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Sample records for administration ames research

  1. NASA Ames ATM Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Ames research Center, in cooperation with the FAA and the industry, has a series of major research efforts underway that are aimed at : 1) improving the flow of traffic in the national airspace system; and 2) helping to define the future air traffic management system. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide a brief summary of some of these activities.

  2. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  3. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  4. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  5. Ames Research Center cryogenics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs describe the Ames Research Center's cryogenics program. Diagrams are given of a fluid management system, a centrifugal pump, a flow meter, a liquid helium test facility, an extra-vehicular activity coupler concept, a dewar support with passive orbital disconnect, a pulse tube refrigerator, a dilution refrigerator, and an adiabatic demagnetization cooler.

  6. Ames Research Center Research and Technology 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report highlights the challenging work accomplished during fiscal year 2000 by Ames research scientists,engineers, and technologists. It discusses research and technologies that enable the Information Age, that expand the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, and that help to maintain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research and technology development. The accomplishments are grouped into four categories based on four of NASA's Strategic Enterprises: Aerospace Technology, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, and Earth Science. The primary purpose of this report is to communicate knowledge-to inform our stakeholders, customer, and partners, and the people of the United States about the scope and diversity of Ames' mission,the nature of Ames' research and technolog) activities,and the stimulating challenges ahead. The accomplishments cited illustrate the contributions that Ames is willing to improve the quality of life for our citizens and the economic position of the United States in the world marketplace.

  7. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  8. Aerothermodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity in the aerothermodynamics branch at the NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed. Advanced concepts and mission studies relating to the next generation aerospace transportation systems are summarized and directions for continued research identified. Theoretical and computational studies directed at determining flow fields and radiative and convective heating loads in real gases are described. Included are Navier-Stokes codes for equilibrium and thermochemical nonequilibrium air. Experimental studies in the 3.5-ft hypersonic wind tunnel, the ballistic ranges, and the electric arc driven shock tube are described. Tested configurations include generic hypersonic aerospace plane configurations, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle shapes and Galileo probe models.

  9. Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography contains the research output of the Center indexed during 1981 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (LSTAR), International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA), and Computer Program Abstracts (CPA). This bibliography is published annually in an attempt to effect greater awareness and distribution of the Center's research output.

  10. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  11. Terminal Area ATM Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard

    1997-01-01

    The presentation will highlight the following: (1) A brief review of ATC research underway 15 years ago; (2) A summary of Terminal Area ATM Tool Development ongoing at NASA Ames; and (3) A projection of research activities 10-15 years from now.

  12. NASA Ames aerospace systems directorate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The Aerospace Systems Directorate is one of four research directorates at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Directorate conducts research and technology development for advanced aircraft and aircraft systems in intelligent computational systems and human-machine systems for aeronautics and space. The Directorate manages research and aircraft technology development projects, and operates and maintains major wind tunnels and flight simulation facilities. The Aerospace Systems Directorate's research and technology as it relates to NASA agency goals and specific strategic thrusts are discussed.

  13. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    Covey, Debra

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  14. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2005-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA Ames researchers have been investigating ways to improve the air transportation system through the development of decision support automation. These software advances, such as the Center-TRACON Automation System (eTAS) have been developed with teams of engineers, software developers, human factors experts, and air traffic controllers; some ASA Ames decision support tools are currently operational in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facilities and some are in use by the airlines. These tools have provided air traffic controllers and traffic managers the capabilities to help reduce overall delays and holding, and provide significant cost savings to the airlines as well as more manageable workload levels for air traffic service providers. NASA is continuing to collaborate with the FAA, as well as other government agencies, to plan and develop the next generation of decision support tools that will support anticipated changes in the air transportation system, including a projected increase to three times today's air-traffic levels by 2025. The presentation will review some of NASA Ames' recent achievements in air traffic management research, and discuss future tool developments and concepts currently under consideration.

  15. Ames vision group research overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of the reseach group is to develop mathematical and computational models of early human vision. These models are valuable in the prediction of human performance, in the design of visual coding schemes and displays, and in robotic vision. To date researchers have models of retinal sampling, spatial processing in visual cortex, contrast sensitivity, and motion processing. Based on their models of early human vision, researchers developed several schemes for efficient coding and compression of monochrome and color images. These are pyramid schemes that decompose the image into features that vary in location, size, orientation, and phase. To determine the perceptual fidelity of these codes, researchers developed novel human testing methods that have received considerable attention in the research community. Researchers constructed models of human visual motion processing based on physiological and psychophysical data, and have tested these models through simulation and human experiments. They also explored the application of these biological algorithms to applications in automated guidance of rotorcraft and autonomous landing of spacecraft. Researchers developed networks for inhomogeneous image sampling, for pyramid coding of images, for automatic geometrical correction of disordered samples, and for removal of motion artifacts from unstable cameras.

  16. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  17. Ames Research Center C-130

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koozer, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    The C130 Earth Resources Aircraft provides a platform for a variety of sensors that collect data in support of terrestrial and atmospheric projects sponsored by NASA in coordination with Federal, state, university, and industry investigators. This data is applied to research in the areas of forestry, agriculture, land use and land cover analysis, hydrology, geology, photogrammetry, oceanography, meteorology, and other earth science disciplines. The C130 is a platform aircraft flying up to 25,000 feet above sea level at speeds between 150 and 330 knots True Air Speed. The aircraft is capable of precise flight line navigation by means of an optical borescope from which line guidance is provided to the pilots.

  18. Photonic processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Ellen; Reid, Max

    1990-01-01

    The Photonic Processing group is engaged in applied research on optical processors in support of the Ames vision to lead the development of autonomous intelligent systems. Optical processors, in conjunction with numeric and symbolic processors, are needed to provide the powerful processing capability that is required for many future agency missions. The research program emphasizes application of analog optical processing, where free-space propagation between components allows natural implementations of algorithms requiring a large degree of parallel computation. Special consideration is given in the Ames program to the integration of optical processors into larger, heterogeneous computational systems. Demonstration of the effective integration of optical processors within a broader knowledge-based system is essential to evaluate their potential for dependable operation in an autonomous environment such as space. The Ames Photonics program is currently addressing several areas of interest. One of the efforts is to develop an optical correlator system with two programmable spatial light modulators (SLMs) to perform distortion invariant pattern recognition. Another area of research is optical neural networks, also for use in distortion-invariant pattern recognition.

  19. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aviation Systems Division at the NASA Ames Research Center conducts leading edge research in air traffic management concepts and technologies. This overview will present concepts and simulation results for research in traffic flow management, safe and efficient airport surface operations, super density terminal area operations, separation assurance and system wide modeling and simulation. A brief review of the ongoing air traffic management technology demonstration (ATD-1) will also be presented. A panel discussion, with Mr. Davis serving as a panelist, on air traffic research will follow the briefing.

  20. PSP Testing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. H.; Hand, L. A.; Schairer, E. T.; Mehta, R. D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) are now used routinely for measuring surface pressures on wind tunnel models at transonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The method utilizes a surface coating containing fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, the brightness of which varies with the local air pressure on the surface. The present paper will summarize PSP activities (in progress and planned) at the NASA Ames Research Center. One of the main accomplishments at NASA Ames has been the development of a PSP measurement system that is production testing capable. This system has been integrated successfully into the large-scale wind tunnel facilities at Ames. There are several problems related to PSP testing which are unique to large-scale wind tunnel testing. The hardware is often difficult to set-up and must operate under harsh conditions (e.g. high pressures and low temperatures). The data acquisition and reduction times need to be kept to a minimum so that the overall wind tunnel productivity is not compromised. The pressure sensitive paints needs to be very robust; the paints must readily adhere to different surfaces with varying geometries and remain functional for long running times. The paint must have well understood, and preferably minimal, temperature sensitivity since fine control of the tunnel temperature is not easily achievable in the larger wind tunnels. In an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the PSP technique, we are currently evaluating some referenced pressure sensitive paints which contain a pressure- independent luminophor in addition to the one which is affected by the surface pressure. The two luminophors are chosen so that their emission wavelengths are somewhat different. Then by taking two 'wind-on' images with either two cameras (with different filters) or one camera with a rotating filter system, the need for 'wind-off' images can be eliminated. The ratio of the two wind-on images accounts for nonuniform lighting and model motion problems

  1. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  2. Ames Research Center Publications, July 1971 through December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors which appeared as formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports is presented. Years covered are July 1971 through December 1973.

  3. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  4. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  5. Planning and scheduling research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Planning and scheduling is the area of artificial intelligence research that focuses on the determination of a series of operations to achieve some set of (possibly) interacting goals and the placement of those operations in a timeline that allows them to be accomplished given available resources. Work in this area at the NASA Ames Research Center ranging from basic research in constrain-based reasoning and machine learning, to the development of efficient scheduling tools, to the application of such tools to complex agency problems is described.

  6. Theoretical Chemistry At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical work being carried out in the Computational Chemistry Branch at NASA Ames will be overviewed. This overview will be followed by a more in-depth discussion of our theoretical work to determine molecular opacities for the TiO and water molecules and a discussion of our density function theory (DFT) calculations to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities to the vibrational bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess their role as carriers to the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Finally, a more in-depth discussion of our work in the area of computational molecular nanotechnology will be presented.

  7. Quantifying Climate Change Hydrologic Risk at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. B.; Bromirski, P. D.; Coats, R. N.; Costa-Cabral, M.; Fong, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Milesi, C.; Miller, N.; Murphy, N.; Roy, S.

    2013-12-01

    In response to 2009 Executive Order 13514 mandating U.S. federal agencies to evaluate infrastructure vulnerabilities due to climate variability and change we provide an analysis of future climate flood risk at NASA Ames Research Center (Ames) along South S.F. Bay. This includes likelihood analysis of large-scale water vapor transport, statistical analysis of intense precipitation, high winds, sea level rise, storm surge, estuary dynamics, saturated overland flooding, and likely impacts to wetlands and habitat loss near Ames. We use the IPCC CMIP5 data from three Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models with Radiative Concentration Pathways of 8.5 Wm-2 and 4.5 Wm-2 and provide an analysis of climate variability and change associated with flooding and impacts at Ames. Intense storms impacting Ames are due to two large-scale processes, sub-tropical atmospheric rivers (AR) and north Pacific Aleutian low-pressure (AL) storm systems, both of which are analyzed here in terms of the Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) exceeding a critical threshold within a search domain and the wind vector transporting the IWV from southerly to westerly to northwesterly for ARs and northwesterly to northerly for ALs and within the Ames impact area during 1970-1999, 2040-2069, and 2070-2099. We also include a statistical model of extreme precipitation at Ames based on large-scale climatic predictors, and characterize changes using CMIP5 projections. Requirements for levee height to protect Ames are projected to increase and continually accelerate throughout this century as sea level rises. We use empirical statistical and analytical methods to determine the likelihood, in each year from present through 2099, of water level surpassing different threshold values in SF Bay near NASA Ames. We study the sensitivity of the water level corresponding to a 1-in-10 and 1-in-100 likelihood of exceedance to changes in the statistical distribution of storm surge height and ENSO height, in addition to

  8. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes JASON kids to NASA while handing out patches and pins. Tom Clausen and Donald James, Ames Education Office in background.

  9. Reduced Crew Operations Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, NASA began exploring the feasibility of single pilot reduced crew operations (SPORCO) in the context of scheduled passenger air carrier operations (i.e., Parts 121 and 135). This research was spurred by two trends in aviation research: the trend toward reducing costs and a shortage of pilots. A series of simulations were conducted to develop tools and a concept of operations to support RCO. This slide deck is a summary of the NASA Ames RCO research prepared for an R T team at Airbus. Airbus is considering moving forward with reducing crew during the cruise phase of flight with long-haul flights and is interested in the work we have completed.

  10. Application of CFD in aeronautics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksymiuk, Catherine M.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Vandalsem, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Ames Research Center has expanded to address a broad range of aeronautical problems, including wind tunnel support, flight test support, design, and analysis. Balancing the requirements of each new problem against the available resources - software, hardware, time, and expertise - is critical to the effective use of CFD. Several case studies of recent applications highlight the depth of CFD capability at Ames, the tradeoffs involved in various approaches, and lessons learned in the use of CFD as an engineering tool.

  11. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  12. Wind-Tunnel Capability at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Presley, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes $700 million wind-tunnel complex at Ames Research Center, including auxiliary support systems, test instrumentation, and special test rigs. Planned near-term facility improvement aimed at providing new test capabilities and increased productivity, as well as some potential longer-term improvements, also discussed. Aerodynamic test facilities range from subsonic wind tunnels to highenthalpy arc jets.

  13. The 1994 Ames Research Center publications: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarich, Shelley J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that Ames Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for formal reports, high-number conference publications, high-number technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting presentation, tech briefs, patents, and translations.

  14. Ames Research Center SR&T program and earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research activities in earth observations at Ames Research Center. Most of the tasks involve the use of research aircraft platforms. The program is also directed toward the use of the Illiac 4 computer for statistical analysis. Most tasks are weighted toward Pacific coast and Pacific basin problems with emphasis on water applications, air applications, animal migration studies, and geophysics.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  16. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Ormiston, Robert A; Young, Larry A.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the NASA and Army rotorcraft research community at Ames Research Center have developed a vision for 'Vertical Flight 2025'. This paper describes the development of that vision and the steps being taken to implement it. In an effort to realize the vision, consistent with both NASA and Army Aviation strategic plans, two specific technology development projects have been identified: (1) one focused on a personal transportation system capable of vertical flight (the 'Roto-Mobile') and (2) the other on small autonomous rotorcraft (which is inclusive of vehicles which range in grams of gross weight for 'MicroRotorcraft' to thousands of kilograms for rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles). The paper provides a status report on these projects as well as a summary of other revolutionary research thrusts being planned and executed at Ames Research Center.

  17. NASA-Ames workload research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    Research has been underway for several years to develop valid and reliable measures and predictors of workload as a function of operator state, task requirements, and system resources. Although the initial focus of this research was on aeronautics, the underlying principles and methodologies are equally applicable to space, and provide a set of tools that NASA and its contractors can use to evaluate design alternatives from the perspective of the astronauts. Objectives and approach of the research program are described, as well as the resources used in conducting research and the conceptual framework around which the program evolved. Next, standardized tasks are described, in addition to predictive models and assessment techniques and their application to the space program. Finally, some of the operational applications of these tasks and measures are reviewed.

  18. Ames Research Center life sciences payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Tremor, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    In response to a recognized need for an in-flight animal housing facility to support Spacelab life sciences investigators, a rack and system compatible Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) has been developed. A series of ground tests is planned to insure its satisfactory performance under certain simulated conditions of flight exposure and use. However, even under the best conditions of simulation, confidence gained in ground testing will not approach that resulting from actual spaceflight operation. The Spacelab Mission 3 provides an opportunity to perform an inflight Verification Test (VT) of the RAHF. Lessons learned from the RAHF-VT and baseline performance data will be invaluable in preparation for subsequent dedicated life sciences missions.

  19. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffrey S; Dezee, Kent J; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-06-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure.

  20. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, contractor reports, and computer programs that were issued by Ames Research Center and indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, International Aerospace Abstracts, and Computer Program Abstracts in 1980. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  1. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1978. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  2. The 1979 Ames Research Center Publications: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1979. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, Personal Author, Corporate Source, Contract Number, and Report/Accession Number Indexes are provided.

  3. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    being pursued within the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division. High Lift Airfoils and the Stall Free Rotor Unlike fixed wing aircraft, helicopter rotors have...pitch angle control inputs, a revolutionary new concept will become a reality - the Stall- Free Rotor. The implications for rotorcraft, beyond the...Rotorcraft Algorithm Development and Integrated Control Laws ( RADICL ) program, the U.S. Army, Sikorsky, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, and NASA Ames Research Center

  4. A Perspective on NASA Ames Air Traffic Management Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes past and present air-traffic-management research at NASA Ames Research Center. The descriptions emerge from the perspective of a technical manager who supervised the majority of this research for the last four years. Past research contributions built a foundation for calculating accurate flight trajectories to enable efficient airspace management in time. That foundation led to two predominant research activities that continue to this day - one in automatically separating aircraft and the other in optimizing traffic flows. Today s national airspace uses many of the applications resulting from research at Ames. These applications include the nationwide deployment of the Traffic Management Advisor, new procedures enabling continuous descent arrivals, cooperation with industry to permit more direct flights to downstream way-points, a surface management system in use by two cargo carriers, and software to evaluate how well flights conform to national traffic management initiatives. The paper concludes with suggestions for prioritized research in the upcoming years. These priorities include: enabling more first-look operational evaluations, improving conflict detection and resolution for climbing or descending aircraft, and focusing additional attention on the underpinning safety critical items such as a reliable datalink.

  5. Final environmental impact statement for Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Research Center is described. together with the nature of its activities, from which it can be seen that the center is basically not a major pollution source. Geographical, and climatic characteristics of the site are described. inasmuch as they influence both the choice of disposal methods and the environmental effects of the pollutants. The known or probable pollution sources at the center are described. Where the intensities of these sources might exceed the recommended guidelines, the corrective actions that have been taken are described.

  6. Using databases in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 77.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Jennifer; Scott, Neil; Harrild, Kirsten; Moffat, Mandy

    2013-05-01

    This AMEE Guide offers an introduction to the use of databases in medical education research. It is intended for those who are contemplating conducting research in medical education but are new to the field. The Guide is structured around the process of planning your research so that data collection, management and analysis are appropriate for the research question. Throughout we consider contextual possibilities and constraints to educational research using databases, such as the resources available, and provide concrete examples of medical education research to illustrate many points. The first section of the Guide explains the difference between different types of data and classifying data, and addresses the rationale for research using databases in medical education. We explain the difference between qualitative research and qualitative data, the difference between categorical and quantitative data, and the difference types of data which fall into these categories. The Guide reviews the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative research. The next section is structured around how to work with quantitative and qualitative databases and provides guidance on the many practicalities of setting up a database. This includes how to organise your database, including anonymising data and coding, as well as preparing and describing your data so it is ready for analysis. The critical matter of the ethics of using databases in medical educational research, including using routinely collected data versus data collected for research purposes, and issues of confidentiality, is discussed. Core to the Guide is drawing out the similarities and differences in working with different types of data and different types of databases. Future AMEE Guides in the research series will address statistical analysis of data in more detail.

  7. NASA/Ames Research Center's science and applications aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center operates a fleet of seven Science and Applications Aircraft, namely the C-141/Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), DC-8, C-130, Lear Jet, and three ER-2s. These aircraft are used to satisfy two major objectives, each of equal importance. The first is to acquire remote and in-situ scientific data in astronomy, astrophysics, earth sciences, ocean processes, atmospheric physics, meteorology, materials processing and life sciences. The second major objective is to expedite the development of sensors and their attendant algorithms for ultimate use in space and to simulate from an aircraft, the data to be acquired from spaceborne sensors. NASA-Ames Science and Applications Aircraft are recognized as national and international facilities. They have performed and will continue to perform, operational missions from bases in the United States and worldwide. Historically, twice as many investigators have requested flight time than could be accommodated. This situation remains true today and is expected to increase in the years ahead. A major advantage of the existing fleet of aircraft is their ability to cover a large expanse of the earth's ecosystem from the surface to the lower stratosphere over large distances and time aloft. Their large payload capability allows a number of scientists to use multi-investigator sensor suites to permit simultaneous and complementary data gathering. In-flight changes to the sensors or data systems have greatly reduced the time required to optimize the development of new instruments. It is doubtful that spaceborne systems will ever totally replace the need for airborne science aircraft. The operations philosophy and capabilities exist at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  8. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  10. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber - Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality capability, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration taskes external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  11. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber: Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration tasks external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  12. Computational Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Langhoff, Steve; Pohorille, Andrew; Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Some forms of nanotechnology appear to have enormous potential to improve aerospace and computer systems; computational nanotechnology, the design and simulation of programmable molecular machines, is crucial to progress. NASA Ames Research Center has begun a computational nanotechnology program including in-house work, external research grants, and grants of supercomputer time. Four goals have been established: (1) Simulate a hypothetical programmable molecular machine replicating itself and building other products. (2) Develop molecular manufacturing CAD (computer aided design) software and use it to design molecular manufacturing systems and products of aerospace interest, including computer components. (3) Characterize nanotechnologically accessible materials of aerospace interest. Such materials may have excellent strength and thermal properties. (4) Collaborate with experimentalists. Current in-house activities include: (1) Development of NanoDesign, software to design and simulate a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes. Early work focuses on gears. (2) A design for high density atomically precise memory. (3) Design of nanotechnology systems based on biology. (4) Characterization of diamonoid mechanosynthetic pathways. (5) Studies of the laplacian of the electronic charge density to understand molecular structure and reactivity. (6) Studies of entropic effects during self-assembly. Characterization of properties of matter for clusters up to sizes exhibiting bulk properties. In addition, the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) supercomputer division sponsored a workshop on computational molecular nanotechnology on March 4-5, 1996 held at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, collaborations with Bill Goddard at CalTech, Ralph Merkle at Xerox Parc, Don Brenner at NCSU (North Carolina State University), Tom McKendree at Hughes, and Todd Wipke at UCSC are underway.

  13. Writing competitive research conference abstracts: AMEE Guide no. 108.

    PubMed

    Varpio, Lara; Amiel, Jonathan; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-09-01

    The ability to write a competitive research conference abstract is an important skill for medical educators. A compelling and concise abstract can convince peer reviewers, conference selection committee members, and conference attendees that the research described therein is worthy for inclusion in the conference program and/or for their attendance in the meeting. This AMEE Guide is designed to help medical educators write research conference abstracts that can achieve these outcomes. To do so, this Guide begins by examining the rhetorical context (i.e. the purpose, audience, and structure) of research conference abstracts and then moves on to describe the abstract selection processes common to many medical education conferences. Next, the Guide provides theory-based information and concrete suggestions on how to write persuasively. Finally, the Guide offers some writing tips and some proofreading techniques that all authors can use. By attending to the aspects of the research conference abstract addressed in this Guide, we hope to help medical educators enhance this important text in their writing repertoire.

  14. Atmosphere of Freedom: Sixty Years at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugos, Glenn E.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Throughout Ames History, four themes prevail: a commitment to hiring the best people; cutting-edge research tools; project management that gets things done faster, better and cheaper; and outstanding research efforts that serve the scientific professions and the nation. More than any other NASA Center, Ames remains shaped by its origins in the NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics). Not that its missions remain the same. Sure, Ames still houses the world's greatest collection of wind tunnels and simulation facilities, its aerodynamicists remain among the best in the world, and pilots and engineers still come for advice on how to build better aircraft. But that is increasingly part of Ames' past. Ames people have embraced two other missions for its future. First, intelligent systems and information science will help NASA use new tools in supercomputing, networking, telepresence and robotics. Second, astrobiology will explore lore the prospects for life on Earth and beyond. Both new missions leverage Ames long-standing expertise in computation and in the life sciences, as well as its relations with the computing and biotechnology firms working in the Silicon Valley community that has sprung up around the Center. Rather than the NACA missions, it is the NACA culture that still permeates Ames. The Ames way of research management privileges the scientists and engineers working in the laboratories. They work in an atmosphere of freedom, laced with the expectation of integrity and responsibility. Ames researchers are free to define their research goals and define how they contribute to the national good. They are expected to keep their fingers on the pulse of their disciplines, to be ambitious yet frugal in organizing their efforts, and to always test their theories in the laboratory or in the field. Ames' leadership ranks, traditionally, are cultivated within this scientific community. Rather than manage and supervise these researchers, Ames leadership merely

  15. Joseph Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Sweetman Ames at his desk at the NACA headquarters. Dr. Ames was a founding member of NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), appointed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1915. Ames took on NACA's most challenging assignments but mostly represented physics. He chaired the Foreign Service Committee of the newly-founded National Research Council, oversaw the NACA's patent cross-licensing plan that allowed manufacturers to share technologies. Ames expected the NACA to encourage engineering education. He pressed universities to train more aerodynamicists, then structured NACA to give young engineers on-the-job training. Ames gave the NACA a focused vision that was research-based and decided that aerodynamics was the most important field of endeavor. He championed the work of theorists like Max Munk. The world class wind tunnels at Langley Aeronautical laboratory reflected his vision as well as the faith Congress put in him. Ames became chairman of the NACA main committee in 1927. Two years later he accepted the Collier Trophy on behalf on the NACA. He kept the NACA alive when Herbert Hoover tried to eliminate it and transfer its duties to industry. Ames accepted a nomination by Air Minister Hermann Goring to the Deutsche Akademie der Luftfartforschung. Ames then considered it an honor, many Americans did, and was surprised to learn about the massive Nazi investment in aeronautical infrastructure, then six times larger than the NACA. Ames urged the funding for a second laboratory and expansion of the NACA facilities to prepare for war. A stroke in May 1936 paralyzed the right side of his body. He immediately resigned as chairman of the NACA executive committee and in October 1937 he resigned from the NACA main committee. On June 8, 1944 the NACA officially dedicated its new laboratory in Sunnyvale California to Joseph S. Ames. Ames died in 1943, having never stepped foot in the new laboratory that bears his name; the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory

  16. Ethnography in qualitative educational research: AMEE Guide No. 80.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Scott; Peller, Jennifer; Goldman, Joanne; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Ethnography is a type of qualitative research that gathers observations, interviews and documentary data to produce detailed and comprehensive accounts of different social phenomena. The use of ethnographic research in medical education has produced a number of insightful accounts into its role, functions and difficulties in the preparation of medical students for clinical practice. This AMEE Guide offers an introduction to ethnography - its history, its differing forms, its role in medical education and its practical application. Specifically, the Guide initially outlines the main characteristics of ethnography: describing its origins, outlining its varying forms and discussing its use of theory. It also explores the role, contribution and limitations of ethnographic work undertaken in a medical education context. In addition, the Guide goes on to offer a range of ideas, methods, tools and techniques needed to undertake an ethnographic study. In doing so it discusses its conceptual, methodological, ethical and practice challenges (e.g. demands of recording the complexity of social action, the unpredictability of data collection activities). Finally, the Guide provides a series of final thoughts and ideas for future engagement with ethnography in medical education. This Guide is aimed for those interested in understanding ethnography to develop their evaluative skills when reading such work. It is also aimed at those interested in considering the use of ethnographic methods in their own research work.

  17. 'Fluid Dynamics,' mixed media by Tina York depicts fluid dynamics studies at the Ames Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    'Fluid Dynamics,' mixed media by Tina York depicts fluid dynamics studies at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of such studies is to learn more about what happens to an object when it encounters the friction of atmospheric resistence (such as a plane encountering resistance as it speeds through the air). used in Ames 60 year history by Glenn Bugos NASA SP-4314

  18. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  19. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  20. Neurolab: Final Report for the Ames Research Center Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maese, A. Christopher (Editor); Ostrach, Louis H. (Editor); Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Neurolab, the final Spacelab mission, launched on STS-90 on April 17, 1998, was dedicated to studying the nervous system. NASA cooperated with domestic and international partners to conduct the mission. ARC's (Ames Research Center's) Payload included 15 experiments designed to study the adaptation and development of the nervous system in microgravity. The payload had the largest number of Principal and Co-Investigators, largest complement of habitats and experiment unique equipment flown to date, and most diverse distribution of live specimens ever undertaken by ARC, including rodents, toadfish, swordtail fish, water snails, hornweed and crickets To facilitate tissue sharing and optimization of science objectives, investigators were grouped into four science discipline teams: Neuronal Plasticity, Mammalian Development, Aquatic, and Neurobiology. Several payload development challenges were experienced and required an extraordinary effort, by all involved, to meet the launch schedule. With respect to hardware and the total amount of recovered science, Neurolab was regarded as an overall success. However, a high mortality rate in one rodent group and several hardware anomalies occurred inflight that warranted postflight investigations. Hardware, science, and operations lessons were learned that should be taken into consideration by payload teams developing payloads for future Shuttle missions and the International Space Station.

  1. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  2. Some innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center since its inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center from 1940 through 1966 are summarized and illustrated. It should be noted that a number of accomplishments were begun at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility before that facility became part of the Ames Research Center. Such accomplishments include the first supersonic flight, the first hypersonic flight, the lunar landing research vehicle, and the first digital fly-by-wire aircraft.

  3. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  4. "Ames Research Center: Linking our Origins to our Future"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Our research traces a path from interstellar materials to inhabited worlds and beyond. We examine how protoplanetary disks evolve and form terrestrial planets, the evolutionary paths of habitable planets, and how external factors (e.g., orbital eccentricity) and internal factors (atmospheric circulation) affect habitability. We trace, spectroscopically and chemically, the evolution of organic molecules from the interstellar medium onto habitable bodies. We examine how membranes might form under prebiotic planetary conditions. We evolve proteins capable of sustaining early metabolism, such as synthesis of biopolymers and transport of ions across membranes. We estimate the frequency of finding a functional prebiotic protein that formed spontaneously. We characterize the formation of diagnostic microbial biosignatures in rock-hosted ecosystems in ophiolite springs as an analog for subsurface life within our solar system, and photosynthetic microbial mats as biota that could be detected on extrasolar planets. We develop quantitative models that simulate energy relationships, biogeochemical cycling, trace gas exchange, and biodiversity. We examine the effects of climate variability on a vegetation-rich biosphere over intermediate time scales, using South American ecosystems as a model. We address natural transport of life beyond its planet of origin, such as on a meteorite, where survivors must withstand radiation, desiccation, and time in transit. We fly organisms and ecosystems in low Earth orbit to test their resistance to space. The Ames E&PO program disseminates these themes to national- and international-scale audiences through partnerships with the California Academy of Sciences, Yellow stone National Park, New York Hall of Science, and several K-14 educational organizations.

  5. Autonomy @ Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalsem, William; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation that highlights autonomy across the 15 NASA technology roadmaps, including specific examples of projects (past and present) at NASA Ames Research Center. The NASA technology roadmaps are located here: http:www.nasa.govofficesocthomeroadmapsindex.html

  6. The NASA Ames Closed Environmental Research Chamber: Present Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Closed Environmental Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created to investigate both components and complete systems for life support of advanced space exploration missions. This facility includes a Main Chamber, an Airlock, a Sample Transfer Lock, a Vacuum System, an Air Recompression System, a dedicated control room and a pit area for housing supporting and environmental control systems. The Main Chamber provides 310 sq ft of internal working/living space on two levels. It is planned that the CERC will be a human-rated facility for habitation simulation under mass balance closure conditions. The internal pressure will be variable over the range of 14.7 psia to 5 psia with accompanying capability for variation in atmosphere composition to maintain the oxygen partial pressure at 160 mm Hg. The CERC will be provided with a core set of primary life support subsystems for temperature and humidity control, C02 removal and trace contaminant control. Interfacing with external life support technology test bds with be provided, along with connection to centralized, microprocessor-based data acquisition and control systems. This paper will discuss the current status of the CERC facility and show how it is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. In particular, it will be shown how the CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator and advanced displays and a virtual reality capability will work together to develop and demonstration applicable technologies for future planetary habitats. Artificial intelligence and expert system programming techniques will be used extensively to provide an automated environment for a 4-person crew. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration tasks external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative

  7. Flight Research at Ames: Fifty-Seven Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Paul F.; Franklin, James A.; Fletcher, Jay W.

    1998-01-01

    This NASA special publication presents a general overview of the flight research that has been conducted at Ames Research Center over the last 57 years. Icing research, transonic model testing, aerodynamics, variable stability aircraft, boundary layer control, short takeoff and landing (STOL), vertical/ short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) and rotorcraft research are among the major topics of interest discussed. Flying qualities, stability and control, performance evaluations, gunsight tracking and guidance and control displays research are also presented. An epilogue is included which presents the significant contributions that came about as a result of research and development conducted at Ames.

  8. PMARC_12 - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER, VERSION 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel method computer programs are software tools of moderate cost used for solving a wide range of engineering problems. The panel code PMARC_12 (Panel Method Ames Research Center, version 12) can compute the potential flow field around complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models. PMARC_12 is a well-documented, highly structured code with an open architecture that facilitates modifications and the addition of new features. Adjustable arrays are used throughout the code, with dimensioning controlled by a set of parameter statements contained in an include file; thus, the size of the code (i.e. the number of panels that it can handle) can be changed very quickly. This allows the user to tailor PMARC_12 to specific problems and computer hardware constraints. In addition, PMARC_12 can be configured (through one of the parameter statements in the include file) so that the code's iterative matrix solver is run entirely in RAM, rather than reading a large matrix from disk at each iteration. This significantly increases the execution speed of the code, but it requires a large amount of RAM memory. PMARC_12 contains several advanced features, including internal flow modeling, a time-stepping wake model for simulating either steady or unsteady (including oscillatory) motions, a Trefftz plane induced drag computation, off-body and on-body streamline computations, and computation of boundary layer parameters using a two-dimensional integral boundary layer method along surface streamlines. In a panel method, the surface of the body over which the flow field is to be computed is represented by a set of panels. Singularities are distributed on the panels to perturb the flow field around the body surfaces. PMARC_12 uses constant strength source and doublet distributions over each panel, thus making it a low order panel method. Higher order panel methods allow the singularity strength to vary linearly or quadratically across each panel. Experience has shown

  9. PMARC_12 - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER, VERSION 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel method computer programs are software tools of moderate cost used for solving a wide range of engineering problems. The panel code PMARC_12 (Panel Method Ames Research Center, version 12) can compute the potential flow field around complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models. PMARC_12 is a well-documented, highly structured code with an open architecture that facilitates modifications and the addition of new features. Adjustable arrays are used throughout the code, with dimensioning controlled by a set of parameter statements contained in an include file; thus, the size of the code (i.e. the number of panels that it can handle) can be changed very quickly. This allows the user to tailor PMARC_12 to specific problems and computer hardware constraints. In addition, PMARC_12 can be configured (through one of the parameter statements in the include file) so that the code's iterative matrix solver is run entirely in RAM, rather than reading a large matrix from disk at each iteration. This significantly increases the execution speed of the code, but it requires a large amount of RAM memory. PMARC_12 contains several advanced features, including internal flow modeling, a time-stepping wake model for simulating either steady or unsteady (including oscillatory) motions, a Trefftz plane induced drag computation, off-body and on-body streamline computations, and computation of boundary layer parameters using a two-dimensional integral boundary layer method along surface streamlines. In a panel method, the surface of the body over which the flow field is to be computed is represented by a set of panels. Singularities are distributed on the panels to perturb the flow field around the body surfaces. PMARC_12 uses constant strength source and doublet distributions over each panel, thus making it a low order panel method. Higher order panel methods allow the singularity strength to vary linearly or quadratically across each panel. Experience has shown

  10. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  11. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  12. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  13. Ames Fellows Award - Mark

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Hans Mark is a leading expert in the fields of aerospace design and national defense policy. From 1969 to 1977, he served as Director of the NASA Ames Research Center. During his tenure, Ames b...

  14. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  15. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  16. Building intelligent systems - Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Lum, Henry

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a 'truly' autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  17. Building intelligent systems: Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, P.; Lum, H.

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a truly autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  18. Developing research skills in medical students: AMEE Guide No. 69.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Anita; Aiton, Jim; Struthers, Julie; Guild, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This Guide has been written to provide guidance for individuals involved in curriculum design who wish to develop research skills and foster the attributes in medical undergraduates that help develop research. The Guide will provoke debate on an important subject, and although written specifically with undergraduate medical education in mind, we hope that it will be of interest to all those involved with other health professionals' education. Initially, the Guide describes why research skills and its related attributes are important to those pursuing a medical career. It also explores the reasons why research skills and an ethos of research should be instilled into professionals of the future. The Guide also tries to define what these skills and attributes should be for medical students and lays out the case for providing opportunities to develop research expertise in the undergraduate curriculum. Potential methods to encourage the development of research-related attributes are explored as are some suggestions as to how research skills could be taught and assessed within already busy curricula. This publication also discusses the real and potential barriers to developing research skills in undergraduate students, and suggests strategies to overcome or circumvent these. Whilst we anticipate that this Guide will appeal to all levels of expertise in terms of student research, we hope that, through the use of case studies, we will provide practical advice to those currently developing this area within their curriculum.

  19. Grounded theory in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 70.

    PubMed

    Watling, Christopher J; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative research in general and the grounded theory approach in particular, have become increasingly prominent in medical education research in recent years. In this Guide, we first provide a historical perspective on the origin and evolution of grounded theory. We then outline the principles underlying the grounded theory approach and the procedures for doing a grounded theory study, illustrating these elements with real examples. Next, we address key critiques of grounded theory, which continue to shape how the method is perceived and used. Finally, pitfalls and controversies in grounded theory research are examined to provide a balanced view of both the potential and the challenges of this approach. This Guide aims to assist researchers new to grounded theory to approach their studies in a disciplined and rigorous fashion, to challenge experienced researchers to reflect on their assumptions, and to arm readers of medical education research with an approach to critically appraising the quality of grounded theory studies.

  20. Waste Processing Research and Technology Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The current "store and return" approach for handling waste products generated during low Earth orbit missions will not meet the requirements for future human missions identified in NASA s new Exploration vision. The objective is to develop appropriate reliable waste management systems that minimize maintenance and crew time, while maintaining crew health and safety, as well as providing protection of planetary surfaces. Solid waste management requirements for these missions include waste volume reduction, stabilization and storage, water recovery, and ultimately recovery of carbon dioxide, nutrients and other resources from a fully regenerative food production life support system. This paper identifies the key drivers for waste management technology development within NASA, and provides a roadmap for the developmental sequence and progression of technologies. Recent results of research and technology development activities at NASA Ames Research Center on candidate waste management technologies with emphasis on compaction, lyophilization, and incineration are discussed.

  1. NASA-Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1983-01-01

    The function of SHARP is to recognize high school juniors who have demonstrated unusually high promise for sucess in mathemtics and science. Twenty academically talented students who will be seniors in high school in September were chosen to participate in SHARP 83. Mentors were selected to provide students with first-hand experiences in a research and development environment in order that each student might try out his or her tentative professional career choice. Some special features of SHARP included field trips to private industries doing similar and related research, special lectures on topics of research here at ARC, individual and group counseling sessions, written research papers and oral reports, and primarily the opportunity to be exposed to the present frontiers in space exploration and research. The long-range goal of SHARP is to contribute to the future recruitment of needed scientists and engineers. This final report is summary of all the phases of the planning and implemenation of the 1983 Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP).

  2. Cultivating a Grassroots Aerospace Innovation Culture at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Sarah; Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the adaptation of specific 'knowledge production' methods to implement a first of its kind, grassroots event that provokes a cultural change in how the NASA Ames civil servant community engages in the creation and selection of innovative ideas. Historically, selection of innovative proposals at NASA Ames Research Center is done at the highest levels of management, isolating the views and perspectives of the larger civil servant community. Additionally, NASA innovation programs are typically open to technical organizations and do not engage non-technical organizations to bring forward innovative processes/business practices. Finally, collaboration on innovative ideas and associated solutions tend to be isolated to organizational silos. In this environment, not all Ames employees feel empowered to innovate and opportunities for employee collaboration are limited. In order to address these issues, the 'innovation contest' method was adapted to create the NASA Ames Innovation Fair, a unique, grassroots innovation opportunity for the civil servant community. The Innovation Fair consisted of a physical event with a virtual component. The physical event provided innovators the opportunity to collaborate and pitch their innovations to the NASA Ames community. The civil servant community then voted for the projects that they viewed as innovative and would contribute to NASA's core mission, making this event a truly grassroots effort. The Innovation Fair website provided a location for additional knowledge sharing, discussion, and voting. On March 3rd, 2016, the 'First Annual NASA Ames Innovation Fair' was held with 49 innovators and more than 300 participants collaborating and/or voting for the best innovations. Based on the voting results, seven projects were awarded seed funding for projects ranging from innovative cost models to innovations in aerospace technology. Surveys of both innovators and Fair participants show the Innovation Fair was successful

  3. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) is described. This program is designed to provide engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students. The students from this work study program which features trips, lectures, written reports, and job experience describe their individual work with their mentors.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has made great strides in the detailed simulation of complex fluid flows, including the fluid physics of flows heretofore not understood. It is now being routinely applied to some rather complicated problems, and starting to impact the design cycle of aerospace flight vehicles and their components. In addition, it is being used to complement, and is being complemented by, experimental studies. In the present paper, some major elements of contemporary CFD research, such as code validation, turbulence physics, and hypersonic flows are discussed, along with a review of the principal pacing items that currently govern CFD. Several examples of pioneering CFD research are presented to illustrate the current state of the art. Finally, prospects for the future development and application of CFD are suggested.

  5. AI at Ames: Artificial Intelligence research and application at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, February 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Charts are given that illustrate function versus domain for artificial intelligence (AI) applications and interests and research area versus project number for AI research. A list is given of project titles with associated project numbers and page numbers. Also, project descriptions, including title, participants, and status are given.

  6. Bayesian Research at the NASA Ames Research Center,Computational Sciences Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is one of NASA s oldest centers, having started out as part of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, (NACA). The site, about 40 miles south of San Francisco, still houses many wind tunnels and other aviation related departments. In recent years, with the growing realization that space exploration is heavily dependent on computing and data analysis, its focus has turned more towards Information Technology. The Computational Sciences Division has expanded rapidly as a result. In this article, I will give a brief overview of some of the past and present projects with a Bayesian content. Much more than is described here goes on with the Division. The web pages at http://ic.arc. nasa.gov give more information on these, and the other Division projects.

  7. Optical information processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Bualat, Maria G.; Cho, Young C.; Downie, John D.; Gary, Charles K.; Ma, Paul W.; Ozcan, Meric; Pryor, Anna H.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    The combination of analog optical processors with digital electronic systems offers the potential of tera-OPS computational performance, while often requiring less power and weight relative to all-digital systems. NASA is working to develop and demonstrate optical processing techniques for on-board, real time science and mission applications. Current research areas and applications under investigation include optical matrix processing for space structure vibration control and the analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine plume spectra, optical correlation-based autonomous vision for robotic vehicles, analog computation for robotic path planning, free-space optical interconnections for information transfer within digital electronic computers, and multiplexed arrays of fiber optic interferometric sensors for acoustic and vibration measurements.

  8. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  9. Early postnatal administration of growth hormone increases tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neuron numbers in Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Clark, Sara; Bokov, Alex F; Richardson, Arlan; Strong, Randy; Hurley, David L; Phelps, Carol J

    2010-07-01

    Hypothalamic tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons secrete dopamine, which inhibits pituitary prolactin (PRL) secretion. PRL has demonstrated neurotrophic effects on TIDA neuron development in PRL-, GH-, and TSH-deficient Ames (df/df) and Snell (dw/dw) dwarf mice. However, both PRL and PRL receptor knockout mice exhibit normal-sized TIDA neuron numbers, implying GH and/or TSH influence TIDA neuron development. The current study investigated the effect of porcine (p) GH on TIDA neuron development in Ames dwarf hypothalamus. Normal (DF/df) and dwarf mice were treated daily with pGH or saline beginning at 3 d of age for a period of 42 d. After treatment, brains were analyzed using catecholamine histofluorescence, tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemistry, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunocytochemistry to detect BrdU incorporation. DF/df males and df/df treated with pGH experienced increased (P

  10. Yesterday, today and tomorrow: A perspective of CFD at NASA's Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Gross, Anthony R.

    1987-01-01

    The opportunity to reflect on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) progam at the NASA Ames Research Center (its beginning, its present state, and its direction for the future) is afforded. Essential elements of the research program during each period are reviewed, including people, facilities, and research problems. The burgeoning role that CFD is playing in the aerospace business is discussed, as is the necessity for validated CFD tools. The current aeronautical position of this country is assessed, as are revolutionary goals to help maintain its aeronautical supremacy in the world.

  11. Memoirs of an Aeronautical Engineer: Flight Tests at Ames Research Center: 1940-1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Seth B.

    2002-01-01

    Seth worked over a period of several years to prepare this monograph-collecting information, drafting the text, and finding and selecting the historic photographs. He describes the beginnings of flight research as he knew it at Ames Research Center, recalls numerous World War II programs, relates his experiences with powered-lift aircraft, and concludes with his impressions of two international flight research efforts. His comprehensive collection of large-format photographs of the airplanes and people involved in the various flight activities related in the text constitutes a compelling part of his work.

  12. Parameter identification studies on the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckavitt, Thomas P., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results of an aircraft parameters identification study conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) in conjunction with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics are given. The ACFS is a commercial airline simulator with a design based on future technology. The simulator is used as a laboratory for human factors research and engineering as applied to the commercial airline industry. Parametric areas examined were engine pressure ratio (EPR), optimum long range cruise Mach number, flap reference speed, and critical take-off speeds. Results were compared with corresponding parameters of the Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft. This comparison identified two areas where improvements can be made: (1) low maximum lift coefficients (on the order of 20-25 percent less than those of a 757); and (2) low optimum cruise Mach numbers. Recommendations were made to those anticipated with the application of future technologies.

  13. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  14. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of acquisition of scientific research at Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Department awards grants and cooperative agreements and contracts to sponsor scientific research at colleges and universities. Compared to cooperative agreements, contracts, particularly management and operating contracts, often impose duplicative and/or unnecessary administrative and compliance burdens on a college or university. Since the Department bears the cost of those additional burdens, the authors audited the cost effectiveness of the Department`s sponsorship of research at Ames Laboratory under a management and operating contract with Iowa State University. The research conducted at Ames is of the type that Congress intended to be sponsored by assistance agreements, rather than contracts. Moreover, they found the contract for managing and operating Ames Laboratory caused micromanagement and unnecessary costs, most of which could have been avoided with a cooperative agreement. However, after completion of the field work, the Department announced initiatives to reduce or eliminate some compliance and oversight burdens associated with management and operating contracts, but did not opt to sponsor research under cooperative agreements. The authors are unable to determine the monetary impact because the initiatives have not been implemented. Nevertheless, they continue to believe that cooperative agreements, having fewer unique bureaucratic requirements, offer the potential for reducing administrative overhead.

  16. An Aerodynamic Performance Evaluation of the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, Paul F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an aerodynamic performance evaluation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), conducted in association with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics, are presented. The ACFS is a full-mission flight simulator which provides an excellent platform for the critical evaluation of emerging flight systems and aircrew performance. The propulsion and flight dynamics models were evaluated using classical flight test techniques. The aerodynamic performance model of the ACFS was found to realistically represent that of current day, medium range transport aircraft. Recommendations are provided to enhance the capabilities of the ACFS to a level forecast for 1995 transport aircraft. The graphical and tabular results of this study will establish a performance section of the ACFS Operation's Manual.

  17. How to write an educational research grant: AMEE Guide No. 101.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Maria A; Gruppen, Larry D; Artino, Anthony R; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Writing an educational research grant in health profession education is challenging, not only for those doing it for the first time but also for more experienced scholars. The intensity of the competition, the peculiarities of the grant format, the risk of rejection, and the time required are among the many obstacles that can prevent educational researchers with interesting and important ideas from writing a grant, that could provide the funding needed to turn their scholarly ideas into reality. The aim of this AMEE Guide is to clarify the grant-writing process by (a) explaining the mechanics and structure of a typical educational research grant proposal, and (b) sharing tips and strategies for making the process more manageable.

  18. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2, NASA Ames Research Center, September 12-14, 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), held on September 12-14, 2005, was cosponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE/SC) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Joint Engineering Team (JET) of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program's Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group. The ONT2 workshop was a follow-on to an August 2004 Workshop on Optical Network Testbeds (ONT1). ONT1 recommended actions by the Federal agencies to assure timely development and implementation of optical networking technologies and infrastructure. Hosted by the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, the ONT2 workshop brought together representatives of the U.S. advanced research and education (R&E) networks, regional optical networks (RONs), service providers, international networking organizations, and senior engineering and R&D managers from Federal agencies and national research laboratories. Its purpose was to develop a common vision of the optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations needed to enable widespread use of optical networks; recommend activities for transitioning the optical networking research community and its current infrastructure to leading-edge optical networks over the next three to five years; and present information enabling commercial network infrastructure providers to plan for and use leading-edge optical network services in that time frame.

  19. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  20. Upper surface blowing noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, A. J.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of the propulsive-lift noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft (QSRA) is described. Comparisons are made of measured QSRA flyover noise and model propulsive-lift noise data available in references. Developmental tests of trailing-edge treatments were conducted using sawtooth-shaped and porous USB flap trailing-edge extensions. Small scale parametric tests were conducted to determine noise reduction/design relationships. Full-scale static tests were conducted with the QSRA preparatory to the selection of edge treatment designs for flight testing. QSRA flight and published model propulsive-lift noise data have similar characteristics. Noise reductions of 2 to 3 dB were achieved over a wide range of frequency and directivity angles in static tests of the QSRA. These noise reductions are expected to be achieved or surpassed in flight tests planned by NASA in 1980.

  1. Development and Flight of the NASA-Ames Research Center Payload on Spacelab-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory K.; Ball, Sally M.; Stolarik, Thomas M.; Eodice, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    Spacelab-J was an international Spacelab mission with numerous innovative Japanese and American materials and life science experiments. Two of the Spacelab-J experiments were designed over a period of more than a decade by a team from NASA-Ames Research Center. The Frog Embryology Experiment investigated and is helping to resolve a century-long quandary on the effects of gravity on amphibian development. The Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment, flown on Spacelab-J as part of a multi-mission investigation, studied the effects of Autogenic Feedback Therapy on limiting the effects of Space Motion Sickness on astronauts. Both experiments employed the use of a wide variety of specially designed hardware to achieve the experiment objectives. This paper reviews the development of both experiments, from the initial announcement of opportunity in 1978, through selection on Spacelab-J and subsequent hardware and science procedures development, culminating in the highly successful Spacelab-J flight in September 1992.

  2. Development of Implicit Methods in CFD NASA Ames Research Center 1970's - 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The focus here is on the early development (mid 1970's-1980's) at NASA Ames Research Center of implicit methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). A class of implicit finite difference schemes of the Beam and Warming approximate factorization type will be addressed. The emphasis will be on the Euler equations. A review of material pertinent to the solution of the Euler equations within the framework of implicit methods will be presented. The eigensystem of the equations will be used extensively in developing a framework for various methods applied to the Euler equations. The development and analysis of various aspects of this class of schemes will be given along with the motivations behind many of the choices. Various acceleration and efficiency modifications such as matrix reduction, diagonalization and flux split schemes will be presented.

  3. Ames Fellows Award - Johnson

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Wayne Johnson is a rotorcraft pioneer and visionary. His legacy of rotorcraft research at NASA Ames continues to be of fundamental importance to the U.S. Army and to the international rotorcraf...

  4. Design outline for a new multiman ATC simulation facility at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Gallagher, O.

    1977-01-01

    A new and unique facility for studying human factors aspects in aeronautics is being planned for use in the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Division at the NASA-Ames Research Center. This facility will replace the existing three cockpit-single ground controller station and be expandable to include approximately seven cockpits and two ground controller stations. Unlike the previous system, each cockpit will be mini-computer centered and linked to a main CPU to effect a distributed computation facility. Each simulator will compute its own flight dynamic and flight path predictor. Mechanical flight instruments in each cockpit will be locally supported and CRT cockpit displays of (e.g.) traffic and or RNAV information will be centrally computed and distributed as a means of extending the existing computational and graphical resources. An outline of the total design is presented which addresses the technical design options and research possibilities of this unique man-machine facility and which may also serve as a model for other real time distributed simulation facilities.

  5. A review of recent developments in flight test techniques at the Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layton, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    New flight test techniques in use at Ames Dryden are reviewed. The use of the pilot in combination with ground and airborne computational capabilities to maximize data return is discussed, including the remotely piloted research vehicle technique for high-risk testing, the remotely augmented vehicle technique for handling qualities research, and use of ground computed flight director information to fly unique profiles such as constant Reynolds number profiles through the transonic flight regime. Techniques used for checkout and design verification of systems-oriented aircraft are discussed, including descriptions of the various simulations, iron bird setups, and vehicle tests. Some newly developed techniques to support the aeronautical research disciplines are discussed, including a new approach to position-error determination, and the use of a large skin friction balance for the measurement of drag caused by various excrescencies.

  6. Ames Research Center FY 2000 Implementation Plan: Leading Technology into the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the implementation plan for Ames Research Center (ARC) within the overall framework of the NASA Strategic Plan. It describes how ARC intends to implement its Center of Excellence responsibilities, Agency assigned missions, Agency and Enterprise lead programs, and other roles in support of NASA's vision and mission. All Federal agencies are required by the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act to implement a long-term strategic planning process that includes measurable outcomes and strict accountability. At NASA, this planning process is shaped by the Space Act of 1958, annual appropriations, and other external mandates, as well as by customer requirements. The resulting Strategic Plan sets the overall architecture for what we do, identifies who our customers are, and directs where we are going and why. The Strategic Plan is the basis upon which decisions regarding program implementation and resource deployment are made. Whereas the strategic planning process examines the long-term direction of the organization and identifies a specific set of goals, the implementation planning process examines the detailed performance of the organization and allocates resources toward meeting these goals. It is the purpose of this implementation document to provide the connection between the NASA Strategic Plan and the specific programs and support functions that ARC employees perform. This connection flows from the NASA Strategic Plan, through the various Strategic Enterprise plans to the ARC Center of Excellence, primary missions, Lead Center programs, program support responsibilities, and ultimately, to the role of the individual ARC employee.

  7. Physical-Chemical Solid Waste Processing for Space Missions at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark; Wignarajah, K.; Tleimat, Maher; Pace, Greg

    2001-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration and reach out to more distant locations such as Mars, solids waste processing progresses from storage technologies to reclamation technologies. Current low Earth orbit technologies consist of store-and dispose to space or return to Earth. Fully regenerative technologies recycle wastes. The materials reclaimed from waste can be used to provide the basic materials to support plant growth for food including carbon dioxide, water, and nutrients. Other products can also be reclaimed from waste such as hydrocarbons and activated carbon. This poster describes development at Ames Research Center of a process to make activated carbon from space mission wastes and to make an incineration system that produces clean flue gas. Inedible biomass and feces contain hydrocarbons in a form that can be pyrolyzed and converted to activated carbon. The activated carbon can then be used to clean up contaminants from various other life support systems; in particular, the activated carbon can be used regeneratively to remove NOx from incinerator flue gas. Incinerator flue gas can also be cleaned up by the use of reductive and oxidative catalysts. A catalytic incinerator flue gas cleanup system has been developed at ARC that produces flue gas clean enough (with the exception of carbon dioxide) to meet the Space Minimum Allowable Concentration limits for human exposure.

  8. A review of recent programs and future plans for rotorcraft in-flight simulation at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshow, Michelle M.; Aiken, Edwin W.; Hindson, William S.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Denery, Dallas G.

    1991-01-01

    A new flight research vehicle, the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL), is being developed by the U.S. Army and NASA at Ames Research Center. The requirements for this new facility stem from a perception of rotorcraft system technology requirements for the next decade together with operational experience with the CH-47B research helicopter that was operated as an in-flight simulator at Ames during the past 10 years. Accordingly, both the principal design features of the CH-47B variable-stability system and the flight-control and cockpit-display programs that were conducted using this aircraft at Ames are reviewed. Another U.S. Army helicopter, a UH-60A Black Hawk, has been selected as the baseline vehicle for the RASCAL. The research programs that influence the design of the RASCAL are summarized, and the resultant requirements for the RASCAL research system are described. These research programs include investigations of advanced, integrated control concepts for achieving high levels of agility and maneuverability, and guidance technologies, employing computer/sensor-aiding, designed to assist the pilot during low-altitude flight in conditions of limited visibility. The approach to the development of the new facility is presented and selected plans for the preliminary design of the RASCAL are described.

  9. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  10. A critical review of the life sciences project management at Ames Research Center for the Spacelab Mission development test 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. M.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A management study was initiated by ARC (Ames Research Center) to specify Spacelab Mission Development Test 3 activities and problems. This report documents the problems encountered and provides conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future ARC life sciences projects. An executive summary of the conclusions and recommendations is provided. The report also addresses broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the space environment.

  11. Research Administrators as Servant Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Joann

    2011-01-01

    Within the sponsored research support offices in departments at research institutions, non-profits, and undergraduate institutions, research administrators are often perceived as servant leaders by their own membership organizations and those who work with them. This perception is influenced by survey results focusing on character. Parolini (2004)…

  12. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  13. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed

  14. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  15. Ames Lab 101: Lanthanum Decanting

    ScienceCinema

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Trevor Riedemann explains the process that allows Ames Laboratory to produce some of the purest lanthanum in the world. This and other high-purity rare-earth elements are used to create alloys used in various research projects and play a crucial role in the Planck satellite mission.

  16. New Roles for Research Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barpal, Isaac

    1988-01-01

    The research administrator of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Pennsylvania) discusses issues in the transformation of the company from a technology-driven to a business-driven organization, a process in which the technical and business segments of the organization work as teams toward successful innovation. (MSE)

  17. Construction of a 2- by 2-foot transonic adaptive-wall test section at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Daniel G.; Lee, George

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new production-size, two-dimensional, adaptive-wall test section with ventilated walls at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. The new facility incorporates rapid closed-loop operation, computer/sensor integration, and on-line interference assessment and wall corrections. Air flow through the test section is controlled by a series of plenum compartments and three-way slide vales. A fast-scan laser velocimeter was built to measure velocity boundary conditions for the interference assessment scheme. A 15.2-cm- (6.0-in.-) chord NACA 0012 airfoil model will be used in the first experiments during calibration of the facility.

  18. Feasibility study of transit photon correlation anemometer for Ames Research Center unitary wind tunnel plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. T., Jr.; Smart, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer measured a two-dimensional vector velocity, using the transit time of scattering particles between two focused and parallel laser beams. The objectives were: (1) the determination of the concentration levels and light scattering efficiencies of naturally occurring, submicron particles in the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel and (2) the evaluation based on these measured data of a laser transit anemometer with digital correlation processing for nonintrusive velocity measurement in this facility. The evaluation criteria were the speeds at which point velocity measurements could be realized with this technique (as determined from computer simulations) for given accuracy requirements.

  19. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program: 1986 research papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Engineering enrollments are rising in universities; however the graduate engineering shortage continues. Particularly, women and minorities will be underrepresented for many years. As one means of solving this shortage, Federal agencies facing future scientific and technological challenges were asked to participate in the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). This program was created to provide an engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students at an age when they could still make career and education decisions. The SHARP program is designed for high school juniors who are U.S. citizens, are 16 years old, and who have very high promise in math and science through outstanding academic performance in high school. Students who are accepted into this summer program will earn as they learn by working 8 hr days in a 5-day work week. Reports from SHARP students are presented.

  20. NASA Ames summary high school apprenticeship research program, 1983 research papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1984-01-01

    Engineering enrollments are rising in universities; however, the graduate engineer shortage continues. Particularly, women and minorities will be underrepresented for years to come. As one means of solving this shortage, Federal agencies facing future scientific and technological challenges were asked to participate in the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). This program was created 4 years ago to provide an engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students at an age when they could still make career and education decisions. The SHARP Program is designed for high school juniors (women and minorities) who are U.S. citizens, are 16 years old, and who have unusually high promise in mathematics and science through outstanding academic performance in high school. Students who are accepted into this summer program will earn as they learn by working 8 hours a day in a 5-day work week. This work-study program features weekly field trips, lectures and written reports, and job experience related to the student's career interests.

  1. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  2. The Ames Project (1942-1946)

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-14

    The Ames Laboratory was officially founded on May 17, 1947, following development of a process to purify uranium metal for the historic Manhattan Project. From 1942 to 1946, Ames Lab scientists produced over two-million pounds of uranium metal. A U.S. Department of Energy national research laboratory, the Ames Laboratory creates materials and energy solutions. Iowa State University operates Ames Laboratory under contract with the DOE.

  3. The Ames Project (1942-1946)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Ames Laboratory was officially founded on May 17, 1947, following development of a process to purify uranium metal for the historic Manhattan Project. From 1942 to 1946, Ames Lab scientists produced over two-million pounds of uranium metal. A U.S. Department of Energy national research laboratory, the Ames Laboratory creates materials and energy solutions. Iowa State University operates Ames Laboratory under contract with the DOE.

  4. The Pilot Land Data System (PLDS) at the Ames Research Center manages aircraft data in collaboration with an ecosystem research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary; Popovici, Lidia; Skiles, Jay

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot Land Data System (PLDS) is a data and information system serving NASA-supported investigators in the land science community. The three nodes of the PLDS, one each at the Ames Research Center (ARC), the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), cooperate in providing consistent information describing the various data holding in the hardware and software (accessible via network and modem) that provide information about and access to PLDS-held data, which is available for distribution. A major new activity of the PLDS node at the Ames Research Center involves the interaction of the PLDS with an active NASA ecosystem science project, the Oregon Transect Ecosystems Research involves the management of, access to, and distribution of the large volume of widely-varying aircraft data collected by OTTER. The OTTER project, is managed by researchers at the Ames Research Center and Oregon State University. Its principal objective is to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water of forest ecosystems using an ecosystem process model driven by remote sensing data. Ten researchers at NASA centers and universities are analyzing data for six sites along a temperature-moisture gradient across the western half of central Oregon (called the Oregon Transect). Sensors mounted on six different aircraft have acquired data over the Oregon Transect in support of the OTTER project.

  5. Ames Fitness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The Ames Fitness Program services 5,000 civil servants and contractors working at Ames Research Center. A 3,000 square foot fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, weight training machines, and free weight equipment is on site. Thirty exercise classes are held each week at the Center. A weight loss program is offered, including individual exercise prescriptions, fitness testing, and organized monthly runs. The Fitness Center is staffed by one full-time program coordinator and 15 hours per week of part-time help. Membership is available to all employees at Ames at no charge, and there are no fees for participation in any of the program activities. Prior to using the Center, employees must obtain a physical examination and complete a membership package. Funding for the Ames Fitness Program was in jeopardy in December 1992; however, the employees circulated a petition in support of the program and collected more than 1500 signatures in only three days. Funding has been approved through October 1993.

  6. The PC/AT compatible computer as a mission control center display processor at Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility's Western Aeronautical Test Range will assign the flight test data display processing function to Mission Control Centers in order to allow research engineers to flexibly configure their own display-processing system to optimize performance during a flight research mission. This will leave the Telemetry Radar Acquisition and Processing System more time to acquire data. One of the processors chosen to handle the display-processing function is an IBM PC/AT-compatible, rack-mounted PC giving engineers a personalized set of analytic and display tools, developed on the basis of off-the-shelf PC/AT-compatible engineering hardware and software items.

  7. Ames Scientists Develop MSL Instrument

    NASA Video Gallery

    David Blake, a research scientist at NASA Ames, led the development of CheMin, one of ten scientific instruments onboard Curiosity, the Mars Scientific Laboratory. The Powder X-Ray Diffraction tool...

  8. An Overview of Current Capabilities and Research Activities in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy M.; Palmer, Everett; Callantine, Todd; Lee, Paul; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeff; Martin, Lynne; Brasil, Connie; Cabrall, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames conducts research to provide a better understanding of roles, responsibilities, and requirements for human operators and automation in future air traffic management (ATM) systems. The research encompasses developing, evaluating, and integrating operational concepts and technologies for near-, mid-, and far-term air traffic operations. Current research threads include efficient arrival operations, function allocation in separation assurance and efficient airspace and trajectory management. The AOL has developed powerful air traffic simulation capabilities, most notably the Multi Aircraft Control System (MACS) that is used for many air traffic control simulations at NASA and its partners in government, academia and industry. Several additional NASA technologies have been integrated with the AOL's primary simulation capabilities where appropriate. Using this environment, large and small-scale system-level evaluations can be conducted to help make near-term improvements and transition NASA technologies to the FAA, such as the technologies developed under NASA's Air Traffic Management Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). The AOL's rapid prototyping and flexible simulation capabilities have proven a highly effective environment to progress the initiation of trajectory-based operations and support the mid-term implementation of NextGen. Fundamental questions about accuracy requirements have been investigated as well as realworld problems on how to improve operations in some of the most complex airspaces in the US. This includes using advanced trajectory-based operations and prototype tools for coordinating arrivals to converging runways at Newark airport and coordinating departures and arrivals in the San Francisco and the New York metro areas. Looking beyond NextGen, the AOL has started exploring hybrid human/automation control strategies as well as highly autonomous operations in the air traffic control domain. Initial results

  9. Acquisition and Analysis of NASA Ames Sunphotometer Measurements during SAGE III Validation Campaigns and other Tropospheric and Stratospheric Research Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1251 provided funding from April 2001 through December 2003 for Mr. John Livingston of SRI International to collaborate with NASA Ames Research Center scientists and engineers in the acquisition and analysis of airborne sunphotometer measurements during various atmospheric field studies. Mr. Livingston participated in instrument calibrations at Mauna Loa Observatory, pre-mission hardware and software preparations, acquisition and analysis of sunphotometer measurements during the missions, and post-mission analysis of data and reporting of scientific findings. The atmospheric field missions included the spring 2001 Intensive of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the Asian Dust Above Monterey-2003 (ADAM-2003) experiment, and the winter 2003 Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II).

  10. 2010 Profile of a Research Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper expands upon the seminal work of Roberts and House, which described the first empirical study of the demographic profile of a research administrator. The original work was based upon data from the 2005 Research Administrator Survey (RAS), a regional study of research administrators in the southeastern United States. In this paper,…

  11. The PC/AT compatible computer as a mission control center display processor at Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1982, the Western Aeronautical Test Range of the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility has been separating the data acquisition and processing function required on all telemetry pulse code modulation (PCM) data and the display processing function required in the flight research mission control centers (MCCs). These two functions historically have been done on the same set of superminicomputers remote from the MCCs. Removing the display processing function from the realm of the superminis or telemetry-radar acquisition and processing system (TRAPS) and out into the MCCs will allow the research engineers the flexibility to configure their own display processing system to optimize performance during a flight research mission. Meanwhile, the TRAPS will have more time to acquire data. One of the processors chosen is an IBM PC/AT compatible rack-mounted personal computer. This class and type machine will not only allow the transfer of the display processing function into the MCCs, but also allow the research engineers a personalized set of analytic and display tools for use on their own unique sets of data.

  12. Ames Research Center Mars/Pathfinder Heat Shield Design Verification ARC-JET Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Hui, Frank; Wercinski, Paul; Cartledge, Alan; Tauber, Mike; Tran, Duoc T.; Chen, Y. K.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Design verification tests were performed on samples representing the aerobrake of the Mars/Pathfinder vehicle. The test specimens consisted of the SLA-561V ablator bonded to the honeycomb structure. The primary objective was to evaluate the ablation materials performance and to measure temperatures within the ablator, at the structural bondline and at the back sheet of the honeycomb structure. Other objectives were to evaluate the effect of ablative repair plug material treatment and voids in the heat shield. A total of 29 models were provided for testing in the Ames 60MW arc-jet facility. Of these, 23 models were flat-faced and six remaining models were curved edge ones, intended to simulate the conditions on the curved rim of the forebody where the maximum shear occurred. Eight sets of test conditions were used. The stagnation point heating rates varied from 47 to 240 W/cm2 and the stagnation pressures from 0.15 to 0.27 atm. (The maximum flight values are 132 W/cm2 and 0.25 atm) The majority of these runs were made at a nominal stagnation pressure of 0.25 atm. Two higher pressure runs were made to check the current (denser) ablation material for spallation, or other forms of thermal stress failure. Over 60% of the flatfaced models yielded good thermocouple data and all produced useful surface recession information. Of the five curved-edge models that were tested, only one gave good data; the remaining ones experienced model-holder failure. The test results can be summarized by noting that no failure of the ablative material was observed on any model. Also, the bondline temperature design limit of 250 C was never reached within an equivalent flight time despite a stagnation point heat load that exceeded the maximum flight value by up to 130%. At heating rates of over 200W/cm2 and stagnation pressures of 0.25 atm, or greater, the average surface recessions exceeded 0.5 cm on some models. The surface roughness increased dramatically at pressures above 0.25 atm and

  13. Using focus groups in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 91.

    PubMed

    Stalmeijer, Renée E; Mcnaughton, Nancy; Van Mook, Walther N K A

    2014-11-01

    Qualitative research methodology has become an established part of the medical education research field. A very popular data-collection technique used in qualitative research is the "focus group". Focus groups in this Guide are defined as "… group discussions organized to explore a specific set of issues … The group is focused in the sense that it involves some kind of collective activity … crucially, focus groups are distinguished from the broader category of group interview by the explicit use of the group interaction as research data" (Kitzinger 1994, p. 103). This Guide has been designed to provide people who are interested in using focus groups with the information and tools to organize, conduct, analyze and publish sound focus group research within a broader understanding of the background and theoretical grounding of the focus group method. The Guide is organized as follows: Firstly, to describe the evolution of the focus group in the social sciences research domain. Secondly, to describe the paradigmatic fit of focus groups within qualitative research approaches in the field of medical education. After defining, the nature of focus groups and when, and when not, to use them, the Guide takes on a more practical approach, taking the reader through the various steps that need to be taken in conducting effective focus group research. Finally, the Guide finishes with practical hints towards writing up a focus group study for publication.

  14. Quantitative and qualitative methods in medical education research: AMEE Guide No 90: Part II.

    PubMed

    Tavakol, Mohsen; Sandars, John

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Medical educators need to understand and conduct medical education research in order to make informed decisions based on the best evidence, rather than rely on their own hunches. The purpose of this Guide is to provide medical educators, especially those who are new to medical education research, with a basic understanding of how quantitative and qualitative methods contribute to the medical education evidence base through their different inquiry approaches and also how to select the most appropriate inquiry approach to answer their research questions.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative methods in medical education research: AMEE Guide No 90: Part I.

    PubMed

    Tavakol, Mohsen; Sandars, John

    2014-09-01

    Medical educators need to understand and conduct medical education research in order to make informed decisions based on the best evidence, rather than rely on their own hunches. The purpose of this Guide is to provide medical educators, especially those who are new to medical education research, with a basic understanding of how quantitative and qualitative methods contribute to the medical education evidence base through their different inquiry approaches and also how to select the most appropriate inquiry approach to answer their research questions.

  16. Aeorodynamic characteristics of an air-exchanger system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Schmidt, G. I.; Meyn, L. A.; Ortner, K. R.; Holmes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A 1/50-scale model of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center was used to study various air-exchange configurations. System components were tested throughout a range of parameters, and approximate analytical relationships were derived to explain the observed characteristics. It is found that the efficiency of the air exchanger could be increased (1) by adding a shaped wall to smoothly turn the incoming air downstream, (2) by changing to a contoured door at the inlet to control the flow rate, and (3) by increasing the size of the exhaust opening. The static pressures inside the circuit then remain within the design limits at the higher tunnel speeds if the air-exchange rate is about 5% or more. Since the model is much smaller than the full-scale facility, it is not possible to completely duplicate the tunnel, and it will be necessary to measure such characteristics as flow rate and tunnel pressures during implementation of the remodeled facility. The aerodynamic loads estimated for the inlet door and for nearby walls are also presented.

  17. Development of the NASA-Ames low disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research up to Mach 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive aerodynamic features of this new quiet tunnel will be a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers on the nozzle walls and steady supersonic diffuser flow. Furthermore, this new wind tunnel will operate continuously at uniquely low compression ratios (less than unity). This feature allows an existing non-specialist compressor to be used as a major part of the drive system. In this paper, we highlight activities associated with drive system development, the establishment of natural laminar flow on the test section walls, and instrumentation development for transition detection. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale model of the supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Plans are progressing to build the full-scale wind tunnel by the end of 1993.

  18. Looking back to move forward: using history, discourse and text in medical education research: AMEE guide no. 73.

    PubMed

    Kuper, Ayelet; Whitehead, Cynthia; Hodges, Brian David

    2013-01-01

    As medical education research continues to diversify methodologically and theoretically, medical education researchers have been increasingly willing to challenge taken-for-granted assumptions about the form, content and function of medical education. In this AMEE guide we describe historical, discourse and text analysis approaches that can help researchers and educators question the inevitability of things that are currently seen as 'natural'. Why is such questioning important? By articulating our assumptions and interrogating the 'naturalness' of the status quo, one can then begin to ask why things are the way they are. Researchers can, for example, ask whether the models of medical education organization and delivery that currently seem 'natural' to them have been developed in order to provide the most benefit to students or patients--or whether they have, rather, been developed in ways that provide power to faculty members, medical schools or the medical profession as a whole. An understanding of the interplay of practices and power is a valuable tool for opening up the field to new possibilities for better medical education. The recognition that our current models, rather than being 'natural', were created in particular historical contexts for any number of contingent reasons leads inexorably to the possibility of change. For if our current ways of doing things are not, in fact, inevitable, not only can they be questioned, they can be made better; they can changed in ways that are attentive to whom they benefit, are congruent with our current beliefs about best practice and may lead to the production of better doctors.

  19. Proceedings of the 1985 NASA Ames Research Center's Ground-Effects Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kerry (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the current technology base for aerodynamic ground effects and to establish directions for further research of advanced, high performance aircraft designs, particularly those concepts utilizing powered lift systems; e.g., V/STOL, ASTOVL, and STOL aircraft. Fourteen papers were presented in the following areas: suckdown and fountain effects in hover; STOL ground vortex and hot gas ingestion; and vortex lift and jet flaps in ground effect. These subject areas were chosen with regard to current activities in the field of aircraft ground effects research.

  20. Researcher's guide to the NASA Ames Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinacori, J. B.; Stapleford, R. L.; Jewell, W. F.; Lehman, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Performance, limitations, supporting software, and current checkout and operating procedures are presented for the flight simulator, in terms useful to the researcher who intends to use it. Suggestions to help the researcher prepare the experimental plan are also given. The FSAA's central computer, cockpit, and visual and motion systems are addressed individually but their interaction is considered as well. Data required, available options, user responsibilities, and occupancy procedures are given in a form that facilitates the initial communication required with the NASA operations' group.

  1. Writing for academia: getting your research into print: AMEE Guide No. 74.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, John H; Roberts, Laura Weiss; Balon, Richard; Beresin, Eugene V

    2013-01-01

    The authors identify and describe strategies for success in writing for publication, including how to choose an educational research topic, define the question and choose the correct design, know the anatomy of a research paper, write each of the sections, optimize the writing before publication, choose a journal, and respond to editors and reviewers. The research question should be focused, modest, and achievable given the constraints of the setting, significant, and appropriately imbedded in the available literature. The choice of methods is determined by the nature of the educational research question and should conform to ethical standards. Specific strategies for writing include starting where it is easiest to do so, spontaneously and uncritically writing the first paragraphs through, minimizing external impediments to the work, and knowing how each section of a manuscript is routinely structured. All papers require a number of revisions with careful attention to accuracy and detail as well as to specific requirements of the target journal before submission. Authors should respond positively, not defensively, and in detail to all of the editor's and reviewers' suggestions for revision. Writing for success is therefore a disciplined and systematic process following prescribed steps, which, although hard work, is rewarding.

  2. The Life Sciences program at the NASA Ames Research Center - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, Joan; Sharp, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    The research projects planned for the Life Sciences program have a goal of answering basic questions concerning the nature of life itself and its evolution in the universe from basic elements, as well as the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The program also includes studies of the evolution and development of life on the planet earth, and the global changes occurring today that affect life on the earth. The paper describes the simulation models developed to study the effects of space, the flight projects of the program, and the biomedical program, which currently focuses on the physiological changes in the human body that are associated with space flights and the interactions among these changes.

  3. Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Ashworth, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Why use SJTs? Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone. This approach has been questioned more recently, as although academic attainment predicts performance early in training, research shows it has less predictive power for demonstrating competence in postgraduate clinical practice. Such evidence, coupled with an increasing focus on individuals working in healthcare roles displaying the core values of compassionate care, benevolence and respect, illustrates that individuals should be selected on attributes other than academic ability alone. Moreover, there are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole. These drivers necessitate a method of assessment that allows individuals to be selected on important non-academic attributes that are desirable in healthcare professionals, in a fair, reliable and valid way. What are SJTs? Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are tests used to assess individuals' reactions to a number of hypothetical role-relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. These scenarios are based on a detailed analysis of the role and should be developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance. From a theoretical perspective, SJTs are believed to measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs), which are shaped by socialisation processes that teach the utility of expressing certain traits in different settings such as agreeable expressions (e.g. helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense). Are SJTs reliable, valid and fair? Several studies, including good

  4. Ames Culture Chamber System: Enabling Model Organism Research Aboard the international Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic, physiological, and behavioral effects of spaceflight on living organisms and elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects are high priorities for NASA. Certain organisms, known as model organisms, are widely studied to help researchers better understand how all biological systems function. Small model organisms such as nem-atodes, slime mold, bacteria, green algae, yeast, and moss can be used to study the effects of micro- and reduced gravity at both the cellular and systems level over multiple generations. Many model organisms have sequenced genomes and published data sets on their transcriptomes and proteomes that enable scientific investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptations of these organisms to space flight.

  5. Ames Research Center Life Sciences Payload Project for Spacelab Mission 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Tremor, J.; Lund, G.; Wagner, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Research Animal Holding Facility, developed to support rodent and squirrel monkey animal husbandry in the Spacelab environment, is to be tested during the Spacelab Mission 3 flight. The configuration and function of the payload hardware elements, the assembly and test program, the operational rationale, and the scientific approach of this mission are examined. Topics covered include animal life support systems, the squirrel monkey restraint, the camera-mirror system, the dynamic environment measurement system, the biotelemetry system, and the ground support equipment. Consideration is also given to animal pretests, loading the animals during their 12 hour light cycle, and animal early recovery after landing. This mission will be the first time that relatively large samples of monkeys and rats will be flown in space and also cared for and observed by man.

  6. Supporting Student Research at the Administrative Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, William A.

    1993-01-01

    This article examines administrative support and its role in developing and sustaining student research activities within schools of dentistry. Discussion focuses on how administrative support can be effective in the areas of mentor selection, funding, managing educational quality, assistance in presenting research results, and providing rewards.…

  7. Database Support for Research in Public Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James Cory

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which databases support student and faculty research in the area of public administration. A list of journals in public administration, public policy, political science, public budgeting and finance, and other related areas was compared to the journal content list of six business databases. These databases…

  8. CLARA: an integrated clinical research administration system

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Xie, Mengjun; Hogan, William; Hutchins, Laura; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl; Holland, Jennifer; Wells, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Administration of human subject research is complex, involving not only the institutional review board but also many other regulatory and compliance entities within a research enterprise. Its efficiency has a direct and substantial impact on the conduct and management of clinical research. In this paper, we report on the Clinical Research Administration (CLARA) platform developed at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. CLARA is a comprehensive web-based system that can streamline research administrative tasks such as submissions, reviews, and approval processes for both investigators and different review committees on a single integrated platform. CLARA not only helps investigators to meet regulatory requirements but also provides tools for managing other clinical research activities including budgeting, contracting, and participant schedule planning. PMID:24778201

  9. CLARA: an integrated clinical research administration system.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Xie, Mengjun; Hogan, William; Hutchins, Laura; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl; Holland, Jennifer; Wells, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Administration of human subject research is complex, involving not only the institutional review board but also many other regulatory and compliance entities within a research enterprise. Its efficiency has a direct and substantial impact on the conduct and management of clinical research. In this paper, we report on the Clinical Research Administration (CLARA) platform developed at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. CLARA is a comprehensive web-based system that can streamline research administrative tasks such as submissions, reviews, and approval processes for both investigators and different review committees on a single integrated platform. CLARA not only helps investigators to meet regulatory requirements but also provides tools for managing other clinical research activities including budgeting, contracting, and participant schedule planning.

  10. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  11. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 September 12-14, 2006 NASA Ames Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti Richard desJardins

    2006-05-01

    A new generation of optical networking services and technologies is rapidly changing the world of communications. National and international networks are implementing optical services to supplement traditional packet routed services. On September 12-14, 2005, the Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), an invitation-only forum hosted by the NASA Research and Engineering Network (NREN) and co-sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), was held at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. The aim of ONT2 was to help the Federal Large Scale Networking Coordination Group (LSN) and its Joint Engineering Team (JET) to coordinate testbed and network roadmaps describing agency and partner organization views and activities for moving toward next generation communication services based on leading edge optical networks in the 3-5 year time frame. ONT2 was conceived and organized as a sequel to the first Optical Network Testbeds Workshop (ONT1, August 2004, www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). ONT1 resulted in a series of recommendations to LSN. ONT2 was designed to move beyond recommendations to agree on a series of “actionable objectives” that would proactively help federal and partner optical network testbeds and advanced research and education (R&E) networks to begin incorporating technologies and services representing the next generation of advanced optical networks in the next 1-3 years. Participants in ONT2 included representatives from innovative prototype networks (Panel A), basic optical network research testbeds (Panel B), and production R&D networks (Panels C and D), including “JETnets,” selected regional optical networks (RONs), international R&D networks, commercial network technology and service providers (Panel F), and senior engineering and R&D managers from LSN agencies and partner organizations. The overall goal of ONT2 was to identify and coordinate short and medium term activities and milestones for researching, developing, identifying

  12. Pharmacy Administration and Clinical Practice Research Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepler, Charles D.

    1987-01-01

    Research needs for pharmacy administration and clinical pharmacy include study of the relationship of pharmacists and society, management methods for providing health care services, pharmacist training and socialization, competence evaluation, formative and summative research on drug use control, and organizational decision making. (MSE)

  13. Advancing Administrative Supports for Research Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Korr, Wynne; White, Barbara; Vroom, Phyllis; Zabora, James; Middleton, Jane; Shank, Barbara; Schatz, Mona

    2008-01-01

    Research administrative supports must parallel and reinforce faculty initiatives in research grant procurement. This article features several types of developments that draw on presentations at the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work meetings. Key changes in social work programs are addressed, including the…

  14. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Alan

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  15. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Alan

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  16. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  17. Transformation Systems at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray; Fischer, Bernd; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, TOm; Roach, Steve; Robinson, Peter; VanBaalen, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the experiences of the Automated Software Engineering Group at the NASA Ames Research Center in the development and application of three different transformation systems. The systems span the entire technology range, from deductive synthesis, to logic-based transformation, to almost compiler-like source-to-source transformation. These systems also span a range of NASA applications, including solving solar system geometry problems, generating data analysis software, and analyzing multi-threaded Java code.

  18. A Tale of Two Small Business Grants: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times from the NASA Ames Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Lee, Geoffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of the SBIR Program are to: stimulate technological innovation in the private sector; strengthen the role of Small Business Concerns (SBCs) in meeting Federal research and development needs; increase the commercial application of these research results; and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged persons and women-owned small businesses. The process can be highly rewarding, providing the small business with resources to pursue research and development with a focus on providing NASA with new and advanced capabilities. We present two examples of how the NASA Ames SBIR Program has addressed these purposes, nurturing innovative ideas from small, businesses into commercially viable products that also address analytical needs in space research. These examples, from the Science Instruments for Conducting Solar System Exploration Subtopic, describe the journey from innovative concept to analytical instrument, one successful and one hampered by numerous roadblocks (including some international intrigue}.

  19. Operations Research and Higher Education Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, T. C . E.

    1993-01-01

    Illustrates the uses of operations research (OR) in higher education administration by reviewing the higher education system's most significant operational problems: resource allocation, financial planning, budgeting, formation of student project groups, scheduling and classroom allocation, student registration, tuition and fee structure…

  20. Research Administration as a Living System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sharon Stewart

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this Delphi study was to gather expert opinions and recommendations for change in the research administration system to bring about growth and collaboration. This study was deemed important because at the heart of every system is the fact that individuals need each other to continue to exist. The results of the Delphi study give…

  1. Fluid dynamic research at NASA-Ames Research Center related to transonic wind tunnel design and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhlstein, L., Jr.; Steinle, F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Fluid dynamic research with the objective of developing new and improved technology in both test facility concepts and test techniques is being reported. A summary of efforts and results thus far obtained in four areas is presented. The four area are: (1) the use of heavy gases to obtain high Reynolds numbers at transonic speeds: (2) high Reynolds number tests of the C-141A wing configuration; (3) performance and flow quality of the pilot injector driven wind tunnel; and (4) integration time required to extract accurate static and dynamic data from tests in transonic wind tunnels. Some of the principal conclusions relative to each of the four areas are: (1) Initial attempts to apply analytical corrections to test results using gases with gamma other than 1.4 to simulate conditions in air show promise but need significant improvement; (2) for the C-141A configuration, no Reynolds number less than the full scale flight value provides an accurate simulation of the full scale flow; (3) high ratios of tunnel mass flow rate to injection mass flow rate and high flow quality can be obtained in an injector driven transonic wind tunnel; and (4) integration times of 0.5 to 1.0 sec may be required for static force and pressure tests, respectively, at some transonic test conditions in order to obtain the required data accuracy.

  2. Biological Visualization, Imaging and Simulation(Bio-VIS) at NASA Ames Research Center: Developing New Software and Technology for Astronaut Training and Biology Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    The Bio- Visualization, Imaging and Simulation (BioVIS) Technology Center at NASA's Ames Research Center is dedicated to developing and applying advanced visualization, computation and simulation technologies to support NASA Space Life Sciences research and the objectives of the Fundamental Biology Program. Research ranges from high resolution 3D cell imaging and structure analysis, virtual environment simulation of fine sensory-motor tasks, computational neuroscience and biophysics to biomedical/clinical applications. Computer simulation research focuses on the development of advanced computational tools for astronaut training and education. Virtual Reality (VR) and Virtual Environment (VE) simulation systems have become important training tools in many fields from flight simulation to, more recently, surgical simulation. The type and quality of training provided by these computer-based tools ranges widely, but the value of real-time VE computer simulation as a method of preparing individuals for real-world tasks is well established. Astronauts routinely use VE systems for various training tasks, including Space Shuttle landings, robot arm manipulations and extravehicular activities (space walks). Currently, there are no VE systems to train astronauts for basic and applied research experiments which are an important part of many missions. The Virtual Glovebox (VGX) is a prototype VE system for real-time physically-based simulation of the Life Sciences Glovebox where astronauts will perform many complex tasks supporting research experiments aboard the International Space Station. The VGX consists of a physical display system utilizing duel LCD projectors and circular polarization to produce a desktop-sized 3D virtual workspace. Physically-based modeling tools (Arachi Inc.) provide real-time collision detection, rigid body dynamics, physical properties and force-based controls for objects. The human-computer interface consists of two magnetic tracking devices

  3. Ocean-atmosphere relationships from synoptic scale to local scale in South San Francisco Bay, with implications to flood risk at NASA Ames Research Center, Silicon Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. B.; Costa-Cabral, M. C.; Bromirski, P. D.; Miller, N. L.; Coats, R. N.; Loewenstein, M.; Roy, S. B.; MacWilliams, M.

    2012-12-01

    This work evaluates the implications to flooding risk at the low-lying NASA Ames Research Center in South San Francisco Bay under historical and projected climate and sea level rise. Atmospheric circulation patterns over the Pacific Ocean, influenced by ENSO and PDO, can result in extended periods of higher mean coastal sea level in California. Simultaneously they originate a larger number of storms that make landfall and have higher mean intensity. These storms generate barometrically-induced high water anomalies, and winds that are sometimes capable of producing large coastal waves. Storm surges that propagate from the coast into the estuary and South Bay, and locally-generated waves, may compromise the discharge capacity of stream channels. These conditions also typically generate high intensity rainfall, and the reduced channel capacity may result in fluvial flooding. Such atmospheric circulation patterns may persist for many months, during which California experiences more precipitation events of longer mean duration and higher intensity, leading to large precipitation totals that saturate soils and may exceed the storage capacity of stormwater retention ponds. Future scenarios of sea level rise, that may surpass a meter in this century according to the projections recently published by the National Research Council for states of CA, OR and WA, and projected atmospheric circulation changes associated with anthropogenic climate change, may amplify these risks. We evaluate the impacts of these changes on NASA's Ames Research Center through four areas of study: (i) wetland accretion and evolution as mean sea level rises, with implications to the Bay's response to the sea level rise and storm surges, (ii) hydrodynamic modeling to simulate the propagation of tidal height and storm surges in the Bay and the influence of local winds on wave height, (iii) evaluation of historical data and future climate projections to identify extreme precipitation events, and (iv

  4. Performance tests for the NASA Ames Research Center 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Giddings, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of initial tests conducted to assess the performance of the NASA Ames 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel. The features of the tunnel are described and two aspects of tunnel operation are discussed. The first is an assessment of the steady mainstream and boundary layer flows and the second deals with oscillating mainstream and boundary layer flows. Experimental results indicate that in steady flow the test section mainstream velocity is uniform in the flow direction and in cross section. The freestream turbulence intensity is about 0.2 percent. With minor exceptions the steady turbulent boundary layer generated on the top wall of the test section exhibits the characteristics of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer generated on a flat plate. The tunnel was designed to generate sinusoidal oscillating mainstream flows. Experiments confirm that the tunnel produces sinusoidal mainstream velocity variations for the range of frequencies (up to 15 Hz). The results of this study demonstrate that the tunnel essentially produces the flows that it was designed to produce.

  5. Congress examines administration's coal research priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    While the Obama administration has proposed a shift in coal research funding to further emphasize carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) programs in its fiscal year (FY) 2012 budget request, Republicans and several witnesses at a 13 October hearing of a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology questioned those priorities, called for additional federal funding for coal research, and defended the use of coal as a major part of the U.S. energy sector. The administration's FY 2012 budget requests 291.4 million to fund the Department of Energy's (DOE) CCS and power systems program while zeroing out funding for DOE's fuels and power systems program (which includes funding for coal research) and shifting some of its line items to the CCS program. The FY 2011 continuing resolution has funded the fuels and power systems program at 400.2 million, including 142 million for carbon sequestration, 64.8 million for innovations for existing plants, and funding for other subprograms such as advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (52.9 million), fuel cells (49.8 million), and advanced research ($47.6 million).

  6. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shechtman, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Shechtman, Danny

    2016-07-12

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  8. Results of the AFRSI rewaterproofing systems screening test in the NASA/Ames Research Center (ARC) 2 x 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Kingsland, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 2x2-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel to evaluate two AFRSI rewaterproofing systems and to investigate films as a means of reducing blanket joint distortion. The wind tunnel wall slot configuration influenced on the flow field over the test panel was investigated; primarily using oil flow data, and resulted in a closed slot configuration to provide a satisfactory screening environment flow field for the test. Sixteen AFRSI test panels, configured to represent the test system or film, were subjected to this screening environment (a flow field of separated and reattached flow at a freestream Mach numnber of 0.65 and q = 650 or 900 psf). Each condition was held until damage to the test article was observed or 55 minutes if no damage was incurred. All objectives related to AFRSI rewaterproofing and to the use of films to stiffen the blanket fibers were achieved.

  9. Thermal modeling of the NASA-Ames Research Center Cryogenic Optical Test Facility and a single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.; Augason, Gordon C.; Young, Jeffrey A.; Howard, Steven D.; Melugin, Ramsey K.

    1990-01-01

    A thermal model of the dewar and optical system of the Cryogenic Optical Test Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center was developed using the computer codes SINDA and MONTE CARLO. The model was based on the geometry, boundary conditions, and physical properties of the test facility and was developed to investigate heat transfer mechanisms and temperatures in the facility and in test mirrors during cryogenic optical tests. A single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror was the first mirror whose thermal loads and temperature distributions were modeled. From the temperature distribution, the thermal gradients in the mirror were obtained. The model predicted that a small gradient should exist for the single arch mirror. This was later verified by the measurement of mirror temperatures. The temperatures, predicted by the model at various locations within the dewar, were in relatively good agreement with the measured temperatures. The model is applicable to both steady-state and transient cooldown operations.

  10. Results of a long-term study of vapor intrusion at four large buildings at the NASA Ames Research Center.

    PubMed

    Brenner, David

    2010-06-01

    Most of the published empirical data on indoor air concentrations resulting from vapor intrusion of contaminants from underlying groundwater are for residential structures. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Park site, located in Moffett Field, CA, and comprised of 213 acres, is being planned for redevelopment as a collaborative research and educational campus with associated facilities. Groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbon and halogenated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is the primary environmental medium of concern at the site. Over a 15-month period, approximately 1000 indoor, outdoor ambient, and outdoor ambient background samples were collected from four buildings designated as historical landmarks using Summa canisters and analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency TO-15 selective ion mode. Both 24-hr and sequential 8-hr samples were collected. Comparison of daily sampling results relative to daily background results indicates that the measured trichloroethylene (TCE) concentrations were primarily due to the subsurface vapor intrusion pathway, although there is likely some contribution due to infiltration of TCE from the outdoor ambient background concentrations. Analysis of the cis-1,2-dichloroethylene concentrations relative to TCE concentrations with respect to indoor air concentrations and the background air support this hypothesis; however, this indicates that relative contributions of the vapor intrusion and infiltration pathways vary with each building. Indoor TCE concentrations were also compared with indoor benzene and background benzene concentrations. These data indicate significant correlation between background benzene concentrations and the concentration of benzene in the indoor air, indicating benzene was present in the indoor air primarily through infiltration of outdoor air into the indoor space. By comparison, measured TCE indoor air concentrations showed a significantly different

  11. 49 CFR 1.46 - Delegations to the Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration. The Administrator of the Research and... modal and OST research budgets. (b) Science and technology. (1) With respect to scientific and... Secretary of the Department of Transportation's Research, Development and Technology Planning Council....

  12. 49 CFR 1.46 - Delegations to the Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration. The Administrator of the Research and... modal and OST research budgets. (b) Science and technology. (1) With respect to scientific and... Secretary of the Department of Transportation's Research, Development and Technology Planning Council....

  13. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  14. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  15. Women in School Administration: A Review of the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkison, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Research published since 1974 regarding women in administration, management, and leadership is reviewed. Research on minority women in school administration is also examined, as are changes directed at improving women's access to leadership positions. (Author/GK)

  16. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  17. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  18. Building a Research Administration Infrastructure at the Department Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Maria B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the current economic crisis, research administrators at public universities are grappling with declining state funding and are faced with identifying other potential sources of revenue to support operations. Research administrators at all levels are forced to do more with less. Department level research administrators must be innovative…

  19. Principal Investigator and Department Administrator Perceptions of Services Provided by Offices of Research Administration at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Kimberley W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine what service attributes were perceived as important factors for a successful Office of Research Administration (ORA) to provide to principal investigators and department administrators. Initially established more than 50 years ago, The Office of Research Administration (ORA) has evolved into an…

  20. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  1. Experimental Investigations of the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnel (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5 million for five different configurations at both wind tunnels. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained in both facilities but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Nacelle/pylon, tail effects and tunnel to tunnel variations have been assessed. The data from both wind tunnels show that an addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5 and that the tail effects also follow the expected trends. Also, all of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability. The tunnel to tunnel differences are negligible for lift and pitching moment, while the drag shows a difference of less than ten counts for all of the configurations. These differences in drag may be due to the variation in the sting mounting systems at the two tunnels.

  2. A Summary of the Experimental Results for a Generic Tractor-Trailer in the Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot and 12-Foot Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Satran, Dale R.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental measurements of a generic tractor-trailer were obtained in two wind tunnels at Ames Research Center. After a preliminary study at atmospheric conditions in the 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel, additional testing was conducted at Reynolds numbers corresponding to full-scale highway speeds in the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel. To facilitate computational modeling, the 1:8-scale geometry, designated the Generic Conventional Model, included a simplified underbody and omitted many small-scale details. The measurements included overall and component forces and moments, static and dynamic surface pressures, and three-component particle image velocimetry. This summary report highlights the effects of numerous drag reduction concepts and provides details of the model installation in both wind tunnels. To provide a basis for comparison, the wind-averaged drag coefficient was tabulated for all configurations tested. Relative to the baseline configuration representative of a modern class-8 tractor-trailer, the most effective concepts were the trailer base flaps and trailer belly box providing a drag-coefficient reduction of 0.0855 and 0.0494, respectively. Trailer side skirts were less effective yielding a drag reduction of 0.0260. The database of this experimental effort is publicly available for further analysis.

  3. Ames Research Center life sciences payload - Overview of results of a spaceflight of 24 rats and 2 monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Bowman, G.; Lencki, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    Engineering and biological data gathered with the research animal holding facilities (RAHFs) used on the Spacelab 3 mission are summarized. The animals totaled 24 rats and two squirrel monkeys. The RAHFs included biotelemetry, cameras and environmental monitoring equipment. The primary mission goal was engineering evaluation of the RAHFs and ancillary equipment. Tightly-fitted seals were found to be a necessity for keeping waste and food particles from contaminating the Spacelab equipment. All the rats returned with little muscle tone and suppressed immune systems. The monkeys displayed highly individual responses to spaceflight. Both species exhibited reduced abilities to maintain meticulously clean furs in weightlessness. Details of several physiological changes detected during post-flight autopsies are provided.

  4. Ames Research Center Life Sciences Payload - Overview of results of a spaceflight of 24 rats and 2 monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Lencki, W. A.; Funk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    A hardware description and experimental results are reported from the initial STS flight carrying two Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) units. The flight was mainly intended for engineering check-out of the RAHF design. The system development and prelaunch preparations are briefly summarized, including the provisions of retrieval teams at alternate landing sites and extensive rehearsals to ensure timely data analysis. The flight revealed a problem with the containment of particulates from the RAHFs and the provision of adequate water for the monkeys. On-board films showed that one of the monkeys experienced motion sickness, from which he recovered after 5 days in space. Necropsy of the subject rats documented suppressed interferon production, loss of muscle mass, an up to 13 percent loss in bone mass (after a one week flight), and a 20 percent decrease in growth-inducing hormone. The volume of data collected is thought to exceed the combined data gathered on all previous U.S. space missions.

  5. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2016-07-12

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  7. Supporting Research: Environments, Administration and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacColl, John; Jubb, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Last year, OCLC Research and the UK's Research Information Network (RIN) undertook a pair of parallel studies in the US and the UK on the theme of research support services in universities (Kroll and Forsman 2010; CIBER 2010). In the US, the library and scholarly information consultancy Kroll Research Associates was commissioned, and in the UK the…

  8. Reporting ethics committee approval in public administration research.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Sara R; Gray, Phillip W

    2014-03-01

    While public administration research is thriving because of increased attention to social scientific rigor, lingering problems of methods and ethics remain. This article investigates the reporting of ethics approval within public administration publications. Beginning with an overview of ethics requirements regarding research with human participants, I turn to an examination of human participants protections for public administration research. Next, I present the findings of my analysis of articles published in the top five public administration journals over the period from 2000 to 2012, noting the incidences of ethics approval reporting as well as funding reporting. In explicating the importance of ethics reporting for public administration research, as it relates to replication, reputation, and vulnerable populations, I conclude with recommendations for increasing ethics approval reporting in public administration research.

  9. UHTC Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2011-01-01

    For enhanced aerodynamic performance. Materials for sharp leading edges can be reusable but need different properties because of geometry and very high temperatures. Require materials with significantly higher temperature capabilities, but for short duration. Current shuttle RCC leading edge materials: T approx. 1650 C. Materials for vehicles with sharp leading edges: T>2000 C. >% Figure depicts: High Temperature at Tip and Steep Temperature Gradient. Passive cooling is simplest option to manage the intense heating on sharp leading edges.

  10. Ames Research Center publications, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists 786 formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports which appeared during 1977 or which were not included in previous annual bibliographies. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and author. Each NASA report is identified by a technical report and accession number to facilitate ordering. An author index is provided.

  11. NASA Ames Celebrates Curiosity Rover's Landing on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Nearly 7,000 people came to NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., to watch the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity land on Mars. A full day's worth of activities and discussions wit...

  12. Large-scale aeroacoustic research feasibility and conceptual design of test-section inserts for the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olsen, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The advantages and disadvantages of likely designs were analyzed. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed leads to the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis indicated a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open jet test section, and a 70 x 100 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining, respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoutic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5 ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustic studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. In all designs studied, the existing structure would have to be reinforced. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers. The larger size of the facility would make installation and removal of the insert components difficult. Consequently, scheduling of the existing 80 x 120 aerodynamic test section and scheduling of the open-jet test section would likely be made on an

  13. The Ames Power Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osetinsky, Leonid; Wang, David

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Power Monitoring System (APMS) is a centralized system of power meters, computer hardware, and specialpurpose software that collects and stores electrical power data by various facilities at Ames Research Center (ARC). This system is needed because of the large and varying nature of the overall ARC power demand, which has been observed to range from 20 to 200 MW. Large portions of peak demand can be attributed to only three wind tunnels (60, 180, and 100 MW, respectively). The APMS helps ARC avoid or minimize costly demand charges by enabling wind-tunnel operators, test engineers, and the power manager to monitor total demand for center in real time. These persons receive the information they need to manage and schedule energy-intensive research in advance and to adjust loads in real time to ensure that the overall maximum allowable demand is not exceeded. The APMS (see figure) includes a server computer running the Windows NT operating system and can, in principle, include an unlimited number of power meters and client computers. As configured at the time of reporting the information for this article, the APMS includes more than 40 power meters monitoring all the major research facilities, plus 15 Windows-based client personal computers that display real-time and historical data to users via graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The power meters and client computers communicate with the server using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) on Ethernet networks, variously, through dedicated fiber-optic cables or through the pre-existing ARC local-area network (ARCLAN). The APMS has enabled ARC to achieve significant savings ($1.2 million in 2001) in the cost of power and electric energy by helping personnel to maintain total demand below monthly allowable levels, to manage the overall power factor to avoid low power factor penalties, and to use historical system data to identify opportunities for additional energy savings. The APMS also

  14. 7 CFR 2.67 - Administrator, Economic Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... research on supply, demand, and trade in food and fiber products and the effects on the U.S. food and... Research, Education, and Economics § 2.67 Administrator, Economic Research Service. (a) Delegations... delegations of authority are made by the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics to...

  15. 7 CFR 2.67 - Administrator, Economic Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... research on supply, demand, and trade in food and fiber products and the effects on the U.S. food and... Research, Education, and Economics § 2.67 Administrator, Economic Research Service. (a) Delegations... delegations of authority are made by the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics to...

  16. 7 CFR 2.67 - Administrator, Economic Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... research on supply, demand, and trade in food and fiber products and the effects on the U.S. food and... Research, Education, and Economics § 2.67 Administrator, Economic Research Service. (a) Delegations... delegations of authority are made by the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics to...

  17. 7 CFR 2.67 - Administrator, Economic Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... research on supply, demand, and trade in food and fiber products and the effects on the U.S. food and... Research, Education, and Economics § 2.67 Administrator, Economic Research Service. (a) Delegations... delegations of authority are made by the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics to...

  18. Using Administrative Data for Longitudinal Substance Abuse Research

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine E.; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of administrative data in substance abuse research has become more widespread than ever. This selective review synthesizes recent extant research from 31 articles to consider what has been learned from using administrative data to conduct longitudinal substance abuse research in four overlapping areas: (1) service access and utilization, (2) underrepresented populations, (3) treatment outcomes, and (4) cost analysis. Despite several notable limitations, administrative data contribute valuable information, particularly in the investigation of service system interactions and outcomes among substance abusers as they unfold and influence each other over the long term. This critical assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of using existing administrative data within a longitudinal framework should stimulate innovative thinking regarding future applications of administrative data for longitudinal substance abuse research purposes. PMID:18679805

  19. Research Administration in a Time of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Edward N., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in biomedical research are outlined including financial competition that forces investigators to spend more time developing proposals and creates pressures to produce quickly; obsolescence of equipment, facilities, people, and knowledge; demand for interdisciplinary approaches and greater accountability; joint ventures with profit making…

  20. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  1. Advantage of collocating research facilities The administrator's point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, H.-M.; Blomeyer, C.

    1995-02-01

    Research facilities are collocated in order to create a maximum of synergy. This also requires a close cooperation of the administration concerned leading to advantages, in particular with regards to infrastructure and cost effectiveness. Faced with the specificities of the research facilities involved, administrators feel challenged to find appropriate solutions. The successive establishment of research institutes on the Polygone Scientifique in Grenoble is described. Forms and content of administrative collaboration between the Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility are analysed, where collocation has led to intensive cooperation.

  2. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program: The Next Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Neri, David F.; Miller, Donna L.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Webbon, Lissa L.; Oyung, Ray L.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four hour, global aviation operations pose unique challenges to humans. Physiological requirements related to sleep, the internal circadian clock, and human fatigue are critical factors that are known to affect safety, performance, and productivity. Understanding the human operators' physiological capabilities, and limitations, will be important to address these issues as global demand for aviation activities continues to increase. In 1980, in response to a Congressional request, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue/Jet Lag Program to examine the role of fatigue in flight operations. Originally established by Dr. John K. Lauber and Dr. Charles E. Billings, the Program was designed to address three objectives: (1) determine the extent of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations; (2) determine how fatigue affected flight crew performance; and (3) develop strategies to maximize performance and alertness during flight operations.

  3. Linking Behavioral Research and Administrative Science: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, T. Barr

    This paper comments on and assesses the power of the research of six studies presented at the American Educational Research Association symposium, "Linking Behavioral Research and Administrative Science." Three of the studies (Jordan, Koehler and Ismail, Bredo) are classified in terms of organizations as formal structures, and as instruments of…

  4. Notification: Preliminary Research on Various Administrative Areas (reissued)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    September 11, 2013. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Inspector General plans to begin preliminary research on various administrative areas as a result of recent actions taken against a former EPA employee.

  5. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  6. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. A perspective on 15 years of proof-of-concept aircraft development and flight research at Ames-Moffett by the Rotorcraft and Powered-Lift Flight Projects Division, 1970-1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, David D.

    1987-01-01

    A proof-of-concept (POC) aircraft is defined and the concept of interest described for each of the six aircraft developed by the Ames-Moffet Rotorcraft and Powered-Lift Flight Projects Division from 1970 through 1985; namely, the OV-10, the C-8A Augmentor Wing, the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft (TRRA), the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA)-compound, and the yet-to-fly RSRA/X-Wing Aircraft. The program/project chronology and most noteworthy features of the concepts are reviewed. The paper discusses the significance of each concept and the project demonstrating it; it briefly looks at what concepts are on the horizon as potential POC research aircraft and emphasizes that no significant advanced concept in aviation technology has ever been accepted by civilian or military users without first completing a demonstration through flight testing.

  10. Ames Fellows Award - Blumberg

    NASA Video Gallery

    A pioneer in medical research and astrobiology, Dr. Baruch Blumberg was one of history's greatest explorer-scientists. Dr. Blumberg strongly believed in the breakthrough value of interdisciplinary ...

  11. Rotorcraft In-Flight Simulation Research at NASA Ames Research Center: A Review of the 1980's and plans for the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Hindson, William S.; Lebacqz, J. Victor; Denery, Dallas G.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1991-01-01

    A new flight research vehicle, the Rotorcraft-Aircrew System Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL), is being developed by the U.S. Army and NASA at ARC. The requirements for this new facility stem from a perception of rotorcraft system technology requirements for the next decade together with operational experience with the Boeing Vertol CH-47B research helicopter that was operated as an in-flight simulator at ARC during the past 10 years. Accordingly, both the principal design features of the CH-47B variable-stability system and the flight-control and cockpit-display programs that were conducted using this aircraft at ARC are reviewed. Another U.S Army helicopter, a Sikorsky UH-60A Black Hawk, was selected as the baseline vehicle for the RASCAL. The research programs that influence the design of the RASCAL are summarized, and the resultant requirements for the RASCAL research system are described. These research programs include investigations of advanced, integrated control concepts for achieving high levels of agility and maneuverability, and guidance technologies, employing computer/sensor-aiding, designed to assist the pilot during low-altitude flight in conditions of limited visibility. The approach to the development of the new facility is presented and selected plans for the preliminary design of the RASCAL are described.

  12. Ames Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Roger Z.

    2015-01-01

    This is an informal presentation presented to the University of Colorado, Boulder Bioastronautics group seminar. It highlights the key focal areas of the Air Revitalization Group research over the past year, including progress on the CO2 Removal and Compression System, testing of CDRA drying bed configurations, and adsorption research.

  13. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  14. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  15. 49 CFR 1.99 - Delegations to the Research and Innovative Technology Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Innovative Technology Administrator. The Research and Innovative Technology Administrator is... Department of Transportation's Research, Development and Technology Planning Council and Planning Team. (5... Management Realignment under the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA).” (q) Carry out...

  16. 49 CFR 1.99 - Delegations to the Research and Innovative Technology Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and Innovative Technology Administrator. The Research and Innovative Technology Administrator is... Department of Transportation's Research, Development and Technology Planning Council and Planning Team. (5... Management Realignment under the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA).” (q) Carry out...

  17. 49 CFR 1.99 - Delegations to the Research and Innovative Technology Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and Innovative Technology Administrator. The Research and Innovative Technology Administrator is... Department of Transportation's Research, Development and Technology Planning Council and Planning Team. (5... Management Realignment under the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA).” (q) Carry out...

  18. Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) Overview and 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test. [conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCluer, Megan S.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most helicopter data trends cannot be extrapolated to tiltrotors because blade geometry and aerodynamic behavior, as well as rotor and fuselage interactions, are significantly different for tiltrotors. A tiltrotor model has been developed to investigate the aeromechanics of tiltrotors, to develop a comprehensive database for validating tiltrotor analyses, and to provide a research platform for supporting future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (FS TRAM) is a dual-rotor, powered aircraft model with extensive instrumentation for measurement of structural and aerodynamic loads. This paper will present the Full-Span TRAM test capabilities and the first set of data obtained during a 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test conducted in late 2000 at NASA Ames Research Center. The Full-Span TRAM is a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 Osprey aircraft, and a heavily instrumented NASA and U.S. Army wind tunnel test stand. Rotor structural loads are monitored and recorded for safety-of-flight and for information on blade loads and dynamics. Left and right rotor balance and fuselage balance loads are monitored for safety-of-flight and for measurement of vehicle and rotor aerodynamic performance. Static pressure taps on the left wing are used to determine rotor/wing interactional effects and rotor blade dynamic pressures measure blade airloads. All of these measurement capabilities make the FS TRAM test stand a unique and valuable asset for validation of computational codes and to aid in future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span TRAM was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel from October through December 2000. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were acquired in addition to wing pressures, rotor acoustics, and Laser Light Sheet (LLS) flow visualization data. Hover, forward flight, and airframe (rotors off) aerodynamic runs were performed. Helicopter-mode data were acquired during angle of attack and thrust sweeps for

  19. Emergent Paradigm: Critical Realism and Transformative Research in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egbo, Benedicta

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the prospects of using critical realism as a guiding philosophy for critical inquiry in the field of educational administration. A relatively recent philosophy in the social sciences, critical realism offers an alternative framework for researchers engaged in empirical work that is aimed at transforming undesirable social…

  20. Administrative Data Linkage as a Tool for Child Maltreatment Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Marni D.; Jutte, Douglas P.

    2013-01-01

    Linking administrative data records for the same individuals across services and over time offers a powerful, population-wide resource for child maltreatment research that can be used to identify risk and protective factors and to examine outcomes. Multistage de-identification processes have been developed to protect privacy and maintain…

  1. Health Services Research and Development: the Veterans Administration Program.

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, P G

    1986-01-01

    Health expenditures are rising inexorably; health status shows relatively little gain; technological possibilities are outstripping our ability or willingness to provide a commensurate level of resources. Clinical and administrative managers face increasingly difficult choices among alternative interventions in attempting to resolve these problems. If health services research is to succeed as a tool for assisting these decisions, clinicians, administrators, and researchers must view it as an integral part of management. This paper describes this concept of health services research and its implementation by the VA HSR&D Service, results from 1981 to date, and future directions. Four programs implement the Service's system to make relevant, valid information accessible to VA staff who can use it to improve veterans' health care: Investigator-Initiated Research (IIR) Program; HSR&D Field Program, which implements the Service's mission in various local areas VA-wide; Special Projects Program, responsive to system-wide issues, including technology assessment and transfer; and Resources Program, the Service's own management system. The Service's impact on improving veterans health care is already apparent. However, the true value of the HSR&D system will become apparent only in the 1990s, after the capacity for conducting health services research has been built and integrated fully with clinical and administrative practice. The VA, the nation's largest health care system, has a unique opportunity to demonstrate how health services research can improve health care. PMID:3081467

  2. Research priorities for administrative challenges of integrated networks of care.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Randy; Hilton, Joshua A; Carrier, Emily; Pines, Jesse M; Hufstetler, Greg; Thorby, Suzette; Milling, T J; Cesta, Beth; Hsia, Renee Y

    2010-12-01

    In 2006, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) advanced the concept of "coordinated, regionalized, and accountable emergency care systems" to address significant problems with the delivery of emergency medical care in the United States. Achieving this vision requires the thoughtful implementation of well-aligned, system-level structures and processes that enhance access to emergency care and improve patient outcomes at a sustainable cost. Currently, the delivery of emergency medical care is supported by numerous administrative systems, including economic; reimbursement; legal and regulatory structures; licensure, credentialing, and accreditation processes; medicolegal systems; and quality reporting mechanisms. In addition, many regionalized systems may not optimize patient outcomes because of current administrative barriers that make it difficult for providers to deliver the best care. However, certain administrative barriers may also threaten the sustainability of integration efforts or prevent them altogether. This article identifies significant administrative challenges to integrating networks of emergency care in four specific areas: reimbursement, medical-legal, quality reporting mechanisms, and regulatory aspects. The authors propose a research agenda for indentifying optimal approaches that support consistent access to quality emergency care with improved outcomes for patients, at a sustainable cost. Researching administrative challenges will involve careful examination of the numerous natural experiments in the recent past and will be crucial to understand the impact as we embark on a new era of health reform.

  3. A conceptual framework contributing to nursing administration and research.

    PubMed

    Biron, Alain D; Richer, Marie-Claire; Ezer, Hélène

    2007-03-01

    The health care system has undergone major changes in the last decade. With greater acuity and complexity of illness, the adoption of innovative technologies and the shortage of health care personnel, the coordination and integration of health care services has become increasingly demanding for administrators. Growing dissatisfaction and concerns about safety issues are being expressed by the users of care who need to navigate through an increasingly complex system and by health care personnel who feel less efficient within the organization. Nursing administrators have a responsibility to address these issues but there is little scientific evidence to guide their actions. There are also few comprehensive models highlighting the main components of nursing administration - models that could guide nursing administration research. This paper presents a conceptual framework for nursing administration and research that links patient health care needs, nursing resources and the nursing care processes to the context of the health care system, and the social, political and cultural environments of care. A selected review of the oncology and cancer care literature is presented to demonstrate how this framework can organize existing knowledge about these concepts in the context of cancer care.

  4. Theory and Research in Educational Administration. Research and Theory in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne K., Ed.; Miskel, Cecil G., Ed.

    This volume presents a range of research and perspectives dedicated to advancing understanding of schools through empirical study and theoretical analysis. The eight chapters are: (1) "Organizational Learning in High-Stakes Accountability Environments: Lessons from an Urban School District" (Helen M. Marks and Susan M. Printy); (2) "Sources of…

  5. An experimental summary of plasma arc exposures of space shuttle high-temperature reusable surface insulation tile array with a single missing tile (conducted at the Ames Research Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    A space shuttle high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tile array with a single missing or lost tile was exposed to a hot gas simulated reentry environment to investigate the heating conditions in and around the vicinity of the missing HRSI tile. Heat flux and pressure data for the lost tile condition were obtained by the use of a water cooled lost tile calibration model. The maximum aluminum substrate temperature obtained during the simulated reentry was 128 C (263 F). The lost tile calibration data indicated a maximum heat flux in the lost tile cavity region of 63 percent of the upstream reference value. This test was conducted at the Ames Research Center in the 20 MW semielliptical thermal protection system (TPS) pilot plasma arc test facility.

  6. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  7. A History of the Energy Research and Development Administration [ERDA

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buck, Alice L.

    1982-03-01

    Congress created the Energy Research and Development Administration on October 11, 1974 in response to the Nation's growing need for additional sources of energy. The new agency would coordinate energy programs formerly scattered among many federal agencies, and serve as the focus point for a major effort by the Federal Government to expand energy research and development efforts. New ways to conserve existing supplies as well as the commercial demonstration of new technologies would hopefully be the fruit of the Government's first significant effort to amalgamate energy resource development programs. This history briefly summarizes the accomplishments of the agency.

  8. History of the Energy Research and Development Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, A.L.

    1982-03-01

    Congress created the Energy Research and Development Administration on October 11, 1974 in response to the Nation's growing need for additional sources of energy. The new agency would coordinate energy programs formerly scattered among many federal agencies, and serve as the focus point for a major effort by the Federal Government to expand energy research and development efforts. New ways to conserve existing supplies as well as the commercial demonstration of new technologies would hopefully be the fruit of the Government's first significant effort to amalgamate energy resource development programs. This history briefly summarizes the accomplishments of the agency.

  9. The active participation of German-speaking countries in conferences of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) between 2005 and 2013: a reflection of the development of medical education research?

    PubMed

    Raes, Patricia; Bauer, Daniel; Schöppe, Franziska; Fischer, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Zielsetzung: International gewinnt medizinische Ausbildungsforschung an Bedeutung. Seit Anfang der 2000er ist auch in deutschsprachigen Ländern (D-A-CH) ein steigendes Interesse zu beobachten. In einer kontinuierlichen Steigerung der Publikationszahlen deutscher Autoren in internationalen Fachzeitschriften zum Thema „medizinische Ausbildung“ schlug sich das bisher jedoch nicht nieder. Die vorliegende Arbeit untersucht, ob sich jene Entwicklungen aus der aktiven Teilnahme deutschsprachiger Forscher an den Konferenzen der AMEE ablesen lassen.Methoden: Die Tagungsbände der AMEE-Kongresse von 2005-2013 der Kategorien „Postervorträge“, „Short Communications“, „Research Papers“ und „Plenarvorträge“ wurden auf Beteiligung aus D-A-CH hin untersucht. Im Anschluss wurden die Abstracts einer inhaltlichen Analyse unterzogen und nach Studiendesign, Methodik, Untersuchungsgegenstand und Forschungsthema kategorisiert. Ergebnisse: Von 9446 analysierten Abstracts weisen 549 Beiträge mindestens einen Erst-/Co- oder Letztautor aus D-A-CH auf. Die absolute Zahl der Beiträge pro Kongress schwankt zwischen 44 im Jahr 2010 und 77 im Jahr 2013. Der prozentuale Anteil schwankt zwischen 10,0% in 2005 und 4,1% im Jahr 2010. Seit 2010 stieg die Beteiligung jedoch kontinuierlich an. Die Arbeiten sind zumeist deskriptiver Art (62,7%). Studien zu grundlegenden Fragen des Lehrens und Lernens (clarification studies) sind eher selten (4,0%). Angewandt wurden meist quantitative Methoden (51,9%), um Fragestellungen zu Themen wie Lehr- und Lernmethoden (33,0%), Evaluation und Assessment (22,4%) oder Curriculumsentwicklung (14,4%) zu untersuchen. Untersuchungsgegenstand sind meist Studierende (52,5%).Schlussfolgerung: Die Beitragszahlen aus D-A-CH weisen zu Beginn und am Ende des Untersuchungszeitraums ein Maximum auf. Ein kontinuierlicher Anstieg der aktiven Beteiligung seit 2005 ist nicht zu beobachten. Dieser Umstand spiegelt nicht das steigende Interesse an der

  10. Ames Selective Dissemination of Information (SDI) System Operating Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lloyd E.; Wegner, Waldo W.

    The Ames Selective Dissemination of Information (SDI) System is an attempt to efficiently place rapidly increasing amounts of information into the hands of scientists and engineers who can exploit it. It is a computerized current awareness system designed to increase researchers' literature searching capabilities by bringing to their attention…

  11. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  12. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-02-13

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  13. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    ScienceCinema

    Ott, Ryan

    2016-07-12

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  14. Briefing to University of Porto on NASA Airborne Science Program and Ames UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames is exploring a partnership with the University of Portugal to jointly develop and test new autonomous vehicle technologies. As part of the discussions I will be briefing the University of Portugal faculty on the NASA Airborne Science Program (ASP) and associated activities at NASA Ames Research Center. The presentation will communicate the requirements that drive the program, the assets available to NASA researchers, and discuss research projects that have used unmanned aircraft systems including MIZOPEX, Surprise Valley, and Florida Keys Coral Reef assessment. Other topics will include the SIERRA and Dragon Eye UAV projects operated at Ames.

  15. Flight and full-scale wind-tunnel comparison of pressure distributions from an F-18 aircraft at high angles of attack. [Conducted in NASA Ames Research Center's 80 by 120 ft wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure distributions were obtained at nearly identical fuselage stations and wing chord butt lines in flight on the F-18 HARV at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and in the NASA Ames Research Center's 80 by 120 ft wind tunnel on a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft. The static pressures were measured at the identical five stations on the forebody, three stations on the left and right leading-edge extensions, and three spanwise stations on the wing. Comparisons of the flight and wind-tunnel pressure distributions were made at alpha = 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg/59 deg. In general, very good agreement was found. Minor differences were noted at the forebody at alpha = 45 deg and 60 deg in the magnitude of the vortex footprints and a Mach number effect was noted at the leading-edge extension at alpha = 30 deg. The inboard leading edge flap data from the wind tunnel at alpha = 59 deg showed a suction peak that did not appear in the flight data. This was the result of a vortex from the corner of the leading edge flap whose path was altered by the lack of an engine simulation in the wind tunnel.

  16. Ames, pesticides, and cancer revisited.

    PubMed

    Richter, Elihu D; Chlamtac, Noga

    2002-01-01

    The case for continuing use of existing levels of pesticides in agriculture, espoused by Bruce Ames, is refuted. Ames' contentions that naturally occurring carcinogens are far more widespread than man-made ones, that pesticides prevent cancer by providing fruits and vegetables at lower costs to the poor, and that animal data on high risks with high doses cannot predict low risks from low doses in humans do not address key issues: 1) fruits and vegetables contain mixtures of carcinogens and anti-carcinogens, and selection effects from human exposures to these mixtures go back more than a million years; 2) exposures from bioconcentrations of biopersistent organochlorines in the food chain create particular risks for meat-eaters, who have higher cancer risks than vegetarians; 3) even low doses from ingestion of produce containing pesticide residues can cause tissue injury, which could itself promote cancer; 4) epidemiologic data show rises in cancer incidences in older people in many countries, major differences in cancer risks between countries, and converging trends in risks for populations migrating to certain countries; 5) studies of pesticide-exposed workers consistently show increased rates of cancers and birth defects and cancers in their offspring; 6) epidemiologic studies based on large databases tend to underestimate risks from environmental causes because of exposure misclassification; 7) exposures to many organochlorines may have pervasive effects on endocrine function; 8) crop yields can be increased with less use of pesticides. Studies demonstrating the latter need replication, and should be supported as part of a coherent government agenda to develop alternative farming methods.

  17. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  18. Comparative Research: An Approach to Teaching Research Methods in Political Science and Public Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbers, Trent A

    2016-01-01

    The teaching of research methods has been at the core of public administration education for almost 30 years. But since 1990, this journal has published only two articles on the teaching of research methods. Given the increasing emphasis on data driven decision-making, greater insight is needed into the best practices for teaching public…

  19. Research Tools, Tips, and Resources for Financial Aid Administrators. Monograph, A NASFAA Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohning, David D.; Redd, Kenneth E.; Simmons, Barry W., Sr.

    This monograph provides research tools, tips, and resources to financial aid administrators who need to undertake research tasks. It answers: What is research? How can financial aid administrators get started on research projects? What resources are available to help answer research questions quickly and accurately? How can research efforts assist…

  20. NASA Ames Helps Search For and Study of Sutter's Mill Meteorites

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists, researchers and volunteers from NASA Ames, the SETI Institute and other organizations are searching for fragments of the Sutter's Mill Meteor that illuminated the sky over the Sierra Ne...

  1. Space Shuttle AFRSI OMS pod environment test using model 81-0 test fixture in the Ames Research Center 9x7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS-314A/B/C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 9x7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help resolve an anomaly that developed during the STS-6 orbiter flight wherein sections of the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) covering the OMS pods suffered some damage. A one-third scale two-dimensional shell structure model of an OMS pod cross-section was employed to support the test articles. These consisted of 15 AFRSI blanket panels form-fitted over the shell structures for exposure to simulated flight conditions. Of six baseline blankets, two were treated with special surface coatings. Two other panels were configured with AFRSI sections removed from the OV099 orbiter vehicle after the STS-6 flight. Seven additional specimens incorporated alternative designs and repairs. Following a series of surface pressure calibration runs, the specimens were exposed to simulated ascent and entry dynamic pressure profiles. Entry conditions included the use of a vortex generator to evaluate the effect of shed vortices on the AFRSI located in the area of concern.

  2. 42 CFR 93.501 - Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General Information § 93.501 Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions. (a) Opportunity to contest. A respondent may contest ORI findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions, including...

  3. Summary of proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Mccauley, Michael E.; Cook, Anthony E.; Voorhees, James W.

    1989-01-01

    A program of research to investigate simulator induced sickness has recently been initiated under the sponsorship of NASA Ames Research Center to coordinate efforts to investigate and eventually eliminate the problem of simulator sickness. As part of this program, a Simulator Sickness Steering Committee has been assembled, comprised of eighteen representatives from the Army, Air Force, Navy, NASA, NATO, academia, and industry. The proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee are summarized and discussed.

  4. Reaching for the APEX at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohut, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The multidimensional design of the APEX program is the result of an extensive research and development effort dating back nearly a decade. "In the late 1990s and early 2000, we were pretty successful at getting new research and technology projects here at the center," Johnson says, "and we had a lack of critical mass of project managers. We were taking people who were primarily researchers and putting them in the position of managing projects." Smith and Johnson held a series of workshops across the center during 2000 and 2001 to gather feedback about how to address this issue. When they briefed the center's senior management on their findings, one of the top recommendations was to establish a project manager development program at Ames. At that point, they cast a wide net for ideas and information. "We did centerwide needs assessment, we did focus groups, we did surveys," Smith says. "We came up with a proposal for what a program would look like, tying in what we knew about the Academy of Program1 Project Leadership (now the Academy for Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, or APPEL), what we've seen at other centers, what other centers have tried. We were always checking to make sure our program mapped to APPEL. We also looked at the PMI [Project Management Institute] model, INCOSE [International Council on Systems Engineering], CMMI [Capability Maturity Model Integration], you name it." "We had a lot of conversations with the Jet Propulsion Lab and Goddard," Johnson adds. "We saw those centers as models for what Ames was aspiring to be in terms of a center for managing space flight missions." Their research confirmed what they already knew-that strong practitioner involvement would be critical to their program design process. 'XPEX is for the practitioner by the practitioner," Smith says. "They have to be a part of designing it. Otherwise there's no way we could design a program that meets their needs." At the same time that they worked at the grassroots

  5. Life into Space: Space Life Sciences Experiments, Ames Research Center, Kennedy Space Center, 1991-1998, Including Profiles of 1996-1998 Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, Kenneth (Editor); Etheridge, Guy (Editor); Callahan, Paul X. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    We have now conducted space life sciences research for more than four decades. The continuing interest in studying the way living systems function in space derives from two main benefits of that research. First, in order for humans to engage in long-term space travel, we must understand and develop measures to counteract the most detrimental effects of space flight on biological systems. Problems in returning to the conditions of Earth must be kept to a manageable level. Second, increasing our understanding of how organisms function in the absence of gravity gives us new understanding of fundamental biological processes. This information can be used to improve human health and the quality of life on Earth.

  6. Biomedical Research Division significant accomplishments for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N. V.

    1984-01-01

    Various research and technology activities of Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, human behavior and performance, general biomedical research, and gravitational biology.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Next Generation Power Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Alan Russell discusses the need to develop new power lines that are stronger and more conductive as a way to address the problem of the nation's aging and inadequate power grid.

  8. Ames Lab 101: osgBullet

    SciTech Connect

    McCorkle, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains osgBullet, a 3-D virtual simulation software, and how it helps engineers design complex products and systems in a realistic, real-time virtual environment.

  9. Ames Lab 101: osgBullet

    ScienceCinema

    McCorkle, Doug

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains osgBullet, a 3-D virtual simulation software, and how it helps engineers design complex products and systems in a realistic, real-time virtual environment.

  10. Ames Lab 101: Next Generation Power Lines

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Alan

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Alan Russell discusses the need to develop new power lines that are stronger and more conductive as a way to address the problem of the nation's aging and inadequate power grid.

  11. Ames Lab Named an Industry Safety Leader

    ScienceCinema

    Wessels, Tom

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has been named a 2010 Industry Leader Award winner by the National Safety Council. The Ames Laboratory was one of only 81 companies/organizations to receive the award for their safety performance and the only DOE national laboratory on the list. The award represents the top 5 percent of members that have qualified for the National Safety Council 2010 Occupational Excellence Achievement Award, based on 2009 calendar year data.

  12. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  13. Goal Setting for School Site Administrators. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    "The principal is the instructional leader of the school" has been reiterated and restated repeatedly in the past 30 years. Theoretically this concept is the idea, however, the reality of building administrators' lives seldom leave appropriate time to plan, let alone implement reasonable curricular and building goals. When an administrator is new…

  14. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  15. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Advisory Committee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-29

    0576 N5-97-3 Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Advisory Committee U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CARDEROCK DIVISION, NAVAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Shipbuilding Research Program, Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Support

  16. NASA Ames UV-LED Poster Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2015-01-01

    UV-LED is a small satellite technology demonstration payload being flown on the Saudisat-4 spacecraft that is demonstrating non-contacting charge control of an isolated or floating mass using new solid-state ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). Integrated to the rest of the spacecraft and launched on a Dnepr in June 19, 2014, the project is a collaboration between the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Stanford University, and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Beginning with its commissioning in December, 2015, the data collected by UV-LED have validated a novel method of charge control that will improve the performance of drag-free spacecraft allowing for concurrent science collection during charge management operations as well as reduce the mass, power and volume required while increasing lifetime and reliability of a charge management subsystem. UV-LED continues to operate, exploring new concepts in non-contacting charge control and collecting data crucial to understanding the lifetime of ultra-violet light emitting diodes in space. These improvements are crucial to the success of ground breaking missions such as LISA and BBO, and demonstrates the ability of low cost small satellite missions to provide technological advances that far exceed mission costs.

  17. Ames collaborative study of cosmic ray neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Stephens, L. D.; Rindi, A.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Griffith, R. V.; Welles, C. G.; Baum, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a collaborative study to define both the neutron flux and the spectrum more precisely and to develop a dosimetry package that can be flown quickly to altitude for solar flare events are described. Instrumentation and analysis techniques were used which were developed to measure accelerator-produced radiation. The instruments were flown in the Ames Research Center high altitude aircraft. Neutron instrumentation consisted of Bonner spheres with both active and passive detector elements, threshold detectors of both prompt-counter and activation-element types, a liquid scintillation spectrometer based on pulse-shape discrimination, and a moderated BF3 counter neutron monitor. In addition, charged particles were measured with a Reuter-Stokes ionization chamber system and dose equivalent with another instrument. Preliminary results from the first series of flights at 12.5 km (41,000 ft) are presented, including estimates of total neutron flux intensity and spectral shape and of the variation of intensity with altitude and geomagnetic latitude.

  18. Inferential Statistics and the Use of Administrative Data in US Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Benjamin G.; Shafer, Kevin; Miles, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    While the use of inferential statistics is a nearly universal practice in the social sciences, there are instances where its application is unnecessary and potentially misleading. This is true for a portion of research using administrative data in educational research in the United States. Surveying all research articles using administrative data…

  19. The Process of Establishing a New Master of Research Administration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jo Ann; Torres, Laurianne

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the second largest university in the nation was awarded a grant from NCURA to initiate a new fully-online graduate program in research administration. The Master of Research Administration (MRA) was approved by the institution's Board of Trustees in March 2011 and the first classes will begin August 2011. Currently the research literature…

  20. 42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... administrative actions. After completing its review, ORI either closes the case without a finding of research... administrative actions based on the record of the research misconduct proceedings and any other information... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Findings of research misconduct and...

  1. 49 CFR 1.98 - The Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Research and Innovative Technology... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.98 The Research and Innovative Technology Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Coordinating, facilitating, and reviewing the Department's research...

  2. 75 FR 24773 - Research and Innovative Technology Administration Advisory Council on Transportation Statistics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Bureau of Transportation Statistics Research and Innovative Technology Administration Advisory Council on Transportation Statistics; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology Administration, U.S... U.S. Mail to: U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology...

  3. 49 CFR 1.98 - The Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Research and Innovative Technology... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.98 The Research and Innovative Technology Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Coordinating, facilitating, and reviewing the Department's research...

  4. 49 CFR 1.98 - The Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Research and Innovative Technology... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.98 The Research and Innovative Technology Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Coordinating, facilitating, and reviewing the Department's research...

  5. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR site showed detectable amounts of /sup 60/Co. This isotope was 1.5 x 10/sup -4/% of the concentration guide (1) and was probably due to ALRR operations. The radioisotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium. The average yearly individual dose from /sup 3/H at the exclusion fence was estimated to 0.0038 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 6.31 man-Rem. These values are 0.00076% and 0.0063%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, /sup 3/H was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.59% of the dose derived from the concentration guide.

  6. Ames Laboratory Site Environmental Report, Calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, L.

    1991-12-31

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. This program is a working requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5484.1, ``Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements`` and Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies several buildings owned by the DOE. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU-owned buildings. Laboratory research activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. Ames Laboratory is responsible for a small chemical burial site, located on ISU property. The site was used for the disposal of chemical and metal slags from thorium and uranium production. Samples of water from existing test wells and upstream and downstream sites on the nearby Squaw Creek show no detectable migration of the contents of the burial site. A Site Assessment plan submitted to the State of Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was approved. A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study work plan has been completed for additional studies at the site. This has been reviewed and approved by the DOE Chicago Field Office and the DNR. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the site resulted in a categorical exclusion finding which has been approved by the DOE. Ames Laboratory has an area contaminated by diesel fuel at the location of a storage tank which was removed in 1970. Soil corings and groundwater have been analyzed for contamination and an assessment written. Pollution awareness and waste minimization programs and plans were implemented in 1990. Included in this effort was the implementation of a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program.

  7. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1981-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

  8. The IBM PC at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Like many large companies, Ames relies very much on its computing power to get work done. And, like many other large companies, finding the IBM PC a reliable tool, Ames uses it for many of the same types of functions as other companies. Presentation and clarification needs demand much of graphics packages. Programming and text editing needs require simpler, more-powerful packages. The storage space needed by NASA's scientists and users for the monumental amounts of data that Ames needs to keep demand the best database packages that are large and easy to use. Availability to the Micom Switching Network combines the powers of the IBM PC with the capabilities of other computers and mainframes and allows users to communicate electronically. These four primary capabilities of the PC are vital to the needs of NASA's users and help to continue and support the vast amounts of work done by the NASA employees.

  9. Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Research on School Administrator Career Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley-Ripple, Elizabeth N.; Solano, Paul L.; McDuffie, Mary Joan

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has focused on issues of retention and turnover among K-12 school administrators, yet it fails to address some important complexities in administrator career paths. This article examines three conceptual and methodological issues in the current literature involving administrative turnover: the complexity of role and place in…

  10. Teacher-Administrator Ratios: A Decade of Change. BCTF Research Report. Section IV. 2009-TD-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This research report examines changes in FTE teachers, FTE administrators, and teacher-administrator ratios, drawing on two data sources over two time periods. The Ministry of Education collects statistics about administrators from two different data sources. Teacher Statistics, an annual report published by the ministry uses data collected in…

  11. The Future of Leisure Studies in Research Universities: Administrators' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dustin, Daniel; Collins, Rachel; Schultz, Jeremy; Browne, Laurie; Schwab, Keri; Rose, Jeff; Timmerman, Danielle; Altschuler, Ben; Jostad, Jeremy; Spencer, Callie; Newman, Jackie; Bricker, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the content of a three-day administrative summit held at Zion Ponderosa Resort in southern Utah in late September 2010. Department chairs, heads, and deans representing 13 universities across North America offering leisure studies doctoral degrees, master's degrees, and undergraduate professional preparation degrees…

  12. Research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report describes various research and technology activities at Ames Moffett and Ames Dryden Research Centers. Highlights of these accomplishments indicate the Centers' varied and highly productive research efforts for 1987.

  13. Technology transfer in the NASA Ames Advanced Life Support Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Kathleen; Schlater, Nelson; Bilardo, Vincent; Masson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a representative set of technology transfer activities which are currently underway in the Advanced Life Support Division of the Ames Research Center. Five specific NASA-funded research or technology development projects are synopsized that are resulting in transfer of technology in one or more of four main 'arenas:' (1) intra-NASA, (2) intra-Federal, (3) NASA - aerospace industry, and (4) aerospace industry - broader economy. Each project is summarized as a case history, specific issues are identified, and recommendations are formulated based on the lessons learned as a result of each project.

  14. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., production, marketing (other than statistical and economic research but including research related to family...). (41)-(46) (47) Coordinate USDA policy and programs relating to global climate change (7 U.S.C....

  15. Educational and Expertise Characteristics of Research Administrators Employed at Various Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodman, John A.; Dingerson, Michael R.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the research administrator's profile compares seven categories of Society of Research Administrators membership (Academic Medical, Academic Non-Medical, Hospital Medical, Foundations and Non-profits, Industry, Government, and Other) with educational attainment and the 21 Priority Interest codes of the membership. (MLW)

  16. A View from within: How Doctoral Students in Educational Administration Develop Research Knowledge and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Militello, Matthew; Piert, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on experiences of doctoral students in educational administration at a time when the effectiveness of programs preparing practitioners and academics in this field are being questioned. Concerns related to how students in educational administration developed knowledge about research and identity as researchers were closely…

  17. 42 CFR 93.501 - Opportunity to contest findings of research misconduct and administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... misconduct and administrative actions. 93.501 Section 93.501 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions General Information § 93.501 Opportunity...

  18. Preparing Future School Administrators To Reach Out to Families through Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda T.; Blendinger, Jack

    This paper focuses on the role that action research can serve in preparing future school administrators to involve families in their children's education. For purposes of the paper, action research is defined as structured field-based investigations conducted in field environments that engage teachers preparing to become school administrators in…

  19. Academic Administrator Influence on Institutional Commitment to Open Access of Scholarly Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinsfelder, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the interrelationships among faculty researchers, publishers, librarians, and academic administrators when dealing with the open access of scholarly research. This study sought to identify the nature of any relationship between the perceived attitudes and actions of academic administrators and an…

  20. Ames Lab 101: C6: Virtual Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains the importance of virtual engineering and talks about the C6. The C6 is a three-dimensional, fully-immersive synthetic environment residing in the center atrium of Iowa State University's Howe Hall.

  1. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Jigang Wang

    2013-04-08

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  2. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2016-07-12

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  4. A Classroom Modification of the Ames Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavornitzky, Joseph; Trzeciak, Victor

    1979-01-01

    A modification of the Ames test for detecting carcinogens and mutagens using a strain of bacteria is described. A suggestion is given for checking the correctness of procedures by using particular hair dyes which have been shown to be mutogenic. (Author/SA)

  5. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    ScienceCinema

    Jigang Wang

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  6. Ames Lab 101: C6: Virtual Engineering

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains the importance of virtual engineering and talks about the C6. The C6 is a three-dimensional, fully-immersive synthetic environment residing in the center atrium of Iowa State University's Howe Hall.

  7. AIM: Ames Imaging Module Spacecraft Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The AIM camera is a small, lightweight, low power, low cost imaging system developed at NASA Ames. Though it has imaging capabilities similar to those of $1M plus spacecraft cameras, it does so on a fraction of the mass, power and cost budget.

  8. Student Aid Research. A Manual for Financial Aid Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jerry Sheehan, Ed.

    This manual contains nine articles intended to assist student financial aid professionals in conducting research. Initial chapters provide basic information for those starting to do such research while later chapters deal with more complex issues. Some chapters include appendices that provide examples of the techniques under consideration. from…

  9. University Research Centers: Heuristic Categories, Issues, and Administrative Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    University-based research centers can bring prestige and revenue to the institutions of higher education with which they are affiliated. Collaborating with corporations, units of government, and foundations, centers provide services to organizational leaders, policy makers, and communities. University research centers continue to increase in…

  10. AME seminar program in the United States: genesis, goals, and cost-benefit reflections.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, J Y; Harris, J L

    1977-04-01

    The practicing physician's requirement for continuing postgraduate medical education is generally accepted and has generated a number of postgraduate education programs. In 1960, the FAA inaugurated a seminar program to serve the special educational needs of its approximately 7,500 designated Aviation Medical Examiners. These doctors, the majority of whom are civilian physicians representing almost every specialty, are charged with issuing or withholding the pilot's medical license to fly. Under the administration of coauthor Harris, the AME Seminar Program undergoes modification and change as improvements are suggested by accrued experience. Evaluation of data acquired from a variety of sources indicates that the AME does, in fact, need refresher training in civil aviation medicine. In helping fulfill that need, the AME Seminar Program is working effectively.

  11. Federal Aviation Administration aircraft inspection research and develoment programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher D.

    1996-11-01

    A substantial and coordinated program in inspection system research was initiated at the FAA Technical Center in 1990 as part of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program. the primary objectives of the inspection systems initiative are to develop improved inspection techniques to address specific aging airframe and engine inspection problems and to evaluate and validate existing and emerging inspection systems. Advanced conventional technologies, emerging technologies, or combinations of technologies are investigated for their ability to accurately and reliably detect cracks, disbonds, corrosion, and other damage. This paper will present an overview of FAA inspection system research initiatives, but will focus primarily on the technical issues which have defined and prioritized those initiatives.

  12. Federal Aviation Administration Plan for Research, Engineering & Development, 1998.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    long-term research, and program area descriptions of air traffic services, airports technology, aircraft safety, aviation security , human factors and aviation medicine, environment and energy, and R,E&D program management.

  13. Crop scientists break down barriers at Ames meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1992-09-04

    For years, crop science has been balkanized, with specialists in rice, corn, and soy beans, for example, working on their commodities and attending their own meetings. But at the First International Crop Science Congress, held in July in Ames, Iowa-an 8-day event 3 years in the making-the discipline displayed a new found hybrid vigor. More than 1000 researchers of various persuasions, including plant molecular biology, classical plant breeding, agronomy, and soil science, representing 85 countries, shared their expertise in basic and applied studies. Here are a couple of proposals for expanding world food production and another that shows the diverse roles crops can play.

  14. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  15. Putting Theory into Theory: Thematic Value of Research in Public Administration Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Stephen; Luke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Research can be a powerful tool informing public administration teaching. This article takes the distinctive approach of exploring its use through the prism of the research itself by considering 10 publications by the article's authors. The existing literature revolves around students learning about the craft of research or research findings. By…

  16. Building capacity for the conduct of nursing research at a Veterans Administration hospital.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Cynthia H; Schumacher, Sandra; Roiland, Rachel; Royer, Heather; Roberts, Tonya

    2015-05-01

    Evidence is the bedrock of nursing practice, and nursing research is the key source for this evidence. In this article, we draw distinctions between the use and the conduct of nursing research and provide a perspective for how the conduct of nursing research in a Veterans Administration hospital can build an organization's capacity for nursing research.

  17. The role of administrative data in the big data revolution in social science research.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Roxanne; Playford, Christopher J; Gayle, Vernon; Dibben, Chris

    2016-09-01

    The term big data is currently a buzzword in social science, however its precise meaning is ambiguous. In this paper we focus on administrative data which is a distinctive form of big data. Exciting new opportunities for social science research will be afforded by new administrative data resources, but these are currently under appreciated by the research community. The central aim of this paper is to discuss the challenges associated with administrative data. We emphasise that it is critical for researchers to carefully consider how administrative data has been produced. We conclude that administrative datasets have the potential to contribute to the development of high-quality and impactful social science research, and should not be overlooked in the emerging field of big data.

  18. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  19. Results of a M = 5.3 heat transfer test of the integrated vehicle using phase-change paint techniques on the 0.0175-scale model 56-OTS in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain supersonic heat-distribution data in areas between the orbiter and external tank using phase-change paint techniques. The tests used Novamide SSV Model 56-OTS in the first and second-stage ascent configurations. Data were obtained at a nominal Mach number of 5.3 and a Reynolds number per foot of 5 x 10 to the 6th power with angles of attack of 0 deg, +/- 5 deg, and sideslip angles of 0 deg and +/- 5 deg.

  20. Research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report describes various research and technology activities at Ames Moffett and Ames Dryden. Highlights of these accomplishments indicate the Center's varied and highly productive research efforts for 1985.

  1. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to soil and water conservation, engineering operations, and methods of cultivation to provide for the... U.S.C. 5821). (32) Administer a national research program on genetic resources to provide for the collection, preservation, and dissemination of genetic material important to American food and...

  2. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to soil and water conservation, engineering operations, and methods of cultivation to provide for the... U.S.C. 5821). (32) Administer a national research program on genetic resources to provide for the collection, preservation, and dissemination of genetic material important to American food and...

  3. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to soil and water conservation, engineering operations, and methods of cultivation to provide for the... U.S.C. 5821). (32) Administer a national research program on genetic resources to provide for the collection, preservation, and dissemination of genetic material important to American food and...

  4. 7 CFR 2.65 - Administrator, Agricultural Research Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to soil and water conservation, engineering operations, and methods of cultivation to provide for the... U.S.C. 5821). (32) Administer a national research program on genetic resources to provide for the collection, preservation, and dissemination of genetic material important to American food and...

  5. Researching Change in Caribbean Education: Curriculum, Teaching and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, T. Ed.; Ezenne, A., Ed.

    The chapters of this collection deal with a number of issues and concerns at all levels of education in the Caribbean. Section 1, "Curriculum," contains: (1) "Science Education in the Caribbean: Analysis of Current Trends" (Aldrin E. Sweeney); (2) "A Decade of Research in Technology Education: Implications for Caribbean…

  6. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  7. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  8. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 3: Angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A review of optical sensors that are capable of accurate angle of attack measurements in wind tunnels was conducted. These include sensors being used or being developed at NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, Boeing Airplane Company, McDonald Aircraft Company, Arnold Engineering Development Center, National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands, National Research Council of Canada, and the Royal Aircraft Establishment of England. Some commercial sensors that may be applicable to accurate angle measurements were also reviewed. It was found that the optical sensor systems were based on interferometers, polarized light detector, linear or area photodiode cameras, position sensing photodetectors, and laser scanners. Several of the optical sensors can meet the requirements of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Two of these, the Boeing interferometer and the Complere lateral effect photodiode sensors are being developed for the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  9. Academic Librarians and Research: A Study of Canadian Library Administrator Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Jacobs, Heidi L. M.; Cornwall, Dayna

    2013-01-01

    Within the literature exploring the role of research in academic librarianship, very little attention has been paid to the perspectives of upper library administrators. This perspective is critical because library administrators play a key role in hiring, evaluating, supporting, promoting, and tenuring professional librarians. As a way of bringing…

  10. Considerations of Administrative Licensure, Provider Type, and Leadership Quality: Recommendations for Research, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackmann, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews U.S. administrative licensure regulations, focusing on type of school leader licensure, provider types, and leadership quality. Licensure obtained through university-based and alternative routes is examined. Due to limited research on alternative school administrative licensure, regulations in medicine, psychology,…

  11. Groundwater hydrology study of the Ames Chemical Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stickel, T.

    1996-05-09

    The Ames Laboratory Chemical Disposal Site is located in northwestern Ames, Iowa west of Squaw Creek. From 1957 to 1966, Ames Laboratory conducted research to develop processes to separate uranium and thorium from nuclear power fuel and to separate yttrium from neutron shielding sources. The wastes from these processes, which contained both hazardous and radiological components, were placed into nine burial pits. Metal drums, plywood boxes, and steel pails were used to store the wastes. Uranium was also burned on the ground surface of the site. Monitoring wells were placed around the waste burial pits. Groundwater testing in 1993 revealed elevated levels of Uranium 234, Uranium 238, beta and alpha radiation. The north side of the burial pit had elevated levels of volatile organic compounds. Samples in the East Ravine showed no volatile organics; however, they did contain elevated levels of radionuclides. These analytical results seem to indicate that the groundwater from the burial pit is flowing down hill and causing contamination in the East Ravine. Although there are many avenues for the contamination to spread, the focus of this project is to understand the hydrogeology of the East Ravine and to determine the path of groundwater flow down the East Ravine. The groundwater flow data along with other existing information will be used to assess the threat of chemical migration down the East Ravine and eventually off-site. The primary objectives of the project were as follows: define the geology of the East Ravine; conduct slug tests to determine the hydraulic conductivity of both oxidized and unoxidized till; develop a three-dimensional mathematical model using ModIME and MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow in the East Ravine.

  12. Strengthening Institutional Research Administration in Uganda: A Case Study on Developing Collaborations among Academic and Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakande, Nelson; Namirembe, Regina; Kaye, Dan K.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the presence of several funded research projects at academic and research institutions in sub-Saharan Africa, the quality of the pre/post grant award process in these institutions is inadequate. There is a need to strengthen research administration through infrastructural, organizational, and human resource development to match the dynamic…

  13. Comparison of Stress-Related Factors in the 2007 and 2010 Research Administrator Stress Perception Surveys (RASPerS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The 2007 Research Administrator Stress Perception Survey (RASPerS) surveyed over 600 research administrators the resadm-l listserve. The 2010 RASPerS surveyed over 1,100 research administrators. During this time, there was significant change in the research funding landscape with the end to the US National Institutes of Health budget doubling and…

  14. Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Selected achievements at the Ames-Moffett and Ames-Dryden sites of the Ames Research Center are illustrated. The challenging work that was accomplished in the past year is presented for the following areas: engineering and technical services, aerospace systems, flight operations and research, aerophysics, and space research.

  15. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  16. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  17. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  18. Comparison of Heat Flux Gages for High Enthalpy Flows - NASA Ames and IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehle, Stefan; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Herdrich, Georg; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Martinez, Edward; Raiche, George

    2016-01-01

    This article is a companion to a paper on heat flux measurements as initiated under a Space Act Agreement in 2011. The current focus of this collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) of the University of Stuttgart and NASA Ames Research Center is the comparison and refinement of diagnostic measurements. A first experimental campaign to test different heat flux gages in the NASA Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) and the Plasmawindkanaele (PWK) at IRS was established. This paper focuses on the results of the measurements conducted at IRS. The tested gages included a at face and hemispherical probe head, a 4" hemispherical slug calorimeter, a null-point calorimeter from Ames and a null-point calorimeter developed for this purpose at IRS. The Ames null-point calorimeter was unfortunately defective upon arrival. The measured heat fluxes agree fairly well with each other. The reason for discrepancies can be attributed to signal-to-noise levels and the probe geometry.

  19. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-20

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S&H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S&H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER).

  20. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-20

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER).

  1. Emerging Thought and Research on Student, Teacher, and Administrator Stress and Coping. Research on Stress and Coping in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Gordon S., Ed.; Wolverton, Mimi, Ed.; Gmelch, Walter H., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of chapters presents research focused on emerging strategies, paradigms, and theories on the sources, experiences, and consequences of stress, coping, and prevention pertaining to students, teachers and administrators. Studies analyze data collected through action research, program evaluation, surveys, qualitative interviewing,…

  2. Negative "Marking"? University Research Administrators and the Contestation of Moral Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn

    2009-01-01

    With the exception of academics, occupational groups within universities remain relatively under-researched. Based upon qualitative interviews with 27 research administrators in 19 UK universities, this article reports on a small-scale qualitative project to investigate the workday worlds of these "boundary-crossing" and…

  3. Methodological Notes on Quantification, Productivity, and Groups in Administrative Research. Discussion Paper No. 110.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, David K.; Prewitt, Kenneth

    This essay presents some of the possibilities for doing systematic quantitative research in the field of African public administration and reviews some of the methodological problems involved. The authors argue that quantitative research is especially desirable because of the gains to be achieved in precision, reliability, comparability, and new…

  4. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Ames Laboratory conducts fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, and mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the vision of DOE and, more specifically, to increase the general levels of knowledge and technical capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for the future, both academia and industry, and to develop new technologies and practical applications from our basic scientific programs that will contribute to a strengthening of the US economy. The Laboratory approaches all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. The Laboratory relies upon its strengths in materials synthesis and processing, materials reliability, chemical analysis, chemical sciences, photosynthesis, materials sciences, metallurgy, high-temperature superconductivity, and applied mathematical sciences to conduct the long term basic and intermediate range applied research needed to solve the complex problems encountered in energy production, and utilization as well as environmental restoration and waste management. Ames Laboratory will continue to maintain a very significant and highly beneficial pre-college math and science education program which currently serves both teachers and students at the middle school and high school levels. Our technology transfer program is aided by joint efforts with ISU`s technology development and commercialization enterprise and will sustain concerted efforts to implement Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, industrially sponsored Work for Others projects. and scientific personnel exchanges with our various customers.

  5. Educational Administration and Its Relations with Planning and Research. The Fundamentals of Educational Planning: Lecture-Discussion Series No. 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malpica, Carlos N.

    The author's discussion of the relationship of educational administration to educational planning and research begins by considering the development of administrative theory in general and reviewing the functional, institutional, and social approaches to analyzing educational administration. He briefly describes educational administration in the…

  6. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Administration of FHWA Planning and Research Funds § 420.121 What other requirements apply to the administration... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds? 420.121 Section 420.121 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  7. Advice for Gaining Upper Administration Support for Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenhower, Donald

    2015-10-01

    This talk has its beginnings in questions asked after my invited talk for the 2015 APS Prize for Outstanding Research at an Undergraduate Institution at the April APS Meeting. A common question was how to gain support from one's university's administration to start an undergraduate research program. As my talk was addressing work done during 28 years at a university that had a long history of undergraduate research, I was not prepared to answer the question. It is easy to point out what one must do to obtain funding, even if actually obtaining the funding is difficult. Many other aspects of choosing appropriate research projects, collaborations, and such can also be relatively easy to do. Answers and advice in how to get upper level university administrators to notice and help you start a research program is not as easy or obvious, but is what this talk will address. It will be based on the premiss that one is at a university that is centered on providing high quality undergraduate education. Thus you have the job of showing your administration that having students working on a research program under you will help provide the highest level of education possible. Experience over many years of interactions at ACU will be drawn on for the advice provided. Research supported in part by Grants from the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  8. Alternative model for administration and analysis of research-based assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption of these assessments within the broader community of physics instructors. Within this historical model, assessment developers create high quality, validated assessments, make them available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors in order to more explicitly support adoption of research-based assessments. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof of concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges that we encountered while developing, maintaining, and automating this system. Ultimately, we argue that centralized administration and data collection for standardized assessments is a viable and potentially advantageous alternative to the default model characterized by decentralized administration and analysis. Moreover, with the help of online administration and automation, this model can support the long-term sustainability of centralized assessment systems.

  9. Joseph Ames's "Typographical Antiquities" and the Antiquarian Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiner, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    One of the most famous historical documents of English printing is Joseph Ames's "Typographical Antiquities," published in London in 1749. Although Ames referred to his work as a history of printing, the bulk of it is a list of the first printers in England and their works through 1600, with very full bibliographical descriptions for…

  10. Leveraging object-oriented development at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenneson, Greg; Connell, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned by the Software Engineering Process Group (SEPG) from results of supporting two projects at NASA Ames using an Object Oriented Rapid Prototyping (OORP) approach supported by a full featured visual development environment. Supplemental lessons learned from a large project in progress and a requirements definition are also incorporated. The paper demonstrates how productivity gains can be made by leveraging the developer with a rich development environment, correct and early requirements definition using rapid prototyping, and earlier and better effort estimation and software sizing through object-oriented methods and metrics. Although the individual elements of OO methods, RP approach and OO metrics had been used on other separate projects, the reported projects were the first integrated usage supported by a rich development environment. Overall the approach used was twice as productive (measured by hours per OO Unit) as a C++ development.

  11. Teachers' and School Administrators' Perspectives and Use of Standardized Achievement Tests: A Review of Published Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etsey, Y. Kafui

    Stakeholders and practitioners are concerned about the extent to which standardized achievement tests are meeting the general and specific purposes they were designed to achieve. Several empirical studies have been conducted to this end. This study reviews this research to determine current trends in teachers' and school administrators'…

  12. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  13. Action Research as a Professional Development Tool for Teachers and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Christine; Tovar, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    Many teachers and administrators would acknowledge there are areas of concern in their classrooms and schools. Whether termed "problems," "issues," "challenges," or, as Nunan (1994) put it "puzzles," they provide committed professionals with an opportunity to improve the status quo. Action research is one…

  14. Mapping the Field of Educational Administration Research: A Journal Citation Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yinying; Bowers, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to uncover how knowledge is exchanged and disseminated in the educational administration research literature through the journal citation network. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Drawing upon social network theory and citation network studies in other disciplines, the authors constructed an educational…

  15. Chaos Theory: A Scientific Basis for Alternative Research Methods in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    This paper has three purposes. First, it places in scientific perspective the growing acceptance in educational administration research of alternative methods to empiricism by an explication of chaos theory and its assumptions. Second, it demonstrates that chaos theory provides a scientific basis for investigation of complex qualitative variables…

  16. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Effectiveness among Sponsored Research Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ventez Derrell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of emotional intelligence, as perceived by senior level university sponsored research administration professionals and their perceived leadership effectiveness, as measured by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory and the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) for Self.…

  17. The Family Support System: Comparative Analysis of Research Projects Funded by the Administration on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Andrew

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of eight research projects funded by the Administration on Aging during the 1970s which focused on the family as caregivers and support systems for elderly relatives. A brief description is provided for each project analyzed in this report as well as highlights of major findings, including that the family…

  18. The Role of Institutional Research in Data Administration and Management. AIR 1986 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Richard L.; And Others

    New roles for college institutional researchers in the area of data administration and management that have resulted from developments in computer technology are reviewed. These developments include easily accessed databases, user-friendly software, and powerful and inexpensive hardware. The growing demand for data, combined with a general lack of…

  19. 42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions. 93.404 Section 93.404 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  20. 42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions. 93.404 Section 93.404 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  1. 42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions. 93.404 Section 93.404 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  2. The Incidence and Types of Occupational Role Stress among University Research Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsapis, Christine C. A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the types of stressors prevalent in the self-reports of university research administrators (URAs) and examined whether or not the degree or type of role stress was influenced by: a) the affiliation of their office unit within their institution, or b) their type. Randomly selected members of NCURA were invited via e-mail to…

  3. The Research Administrator's Responsibility for Buying from Minority-Owned Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Lyle E.

    1979-01-01

    The author, the president of Amoco Venture Capital Company, a subsidiary of Standard Oil Company of Indiana designed to promote minority purchasing and finance minority enterprise, describes his program and the national program to promote minority enterprise. Ways that research administrators can develop minority sources for laboratory needs are…

  4. Assessing Grant Capacity and Readiness: A Systematic Review of the Periodical Literature of Research Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preuss, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The author knew of no formalized system for appraising grant capacity and readiness so, in an effort to understand the current state of knowledge regarding assessment of these institutional factors, conducted a systematic review of the research administration literature. Every article published from 1982 through 2013 by five major journals in the…

  5. Factors Affecting the Identification of Research Problems in Educational Administration Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçin, Mikail; Bektas, Fatih; Öztekin, Özge; Karadag, Engin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the factors that affect the identification of research problems in educational administration studies. The study was designed using the case study method. Criterion sampling was used to determine the work group; the criterion used to select the participants was that of having a study in the field of…

  6. Automatic speech recognition research at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coler, Clayton R.; Plummer, Robert P.; Huff, Edward M.; Hitchcock, Myron H.

    1977-01-01

    A trainable acoustic pattern recognizer manufactured by Scope Electronics is presented. The voice command system VCS encodes speech by sampling 16 bandpass filters with center frequencies in the range from 200 to 5000 Hz. Variations in speaking rate are compensated for by a compression algorithm that subdivides each utterance into eight subintervals in such a way that the amount of spectral change within each subinterval is the same. The recorded filter values within each subinterval are then reduced to a 15-bit representation, giving a 120-bit encoding for each utterance. The VCS incorporates a simple recognition algorithm that utilizes five training samples of each word in a vocabulary of up to 24 words. The recognition rate of approximately 85 percent correct for untrained speakers and 94 percent correct for trained speakers was not considered adequate for flight systems use. Therefore, the built-in recognition algorithm was disabled, and the VCS was modified to transmit 120-bit encodings to an external computer for recognition.

  7. 3rd Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    The Space Science and Astrobiology Division at NASA Ames Research Center consists of over 50 civil servants and more than 110 contractors, co-­-ops, post-­-docs and associates. Researchers in the division are pursuing investigations in a variety of fields including exoplanets, planetary science, astrobiology and astrophysics. In addition, division personnel support a wide variety of NASA missions including (but not limited to) Kepler, SOFIA, LADEE, JWST, and New Horizons. With such a wide variety of interesting research going on, distributed among three branches in at least 5 different buildings, it can be difficult to stay abreast of what one's fellow researchers are doing. Our goal in organizing this symposium is to facilitate communication and collaboration among the scientists within the division, and to give center management and other ARC researchers and engineers an opportunity to see what scientific research and science mission work is being done in the division. We are also continuing the tradition within the Space Science and Astrobiology Division to honor one senior and one early career scientist with the Pollack Lecture and the Early Career Lecture, respectively. With the Pollack Lecture, our intent is to select a senior researcher who has made significant contributions to any area of research within the space sciences, and we are pleased to honor Dr. William Borucki this year. With the Early Career Lecture, our intent is to select a young researcher within the division who, by their published scientific papers, shows great promise for the future in any area of space science research, and we are pleased to honor Dr. Melinda Kahre this year

  8. Building research administration applications for the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Guard, J Roger; Brueggemann, Ralph F; Highsmith, Robert F; Marine, Stephen A; Riep, Josette R; Schick, Leslie C

    2005-11-01

    The academic health center information environment is saturated with information of varying quality and overwhelming quantity. The most significant challenge is transforming data and information into knowledge. The University of Cincinnati Medical Center's (UCMC) focus is to develop an information architecture comprising data structures, Web services, and user interfaces that enable individuals to manage the information overload so that they can create new knowledge. UCMC has accomplished much of what is reported in this article with the help of a four-year Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) operation grant awarded by the National Library of Medicine in 2003. In the UCMC vision for knowledge management, individuals have reliable, secure access to information that is filtered, organized, and highly relevant for specific tasks and personal needs. Current applications and tool sets will evolve to become the next generation knowledge management applications or smart digital services. When smart digital services are implemented, silo applications will disappear. A major focus of UCMC's IAIMS grant is research administration. Testing and building out existing and new research administration applications and digital services is underway. The authors review UCMC's progress and results in developing a software architecture, tools, and services for research administration. Included are sections on the evolution to full integration, the impact of the work at UCMC to date, lessons learned during this research and development process, and future plans and needs.

  9. What Research Administrators Need to Know about Researcher Development: Towards a New Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Located within the recently emerged field of researcher development, this article represents an attempt to make a key theoretical contribution to its knowledge base through a conceptual analysis. It presents as propositional knowledge an original theoretical model of the componential structure of researcher development, as interpreted and defined…

  10. Filter extraction and Ames bioassay results for EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) particulate samples. Final report September 1983-May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Warner-Selph, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    This report describes filter extractions and Ames bioassay of filter extracts performed for the Emission Control Technology Division of Environmental Protection Agency. Eight sets of particulate-loaded filters were provided to SwRI by the sponsor. The filters were soxhlet-extracted in methylene chloride, and the extracts were dried and weighed. The organic extracts were analyzed using the Ames bioassay at Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR), formerly Southwest Foundation for Research and Education. The data were analyzed using linear and non-linear regression methods.

  11. Ames life science telescience testbed evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Johnson, Vicki; Vogelsong, Kristofer H.; Froloff, Walt

    1989-01-01

    Eight surrogate spaceflight mission specialists participated in a real-time evaluation of remote coaching using the Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed facility. This facility consisted of three remotely located nodes: (1) a prototype Space Station glovebox; (2) a ground control station; and (3) a principal investigator's (PI) work area. The major objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of telescience techniques and hardware to support three realistic remote coaching science procedures: plant seed germinator charging, plant sample acquisition and preservation, and remote plant observation with ground coaching. Each scenario was performed by a subject acting as flight mission specialist, interacting with a payload operations manager and a principal investigator expert. All three groups were physically isolated from each other yet linked by duplex audio and color video communication channels and networked computer workstations. Workload ratings were made by the flight and ground crewpersons immediately after completing their assigned tasks. Time to complete each scientific procedural step was recorded automatically. Two expert observers also made performance ratings and various error assessments. The results are presented and discussed.

  12. Conducting research using the electronic health record across multi-hospital systems: semantic harmonization implications for administrators.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Kathryn H; Potashnik, Sheryl; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Rosenberg, Melissa; Shih, Nai-Wei; Topaz, Maxim; Holmes, John H; Naylor, Mary D

    2013-06-01

    Administrators play a major role in choosing and managing the use of the electronic health record (EHR). The documentation policies and EHR changes enacted or approved by administrators affect the ability to use clinical data for research. This article illustrates the challenges that can be avoided through awareness of the consequences of customization, variations in documentation policies and quality, and user interface features. Solutions are posed that assist administrators in avoiding these challenges and promoting data harmonization for research and quality improvement.

  13. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  14. The Ames two-dimensional stratosphere-mesospheric model. [chemistry and transport of SST pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Watson, V. R.; Capone, L. A.; Maples, A. L.; Riegel, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of the stratosphere and mesosphere has recently been developed at Ames Research Center. The model contains chemistry based on 18 species that are solved for at each step and a seasonally-varying transport model based on both winds and eddy transport. The model is described and a preliminary assessment of the impact of supersonic aircraft flights on the ozone layer is given.

  15. Improving response rates and evaluating nonresponse bias in surveys: AMEE Guide No. 102.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew W; Reddy, Shalini; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Robust response rates are essential for effective survey-based strategies. Researchers can improve survey validity by addressing both response rates and nonresponse bias. In this AMEE Guide, we explain response rate calculations and discuss methods for improving response rates to surveys as a whole (unit nonresponse) and to questions within a survey (item nonresponse). Finally, we introduce the concept of nonresponse bias and provide simple methods to measure it.

  16. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. (a) When the ORI makes a finding of research misconduct or seeks to impose or enforce HHS administrative actions, other than debarment or... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of...

  17. Research Administration in History: The Development of OMB Circular A-110 through Joseph Warner's COGR Subcommittee, 1976-1979

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Phillip E.; Smith, Marie F.

    2008-01-01

    Research administrators can be assisted in resolving issues with awareness of the critical period of policy formation divulged in the Joseph Warner Papers. He and his colleagues on the Subcommittee on Grants and Contracts Provisions of COGR adopted the philosophy that research administrators needed flexibility and reduced paperwork and costs.…

  18. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  19. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Zhang, Song

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  20. Site environmental report for Ames Laboratory, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, L.K.

    1990-05-01

    This report contains brief information concerning the environment and environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory. Discharges of liquid wastes, radioactive effluents and soil contamination are described. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (CBS)

  1. 2. David Ames, Photographer, October 1982 VIEW EAST SHOWING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. David Ames, Photographer, October 1982 VIEW EAST SHOWING WEST (FRONT) ELEVATION - Jacob Dingee House, 105 East Seventh Street (moved to 500 Block North Market Street), Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  2. Ames Laboratory integrated safety management self-assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The implementation of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) at Ames Laboratory began with the signing of the ISM Implementation Charter on February 24, 1997 (see Appendix A). The first step toward implementation of ISM at Ames Laboratory is the performance of a Self-Assessment (SA). In preparation for the SA, a workshop on ISM was provided to the Laboratory`s Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Coordinators, Safety Review Committee members, and the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH&A) staff. In addition, a briefing was given to the Laboratory`s Executive Council and Program Directors. Next, an SA Team was organized. The Team was composed of four Ames Laboratory and four Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office (DOE-CH) staff members. The purpose of this SA was to determine the current status of ES&H management within Ames Laboratory, as well as to identify areas which need to be improved during ISM implementation. The SA was conducted by reviewing documents, interviewing Ames Laboratory management and staff, and performing walkthroughs of Laboratory areas. At the conclusion of this SA, Ames Laboratory management was briefed on the strengths, weaknesses, and the areas of improvement which will assist in the implementation of ISM.

  3. The Ames MER Microscopic Imager Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Randy; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, Clayton; Sims, Michael; Herkenhoff, Ken

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, have spent several successful months on Mars, returning gigabytes of images and spectral data to scientists on Earth. One of the instruments on the MER rovers, the Athena Microscopic Imager (MI), is a fixed focus, megapixel camera providing a plus or minus mm depth of field and a 3lx31mm field of view at a working distance of 63 mm from the lens to the object being imaged. In order to maximize the science return from this instrument, we developed the Ames MI Toolkit and supported its use during the primary mission. The MI Toolkit is a set of programs that operate on collections of MI images, with the goal of making the data more understandable to the scientists on the ground. Because of the limited depth of field of the camera, and the often highly variable topography of the terrain being imaged, MI images of a given rock are often taken as a stack, with the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) moving along a computed normal vector, pausing every few millimeters for the MI to acquire an image. The MI Toolkit provides image registration and focal section merging, which combine these images to form a single, maximally in-focus image, while compensating for changes in lighting as well as parallax due to the motion of the camera. The MI Toolkit also provides a 3-D reconstruction of the surface being imaged using stereo and can embed 2-D MI images as texture maps into 3-D meshes produced by other imagers on board the rover to provide context. The 2-D images and 3-D meshes output from the Toolkit are easily viewed by scientists using other mission tools, such as Viz or the MI Browser. This paper describes the MI Toolkit in detail, as well as our experience using it with scientists at JPL during the primary MER mission.

  4. The Ames MER microscopic imager toolkit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, R.; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, C.; Sims, M.; Herkenhoff, K.

    2005-01-01

    12The Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, have spent several successful months on Mars, returning gigabytes of images and spectral data to scientists on Earth. One of the instruments on the MER rovers, the Athena Microscopic Imager (MI), is a fixed focus, megapixel camera providing a ??3mm depth of field and a 31??31mm field of view at a working distance of 63 mm from the lens to the object being imaged. In order to maximize the science return from this instrument, we developed the Ames MI Toolkit and supported its use during the primary mission. The MI Toolkit is a set of programs that operate on collections of MI images, with the goal of making the data more understandable to the scientists on the ground. Because of the limited depth of field of the camera, and the often highly variable topography of the terrain being imaged, MI images of a given rock are often taken as a stack, with the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) moving along a computed normal vector, pausing every few millimeters for the MI to acquire an image. The MI Toolkit provides image registration and focal section merging, which combine these images to form a single, maximally in-focus image, while compensating for changes in lighting as well as parallax due to the motion of the camera. The MI Toolkit also provides a 3-D reconstruction of the surface being imaged using stereo and can embed 2-D MI images as texture maps into 3-D meshes produced by other imagers on board the rover to provide context. The 2-D images and 3-D meshes output from the Toolkit are easily viewed by scientists using other mission tools, such as Viz or the MI Browser.This paper describes the MI Toolkit in detail, as well as our experience using it with scientists at JPL during the primary MER mission. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  5. Use of Pooled State Administrative Data for Mental Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Essock, Susan; Morrissey, Joseph; Libby, Anne; Donahue, Sheila; Druss, Benjamin; Finnerty, Molly; Frisman, Linda; Narasimhan, Meera; Stein, Bradley D; Wisdom, Jennifer; Zerzan, Judy

    2016-01-01

    State systems are a rich, albeit challenging, laboratory for policy-relevant services research studies. State mental health authorities routinely devote resources to collect data for state planning and reporting purposes. However, these data are rarely used in cross-state comparisons to inform state or federal policy development. In 2008, in response to key recommendations from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Advisory Council's "The Road Ahead: Research Partnership to Transform Services," (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/advisory-boards-and-groups/namhc/reports/road-ahead.pdf), NIMH issued a request for applications (RFA) to support studies on the impact of state policy changes on access, cost, quality and outcomes of care for individuals with mental disorders. The purpose of the RFA was to bridge the divide between research and policy by encouraging research that used state administrative data across states, and to address significant state-defined health policy initiatives. Five projects involving eight states were selected through peer review for funding. Projects began in 2009 and were funded for 3 years. This report provides a brief description of the five projects, followed by an analysis of the impact, challenges, and lessons learned from these policy-partnered studies. We conclude by offering suggestions on ways to use state administrative data for informing state health policies, which is especially timely given national and state changes in the structure and financing of healthcare.

  6. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  7. Impact of new Food and Drug Administration regulations on college, university, and experiment station researchers.

    PubMed

    Willett, L B

    1981-09-01

    The Good Laboratory Practice regulations adopted by the Food and Drug Administration describe specific procedures to assure the integrity of the research results. Those studies conducted with the intent to provide data on the safety of drugs and chemicals will be required to comply with the published relations. The process of bringing research laboratories into compliance with the regulations may be either arduous or fairly routine depending on the organization, goals, and type of research. Typically, the Good Laboratory Practice regulations will increase sharply the cost of health safety information. Hiring more and better trained technical and professional personnel will be much of this expense. If university and experiment station researchers choose to avoid compliance with these regulations, then agricultural research science may not continue to be recognized as an authority on the safety of products used for production of human food. Irrespective of whether universities choose to conduct regulated research or delegate this role to other segments of society, academic institutions must assume the role of training those individuals needed to conduct toxicity research.

  8. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tier, for experimental, developmental or research work: “The subgrantee or contractor will retain all... FHWA planning and research funds? 420.121 Section 420.121 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM...

  9. Fifteen Years of Laboratory Astrophysics at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Salama, F.; Hudgins, D. M.; Bernstein, M.; Goorvitch, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    of the Ames Program will be given. We have been involved in identifying 9 out of the 14 interstellar pre-cometary ice species known, determined their abundances and the physical nature of the ice structure. Details on our ice work are given in the paper by Sandford et al. Our group is among the pioneers of the PAH model. We built the theoretical framework, participated in the observations and developed the experimental techniques needed to test the model. We demonstrated that the ubiquitous infrared emission spectrum associated with many interstellar objects can be matched by laboratory spectra of neutral and positively charged PAHs and that PAHs were excellent candidates for the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers. See Salama et al. and Hudgins et al.

  10. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance.

  11. Growth Hormone Alters the Glutathione S-Transferase and Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Systems in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH’s actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. PMID:24285747

  12. The use of research questionnaires with hearing impaired adults: online vs. paper-and-pencil administration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When evaluating hearing rehabilitation, it is reasonable to use self-report questionnaires as outcome measure. Questionnaires used in audiological research are developed and validated for the paper-and-pencil format. As computer and Internet use is increasing, standardized questionnaires used in the audiological context should be evaluated to determine the viability of the online administration format. The aim of this study was to compare administration of questionnaires online versus paper- and pencil of four standardised questionnaires used in hearing research and clinic. We included the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA), Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Methods A cross-over design was used by randomly letting the participants complete the questionnaires either online or on paper. After 3 weeks the participants filled out the same questionnaires again but in the other format. A total of 65 hearing-aid users were recruited from a hearing clinic to participate on a voluntary basis and of these 53 completed both versions of the questionnaires. Results A significant main effect of format was found on the HHIE (p < 0.001), with participants reporting higher scores on the online format than in the paper format. There was no interaction effect. For the other questionnaires were no significant main or interaction effects of format. Significant correlations between the two ways of presenting the measures was found for all questionnaires (p<0.05). The results from reliability tests showed Cronbachs α’s above .70 for all four questionnaires and differences in Cronbachs α between administration formats were negligible. Conclusions For three of the four included questionnaires the participants’ scores remained consistent across administrations and formats. For the fourth included questionnaire (HHIE) a

  13. Internet administration of paper-and-pencil questionnaires used in couple research: assessing psychometric equivalence.

    PubMed

    Brock, Rebecca L; Barry, Robin A; Lawrence, Erika; Dey, Jodi; Rolffs, Jaci

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the psychometric equivalence of paper-and-pencil and Internet formats of key questionnaires used in couple research. Self-report questionnaires assessing interpersonal constructs (relationship satisfaction, communication/conflict management, partner support, emotional intimacy) and intrapersonal constructs (individual traits, psychological symptoms, contextual influences) were administered to young adults in committed dating relationships. The same measures were administered twice via paper-and-pencil and/or Internet methods over a 2-week period. Method order was counterbalanced among participants, and temporal stability was controlled. Intrapersonal and interpersonal measures generally remained reliable when administered online and demonstrated quantitative and qualitative equivalence across methods. The implications of online administration of questionnaires are discussed, and specific recommendations are made for researchers who wish to transition to online data collection.

  14. With Agriculture Knowledge and Wisdom (Me Ka Ike Ame Ka Na'auao). Proceedings of the Annual Western Region Agricultural Education Research Meeting (Honolulu, Hawaii, April 13-16, 1994). Volume XIII, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, David E., Ed.; Walton, Frank C., Ed.

    This proceedings includes the following papers: "Examining Learning Styles of Students in College of Agriculture" (Torres, Cano); "Developing a Scale to Research and Evaluate Youth Leadership Life Skills Development" (Seevers, Dormody, Clason); "Predicting Youth Leadership Life Skills Development among FFA (Future Farmers…

  15. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  16. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  17. Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

    The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

  18. Educational Research within the Administration: A Booming Business in the French-Speaking Part of Switzerland (1950-1980)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothen, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the formation and development of educational research institutions within the educational administration using the example of four research institutions in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. The analysis gives insight into the institutionalisation process of education research outside the university with special focus on…

  19. Ames test results on shot-tank residues

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, G.H.

    1990-09-21

    In August 1987, a routine Ames test on soot from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 4-in. gun showed that the soot was mutagenic to Salmonella bacteria. Subsequent liquid chromatography on the soot showed that, out of hundreds of ultravoilet-absorbing compounds found in the residue, only three or four were mutagenic. When a sample large enough to weigh was collected, it was found that No environmentally identified complex mixture has ever been reported with as much Ames/Salmonella activity per gram as the gun residues.'' Since then, Ames tests of hundreds of samples have verified that the residues from our gun tanks may be hazardous to health. The actual degree of the hazard and the identity of the offending chemicals are still unknown. 2 refs.

  20. Criminal liability research in vaccine administration by public health nurse: a case study of the Nantou vaccine administration case.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jui-Chu; Wang, Triumph

    2008-03-01

    Immunization is recognized as a powerful public health tool in disease control and eradication. Registered nurses (RNs) are the principal health professionals responsible for administering vaccines, not only in terms of childhood immunization but also increasingly in administering travel vaccines and annual influenza vaccinations. The RN often provides leadership in developing and maintaining a high quality program. The legal position of nurses when administering a vaccine conflicts with their role as care providers, and nurses must be aware of their legal position when administering a vaccine that has not been individually prescribed by a doctor. A recent case involving a baby who died after receiving a vaccine administered by a public health nurse without a doctor's prescription resulted in the prosecutor initiating a prosecution against the nurse and chief of Health Bureau for a violation of Article 28 of the Physician's Act and the criminal law. Although the nurse and Bureau Chief were judged not guilty, the first trial court pointed out that the behavior of this nurse still violated Article 28. This reflects the conflict that exists between empirical practice and legal regulations. In order to guarantee that prophylactic inoculation is implemented properly under legitimate and effective conditions (specially in remote districts), in May 23, 2006, Legislative Yuan passed an amendment to Article 4 of the Communicable Disease Control Act, which specified that no public health nurse can be prosecuted for violations of Article 28 of the Physician's Act as a result of vaccine administration. In the future, nurses in clinics located in remote districts may conduct prophylactic inoculation work without fear of the terms of Article 28 and focus on implementing public prophylactic inoculation responsibilities. However, a public health nurse can still be liable for the malpractice in criminal law during the vaccination. Therefore, following procedure is still necessary

  1. Conducting Research Using the Electronic Health Record Across Multi-Hospital Systems: Semantic Harmonization Implications for Administrators

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Kathryn H.; Potashnik, Sheryl; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Rosenberg, Melissa; Shih, Nai-Wei; Topaz, Maxim; Holmes, John H.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    Administrators play a major role in choosing and managing the use of the electronic health record (EHR). The documentation policies and EHR changes enacted or approved by administrators affect the ability to use clinical data for research. This article illustrates the challenges that can be avoided through awareness of the consequences of customization, variations in documentation policies and quality, and user interface features. Solutions are posed that assist administrators in avoiding these challenges and promoting data harmonization for research and quality improvement. PMID:23708504

  2. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    PubMed

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data.

  3. A Health Services Research Agenda for Bariatric Surgery Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Funk, L M; Gunnar, W; Dominitz, J A; Eisenberg, D; Frayne, S; Maggard-Gibbons, M; Kalarchian, M A; Livingston, E; Sanchez, V; Smith, B R; Weidenbacher, H; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    In 2016, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) held a Weight Management State of the Art conference to identify evidence gaps and develop a research agenda for population-based weight management for veterans. Included were behavioral, pharmacologic, and bariatric surgery workgroups. This article summarizes the bariatric surgery workgroup (BSWG) findings and recommendations for future research. The BSWG agreed that there is evidence from randomized trials and large observational studies suggesting that bariatric surgery is superior to medical therapy for short- and intermediate-term remission of type 2 diabetes, long-term weight loss, and long-term survival. Priority evidence gaps include long-term comorbidity remission, mental health, substance abuse, and health care costs. Evidence of the role of endoscopic weight loss options is also lacking. The BSWG also noted the limited evidence regarding optimal timing for bariatric surgery referral, barriers to bariatric surgery itself, and management of high-risk bariatric surgery patients. Clinical trials of pre- and post-surgery interventions may help to optimize patient outcomes. A registry of overweight and obese veterans and a workforce assessment to determine the VHA's capacity to increase bariatric surgery access were recommended. These will help inform policy modifications and focus the research agenda to improve the ability of the VHA to deliver population-based weight management.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation Synthetic Aperture Radar Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Dubayah, R.; Hager, B. H.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation are planning a synthetic aperture radar (currently named NISAR) mission for launch in 2020. The mission is a dual L- and S-band polarimetric SAR satellite with a 12-day interferometric orbit and 240 km wide ground swath. The 3-year mission will have a circular sun synchronous orbit (6 am and 6 pm) with a 98° inclination and 747 km altitude that will provide systematic global coverage. Its primary science objectives are to: measure solid Earth surface deformation (earthquakes, volcanic unrest, land subsidence/uplift, landslides); track and understand cryosphere dynamics (glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, and permafrost); characterize and track changes in vegetation structure and wetlands for understanding ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle; and support global disaster response. We will describe the current mission concept: the satellite design/capabilities, spacecraft, launch vehicle, and data flow.

  5. An Examination of the Role and Career Paths of Chief Research Administrators in Selected Major Research Universities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Chief Research Administrator (CRA), also known as the Vice President, Vice Provost, or Vice Chancellor for Research, plays a key role in the research university. It is a position of power and not only affects the mission of the institution, but also controls a very large and vital percentage of external funding. The lack of information on how…

  6. Flight Test 4 Preliminary Results: NASA Ames SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Doug; Gong, Chester; Reardon, Scott; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements as well as the safety substantiation and end-to-end assessment of DAA system performance. The Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Project conducted flight test program, referred to as Flight Test 4, at Armstrong Flight Research Center from April -June 2016. Part of the test flights were dedicated to the NASA Ames-developed Detect and Avoid (DAA) System referred to as JADEM (Java Architecture for DAA Extensibility and Modeling). The encounter scenarios, which involved NASA's Ikhana UAS and a manned intruder aircraft, were designed to collect data on DAA system performance in real-world conditions and uncertainties with four different surveillance sensor systems. Flight test 4 has four objectives: (1) validate DAA requirements in stressing cases that drive MOPS requirements, including: high-speed cooperative intruder, low-speed non-cooperative intruder, high vertical closure rate encounter, and Mode CS-only intruder (i.e. without ADS-B), (2) validate TCASDAA alerting and guidance interoperability concept in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors and in multiple-intruder encounters against both cooperative and non-cooperative intruders, (3) validate Well Clear Recovery guidance in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors, and (4) validate DAA alerting and guidance requirements in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors. The results will be

  7. Research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Moffett and Ames Dryden are described. Highlights of these accomplishments indicate the Center's varied and highly productive research efforts for 1984. The research is divided into three subject areas, which are: Aeronautics, Life Science and Space Science and Applications.

  8. Educational Sociology and Educational Administration: Problems with Paradigms, Epistemology, Research and Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrell, Michael M.; Macpherson, R. J. S.

    1995-01-01

    Traces the different paradigmatic pathways followed by educational sociology and educational administration. Educational sociology has followed ideostructural, interpretive, and psychosocial paradigms, with emergent holistic critical perspectives and sociobiological materialism. Educational administration has had one dominant tradition,…

  9. Report: Office of Research and Development Needs to Improve Its Method of Measuring Administrative Savings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-P-0333, July 14, 2011. ORD’s efforts to reduce its administrative costs are noteworthy, but ORD needs to improve its measurement mechanism for assessing the effectiveness of its initiatives to reduce administrative costs.

  10. Comparison Between Field Data and NASA Ames Wind Tunnel Data

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this analysis is to compare the measured data from the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment to those collected in the field at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) with the same turbine configuration. The results of this analysis provide insight into what measurements can be made in the field as opposed to wind tunnel testing.

  11. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1995. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

  12. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  13. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  14. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  15. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  16. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  17. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... misconduct and HHS administrative actions. 93.405 Section 93.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.405 Notifying the respondent...

  18. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.405 Notifying the respondent of... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. 93.405 Section 93.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...

  19. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.405 Notifying the respondent of... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. 93.405 Section 93.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...

  20. 42 CFR 93.405 - Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.405 Notifying the respondent of... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notifying the respondent of findings of research misconduct and HHS administrative actions. 93.405 Section 93.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH...

  1. Research Management and Administration: A Reflection of Where We Are and Where We Need to Go as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on research management and administration (RMA) as a profession. RMA arose from the need to manage growth in the number and complexity of research awards over the last fifty years, and is an activity and profession that continues to mature. It has grown in parallel with the increasing complexity of research…

  2. Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla Aircraft Industry, England (center right) at the NAS Facility Cray 2 computer with Ron Deiss, NAS Deputy Manager (L) and Vic Peterson, Ames Deputy Director (R).

  3. Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight Central simulator tower L-R: Dr Geoffrey Briggs; Jen Jasper (seated); Dr Jan Akins and Mr. Tony Gross, Ames

  4. Transverse vorticity measurements in the NASA Ames 80 x 120 wind tunnel boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, John F.; Bhol, D. G.; Bramkamp, F. D.; Klewicki, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    The MSU compact four-wire transverse vorticity probe permits omega(sub z)(t) measurements in a nominally 1 sq mm domain. Note that a conventional coordinate system is used with x and y in the streamwise and normal directions respectively. The purpose of this investigation was to acquire time series data in the same access port at the ceiling of the 80 ft x 120 ft wind tunnel (NASA Ames Research Center) as earlier used by the Wallace group from the University of Maryland and to compare the present results with those of the three-component vorticity probe used in that earlier study.

  5. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  6. 76 FR 22900 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Ames Laboratory in Ames...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. The initial proposed definition for the class being evaluated, subject to revision as warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Ames.... Period of Employment: January 1, 1942 through December 31, 1970. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  7. Mechanical design of NASA Ames Research Center vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbert, D. F.; Bakke, A. P.; Chargin, M. K.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    NASA has designed and is constructing a new flight simulator with large vertical travel. Several aspects of the mechanical design of this Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) are discussed, including the multiple rack and pinion vertical drive, a pneumatic equilibration system, and the friction-damped rigid link catenaries used as cable supports.

  8. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    existence began as many as 5,000 years ago, but the first major breakthrough stemmed from the devel- opment of the arithmetic machine in 1642 by Blaise ... Pascal . The machine contained eight wheels having the numbers zero through nine printed on them. These wheels were attached in such a way that dialing

  9. Fisher Ames and Political Judgment: Reason, Passion, and Vehement Style in the Jay Treaty Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes Fisher Ames' fiery speech of 1796 on the Jay Treaty. Demonstrates the influence of Scottish enlightenment thinkers (particularly in moral sense philosophy and faculty psychology) on Ames and his rhetoric. Demonstrates how Ames made a compelling case to shift the standard of political judgment from reason to passion. (SR)

  10. 1991 research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts for 1991.

  11. Research and Technology, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These accomplishments exemplify the Center's varied and highly productive research efforts for 1989.

  12. Research and technology, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts for 1992.

  13. Recommendations for the standardisation of oxytocin nasal administration and guidelines for its reporting in human research.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Hickie, Ian B; McGuinness, Margaret M; Otis, Melissa; Woods, Elizabeth A; Disinger, Hannah M; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chen, Timothy F; Banati, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    A series of studies have reported on the salubrious effects of oxytocin nasal spray on social cognition and behavior in humans, across physiology (e.g., eye gaze, heart rate variability), social cognition (e.g., attention, memory, and appraisal), and behavior (e.g., trust, generosity). Findings suggest the potential of oxytocin nasal spray as a treatment for various psychopathologies, including autism and schizophrenia. There are, however, increasing reports of variability of response to oxytocin nasal spray between experiments and individuals. In this review, we provide a summary of factors that influence transmucosal nasal drug delivery, deposition, and their impact on bioavailability. These include variations in anatomy and resultant airflow dynamic, vascularisation, status of blood vessels, mode of spray application, gallenic formulation (including presence of uptake enhancers, control release formulation), and amount and method of administration. These key variables are generally poorly described and controlled in scientific reports, in spite of their potential to alter the course of treatment outcome studies. Based on this review, it should be of no surprise that differences emerge across individuals and experiments when nasal drug delivery methods are employed. We present recommendations for researchers to use when developing and administering the spray, and guidelines for reporting on peptide nasal spray studies in humans. We hope that these recommendations assist in establishing a scientific standard that can improve the rigor and subsequent reliability of reported effects of oxytocin nasal spray in humans.

  14. Genotoxicity of o-aminoazotoluene (AAT) determined by the Ames test, the in vitro chromosomal aberration test, and the transgenic mouse gene mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, K; Hirano, N; Sugiura, M; Nakagawa, S; Kimura, M

    2000-11-20

    o-Aminoazotoluene (AAT) has been evaluated as a possible human carcinogen (Class 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The Ames test found it to be mutagenic in the presence of a metabolic activation system, whereas it has little clastogenicity either in vitro or in vivo in the chromosomal aberration assay. AAT is also carcinogenic in the lung or liver of mice and rats given long-term administrations. Therefore, metabolites generated in the liver etc. may have gene mutation activity, and carcinogenesis would occur. We examined the mutagenicity of AAT in a gene mutation assay, using lacZ transgenic mice (MutaMice) and a positive selection method. AAT showed positive results for organs with metabolic functions, such as liver and colon and other organs. Positive results were also seen in an Ames test in the presence of metabolic activation and negative results seen in a chromosomal aberration test. Therefore, AAT had the potential to cause gene mutation in the presence of metabolic activation systems in vitro and the same reaction was confirmed in vivo with organs with metabolic function, such as liver and colon, but little clastogenicity in vitro or in vivo. Thus, metabolites with gene mutation activity may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of AAT. The transgenic mouse mutation assay proved to be useful for concurrent assessment of in vivo mutagenicity in multiple organs and to supplement the standard in vivo genotoxicity tests, such as the micronucleus assay which is limited to bone marrow as the only target organ.

  15. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  16. The Economics of Perception: Potential Effect regarding Institutional Uses of Recovered Facilities and Administrative Costs upon a Faculty Member's Decision to Engage in Sponsored Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Anne Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    There is one aspect of sponsored research associated with higher education's research enterprise that often places the institution's research administrators and the institution's faculty members in conflict with each other; the recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored research projects (Sedwick, 2009;…

  17. Three Possibilities for Progress in Educational Administration: Reform, Techno-Science Rationality, Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusack, Brian O.

    During the 1980s major changes occurred in the field of educational administration. Three antecedents for change were the restructuring of education administration by governments across the world as a function of the economic management of state, the general availability of powerful information technology to meet the processing and communication…

  18. Using Multilevel Analysis to Monitor Test Performance across Administrations. Research Report. ETS RR-14-29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Youhua; Qu, Yanxuan

    2014-01-01

    For a testing program with frequent administrations, it is important to understand and monitor the stability and fluctuation of test performance across administrations. Different methods have been proposed for this purpose. This study explored the potential of using multilevel analysis to understand and monitor examinees' test performance across…

  19. Toward an Ontology of Practices in Educational Administration: Theoretical Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Paul; Riveros, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we argue for a study of educational administration centered on an "ontology of practices." This is an initial proposal for thinking about and conceptualizing practices in educational administration. To do this, first, we explore how practices are constituted and how they configure the social realities of practitioners.…

  20. How Prepared Are Academic Administrators? Leadership and Job Satisfaction within US Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Tracy L.; Laipple, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    A national sample of 1515 university administrators (academic deans, directors, associate deans, and department chairs) completed a survey of leadership skills, preparedness for administrative role, and job satisfaction. Overall, participants felt least well prepared in the areas of developing entrepreneurial revenue, developing metrics to…

  1. 3-D seismic exploration in the Ames hole

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, K.R.

    1995-09-01

    The Ames Crater of Major County, Oklahoma has been one of the more controversial drilling projects to emerge in the Mid-Continent province in this decade. Within the crater, dolomitic and granodiorite breccias produce substantial quantities of oil and gas within structurally controlled accumulations. To understand the structural complexities of the crater, Continental Resources, in partnership with other Ames operators, acquired 3-D seismic data in four separate acquisition projects across various exploratory and development projects across the crater. Integrated seismic and subsurface control revealed four separate features within the principal crater floor oil and gas accumulation. Using the 3-D data as a lead tool, these companies identified and developed a significant number of commercial tests within the limits of the seismic surveys. Although the tool generally proved to be successful, reservoir variability, velocity variations, and interpretational errors resulted in some non-commercial and dry tests.

  2. Is the Moon Illusion a Celestial Ames Demonstration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    To most naked eye observers, the Moon appears larger when seen near the horizon than it does when seen near the zenith. This "Moon Illusion” has been reported from as early as the fourth century BC and has been the subject of hundreds of papers and two books. Its explanation does not lie in the realm of physics (atmospheric refraction) or astronomy (eccentric lunar orbit) but, rather, in the realm of visual perception. Theories for the cause of the effect abound but, at present, there is no universally accepted explanation. Because the effect can be easily observed in many locations and during the course of an academic year, the moon illusion can provide a nice astronomical example that involves both direct observations and theoretical analysis. As part of the NSF funded "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments", we have been developing inexpensive experiments and demonstrations that can be done at home. One of these is a miniature version of the classic "Ames Room". The life size version was originally developed by Adelbert Ames, Jr. and can be seen in many science museums. Our "digital” Ames Room has been designed to be printed on heavy paper using an inexpensive inkjet printer from a PDF file that is posted on the Project LITE web site http://lite.bu.edu and then cut and folded to make the room. When viewed through one wall using a commonly available door viewer, it dramatically demonstrates how the eye and brain system assesses the relative size of objects by making comparisons with the surrounding environment in which the objects are placed. In this presentation we will discuss some insights that the Ames Room provides that may offer clues to the correct explanation for the Moon Illusion. Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  3. Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997.

  4. Ames Coronagraph Experiment: Enabling Missions to Directly Image Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Technology to find biomarkers and life on other worlds is rapidly maturing. If there is a habitable planet around the nearest star, we may be able to detect it this decade with a small satellite mission. In the 2030 decade, we will likely know if there is life in our Galactic neighborhood (1000 nearest stars). The Ames Coronagraph Experiment is developing coronagraphic technologies to enable such missions.

  5. Ames Laboratory Site Environmental Report, Calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. Pollution awareness and waste minimization programs and plans implemented in 1990 are continuing to date. Ames Laboratory (AL) is responsible for a small chemical burial site, located on ISU property. The site was used for the disposal of chemical and metal slags from thorium and uranium production. Samples of water from existing test wells, and upstream and downstream sites on the nearby Squaw Creek, have not detected migration of the buried materials off site. Surface, hand auger and deep boring soil samples have been collected from the site. The analytical results are pending, Six new monitoring wells have been installed and sampled. Analytical results are pending. Ames Laboratory is responsible for an area contaminated by diesel fuel that leaked from an underground storage tank (UST) in 1970. The tank was removed that year. Soil borings and groundwater have been analyzed for contamination and a preliminary assessment written. Nine small inactive waste sites have been identified for characterization. The NEPA review for this work resulted in a CX determination. The work plans were approved by AL and CH. A subcontractor has surveyed and sampled the sites. Analytical results are pending.

  6. Regulatory implications of Ames' mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.A.; Pertel, R.

    1986-07-01

    Interpretive difficulties can be expected when molecular biology and modern genetics are applied to the safety evaluation of chemicals. Experience, in a regulatory setting, with evaluating the results of short term tests, such as Ames' mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium (Ames' assay), shows that the traditional toxicological paradigm for interpreting and evaluating the results of such tests is less than adequate. The considerable importance of a negative test outcome to the public health as well as to the course of the commercial development of a potentially useful chemical places special demands on both the investigator and the regulatory reviewer for an understanding of Ames' assay. The adequate design, conduct, interpretation, and evaluation of the outcomes of this assay require a knowledge of the chemical properties of the test agent, an understanding of the scientific basis of the test, and an appreciation of the extent to which modifications of the assay can alter the outcome. The investigator and the regulatory reviewer use the same considerations to determine the adequacy of the test design and of the test results. However, a fundamental difference exists between how they interpret results and how they view the outcome. Results from a study comparing activation systems from food animal and laboratory animal sources are used to illustrate the complexity of using safety data from a genetic test. A framework is developed to suggest how to accommodate the points of view of the investigator and the regulatory reviewer in evaluating these data.

  7. Extending the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model to Explore Mars’ Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Amanda; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) upper boundary has been extended to ~120 km altitude (p ~10-5 mbar). The extension of the MGCM upper boundary initiates the ability to understand the connection between the lower and upper atmosphere of Mars through the middle atmosphere 70 - 120 km). Moreover, it provides the opportunity to support future missions (i.e. the 2013 MAVEN mission). A major factor in this extension is the incorporation of the Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) heating (visible) and cooling (infrared). This modification to the radiative transfer forcing (i.e., RT code) has been significantly tested in a 1D vertical column and now has been ported to the full 3D Mars GCM. Initial results clearly show the effects of NLTE in the upper middle atmosphere. Diagnostic of seasonal mean fields and large-scale wave activity will be shown with insight into circulation patterns in the middle atmosphere. Furthermore, sensitivity tests with the resolution of the pressure and temperature grids, in which the k-coefficients are calculated upon, have been performed in the 1D RT code. Our progress on this research will be presented. Brecht is supported by NASA’s Postdoctoral Program at the Ames Research Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  8. A Three-Pronged Approach to Evaluating Salary Equity among Faculty, Administrators, and Staff at a Metropolitan Research University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armacost, Robert L.

    A study was conducted to evaluate inequalities in salary for all regular faculty, administrative, and staff employees with respect to gender and ethnicity at a major metropolitan research university. In all, there were 648 minorities in the study and 1,443 women. Three approaches were used to test for inequalities: (1) a multiple regression…

  9. Staffing Patterns in Public School Systems: Current Status and Trends, Update 2003. A Reference Tool for School Administrators. Research Snapshot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Alicia R.; Protheroe, Nancy; Parks, Michael C.

    This research brief examines staffing patterns within U.S. public school systems. Specifically, it answers the following sets of questions: (1) Why is information about staffing ratios important? (2) How many people currently work in public schools? What proportion of these are teachers, administrators, and support staff? (3) What are the current…

  10. A Research-Based Approach to the President-Principal Model: Problems, Dynamics, and High Performance through Administrative Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many Catholic high schools have transitioned to a president-principal administrative structure. This article discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the model, revealing pertinent issues that must be addressed while operationalizing the model. Recent research supports some aspects of the model, but it is no panacea. Clear job descriptions, role…

  11. In honour of Prof. Dr J.J.M. Franse. How to combine research, education and administration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, P. E.

    2002-07-01

    On the occasion of the celebration of the 65th anniversary of Prof. Dr. J.J.M. Franse, a brief overview of his career and work is presented. His ability to combine fundamental research, educational tasks and administrative duties is emphasised.

  12. Virtue blindness and hegemony: qualitative evidence of negotiated ethical frameworks in the social language of university research administration.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Timothy N; Gilleland, Diane S

    2007-06-01

    The study used critical discourse analysis (CDA) to elucidate normative structures of ethical behavior in university research administration which may be useful for knowledge transference to future studies of research integrity. Research administration appears to support integrity in the research environment through four very strong normative domains: (1) respect for authority structures; (2) respect for institutional boundaries; (3) professionalism; and (4) a strong sense of virtue. The strong norm structure of research administration, however, appears to be threatened by the fifth domain, (5) political power, which is inhabited by prestigious faculty with tenure, top-down authority misalignment, and the power for some institutional members to circumvent the system. The strong normative structure also appears threatened by the overall consequentiality of the regulatory environment, and shifting contexts that threaten personal virtue. In the end, the normative structure is fluid, politically acquiescent to power, and ambiguous. Although the professional core of the norm structure is strong, the strengths and weaknesses in the overall system can be connected to poorly constructed elements of the institutional environment.

  13. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  14. 42 CFR 93.404 - Findings of research misconduct and proposed administrative actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Findings of research misconduct and proposed... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.404 Findings of research misconduct and...

  15. Comparison of determinants of research knowledge utilization by practitioners and administrators in the field of child and family social services

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important gap exists between research production and its utilization. Few studies have examined the factors affecting knowledge utilization in the field of child and family social services. Methods The objectives of the study are to describe knowledge utilization by child protection administrators and practitioners (N = 477) and to compare factors related to knowledge utilization by these two occupational groups. The study was conducted with an adapted version of the Questionnaire sur l'utilisation des connaissances (Knowledge Utilization Questionnaire). Factor analysis was used to collapse data collected on the questionnaire items. Factor score for each respondent served as independent variables in three separate multivariate regression analyses to explore variables likely to predict research-based knowledge utilization. Results A minority of respondents (18%) report using on a frequent basis research-based knowledge in their practice. Relational capital between researchers and users and perceived usefulness of research based knowledge were the two factors most strongly related to utilization. There was a specificity in the factors associated with knowledge utilization according to occupational groups in child protection organizations. Use of active knowledge transfer strategies was associated with knowledge utilization by practitioners, while knowledge dissemination efforts played a more significant role for administrators. Conclusion These results encourage both the use of strategies differentiated according to users and the intensification of interactions between users and researchers to foster research knowledge utilization. PMID:20525270

  16. Teacher Evaluation in Practice: Year 3 Teacher and Administrator Perceptions of REACH. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporte, Susan E.; Jiang, Jennie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Three years after the launch of Chicago's redesigned teacher evaluation system, Recognizing Educators Advancing Chicago Students (REACH) Students, most teachers and administrators continue to report they believe REACH has the potential to improve instruction and student learning, and they remain negative about the use of student growth in…

  17. The Organization and Administration of Education for Employment in Illinois. Research Memorandum No. 77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation, Springfield.

    This report explores the organization and administration of the education for employment delivery system in Illinois. Problems central to service delivery in Illinois are identified in such key areas as intake, assessment and follow-up practices, gaps in services and duplicative services and regional and local planning boundaries. Legislative…

  18. The Effects of Applying Alternative Research Methods to Educational Administration Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    Ways in which the application of positivistic, phenomenological, ethnomethodological, and critical theories affect educational administration theory and practice are explored in this paper. A review of literature concludes that positivism separates practice from abstract theory; phenomenology offers a different view of reality; ethnomethodology is…

  19. Evaluation of Educational Administration: A Decade Review of Research (2001-2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    This sequential mixed methods study analyzed how program evaluation was used to assess educational administration and examined thematic trends in educational evaluation published over 10 years (2001-2010). First, qualitative content analysis examined the articles in eight peer-reviewed evaluation journals. This analysis revealed that numerous…

  20. Developing Insight in Aspiring Researchers: Challenges Confronting Public Administration Teachers and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 2 matrix identifying four discrete thought processes was presented. The contributions of the first three processes in developing the knowledge base of public administration were detailed as were their limitations. It was argued that the fourth process--insight and its mental powers--builds upon the strengths and overcomes the limitations…

  1. Research Administration Training and Compliance at the Department Level for a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temples, Beryline; Simons, Paula; Atkinson, Timothy N.

    2012-01-01

    By providing training from the Central Sponsored Programs Office (SPO), departments, and colleges at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) can increase compliance with grant requirements. PUIs usually do not focus on department- or college-level grants administration and lack monetary resources to support this function. However, at the…

  2. Employment Factors Superintendents Use in Hiring Administrators for Their School Districts. ASCUS Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, B. J.; And Others

    A nationwide questionnaire provided the data for this study to gain insight into factors that are utilized in securing school administrators. The questionnaire was distributed to more than 200 superintendents and a return of 21 percent was realized. The survey revealed a continuing and close relationship between college placement officers and…

  3. Social Climate and Administrative Decision-Making Research for Institutional Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Mohammed A.

    An Arabic translation of the "Work Environment Scale" was administered to the employees of Riyadh University's College of Education in Saudi Arabia for the purpose of gathering data useful in administrative decision-making. The survey investigated the work environment of the college as it is perceived by three distinct groups: the…

  4. Joint NASA Ames/Langley Experimental Evaluation of Integrated Air/Ground Operations for En Route Free Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal; Battiste, Vernol; Doble, Nathan; Johnson, Walter; Lee, Paul; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating a new concept of operations known as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). Under the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM, appropriately equipped autonomous aircraft self separate from other autonomous aircraft and from managed aircraft that continue to fly under today s Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Controllers provide separation services between IFR aircraft and assign traffic flow management constraints to all aircraft. To address concept feasibility issues pertaining to integrated air/ground operations at various traffic levels, NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers conducted a joint human-in-the-loop experiment. Professional airline pilots and air traffic controllers flew a total of 16 scenarios under four conditions: mixed autonomous/managed operations at three traffic levels and a baseline all-managed condition at the lowest traffic level. These scenarios included en route flights and descents to a terminal area meter fix in airspace modeled after the Dallas Ft. Worth area. Pilots of autonomous aircraft met controller assigned meter fix constraints with high success. Separation violations by subject pilots did not appear to vary with traffic level and were mainly attributable to software errors and procedural lapses. Controller workload was lower for mixed flight conditions, even at higher traffic levels. Pilot workload was deemed acceptable under all conditions. Controllers raised several safety concerns, most of which pertained to the occurrence of near-term conflicts between autonomous and managed aircraft. These issues are being addressed through better compatibility between air and ground systems and refinements to air and ground procedures.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  6. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  7. Modifications to the NASA Ames Space Station Proximity Operations (PROX OPS) Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam

    1988-01-01

    As the United States is approaching an operational space station era, flight simulators are required to investigate human design and performance aspects associated with orbital operations. Among these are proximity operations (PROX OPS), those activities occurring within a 1-km sphere of Space Station including rendezvous, docking, rescue, and repair. The Space Station Proximity Operations Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center was modified to provide the capability for investigations into human performance aspects of proximity operations. Accurate flight equations of motion were installed to provide the appropriate visual scene to test subjects performing simulated missions. Also, the flight control system was enhanced by enabling pilot control over thruster acceleration values. Currently, research is under way to examine human performance in a variety of mission scenarios.

  8. Development and operation of a real-time simulation at the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, Christopher; Sheppard, Shirin; Chetelat, Monique

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility at the NASA Ames Research Center combines the largest vertical motion capability in the world with a flexible real-time operating system allowing research to be conducted quickly and effectively. Due to the diverse nature of the aircraft simulated and the large number of simulations conducted annually, the challenge for the simulation engineer is to develop an accurate real-time simulation in a timely, efficient manner. The SimLab facility and the software tools necessary for an operating simulation will be discussed. Subsequent sections will describe the development process through operation of the simulation; this includes acceptance of the model, validation, integration and production phases.

  9. Voluntary cleanup of the Ames chemical disposal site.

    SciTech Connect

    Taboas, A. L.; Freeman, R.; Peterson, J.; Environmental Assessment; USDOE

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy completed a voluntary removal action at the Ames chemical disposal site, a site associated with the early days of the Manhattan Project. It contained chemical and low-level radioactive wastes from development of the technology to extract uranium from uranium oxide. The process included the preparation of a Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study, Baseline Risk Assessment, and, ultimately, issuance of a Record of Decision. Various stakeholder groups were involved, including members of the regulatory community, the general public, and the landowner, Iowa State University. The site was restored and returned to the landowner for unrestricted use.

  10. A Standard Kinematic Model for Flight Simulation at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A standard kinematic model for aircraft simulation exists at NASA-Ames on a variety of computer systems, one of which is used to control the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The derivation of the kinematic model is given and various mathematical relationships are presented as a guide. These include descriptions of standardized simulation subsystems such as the atmospheric turbulence model and the generalized six-degrees-of-freedom trim routine, as well as an introduction to the emulative batch-processing system which enables this facility to optimize its real-time environment.

  11. Use of Ames test in evaluation of shale oil fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Pelroy, R A; Petersen, M R

    1979-01-01

    Conditions that affect the sensitivity of the Ames assay of complex hydrocarbon mixtures derived from shale oil were studied. Two fractions, one enriched in polynuclear aromatic compounds (PNA fraction), and a second fraction enriched in aromatic and heterocyclic amines (basic fraction), were selected for most of this work because of their comparatively high mutagenicity (i.e., compared with raw shale oil). The crude shale oil, as well as the basic, PNA, and tar fractions were mutagenic against the Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100. Mutation was dependent on metabolic activation by microsomal (S9) enzymes. Both test strains responded equally well to the crude product and to the basic fraction; however, strain TA100 was more effective than TA198 in demonstrating the mutagenicity of the PNA fraction. The mutagenicity of the tar fraction could be most easily detected after metabolic activation in a liquid medium, as opposed to S9 activation in the top agar of the standard Ames assay. The mutagenicity of the basic fraction or 2-aminoanthracene was also demonstrated by metabolic activation in a liquid medium. In other set of experiments, the effect of chemical composition on the expression of mutagenicity in the standard Ames assay was estimated. Premutagens requiring metabolic activation were added to the basic and PNA fractions, and the numbers of revertants obtained in the presence of the fractions were compared with mutation induced by the compounds alone. The basic fraction did not interfere with the mutagenicity of 2-aminoanthracene and 7,9 dimethylbenz[c]acridine. Moreover, in certain experiments, the mutagenicity of the complex fraction plus the added compound was higher than expected on the basis of assays performed on these materials separately. Conversely, the PNA fraction prevented or strongly inhibited mutation by several polynuclear aroumatic compounds, and an acridine. However, the PNA fraction did not inhibit mutation induced by 2

  12. Alternative Model for Administration and Analysis of Research-Based Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption…

  13. NASA RECON: Course development, administration, and evaluation. A research and development proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Roquemore, Leroy

    1984-01-01

    This proposal addresses the development, administration, and evaluation of a set of transportable, college-level courses to educate science and engineering students in the effective use of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems, and, in particular, in the use of the NASA RECON system. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction. Chapter 2 identifies general and specific objectives, i.e., needs analysis, course development, course administration, and course evaluation. Chapter 3 proposes the methodology to be used in successfully accomplishing these objectives. Chapter 4 highlights expected results and product deliverables, and Chapter 5 presents the project evaluation plan to be followed. Chapter 6 is a brief overview of the institutional resources available at the proposing institutions, i.e., at the University of Southwestern Louisiana and at Southern University to support the project. Chapter 7 proposes a budget, time schedule, and management plan. Chapter 8 is a summary of the foregoing.

  14. Airflow Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is an overview of research being done in laminar flow at Ames Dryden Flight Research Center and Langley Research Center. Airflow research at Ames Dryden has resulted in a special wing covering that will artificially induce laminar flow on the wing surface; this specially adapted wing is shown being tested in different flying conditions. This video also features research done at Langley in producing a chemical covering for wings that will make visible natural laminar flow and turbulent airflow patterns as they occur. Langley researchers explain possible use of this technology in supersonic flight.

  15. Brown Adipose Tissue Function Is Enhanced in Long-Lived, Male Ames Dwarf Mice.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Justin; McFadden, Samuel; Fang, Yimin; Huber, Joshua A; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Ames dwarf mice (Prop1(df/df)) are long-lived due to a loss of function mutation, resulting in deficiency of GH, TSH, and prolactin. Along with a marked extension of longevity, Ames dwarf mice have improved energy metabolism as measured by an increase in their oxygen consumption and heat production, as well as a decrease in their respiratory quotient. Along with alterations in energy metabolism, Ames dwarf mice have a lower core body temperature. Moreover, Ames dwarf mice have functionally altered epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) that improves, rather than impairs, their insulin sensitivity due to a shift from pro- to anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Given the unique phenotype of Ames dwarf epididymal WAT, their improved energy metabolism, and lower core body temperature, we hypothesized that Ames dwarf brown adipose tissue (BAT) may function differently from that of their normal littermates. Here we use histology and RT-PCR to demonstrate that Ames dwarf mice have enhanced BAT function. We also use interscapular BAT removal to demonstrate that BAT is necessary for Ames dwarf energy metabolism and thermogenesis, whereas it is less important for their normal littermates. Furthermore, we show that Ames dwarf mice are able to compensate for loss of interscapular BAT by using their WAT depots as an energy source. These findings demonstrate enhanced BAT function in animals with GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies, chronic reduction of body temperature, and remarkably extended longevity.

  16. Design, development and evaluation of Stanford/Ames EVA prehensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry J.; Aldrich, J.; Leblanc, M.; Sabelman, E.; Schwandt, D.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station operations and maintenance are expected to make unprecedented demands on astronaut EVA. With Space Station expected to operate with an 8 to 10 psi atmosphere (4 psi for Shuttle operations), the effectivness of pressurized gloves is called into doubt at the same time that EVA activity levels are to be increased. To address the need for more frequent and complex EVA missions and also to extend the dexterity, duration, and safety of EVA astronauts, NASA Ames and Stanford University have an ongoing cooperative agreement to explore and compare alternatives. This is the final Stanford/Ames report on manually powered Prehensors, each of which consists of a shroud forming a pressure enclosure around the astronaut's hand, and a linkage system to transfer the motions and forces of the hand to mechanical digits attached to the shroud. All prehensors are intended for attachment to a standard wrist coupling, as found on the AX-5 hard suit prototype, so that realistic tests can be performed under normal and reduced gravity as simulated by water flotation.

  17. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  18. The Food and Drug Administration has the legal basis to restrict promotion of flawed comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Avorn, Jerry

    2012-10-01

    Under Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policy, communications by prescription drug manufacturers must be backed by "substantial evidence" from "adequate and well-controlled investigations." But numerous exceptions permit manufacturer promotion based on data other than randomized trials. The observational research presented in the Hemikrane hypothetical case in this month's Health Affairs is methodologically flawed and also does not meet any of these exceptions. Therefore, plausible scientific and policy rationales support rules restricting the company's communication of its findings. The FDA's current reluctance to authorize promotional claims based on observational research is understandable. Further work is required to define the characteristics of high-quality observational research. However, as this field matures, higher-quality observational studies could meet the legal standard of an "adequate and well-controlled investigation." At that point, the FDA will need to issue formal guidance to minimize confusion on what kinds of observational research can meet its evidentiary standards.

  19. Exploring the Relationship between Special Education Teachers and Professional Learning Communities: Implications of Research for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Linda P.; Perez, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    School accountability reports reveal that wide achievement gaps exist among different subgroups of students in PK-12 schools. Research findings reveal that general and special education teachers improve their classroom practices when working in professional learning communities (PLCs). In addition, research shows that special education teachers…

  20. The Influence of Emerging Nursing Administrative and Leadership Researchers: An Interview With Dr Lesly Kelly.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M

    2017-02-01

    This department highlights emerging nursing leaders who have demonstrated leadership in advancing innovation and patient care in practice, policy, research, education, and theory. This interview profiles Lesly Kelly, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor at the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation and Nursing and Clinical Research Program Director at Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix.

  1. A Case Study of Qualitative Research: Methods and Administrative Impact. AIR 1983 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jane; Warner, Sean

    A case study in program evaluation that demonstrates the effectiveness of qualitative research methods is presented. Over a 5-year period, the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities in Ohio offered a baccalaureate program (University Without Walls) to local employees of a national manufacturing firm. The institutional research office…

  2. University Efficiency: Complementariness versus Trade-Off between Teaching, Research and Administrative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers-Rubio, Ricardo; Mas-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Casado-Diaz, Ana B.

    2010-01-01

    University managers should be aware of the importance that efficiency has for their own universities, orientating their actions towards research and teaching excellence. This study estimates teaching and research efficiency of the different departments of a university and tests the complementariness versus trade-off between them. The results…

  3. Intellectual Property Rights at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Vernon E.

    1994-01-01

    At a fundamental level, intellectual property is the core work product of a technical organization. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), produces a variety of intellectual property including: patents, trademarks, data rights, copyright and rights associated with National Security. For a scientific organization to properly manage its work product it has to manage its intellectual property. This paper endeavors to describe how the intellectual property rights are generated and allocated at NASA. The author then goes on to discuss how the intellectual property might be managed to meet the objectives of program implementation, technology transfer and security.

  4. Interplanetary shocks seen by Ames plasma probe on Pioneer 6 and 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Yun, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Interplanetary shocks and discontinuities observed by the Ames Research Center plasma probe on Pioneer 6 and 7 are analyzed with Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer data. Several shock normals are used for the MHD model of a shock where the mixed data shock normals, which use plasma and magnetic-field data, give the best agreement with the theoretical requirements. The requirements are the satisfaction of the Rankine-Hugoniot conservation equations across the shock where angles (predicted theoretically from the conservation equations) between certain combinations of plasma and magnetic-field data vectors in the shock normals are explicitly checked. The results for the August 29, 1966, shock are compared with previous results.

  5. The NASA Ames integral aircraft passenger seat concept - A human engineering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A new NASA Ames concept for an aircraft passenger seat has been under research and development since 1968. It includes many human-factor features that will provide protection to the passenger from vibration, jostle, and high impact. It is comfortable and safer than any of the seats presently in use. An in-depth design, fabrication, and impact analysis was conducted in order to design a seat that will maximize passenger protection in high g impacts (20 g horizontal -Gx, 36 g vertical +Gz, 16 g lateral Gy). The method for absorbing impact energy was accomplished with a combination of stretching stainless steel cables, thread breaking of stitches, hydraulic mechanism and the special Temper Form cushions. The restraint system for the seat consisted of a lap belt and shoulder harness inertia reel combination.

  6. Supersonic Retropropulsion CFD Validation with Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Zarchi, Kerry A.; Kleb, William L.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    A validation study of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) was conducted using three Navier-Stokes flow solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW). The study compared results from the CFD codes to each other and also to wind tunnel test data obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center 90 70 Unitary PlanWind Tunnel. Comparisons include surface pressure coefficient as well as unsteady plume effects, and cover a range of Mach numbers, levels of thrust, and angles of orientation. The comparisons show promising capability of CFD to simulate SRP, and best agreement with the tunnel data exists for the steadier cases of the 1-nozzle and high thrust 3-nozzle configurations.

  7. The NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel Nozzle Simulations and Experimental Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TokarcikPolsky, S.; Papadopoulos, P.; Venkatapathy, E.; Delwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The 16-Inch Shock Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center is a unique test facility used for hypersonic propulsion testing. To provide information necessary to understand the hypersonic testing of the combustor model, computational simulations of the facility nozzle were performed and results are compared with available experimental data, namely static pressure along the nozzle walls and pitot pressure at the exit of the nozzle section. Both quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric approaches were used to study the numerous modeling issues involved. The facility nozzle flow was examined for three hypersonic test conditions, and the computational results are presented in detail. The effects of variations in reservoir conditions, boundary layer growth, and parameters of numerical modeling are explored.

  8. THE NASA AMES POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE: THE COMPUTED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauschlicher, C. W.; Ricca, A.; Boersma, C.; Mattioda, A. L.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sanchez de Armas, F.; Puerta Saborido, G.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2010-08-15

    The astronomical emission features, formerly known as the unidentified infrared bands, are now commonly ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The laboratory experiments and computational modeling done at the NASA Ames Research Center to create a collection of PAH IR spectra relevant to test and refine the PAH hypothesis have been assembled into a spectroscopic database. This database now contains over 800 PAH spectra spanning 2-2000 {mu}m (5000-5 cm{sup -1}). These data are now available on the World Wide Web at www.astrochem.org/pahdb. This paper presents an overview of the computational spectra in the database and the tools developed to analyze and interpret astronomical spectra using the database. A description of the online and offline user tools available on the Web site is also presented.

  9. Postdoctoral and Senior Postdoctoral Resident Research Associateship Program and Research Management Associateship Program for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Information on the status of all Resident Research Associated and Research Management Associates is provided. All Associated whose tenure continued as of June 1, 1985 are listed alphabetically by laboratory. Also included are their countries of citizenship and dates of tenure. The status of reporting obligations are summarized. A list of progress reports received during this reporting period is also provided. All Associates who terminated during the reporting period are listed.

  10. Tobacco regulatory science: research to inform regulatory action at the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Ashley, David L; Backinger, Cathy L; van Bemmel, Dana M; Neveleff, Deborah J

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promotes the development of regulatory science to ensure that a strong evidence base informs all of its regulatory activities related to the manufacture, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products as well as public education about tobacco product constituents and effects. Toward that end, the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) provides funding for research studies with scientific aims that fall within its defined regulatory authority. However, given their traditional biomedical focus on basic and applied research, some researchers may not understand the principles of regulatory science or the types of studies CTP funds. The purpose of this paper is (1) to clarify the definition of regulatory science as a distinct scientific discipline, (2) to explore the role of tobacco regulatory science in order to help researchers understand the parameters and types of research that can be funded by CTP, and (3) to describe the types of research efforts that will inform the FDA's public health framework for tobacco product regulation.

  11. Portable Linear Sled (PLS) for biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallotton, Will; Matsuhiro, Dennis; Wynn, Tom; Temple, John

    1993-01-01

    The PLS is a portable linear motion generating device conceived by researchers at Ames Research Center's Vestibular Research Facility and designed by engineers at Ames for the study of motion sickness in space. It is an extremely smooth apparatus, powered by linear motors and suspended on air bearings which ride on precision ground ceramic ways.

  12. Implementation of the Enhanced Flight Termination System at National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology, requirements, tests, and results of the implementation of the current operating capability for the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The implementation involves the development of the EFTS at NASA DFRC starting from the requirements to system safety review to full end to end system testing, and concluding with the acceptance of the system as an operational system. The paper discusses the first operational usage and subsequent flight utilizing EFTS successfully.

  13. Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lynn W; Vaughn, David W; Skillman, Donald R

    2006-07-01

    US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

  14. Graduate programs in health administration: faculty academic reputation and faculty research reputation by program location and program reputation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, M

    1995-01-01

    This study used program location and program reputation to describe two important faculty characteristics: academic reputation and research reputation. The study involved 44 graduate programs in health administration representing four program locations: schools of public health, business, medicine/allied health, and graduate/independent. Fourteen programs were identified as ranked programs and the remaining 30 programs were identified as unranked programs. While the study identifies many differences, few are significant, thus adding credence to the argument for diversity in program location and diminishing credence in the argument for program reputation.

  15. Internet Administration of Paper-and-Pencil Questionnaires Used in Couple Research: Assessing Psychometric Equivalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Rebecca L.; Barry, Robin A.; Lawrence, Erika; Dey, Jodi; Rolffs, Jaci

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric equivalence of paper-and-pencil and Internet formats of key questionnaires used in couple research. Self-report questionnaires assessing interpersonal constructs (relationship satisfaction, communication/conflict management, partner support, emotional intimacy) and intrapersonal constructs (individual traits,…

  16. Studies in Leading and Organizing Schools. A Volume in Research and Theory in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne, Ed.; Miskel, Cecil, Ed.

    This collection of research reports is intended to advance the understanding of schools through empirical study and theoretical analysis. The reports are as follows: "The Punctuated Equilibrium of National Reading Policy: Literacy's Changing Images and Venues" (Celia Sims and Cecil Miskel); "Productive Campus Leadership Responses to…

  17. 78 FR 38846 - Potato Research and Promotion Plan; Amend the Administrative Committee Structure and Delete the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1207 Potato Research and Promotion Plan... Marketing Service. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This proposal invites comments on amending the structure....regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia A. Petrella, Marketing Specialist, Promotion...

  18. Using Participatory Action Research and Photo Methods to Explore Higher Education Administration as an Emotional Endeavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.; Rincones, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we build on Wood's (2010, 2012) recent call to consider higher education as a work place that conjures emotion among constituents, particularly positional leaders, like department chairs. Using a participatory action research and photo-enhanced methodological approach, we illustrate the emotional labor that was poured into the…

  19. An Examination of Student Reengagement District Administrative Procedures: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Jared Louis

    2016-01-01

    Changes in Washington State law require all school districts to adopt policies and procedures concerned with student reengagement. This dissertation describes the action research undertaken in the Mead School District to address requirements of the new law to successfully reenter students after being absent due to exclusionary discipline. The…

  20. The Role of a Research Administration Program in Adverse Event Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedor, Carol; Cola, Philip; Polites, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The reporting, analysis, and management of adverse events (AEs) provide an ongoing assessment of risk in the context of a clinical trial and enhance the protection of human research participants and the informed consent process. Effective and efficient review of AEs has been a long-standing challenge for Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and…

  1. 7 CFR 2.66 - Administrator, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... research, extension, and education to address food and agricultural sciences (7 U.S.C. 450i(b)). (8... the food and agricultural sciences to meet major needs and challenges in food and agricultural system... education in the food and agricultural sciences; administer grants to colleges and universities; maintain...

  2. [Research on bioactive ingredients in rat liver after oral administration of different combinations of Wuji pill].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Jie; Chen, Ying; Gong, Zi-Peng; Dong, Yu; Zhang, Hai-Xian; Yang, Qing; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Li, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2014-05-01

    A L9 (3(4)) orthogonal design table to be used to get nine combinations of extraction of three herbs of Wuji pill: Coptis chinensis, Tetradium ruticarpum and Paeonia lactiflora Pall., and nine extraction of single herbs correspondingly, altogether eighteen combinations. Quantification of five representative bioactive ingredients: berberine, palmatine, evodiamine, rutaecarpine, paeoniflorin in rat liver by ultra high liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after oral administration at 2 h time point of eighteen combinations. The result shows the bioactive ingredients have different concentrations betweem different combinations and the single herb with the same dosage significantly as well as the same dose combinations. C. chinensis with evodiamine concentration of low and high dose T. ruticarpum was positively correlated. T. ruticarpum with berberine concentration of low dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and of meddle dose C. chinensis was correlated positively. T. ruticarpum with paeoniflorin concentration of middle dose P. lactiflora was correlated positively. P. lactiflora with palmatine concentration of middle dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and with evodiamine and rutaecarpine concentration of middle dose T. ruticarpum was negatively correlated. These shows the three single herbs interactions resulted in the differences of each ingredients concentration in rat liver. The orthogonal analysis indicates the combination 12: 6: 6 make the maximum concentration in rat liver.

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration fundamental research program. Information utilization and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Eisgruber, L.

    1981-01-01

    In the second half of the 1980's NASA can expect to face difficult choices among alternative fundamental and applied research, and development projects that could potentially lead to improvements in the information systems used to manage renewable resources. The working group on information utilization and evaluation believes that effective choices cannot be made without a better understanding of the current and prospective problems and opportunities involved in the application of remote sensing to improve renewable research information systems. A renewable resources information system is defined in a broad context to include a flow of data/information from: acquisition through processing, storage, integration with other data, analysis, graphic presentation, decision making, and assessment of the affects of those decisions.

  4. An Overview of DoD Policy for and Administration of Independent Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    advocates, direct contractingof IX&D projects which have sufficient benefits to warrant the cost. (Ref. 104o 2p. 1 3 Most of the other challenges to...contract any projects which have sufficient benefits to warrant the cost so that ". . . xesponsible Government officials can exercise technical...that an independent research and develop- ment project is of benefit to the conttack requires the exercise of technical judgment. It is not sufficient

  5. The NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database: A Demo of its Contents and Web Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Christiaan; Sánchez de Armas, F.; Ricca, A.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Mattioda, A. L.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2009-01-01

    The features formerly known as the Unidentified Infrared (UIR) Emission Bands are now generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exploitation of these features as astrophysical and astrochemical probes requires the IR properties of PAHs under interstellar conditions. To fulfill this need, we experimentally measured and theoretically computed the 2-2000 µm spectra of many PAHs over the past 18 years at NASA's Ames Research Center. Today's collection comprises about 600 theoretically computed and 60 laboratory measured spectra of PAHs in different forms. The molecules in the collection range in size from C10H8 to C130H28. For most of these, spectra are available for PAHs in their neutral and singly charged (+/-) states. In some cases, IR spectra of multiply charged species were also computed. The database includes pure PAHs; PAHs containing nitrogen (PANHs), oxygen, and silicon; PAHs with side groups; PAHs with extra hydrogens; and PAHs complexed with iron and magnesium. This collection of PAH spectra from 2 - 2000 µm has been assembled into a uniform database, which we will make publicly available on the web in early 2009. A WebGUI interface has been developed that can effectively interrogate the database using a variety of queries, such as formula, molecular name, charge, specific number of atoms, etc. Several molecules can be selected in such a process and one can obtain their 3-D structures, plot and co-add their spectra, adjust parameters such as the bandwidth, download their data and print graphs. The database can also be downloaded as a whole and IDL-routines are provided to interrogate it. This talk will present an overview of the contents and the web-GUI tools of the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. Hands-on demonstrations will be available at the SOFIA Booth.

  6. A European Flood Database: facilitating comprehensive flood research beyond administrative boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J.; Arheimer, B.; Aronica, G. T.; Bilibashi, A.; Boháč, M.; Bonacci, O.; Borga, M.; Burlando, P.; Castellarin, A.; Chirico, G. B.; Claps, P.; Fiala, K.; Gaál, L.; Gorbachova, L.; Gül, A.; Hannaford, J.; Kiss, A.; Kjeldsen, T.; Kohnová, S.; Koskela, J. J.; Macdonald, N.; Mavrova-Guirguinova, M.; Ledvinka, O.; Mediero, L.; Merz, B.; Merz, R.; Molnar, P.; Montanari, A.; Osuch, M.; Parajka, J.; Perdigão, R. A. P.; Radevski, I.; Renard, B.; Rogger, M.; Salinas, J. L.; Sauquet, E.; Šraj, M.; Szolgay, J.; Viglione, A.; Volpi, E.; Wilson, D.; Zaimi, K.; Blöschl, G.

    2015-06-01

    The current work addresses one of the key building blocks towards an improved understanding of flood processes and associated changes in flood characteristics and regimes in Europe: the development of a comprehensive, extensive European flood database. The presented work results from ongoing cross-border research collaborations initiated with data collection and joint interpretation in mind. A detailed account of the current state, characteristics and spatial and temporal coverage of the European Flood Database, is presented. At this stage, the hydrological data collection is still growing and consists at this time of annual maximum and daily mean discharge series, from over 7000 hydrometric stations of various data series lengths. Moreover, the database currently comprises data from over 50 different data sources. The time series have been obtained from different national and regional data sources in a collaborative effort of a joint European flood research agreement based on the exchange of data, models and expertise, and from existing international data collections and open source websites. These ongoing efforts are contributing to advancing the understanding of regional flood processes beyond individual country boundaries and to a more coherent flood research in Europe.

  7. ELAPSE - NASA AMES LISP AND ADA BENCHMARK SUITE: EFFICIENCY OF LISP AND ADA PROCESSING - A SYSTEM EVALUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    One area of research of the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center is devoted to the analysis and enhancement of processors and advanced computer architectures, specifically in support of automation and robotic systems. To compare systems' abilities to efficiently process Lisp and Ada, scientists at Ames Research Center have developed a suite of non-parallel benchmarks called ELAPSE. The benchmark suite was designed to test a single computer's efficiency as well as alternate machine comparisons on Lisp, and/or Ada languages. ELAPSE tests the efficiency with which a machine can execute the various routines in each environment. The sample routines are based on numeric and symbolic manipulations and include two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations, Cholesky decomposition and substitution, Gaussian elimination, high-level data processing, and symbol-list references. Also included is a routine based on a Bayesian classification program sorting data into optimized groups. The ELAPSE benchmarks are available for any computer with a validated Ada compiler and/or Common Lisp system. Of the 18 routines that comprise ELAPSE, provided within this package are 14 developed or translated at Ames. The others are readily available through literature. The benchmark that requires the most memory is CHOLESKY.ADA. Under VAX/VMS, CHOLESKY.ADA requires 760K of main memory. ELAPSE is available on either two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes (standard distribution) or a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. The contents of the diskettes are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The ELAPSE benchmarks were written in 1990. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  8. Space Research Data Management in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Space related scientific research has passed through a natural evolutionary process. The task of extracting the meaningful information from the raw data is highly involved and will require data processing capabilities that do not exist today. The results are presented of a three year examination of this subject, using an earlier report as a starting point. The general conclusion is that there are areas in which NASA's data management practices can be improved and recommends specific actions. These actions will enhance NASA's ability to extract more of the potential data and to capitalize on future opportunities.

  9. Environmental impact statement for National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The probable environmental impact and adverse effects of the Lewis Research Center are assessed. The Cleveland and Plum Brook facilities are briefly described. It is felt that the absence of harmful environmental impact from the Cleveland site is apparent, and the monitoring at the Plum Brook reactor facility shows the effectiveness of effluent controls. The probable adverse effects are considered for air, water, and noise pollution, and radioactive and hazardous waste storage and disposal; it is concluded that all emissions are maintained below Federal, and local standards. There are no appropriate alternatives to the operation of the Center, and no improvement in environmental quality would result from relocation. The relationship between local short-term productivity is briefly discussed. No adverse comment has been received from public agencies or private organizations or individuals.

  10. Automating the Analytical Laboratories Section, Lewis Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, W. G.; Barton, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized automation of the Analytical Laboratories Section at NASA's Lewis Research Center was considered. Since that laboratory's duties are not routine, the automation goals were set with that in mind. Four instruments were selected as the most likely automation candidates: an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, an emission spectrometer, an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, and an X-ray diffraction unit. Two options for computer automation were described: a time-shared central computer and a system with microcomputers for each instrument connected to a central computer. A third option, presented for future planning, expands the microcomputer version. Costs and benefits for each option were considered. It was concluded that the microcomputer version best fits the goals and duties of the laboratory and that such an automted system is needed to meet the laboratory's future requirements.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration fundamental research program. Information utilization and evaluation, appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Eisgruber, L.

    1981-01-01

    Important points presented and recommendations made at an information and decision processes workshop held in Asilomar, California; at a data and information performance workshop held in Houston, Texas; and at a data base use and management workshop held near San Jose, California are summarized. Issues raised at a special session of the Soil Conservation Society of America's remote sensing for resource management conference in Kansas City, Missouri are also highlighted. The goals, status and activities of the NASA program definition study of basic research requirements, the necessity of making the computer science community aware of user needs with respect to information related to renewable resources, performance parameters and criteria for judging federal information systems, and the requirements and characteristics of scientific data bases are among the topics reported.

  12. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol) in naïve and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Gutting, Bradford W; Nichols, Tonya L; Channel, Stephen R; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Andrews, George A; Berger, Alan E; Mackie, Ryan S; Watson, Brent J; Taft, Sarah C; Overheim, Katie A; Sherwood, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    TBLN between 24 and 36 h post-exposure with small numbers of bacteria in the circulation only at 24 h post-exposure. These results characterize and quantify disease progression in naïve rabbits following aerosol administration of Ames spores which may be useful in a number of different research applications, including developing quantitative models of infection for use in human inhalational anthrax risk assessment.

  13. Facies analysis and depositional environment of the Ames Marine Member of the Conemaugh Group in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qayim, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lithologic and paleontological aspects for fifty localities of the Ames Marine Member were examined. The regional stratigraphic reconstruction shows that it is variably composed of limestone and shale, and often associated with a thin basal coal seam. A generalized, composite stratigraphic section of the Ames Member consists of the following units from top to bottom: the Grafton Sandstone, Nonmarine Shale, Upper Ames Shale, Upper Ames Limestone, Middle Ames Shale, Lower Ames Limestone, Lower Ames Shale, Ames Coal, Nonmarine Silty Shale, and Harlem Coal. Harlem coal is commonly the basal coal in Ohio, and the Ames Coal is common in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Insoluble residue analysis of 223 samples shows that quartz and glauconite are the major and significant residues. The major petrographic components of the Ames rocks are bioclastic grains of echinoderm, brachiopods, molluscs, bryozoa, and foraminifera in a matrix variably composed of clay and calcium carbonate. A quantitative microfacies study applying factor and cluster analysis reveals five basin-wide biofacies and four lithofacies reflecting a gradient from shoreline to an offshore position. The areal and vertical distribution of the different facies reflects the transgression-regression history of the Ames Cycle. A uniform slow eustatic rise of sea level with an early rapid transgression was responsible for the deposition of most of the Ames marine section. The small, upper, underdeveloped regressive section suggests a rapid regression by active prograding deltaic deposits which rapidly terminated the marine conditions over most the the Appalachian Basin.

  14. Internet Administration of Three Commonly Used Questionnaires in Panic Research: Equivalence to Paper Administration in Australian and Swedish Samples of People With Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David W.; Carlbring, Per; Richards, Jeffrey C.; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the degree of equivalence between paper and Internet administration of three measures of panic and agoraphobia-related cognition and behavior: Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ), Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and Mobility Inventory (MI). Participants were 110 people with panic disorder who had registered for an…

  15. The Uses of Research Sponsored by the Administration on Aging (AoA). Case Study No. 2. Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS). Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; Heinsohn, Ingrid

    This case study, one in a series of research efforts designed to examine the utilization of the Administration on Aging's research, discusses reasons for the wide utilization of the Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) research. (The OARS methodology assesses the levels of functioning of individual elderly persons. The resulting…

  16. The Uses of Research Sponsored by the Administration on Aging (AoA). Case Study No. 1. Transportation Services for the Elderly. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; Heinsohn, Ingrid

    This case study, one in a series of research efforts designed to examine the utilization of the Administration on Aging's research, describes the different types of uses of materials produced by a research project on improvement of transportation services for the elderly. (The materials are a state-of-the-art report, planning handbook, and…

  17. Computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames and the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Computers are playing an increasingly important role in the field of aerodynamics such as that they now serve as a major complement to wind tunnels in aerospace research and development. Factors pacing advances in computational aerodynamics are identified, including the amount of computational power required to take the next major step in the discipline. The four main areas of computational aerodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center which are directed toward extending the state of the art are identified and discussed. Example results obtained from approximate forms of the governing equations are presented and discussed, both in the context of levels of computer power required and the degree to which they either further the frontiers of research or apply to programs of practical importance. Finally, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program--with its 1988 target of achieving a sustained computational rate of 1 billion floating-point operations per second--is discussed in terms of its goals, status, and its projected effect on the future of computational aerodynamics.

  18. Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-19

    DOE established policies to ensure that Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) enhance US competitiveness in the world economy, provide a reasonable return on resources invested, and enable successful commercialization of technologies developed. DOE`s Office of Technology Partnerships issued a General Guidance Memorandum to DOE operations offices establishing policy goals for technology transfer programs, including CRADAS. Our audit disclosed that efforts to manage CRADAs at three national laboratories did not fully achieve DOE`s policy goals outlined in the General Guidance Memorandum. Specifically, the audit showed that: (1) joint work statements did not always contain clearly defined information that allowed DOE to facilitate technology transfer or to evaluate CRADAs potential benefits; (2) CRADA statements of work did not always contain adequate documentation or address potential benefits; (3) the national laboratories reviewed did not have effective mechanisms for continuous self-appraisal or measures of overall program success; and (4) CRADA provisions did not exist to ensure an accurate evaluation of partner contributions.

  19. Challenges of the Administrative Consultation Wiki Research Project as a Learning and Competences Development Method for MPA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Polonca; Stare, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Administrative Consultation Wiki (ACW) is a project run under the auspices of the Faculty of Administration and the Ministry of Public Administration in Slovenia since 2009. A crucial component thereof is the involvement of students of Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree programs to offer them an opportunity to develop competences in…

  20. Evaluation of School Administrators. NAESP School Leadership Digest Series, Number Five. ERIC/CEM Research Analysis Series, Number Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraclough, Terry

    Administrators have always been evaluated in one way or another. Decisions on hiring, training, promotion, and firing of administrators have always been necessary; such decisions are based on some sort of evaluation, whether formal or informal, of administrative performance. The concept of accountability has also affected administrator evaluation.…