processes in the recipe of massive star formation. Aims: We have selected a hot molecular core (HMC) in the high-mass star-forming region G023.01-00.41, where VLBI multi-epoch observations of water and methanol masers have suggested the existence of rotation and expansion within 2000 AU of its center. Our purpose is to image the thermal line and continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths to establish the physical parameters and velocity field of the gas in the region. Methods: We performed SMA observations at 1.3 mm with both the most extended and compact array configurations, providing subarcsecond and high sensitivity maps of various molecular lines, including both hot-core and outflow tracers. We also reconstructed the spectral energy distribution of the region from millimeter to near infrared wavelengths, using the Herschel/Hi-GAL maps, as well as archival data. Results: From the spectral energy distribution, we derive a bolometric luminosity of ~4 × 104 L⊙. Our interferometric observations reveal that the distribution of dense gas and dust in the HMC is significantly flattened and extends up to a radius of 8000 AU from the center of radio continuum and maser emission in the region. The equatorial plane of this HMC is strictly perpendicular to the elongation of the collimated bipolar outflow, as imaged on scales of ~0.1-0.5 pc in the main CO isotopomers, as well as in the SiO(5-4) line. In the innermost HMC regions (≲1000 AU), the velocity field traced by the CH3CN (12K - 11K) line emission shows that molecular gas is both expanding along the outflow direction following a Hubble law and rotating about the outflow axis, in agreement with the (3D) velocity field traced by methanol masers. The velocity field associated with rotation indicates a dynamical mass of ~19 M⊙ at the center of the core. The latter is likely to be concentrated in a

  10. Violence Against Women

    PubMed Central

    Fulu, Emma; Miedema, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Globalization theories have proliferated over the past two decades. However, global developments have yet to be systematically incorporated into theories around violence against women. This article proposes to add a global level to the existing ecological model framework, popularized by Lori Heise in 1998, to explore the relationships between global processes and experiences of violence against women. Data from the Maldives and Cambodia are used to assess how globalized ideologies, economic development and integration, religious fundamentalisms, and global cultural exchange, as components of a larger globalization process, have affected men and women’s experiences and perceptions of violence against women. PMID:26215287

  11. ASASSN-16gp and ASASSN-16gq: Discovery of Probable Supernovae in WKK 2066 and ESO 446-G023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping

    2016-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered two new transient sources, most likely supernovae, in the galaxies WKK 2066 and ESO 446-G023.

  12. Unlearning Violence: MDE's Violence Prevention Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Cordelia; And Others

    The Minnesota Department of Education has created a plan, "Unlearning Violence," to aid schools and communities in their efforts to create safe and nurturing environments for all the state's children. The goals and challenges of this plan were formulated with the involvement of over 600 citizens and an in-depth study of research related to…

  13. Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children What is domestic violence? Domestic violence is abuse by a ...

  14. Bridging the Workplace and the Academy: Teaching Professional Genres through Classroom-Workplace Collaborations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Ann M.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the effect of classroom-workplace collaborations on student learning. Explores how classroom-workplace collaborations help to teach professional genres. Examines how they replicate workplace activity and convey features of workplace genres and how they serve as transitional experiences for students. Examines students' reactions to the…

  15. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Safety & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety and Health Topics Industries & Occupations Hazards & Exposures Diseases & ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  16. Workplace Safety and Health: Body Art

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Body Art Get Vaccinated Prevent Needlestick ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  17. Innovation in Australian Workplaces: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The determinants of innovation were examined using data from 698 Australian workplaces. Results suggest that better employee-management communications are associated with more change and that workplaces with higher levels of training undergo more change. (Author/JOW)

  18. Incivility and bullying in the workplace and nurses' shame responses.

    PubMed

    Felblinger, Dianne M

    2008-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in the workplace are intimidating forces that result in shame responses and threaten the well-being of nurses. Some nurses are accustomed to tolerating behaviors that are outside the realm of considerate conduct and are unaware that they are doing so. These behaviors affect the organizational climate, and their negative effects multiply if left unchecked. Interventions for incivility and bullying behaviors are needed at both individual and administrative levels. PMID:18336449

  19. Workplace bullying in nursing: towards a more critical organisational perspective.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Marie; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Wilkes, Lesley

    2006-06-01

    Workplace bullying is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession. Bullying in nursing is frequently described in terms of 'oppressed group' behaviour or 'horizontal violence'. It is proposed that the use of 'oppressed group' behaviour theory has fostered only a partial understanding of the phenomenon in nursing. It is suggested that the continued use of 'oppressed group' behaviour as the major means for understanding bullying in nursing places a flawed emphasis on bullying as a phenomenon that exists only among nurses, rather than considering it within the broader organisational context. The work of Foucault and the 'circuits of power' model proposed by Clegg are used to provide an alternative understanding of the operation of power within organisations and therefore another way to conceive bullying in the nursing workforce. PMID:16700755

  20. Systemic Violence in Education: Promise Broken. SUNY Series, Education and Culture: Critical Factors in the Formation of Character and Community in American Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Juanita Ross, Ed.; Watkinson, Ailsa M., Ed.

    This collection illuminates some of the issues surrounding systemic violence in education, exposing the structures and processes of the schools and examining the effects of these structures on students. Part 1 concerns systemic violence in administrative practice; and Part 2 discusses systemic violence in pedagogical practice. Part 3 of the…

  1. Nursing victims of violence.

    PubMed

    Sekula, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Nurse executives are key to providing quality care to patients affected by violence, with the growth in crime being a critical consideration in designing patient care and fostering collaboration across teams. PMID:27581907

  2. Sports Violence: Caveat Vendor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Jean

    1978-01-01

    Violence at sporting events is a self-feeding stimulus, not a useful cathartic for natural aggression; in the final analysis, it should be realized that athletic contests are games, not struggles for survival. (MM)

  3. Teen Dating Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keeffe, Nona K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surveyed high school students (N=256) in Sacramento, California. Found that 35.1 percent had experienced some form of abuse in their dating relationships. Explored the severity of the violence and its intergenerational component. (Author/ABB)

  4. Understanding Sexual Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... protective factors. Step 3: Develop and test prevention strategies Using information gathered in research, CDC develops and evaluates strategies ... or technical help so communities can adopt these strategies. For more information on sexual violence prevention activities at CDC, please ...

  5. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  6. Violence and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Rueve, Marie E.; Welton, Randon S.

    2008-01-01

    Violence attracts attention in the news media, in the entertainment business, in world politics, and in countless other settings. Violence in the context of mental illness can be especially sensationalized, which only deepens the stigma that already permeates our patients’ lives. Are violence and mental illness synonymous, connected, or just coincidental phenomena? This article reviews the literature available to address this fundamental question and to investigate other vital topics, including etiology, comorbidity, risk factor management, and treatment. A psychiatrist who is well versed in the recognition and management of violence can contribute to the appropriate management of dangerous behaviors and minimize risk to patients, their families, mental health workers, and the community as a whole. PMID:19727251

  7. Key Issues for Workplace Literacy Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikulecky, Larry; And Others

    The research on workplace literacy programs during the past two decades has revealed a great deal about the requisites for successful workplace literacy programs. The following have been identified as characteristics of effective workplace literacy programs: active involvement by all project partners; employee involvement in the early stages of…

  8. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  9. Gratitude in Workplace Research: A Rossian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Workplace learning is complex in form. It is explorative, social and creative enquiry, and because it is carried out in the socio-political domain of the workplace, it is potentially exploitative of all who contribute. This paper suggests that the workplace researcher might conceptualise the contributions of participants as benefits and/or gifts,…

  10. Combatting Racism in the Workplace. Readings Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barb; Novogrodsky, Charles

    Readings and exercises for use with a course for Canadian workers on racism and the workplace are included in this book. The materials are organized to reflect the themes of the ten sessions of the course: (1) racism hurts workers; (2) analysing racial situations in the workplace; (3) the employer connection to racism in the workplace; (4)…

  11. Perspectives into Learning at the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynjala, Paivi

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a thematic review of the recent research on workplace learning. It is divided into two main sections. The first section asks what we know about learning at work, and states four propositions: (1) the nature of workplace learning is both different from and similar to school learning; (2) learning in the workplace can be…

  12. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  13. Workplace Learning in Malaysia: The Learner's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Idris, Khairuddin

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a scenario of workplace learning as practiced in Malaysia. Based on survey research, the article describes learner profiles, learning provision and pattern. The analysis shows that Malaysians participate in formal workplace learning as part of their employment activities. Workplace learning in Malaysia is contextual, promoted by…

  14. Conceptualizing the Engaging Bystander Approach to Sexual Violence Prevention on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Sarah; Postmus, Judy L.; Koenick, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Bystander intervention offers promise as a sexual violence prevention tool for student affairs administrators on college campuses, but the conceptualization and definition of the approach is in its infancy and needs further development. In an effort to emphasize the potential role of bystanders in the primary prevention of sexual violence, we put…

  15. Interpersonal Violence and Alcohol and Other Drug Use. Infofacts/Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Because alcohol and other drugs are involved in most acts of violence on campus, college and university administrators are under increasing pressure to acknowledge this connection and reduce alcohol consumption on campus. But because alcohol alone does not cause violence, campuses must also address other contributing factors. Since research has…

  16. Creating Caring Relationships To Foster Academic Excellence: Recommendations for Reducing Violence in California Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dear, Joseph D.

    California is the only state to require school-violence training as a condition for state certification of teachers, school administrators, and pupil service personnel. This report presents findings of a study conducted by the State of California Commission on Teacher Credentialing's advisory panel on school violence. The study identifies the…

  17. The Effects of a Violence Prevention Program on Alternative High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplett, Carla A.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the effectiveness of a violence prevention program in an inner-city alternative school setting. The researcher, an administrator at the school, used a prepackaged curriculum targeting lessons on violence in an eight-week study with the entire school population. Students met bi-weekly with a team of two teachers to review and…

  18. K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of School Policy and Fear of School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Melissa L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1990s, schools have focused their attention on policies designed to improve school safety. Most researches on school violence policies have concentrated on the needs of students and administrators. This study investigated the impact of school violence policies on K-12 teachers' fear. Using self-report data from 447 K-12 teachers from a…

  19. Gang membership of California middle school students: behaviors and attitudes as mediators of school violence.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Joey Nuñez; Gilreath, Tamika D; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2013-08-01

    Empirical evidence examining how risk and protective behaviors may possibly mediate the association between gang membership and school violence is limited. This study utilizes a statewide representative sample of 152 023 Latino, Black and White seventh graders from California to examine a theoretical model of how school risk (e.g. truancy, school substance use and risky peer approval) and protective (e.g. connectedness, support and safety) behaviors and attitudes mediate the effects of gang membership on school violence behaviors. The dataset was collected in the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 academic school years using the ongoing large-scale California Healthy Kids Survey conducted by WestEd for the State of California. Approximately 9.5% of the sample considered themselves to be a member of a gang. The findings indicate that school risk behaviors and attitudes mediate the association between gang membership and school violence behaviors. Although the direct negative association between gang membership and school violence perpetration is weak, the positive indirect effect mediated by school risks behaviors and attitudes is strong. This indicates that when gang members engage in school risk behaviors, they are much more likely to be school violence perpetrators. Implications for further research, theory and practice for both gang and school violence researchers are discussed. PMID:23525778

  20. Intimate Partner Violence: Associated Factors and Acceptability of Contraception Among the Women

    PubMed Central

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Singh, Nilanchali; Kaushik, Somya; Mendiratta, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of various types of domestic violence and to find out the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adoption of contraceptive measures among the women who are victim to this. Materials and Methods: This questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Four hundred and one postpartum females were randomly selected over a period of 5 months and were questioned about their age, parity, educational status, occupation, husband's education, monthly family income, and, if present, IPV in detail. These study participants were enquired about their contraceptive knowledge and use. Results: Sexual violence was seen in 38.4% of the cases, physical violence in 22.4% of the cases, and verbal abuse was seen in nearly 32.7% of the cases. In response to any of the three violence faced, only 23 women (11.79%) reacted by discussing with parents and friends. In 4.61% of the cases, the violence was so severe that she had to inform police. This study showed that higher percentage of women without IPV accepted immediate postpartum contraception methods as compared to those with IPV (35.9% vs. 25%, P = 0.023), but the overall frequency of using contraceptive methods was higher in those with IPV as compared to those without IPV (49% vs. 47%, P = 0.690). Conclusion: IPV is associated with increased contraceptive adoption. PMID:27385873

  1. Workplace Bullying: Curing the Cancer of the American Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review concluded that supervisor/supervisee relationships are critical to job satisfaction; workplace bullying in the form of a management style of aggressive and intimidating behaviors is widespread; certain types of organizations foster bullying; and bullying has high costs for the targeted employee and the organization. (Contains…

  2. Workplace Participatory Practices: Conceptualising Workplaces as Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Arguing against a concept of learning as only a formal process occurring in explicitly educational settings like schools, the paper proposes a conception of the workplace as a learning environment focusing on the interaction between the affordances and constraints of the social setting, on the one hand, and the agency and biography of the…

  3. Violence against women.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    Domestic violence constitutes historical behavior in accord with patriarchal systems. Family and domestic violence includes female infanticide, higher female mortality, female genital mutilation, bride burning, rape, wife battering, and early marriage. These practices are commonly integrated into values and beliefs. Women accept domestic violence in violation of their basic human rights due to social prejudice and low self esteem. Mothers who perpetuate female genital mutilation believe that they are acting in the best interests of the child by adhering to centuries-long traditions. Women who allow female infanticide or female abortion are motivated to do so in order to maintain the security of their marriage. Women are in unequal power relationships and submit to their own detriment. Negative attitudes against women are perpetuated through incorrect interpretations of religious principles and myths. Economic self-reliance gives women the courage to stand up against domestic violence. Empowerment through education and appropriate and protective legislation also gives women the means to fight violence. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) at the national, regional, and international levels are active in creating awareness of domestic violence and influencing policy change. The NGO Working Group on Traditional Practices and the Inter-African Committee have a 10-year history of fighting against practices such as female genital mutilation. In order to bring about change, there must be cooperative and joint action among governmental and inter-governmental groups and NGOs. PMID:12157986

  4. Epidemiology of juvenile violence.

    PubMed

    Farrington, D P; Loeber, R

    2000-10-01

    It is difficult to review the epidemiology of juvenile violence because few studies focus specifically on this topic as opposed to childhood aggression or delinquency in general. More research is needed specifically on juvenile violence, which is generally measured using official records or self-reports. Self-report research shows that a substantial fraction of the male juvenile population commits violence, and that very few violent acts are followed by arrests or convictions. Racial differences in violence may be explainable by reference to racial differences in community contexts. There is a great deal of versatility in juvenile violence. Juveniles who commit one type of violent offense also tend to commit other types and nonviolent offenses. Violent offenders tend to be persistent or frequent offenders, and there is little difference between violent offenders and nonviolent but equally frequent offenders. Nevertheless, there is some degree of specialization in violence. More research is needed to investigate whether risk factors exist for violence that are not risk factors for serious nonviolent delinquency (e.g., biologic factors). Violent juveniles tend to have co-occurring problems such as victimization, substance abuse, and school failure. Often, they might be described as multiple-problem youth. There is considerable continuity from childhood aggression to juvenile violence. An early age of onset of violence predicts a large number of violent offenses. The major long-term risk factors for juvenile violence are individual (high impulsiveness and low intelligence, possibly linked to the executive functions of the brain), family (poor supervision, harsh discipline, child physical abuse, a violent parent, large family size, poverty, a broken family), peer delinquency, gang membership, urban residence, and living in a high-crime neighborhood (characterized by gangs, guns, and drugs in the United States). More research is needed on interactions among risk factors

  5. Interventions to reduce the risk of violence toward emergency department staff: current approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ramacciati, Nicola; Ceccagnoli, Andrea; Addey, Beniamino; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The phenomenon of workplace violence in health care settings, and especially in the emergency department (ED), has assumed the dimensions of a real epidemic. Many studies highlight the need for methods to ensure the safety of staff and propose interventions to address the problem. Aim The aim of this review was to propose a narrative of the current approaches to reduce workplace violence in the ED, with a particular focus on evaluating the effectiveness of emergency response programs. Methods A search was conducted between December 1, 2015 and December 7, 2015, in PubMed and CINAHL. Ten intervention studies were selected and analyzed. Results Seven of these interventions were based on sectoral interventions and three on comprehensive actions. Conclusion The studies that have attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions have shown weak evidence to date. Further research is needed to identify effective actions to promote a safe work environment in the ED. PMID:27307769

  6. Breaking barriers: addressing structural obstacles to social service provision for Asian survivors of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mihan

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have attributed the disproportionately high rate of domestic violence in Asian communities to Asian patriarchal "cultural norms" and the psychological and behavioral traits that these norms produce in individuals. This article seeks to expand the scope of domestic violence analysis beyond these individual and cultural frameworks, arguing that Asian domestic violence is also a product of larger scale, social systems of inequality. By examining the funding criteria of the Family Violence Prevention Services Administration (FVPSA) and the Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY) standard used by Robin Hood, my research shows how state and private organizations systematically devalue and underfund minority-targeted programs. PMID:24367062

  7. What the medical practice employee needs to know about workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2012-01-01

    An eye roll, a glare, a dismissive snort, a nasty remark, a joke at someone's expense--these are some of the subtle tactics of the workplace bully. Such behaviors may not sound like much by themselves. However, that is precisely why they are so insidious and why workplace bullying is so much more common than many people realize. This article will help medical practice employees and administrators learn the skills and techniques they need to identify workplace bullying and to neutralize and overcome bullying behaviors when they encounter them. It describes what workplace bullying is and isn't, and offers startling statistics about the scope of the workplace bullying problem today. This article also describes the characteristics of workplace bullies and their targets, and how bullying affects both the targeted individual and the employer. It offers eight strategies for the medical practice manager to prevent and deal effectively with bullying. It also offers 12 tips for employees who are the target of bullying and additional strategies to help and guide bullying bystanders. Finally, this article offers 10 additional strategies for preventing and dealing with workplace bullying, a checklist of bullying behaviors, and a sample medical practice anti-bullying policy. PMID:22594064

  8. Workshop III: Improving the Workplace Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Igle; Butcher, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, participants heard about initiatives taking place in Canada, the UK, Japan, and India to improve the workplace environment and shared good practices from around the world. Some of the less tangible aspects of the workplace environment, such as unconscious bias and accumulation of advantage and disadvantage, were explored.

  9. Basic Skills for the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.; And Others

    This book is a practitioner's guide to developing literacy training programs for workers. Titles of the 28 chapters and epilogue are as follows: "Understanding the History and Definitions of Workplace Literacy" (Askov, Aderman); "Understanding Literacy in the Canadian Business Context: Conference Board of Canada Study" (Hart); "Understanding Basic…

  10. Workplace Literacy Tutor Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janney-Pace, Priscilla; Fox, Laurie

    This manual contains a workshop curriculum that offers background information and activities rooted in the whole language approach. It is designed to address needs of employees with skill levels below fifth grade. Section I is an introduction to the changing workplace environment. Sections II-V cover problem solving, communication (speaking…

  11. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  12. Health & Hygiene in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapp, Mary

    Developed by educators from the Emily Griffith Opportunity School with input from employees--both workplace literacy students and nonstudents--this guide contains activities for teaching health and hygiene on the job. Flowing from a perspective of respecting cultural diversity and guided by a common thread of good work practices, the activities…

  13. Workplace Education: Twenty State Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, James T.

    2007-01-01

    From 1989 until 1998 the U.S. Department of Education administered the National Workplace Literacy Demonstration Program. During that period, over $130 million supported some 300 projects where adult education programs partnered with thousands of businesses, agencies, and organizations to provide work-based skills to employees. While only seven…

  14. Cognitive Skills in Workplace Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assiter, Alison

    This philosophical and empirical investigation explored whether cognitive skills can be acquired in a workplace setting. A preliminary investigation looked at views of knowledge in liberal humanism where knowledge is a matter for individuals with transcendent minds with objects of knowledge being matters for which there is clear perceptual…

  15. Flipped Learning in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nederveld, Allison; Berge, Zane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a summary of resources on flipped learning for workplace learning professionals. A recent buzzword in the training world is "flipped". Flipped learning and the flipped classroom are hot topics that have emerged in K-12 education, made their way to the university and are now being noticed…

  16. Expansive Learning across Workplace Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerosuo, Hannele; Toiviainen, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses a collaborative effort of learning across workplace boundaries in a regional learning network of South Savo, Finland. The focus is on the "Forum of In-house Development" in the network. Our objective is to highlight a dialectical approach to boundaries that draws from the ideas of cultural-historical activity theory. Expansive…

  17. Adult Development and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, James M.

    Little attention has been given to how adults develop through their lifetimes and what roles their workplace environments play in that development. Research and theory regarding adult psychosocial development have confirmed the developmental life-cycle phases of adulthood. These are: leaving the family (ages 16-22), getting into the adult world…

  18. Adult Learning in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on adult learning in the workplace. The first paper, "Measuring Critical Thinking: Is There a Single Instrument?" (Patricia K. Leitsch, Carol A. Lentz), examines two issues: the relationship between tests measuring critical thinking and those measuring readiness for self-directed learning and the…

  19. Self-Directed Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on self-directed workplace learning. "Self-Directed Work Teams: Implementation and Performance" (Marcel van der Klink, Hilde ter Horst) discusses the results of a study examining the implementation and effects of self-directed work teams in a land register office and the role of the department's…

  20. Making Spaces: Teacher Workplace Topologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the workplace of teachers commonly focus on the spaces of the classroom, staffroom and school as pre-given and bounded entities. This article explores the possibilities of moving beyond such topographies of enclosure, towards seeing space(-time) as recursively constructed with social relations and so made and remade. Boundaries are then…

  1. Workplace Training at SBS Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lynette

    2001-01-01

    Notes that at Australia's Special Broadcasting Services Radio, workplace training is an essential requirement for on-air staff but a degree in journalism or communications is an enormous advantage. Describes several in-house accredited competency-based modules in journalism and broadcasting. (RS)

  2. Epistemological Agency in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss research that sought to explore how the individually purposeful nature of new employee workplace learning might be understood through its conception as epistemological agency, that is, the personally mediated construction of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: Using a sociocultural…

  3. Workplace Education: The Changing Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.

    The 23 chapters of this book are as follows: "A Framework for Developing Partnerships" (Wendy M. Doughty); "Partnership Building in Nova Scotia" (Marjorie Davison, Paul Temple); "What Makes a Successful Workplace Education Partnership?" (Rob Despins et al.); "Building Linkages in Large Organizations: The Syncrude Canada Ltd. Experience" (Lloyd…

  4. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were those of…

  5. Foreign Language in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Richard D., Ed.; Moore, Sarah Jane, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue of the journal, devoted to the subject of languages in the workplace, include: "Language Use in International Research" (Eugene Garfield, Alfred Welljams-Dorof); "The Foreign Language Needs of U.S.-Based Corporations" (Carol S. Fixman); "Foreign Language Use Among International Business Graduates" (Richard D. Lambert);…

  6. Listening Skills in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grognet, Allene; Van Duzer, Carol

    This article examines the listening process and factors affecting listening. It also suggests general guidelines for teaching and assessing listening and gives examples of activities for practicing and developing listening skills for the workplace. Listening is a demanding process that involves the listener, speaker, message content, and…

  7. Computation. Workplace Education Program Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer; Sullivan, Mark

    The BUILD Program (Businesses United to Increase Literacy Development) was conducted from June 1991 through December 1992 as a cooperative workplace literacy program joining Arapahoe Community College and four companies in Littleton, Colorado. This document consists of two modules for the mathematics (computation) classes of the program. The first…

  8. Workplace Testing: Who's Testing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Eric Rolfe

    1989-01-01

    A survey conducted by the American Management Association on workplace-testing policies included questions about drug testing, polygraphs, and testing for the human immunodeficiency virus. The survey found that testing increased from 21 percent in 1986 to 37 percent in 1987 and 48 percent in the 1988 survey. (JOW)

  9. Patient Relations and Workplace Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The workbook contains lessons and exercises in patient relations and workplace communication in a medical services office, particularly for interactions involving one or more non-native speaker of English. Seven units address these topics: (1) greetings and basic assistance, greeting established patients, and measuring height and weight and taking…

  10. Workplace Readiness for Communicating Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Clive

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a model for communicating change about diversity using a workplace-readiness approach. Discusses ways organizational change agents can assess the company's current interpersonal and social dynamics, use appropriate influence strategies, and create effective messages that will appeal to employees and help to achieve the desired acceptance…

  11. Information Literacy in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oman, Julie N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for information literacy in the workplace in the face of information overload and problems related to end user information skills. Explains how to improve information literacy by assessing the organization's infrastructure, including available information technologies and information processes; considering demographics; and…

  12. Results Orientated Workplace Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Virginia, Comp.

    Cuyahoga Community College's (CCC) Unified Technologies Center (UTC) collaborated with three Cleveland area manufacturing companies in a workplace literacy project. The project provided job-related mathematics and communications programs for 302 employees who needed basic skills upgrading to improve their job performance. The project…

  13. Canadian Accountants: Examining Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Bagg, Robert; Doyle, Wendy; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine workplace learning strategies, learning facilitators and learning barriers of public accountants in Canada across three professional levels--trainees, managers, and partners. Design/methodology/approach: Volunteer participants from public accounting firms in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick completed a demographic…

  14. Internet Gambling in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to gambling--and more specifically internet gambling--in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, this paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of gambling and problem gambling,…

  15. A Positive Domestic Violence Screen Predicts Future Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houry, Debra; Feldhaus, Kim; Peery, Benjamin; Abbott, Jean; Lowenstein, Steven R.; al-Bataa-de-Montero, Sameerah; Levine, Saul

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a brief screen for domestic violence (DV) predicts future violence. We conducted a cohort study of adult women who presented to an inner-city emergency department during an 8-week study period. Participants were screened for DV using the Partner Violence Screen (PVS). At 4 months, follow-up telephone…

  16. Key Injury and Violence Data

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Data & Statistics Home & Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Prescription Drug Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence ... from violence and injuries — such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, or homicides — than from any ...

  17. Workplace bullying: an emergent issue.

    PubMed

    Essen, S Donovan; Esquivel, Cynthia; Jha, Pankaj

    2014-09-01

    All companies, including dentists, rely on their staff to represent their firms in the most positive and effective manner. Today's managers face a multitude of issues, and as such, they must walk a fine line of fostering a productive, harmonious and safe working environment for their employees. Over the last several decades it is apparent that on the- job sexual harassment is no longer the leading issue of employee complaints. Rather, the organization issue which was investigated is workplace bullying, also commonly referred to as employee harassment. Risk management is no longer limited to avoiding malpractice issues but also preventing litigation created by poor organizational behavior. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the background of workplace bullying and how it affects today's managers and their employees, customers and suppliers. In other words, the scope of this paper will feature research on past studies, results and conclusions. Since workplace bullying affects all levels of a corporation, it must be stated that the concern and focus of this paper is for today's manager to understand the background and history of workplace bullying, and what they can do to foster a safe working environment and prevent the bully from creating mental and physical harm to their employees. This paper details the history of workplace bullying and how management, employees and suppliers deal with and address the issue. Lastly, this treatise looks at risk management from a manger/dentist's perspective, the assessment/conclusion summarizes the implications for managers regarding how they must handle the issue or risk harm to the employee and/or serious legal ramifications. PMID:25284567

  18. Animal Violence Demystified

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Deepa; Caramaschi, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Violence has been observed in humans and animals alike, indicating its evolutionary/biological significance. However, violence in animals has often been confounded with functional forms of aggressive behavior. Currently, violence in animals is identified primarily as either a quantitative behavior (an escalated, pathological and abnormal form of aggression characterized primarily by short attack latencies, and prolonged and frequent harm-oriented conflict behaviors) or a qualitative one (characterized by attack bites aimed at vulnerable parts of the opponent's body and context independent attacks regardless of the environment or the sex and type of the opponent). Identification of an operational definition for violence thus not only helps in understanding its potential differences from adaptive forms of aggression but also in the selection of appropriate animal models for both. We address this issue theoretically by drawing parallels from research on aggression and appeasement in humans and other animals. We also provide empirical evidences for violence in mice selected for high aggression by comparing our findings with other currently available potentially violent rodent models. The following violence-specific features namely (1) Display of low levels of pre-escalatory/ritualistic behaviors. (2) Immediate and escalated offense durations with low withdrawal rates despite the opponent's submissive supine and crouching/defeat postures. (3) Context independent indiscriminate attacks aimed at familiar/unfamiliar females, anaesthetized males and opponents and in neutral environments. (4) Orientation of attack-bites toward vulnerable body parts of the opponent resulting in severe wounding. (5) Low prefrontal serotonin (5-HT) levels upon repeated aggression. (6) Low basal heart rates and hyporesponsive hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis were identified uniquely in the short attack latency (SAL) mice suggesting a qualitative difference between violence

  19. Violence against women.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T

    1996-01-01

    This essay opens its discussion of violence against women by referring to the 1994 television broadcast of a 10-year-old Egyptian girl undergoing female genital mutilation (FGM) without benefit of infection control measures or anesthesia at the hands of a local barber. After presenting a brief description of FGM, its various justifications, and its impacts on its victims, the official Egyptian policy is described as ambiguous, and the broadcast is shown to have caused influential religious leaders and medical personnel to defend FGM and, thus, led to postponement of a bill to outlaw FGM. The next section of the essay shows that Egypt's response to FGM reflects the international debate on all forms of violence against women emerging from and reinforcing the social relationships that give men power over women. These forms of violence include domestic violence in almost all societies; the dowry-related, bride-burning homicides that claim 5000-12,000 lives each year in India; son preference that leads to abortion of female fetuses and female infanticide; and crimes such as rape, sexual abuse, and forced prostitution. The essay continues with a look at the costs of violence hidden in the damage to women that increases health care costs substantially and reduces economic productivity. Violence towards women, which occurs throughout the world and can prevent women from participating in public life or from controlling their fertility, is a male tool to inhibit women from gaining autonomy outside the home. The essay concludes that victims of violence are beginning to break the silence that surrounded these deeds and are seeking legislative protection. Laws may not result in real-life changes, but the movement to eliminate FGM may prove to be the first success in women's efforts to achieve human rights. An example is the important precedent being set in the US by a woman seeking asylum to avoid facing an arranged marriage and FGM in her native Togo. PMID:12291323

  20. Optical investigation of the thermoelectric topological crystalline insulator Pb0.77Sn0.23Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, Anjan A.; Hamilton, Jason; Britto, Vivian; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Gibson, Quinn D.; Cava, R. J.; Burch, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Pb0.77Sn0.23Se is a promising thermoelectric alloy that exhibits a temperature dependent band inversion below 300 K. Recent work has shown that this band inversion also coincides with a trivial to nontrivial topological phase transition. To understand how the properties critical to thermoelectric efficiency are affected by the band inversion, we measured the broadband optical response of Pb0.77Sn0.23Se as a function of temperature. We find clear optical signatures suggesting the band inversion occurs at 160 ±15 K, and use the extended Drude model to accurately determine a T3 /2 dependence of the bulk carrier lifetime, associated with electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Due to the high bulk carrier doping level, no discriminating signatures of the topological surface states are found, although their presence cannot be excluded from our data.