Science.gov

Sample records for administration commercial space

  1. 14 CFR 401.3 - The Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator to exercise the Secretary's authority to license or permit and otherwise regulate commercial space transportation and to discharge the Secretary's responsibility to encourage, facilitate, and promote...

  2. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  3. Commercial space launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    While the space shuttle is expected to be the principle Space Transportation System (STS) of the United States, the Reagan Administration is moving ahead with the President's declared space policy of encouraging private sector operation of expendable launch vehicles (ELV's). With the signing of the “Commercial Space Launch Law” on October 30, the administration hopes that it has opened up the door for commercial ventures into space by streamlining regulations and coordinating applications for launches. The administration considers the development and operation of private sector ELV's as an important part of an overall U.S. space policy, complementing the space shuttle and government ELV's. The law follows by nearly a year the creation of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), which will coordinate applications for commercial space launches.

  4. Safety And Promotion in the Federal Aviation Administration- Enabling Safe and Successful Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repcheck, Randall J.

    2010-09-01

    The United States Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation(AST) authorizes the launch and reentry of expendable and reusable launch vehicles and the operation of launch and reentry sites by United States citizens or within the United States. It authorizes these activities consistent with public health and safety, the safety of property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States. In addition to its safety role, AST has the role to encourage, facilitate, and promote commercial space launches and reentries by the private sector. AST’s promotional role includes, among other things, the development of information of interest to industry, the sharing of information of interest through a variety of methods, and serving as an advocate for Commercial Space Transportation within the United States government. This dual safety and promotion role is viewed by some as conflicting. AST views these two roles as complementary, and important for the current state of commercial space transportation. This paper discusses how maintaining a sound safety decision-making process, maintaining a strong safety culture, and taking steps to avoid complacency can together enable safe and successful commercial space transportation.

  5. Commercial ELV services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Concord or discord?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankle, Edward A.

    1988-01-01

    In implementation of the U.S. policy to foster and encourage the commercial expendable launch vehicle (ELV) industry, tensions have developed between the industry and U.S. Government agencies in two distinct areas: industry use of government facilities and government purchase of commercial ELV services. The reasons for the tensions and discrete legal problems for each area are identified and discussed. Specifically, in the use of government facilities area, issues of insurance and indemnification for third-party liability and government property, concerns over priority and scheduling, and dispute-resolution procedures are discussed. In the area of government purchase of ELV launch services, a comparison is made between a launch service purchase and prior procurement practice. In all areas, the conclusion is reached that while problems still exist, they generally are understood and great progress has been made toward their resolution.

  6. 76 FR 82031 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... teleconference of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC) Risk Management Working...

  7. 78 FR 14401 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). DATES:...

  8. 76 FR 15039 - Commercial Space Transportation Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Grants Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request for grant proposals for the Commercial Space Transportation... development of a Commercial Space Transportation infrastructure system, which supports the National...

  9. 76 FR 78329 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space... Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The teleconference will take place on...

  10. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  11. 75 FR 23841 - Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request for grant proposals for the Commercial Space Transportation Grant Program. SUMMARY: The FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) requests...

  12. 77 FR 35102 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group (OWG) of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC)....

  13. Space America's commercial space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, N. H.

    1984-01-01

    Space America prepared a private sector land observing space system which includes a sensor system with eight spectral channels configured for stereoscopic data acquisition of four stereo pairs, a spacecraft bus with active three-axis stabilization, a ground station for data acquisition, preprocessing and retransmission. The land observing system is a component of Space America's end-to-end system for Earth resources management, monitoring and exploration. In the context of the Federal Government's program of commercialization of the US land remote sensing program, Space America's space system is characteristic of US industry's use of advanced technology and of commercial, entrepreneurial management. Well before the issuance of the Request for Proposals for Transfer of the United States Land Remote Sensing Program to the Private Sector by the US Department of Commerce, Space Services, Inc., the managing venturer of Space America, used private funds to develop and manage its sub-orbital launch of its Conestoga launch vehicle.

  14. 77 FR 52067 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This Committee reports to the NAC... Agreements --Ames Research Center's Commercial Space Activities and Plans --Dryden Flight Research...

  15. 78 FR 53496 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). DATES: The teleconference will take place on...

  16. 75 FR 70347 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Renewal AGENCY... given that the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC) has been renewed for a 2.... commercial space transportation industry. The ] primary goals of the Committee are to evaluate...

  17. 77 FR 4370 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  18. 76 FR 17712 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  19. 75 FR 11200 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  20. 78 FR 42111 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  1. 77 FR 20852 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  2. 75 FR 17437 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  3. 78 FR 10213 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  4. 75 FR 53349 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  5. 76 FR 3674 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  6. 75 FR 28821 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  7. 75 FR 39973 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  8. 77 FR 67028 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  9. 77 FR 38678 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  10. Serving the Space Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jack E.; Thompson, Arthur W.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the current program was to establish an upward mobility program that afforded employees an opportunity to improve their credibility in job opportunity selection under the directives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (Author/RK)

  11. 75 FR 4875 - NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Commercial Space Committee to the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Tuesday, February 16, 2010, 10 a.m.-5...

  12. Space Station Freedom commercial infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barquinero, Kevin; Cassidy, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    NASA policy concerning the commercial infrastructure of the Space Station is examined. Plans for receiving and evaluating unsolicited proposals to provide commercial infrastructure are outlined. The guidelines for development of the commercial infrastructure and examples of opportunities for industry are listed. Also, a program for industry feedback concerning the commercial infrastructure policy is discussed.

  13. 78 FR 18416 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  14. 78 FR 53496 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  15. Space Station commercial user development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The commercial utilization of the space station is investigated. The interest of nonaerospace firms in the use of the space station is determined. The user requirements are compared to the space station's capabilities and a feasibility analysis of a commercial firm acting as an intermediary between NASA and the private sector to reduce costs is presented.

  16. 77 FR 44707 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The...

  17. 78 FR 70093 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  18. 76 FR 12211 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The teleconference will take place on...

  19. 77 FR 65443 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The...

  20. 77 FR 48585 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group (OWG) of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC)....

  1. Commercial Space Tourism and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ronald

    2007-08-01

    Space tourism, a concept which even a few years ago was perveived as science fantasy, is now a credible industry. Five individuals have paid up to $25 M to spend more than a week on the International Space Station. Several enterprises are working toward viable suborbital and orbital private space operations. while operational space weather support to human space flight has been the domain of government entities the emergence of space tourism now presents a new opportunity for the commercial space weather community. This article examines the space weather impact on crews and passengers of the future space tourism industry.

  2. 77 FR 52108 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial...

  3. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Commercial Space; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  4. Commercialization of solar space power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Alok; Sera, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to help U.S. companies commercialize renewable energy in India, with a special focus on solar energy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) is working with ENTECH, Inc., a solar photovoltaic (SPV) systems manufacturer to form partnerships with Indian companies. MCTTC has conducted both secondary and primary market research and obtained travel funding to meet potential Indian partners face to face. MCTTC and ENTECH traveled to India during June 2-20, 1994, and visited New Delhi, Bombay, Pune and Calcutta. Meetings were held with several key government officials and premier Indian business houses and entrepreneurs in the area of solar energy. A firsthand knowledge of India's renewable energy industry was gained, and companies were qualified in terms of capabilities and commitment to the SPV business. The World Bank has awarded India with 280 million to commercialize renewable energies, including 55 million for SPV. There is a market in India for both small-scale (kW) and large SPV (MW) applications. Each U.S. company needs to form a joint venture with an Indian firm and let the latter identify the states and projects with the greatest business potential. Several big Indian companies and entrepreneurs are planning to enter the SPV business, and they currently are seeking foreign technology partners. Since the lager companies have adopted a more conservative approach, however, partnerships with entrepreneurs might offer the quickest route to market entry in India.

  5. NASA's approach to space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Office of Commercial Programs fosters private participation in commercially oriented space projects. Five Centers for the Commercial Development of Space encourage new ideas and perform research which may yield commercial processes and products for space ventures. Joint agreements allow companies who present ideas to NASA and provide flight hardware access to a free launch and return from orbit. The experimenters furnish NASA with sufficient data to demonstrate the significance of the results. Ground-based tests are arranged for smaller companies to test the feasibility of concepts before committing to the costs of developing hardware. Joint studies of mutual interest are performed by NASA and private sector researchers, and two companies have signed agreements for a series of flights in which launch costs are stretched out to meet projected income. Although Shuttle flights went on hold following the Challenger disaster, extensive work continues on the preparation of commercial research payloads that will fly when Shuttle flights resume.

  6. 76 FR 621 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The teleconference will take place on...

  7. 76 FR 4988 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The teleconference will take place on...

  8. 76 FR 41323 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The teleconference will take place on...

  9. 76 FR 42160 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Space Transportation Operations Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY:...

  10. 78 FR 1917 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space... Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). DATES: The teleconference will take place on...

  11. 77 FR 71474 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Charter Renewal AGENCY... Renewal of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). SUMMARY: FAA announces the... (FAA) on the critical matters facing the U.S. commercial space transportation industry. This...

  12. Commercial Space with Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Carey M.; Rhodes, Russell E.; Robinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    To provide affordable space transportation we must be capable of using common fixed assets and the infrastructure for multiple purposes simultaneously. The Space Shuttle was operated for thirty years, but was not able to establish an effective continuous improvement program because of the high risk to the crew on every mission. An unmanned capability is needed to provide an acceptable risk to the primary mission. This paper is intended to present a case where a commercial space venture could share the large fixed cost of operating the infrastructure with the government while the government provides new advanced technology that is focused on reduced operating cost to the common launch transportation system. A conceivable commercial space venture could provide educational entertainment for the country's youth that would stimulate their interest in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through access at entertainment parks or the existing Space Visitor Centers. The paper uses this example to demonstrate how growing public-private space market demand will re-orient space transportation industry priorities in flight and ground system design and technology development, and how the infrastructure is used and shared.

  13. Commercializing Space Weather using GAIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Sojka, Jan J.

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the en-ergy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects com-munication and navigation systems. The Utah State University (USU) Space Weather Center (SWC) was organized in 2009 to develop commercial space weather applications. It uses the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system as the basis for providing improvements to communication and navigation systems. For example, in August 2009 SWC released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world's first real-time space weather via an iPhone app, Space WX. It displays the real-time, current global ionosphere to-tal electron content along with its space weather drivers, is available through the Apple iTunes store, and is used around the world. The GAIM system is run operationally at SWC for global and regional (continental U.S.) conditions. Each run stream continuously ingests up to 10,000 slant TEC measurements every 15-minutes from approximately 500 stations in a Kalman filter to adjust the background output from the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM). Additionally, 80 real-time digisonde data streams from around the world provide ionosphere characterization up to the F-region peak. The combination of these data dramatically improves the current epoch ionosphere specification beyond the physics-based solution. The altitudinal range is 90-1500 km for output TEC, electron densities, and other data products with a few degrees resolution in latitude and longitude at 15-minute time granularity. We describe the existing SWC products that are used as commercial space weather information. SWC funding is provided by the State of Utah's Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The SWC is physically located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah.

  14. Commercial space initiatives - Signs of hope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Wood, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the evolution and status of commercial space development along with the U.S. Government's role in commercial development. Special attention is given to several activities in the NASA program in this area. These activities include the development of space technology to meet the needs of promising commercial applications (such as new satellite communications and remote sensing technology), serving as a customer to commercial space ventures, and providing direct assistance to private sector commercial space initiatives.

  15. Collaborative Commercial Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, T. S.; Hendrix, D.; Sibert, D.; Hall, R. A.; Therien, W.

    2013-09-01

    There is an increasing recognition by commercial and civil space operators of the need for space situational awareness (SSA) data to support ongoing conjunction analysis, maneuver planning, and radio frequency interference mitigation as part of daily operations. While some SSA data is available from the Joint Space Operations Center via the Space Track web site, access to raw observations and photometric data is limited due to national security considerations. These data, however, are of significant value in calibrating intra- and inter-operator orbit determination results, determining inter-system biases, and assessing operating profiles in the geostationary orbit. This paper details an ongoing collaborative effort to collect and process optical observations and photometric data using a network of low-cost telescope installations and shows how these data are being used to support ongoing operations in the Space Data Center. This presentation will demonstrate how by leveraging advance photometric processing algorithms developed for Missile Defense Agency and the Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) mission ExoAnalytic and AGI have been able to provide actionable SSA for satellite operators from small telescopes in less than optimal viewing conditions. Space has become an increasingly cluttered environment requiring satellite operators to remain forever vigilant in order to prevent collisions to preserve their assets and prevent further cluttering the space environment. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC), which tracks all objects in earth orbit, reports possible upcoming conjunctions to operators by providing Conjunction Summary Messages (CSMs). However due to large positional uncertainties in the forward predicted position of space objects at the time closest approach the volume of CSMs is excessive to the point that maneuvers in response to CSMs without additional screening is cost prohibitive. CSSI and the Space Data Association have been able to screen most

  16. 78 FR 28275 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Safety Approval Performance... hypobaric chamber training for crew and space flight participants to experience and demonstrate knowledge of...), FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), 800 Independence Avenue SW., Room 331,...

  17. 77 FR 58607 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance..., Licensing and Evaluation Division (AST-200), FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), 800... Space Transportation. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P...

  18. 77 FR 20531 - Correction of Authority Citations for Commercial Space Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ...] Correction of Authority Citations for Commercial Space Transportation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... the FAA's commercial space transportation regulations. This action is necessary to correct affected... Space Transportation, Office of the Chief Counsel, Regulations Division, AGC-200, Federal...

  19. A study of factors related to commercial space platform services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    In the past four years, the issue of the commercial development of space has come to the forefront of the U. S. national space policy. Though the Administration, Congress and NASA have all shown strong support for encouraging the private sector to become more actively involved in the commercial utilization of space, the question remains whether they must do more to foster the creation and development of a viable U. S. commercial space industry. Marketing aspects, insurance and risk loss, tax related factors, space transportation, termination liability, institutional barriers, and procurement laws and regulations are discussed.

  20. 76 FR 20070 - Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria... received, a safety approval for the ability of its Space Training System: Model 400 (STS-400) to replicate....19 (a)(4). NASTAR's ] STS-400 suborbital space flight simulator (a multi-axis centrifuge) is...

  1. Second Symposium on Space Industrialization. [space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The policy, legal, and economic aspects of space industrialization are considered along with satellite communications, material processing, remote sensing, and the role of space carriers and a space station in space industrialization.

  2. 76 FR 4412 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... 102-3.160, notice is hereby given of a special closed session of the Commercial Space...

  3. 78 FR 69742 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  4. 77 FR 16891 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  5. 76 FR 17474 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  6. 75 FR 54002 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial Space...

  7. A gap analysis of meteorological requirements for commercial space operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Nicholas James

    been generated for the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Congress, commercial space launch companies, and areas are identified for further research.

  8. Enabling Sustainable Exploration through the Commercial Development of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The commercial development of space offers enabling benefits to space exploration. This paper examines how those benefits can be realized, and how the Space Product Development Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is taking the first steps towards opening the space frontier through vital and sustainable industrial development. The Space Product Development Office manages 15 Commercial Space Centers that partner with US industry to develop opportunities for commerce in space. This partnership directly benefits NASA exploration in four primary ways. First, by actively involving traditional and non-traditional companies in commercial space activities, it seeks and encourages to the maximum extent possible the fullest commercial use of space, as directed by NASA's charter. Second, the commercial research and technologies pursued and developed in the program often have direct applicability to NASA priority mission areas. This dual use strategy for research and technology has the potential to greatly expand what the NASA scientific community can do. Third, the commercial experiment hardware developed by the Commercial Space Centers and their industrial partners is available for use by NASA researchers in support of priority NASA research. By utilizing low cost and existing commercial hardware, essential NASA research can be more readily accomplished. Fourth, by assisting industry in understanding the use of the environment of space and in helping industry enhance the tools and technologies for NASA and commercial space systems, the market for commercial space utilization and the capability for meeting the future growing market needs is being developed. These two activities taken together form the beginning of a new space economy that will enable sustainable NASA exploration of the universe.

  9. Transitioning NASA Space Operations to Commercial Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene E.

    1998-01-01

    Major considerations associated with "Transitioning NASA Space Operations to Commercial Services" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Government use of commercial frequencies vs. commercial use of commercial frequencies for government use; 2) Commercial use of government frequencies; 3) Government vs commercial: Access techniques, data formats, and modulation and coding; 4) Government need for multiple sources: backup and competition; 5) Government in perceived competition with commercial service providers if TDRSS is used for commercial purposes; and 6) Coordination required among plans for CSOC, NSCP, and satellite industry.

  10. Non-US approaches to space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The approaches to the commercialization of space taken by the four foreign countries most active in the field - Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Japan are described. National space program elements with commercial potential are examined in the context of national industrial and science policies, with special attention to objectives, timetables, and budgetary priority relative to other sectors. The role of the European Space Agency in attaining national and regional commercialization objectives is also examined.

  11. Space Industry Commercialization: A Systems Engineering Evaluation of Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinally, Jihan

    The Constellation Program cancellation reversed the government and commercial space industry's roles and relationships by dedicating the majority of the federal funding and opportunities to the commercial space industry and left the government space industry in search of an approach to collaborate with the dominant organization, the commercial space industry service providers. The space industry government agencies, Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had realized that to gain resources in the new commercially oriented economic environment, they had to work together and possess the capabilities aligned with the National Space Policy's documented goals. Multi-organizational collaboration in space industry programs is challenging, as NASA, AFSPC, and commercial providers, follow different [1] enterprise architecture guidance such as the NASA systems engineering Handbook, MIL-STD-499 and "A Guide to the systems engineering Body of Knowledge" by the International Council on systems engineering [2] [3]. A solution to streamline their enterprise architecture documentation and meet National Space Policy goals is the Multi-User Architecture Maturity Model Methodology (MAM3), which offers a tailored systems engineering technique the government agencies and private companies can implement for the program's maturity level. In order to demonstrate the MAM3, a CubeSat motivated study was conducted partnering a commercial provider with a government agency. A survey of the commercial space industry service providers' capabilities was performed to select the private companies for the study. Using the survey results, the commercial space industry service providers were ranked using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) [4]. The AHP is a structured technique for making complex decisions for representing and quantifying its weights, relating those weights to overall goals, and evaluating alternative solutions [5] - [8]. The weights

  12. 14 CFR 401.1 - The Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The Office of Commercial Space... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL ORGANIZATION AND DEFINITIONS § 401.1 The Office of Commercial Space Transportation. The Office of Commercial Space Transportation, referred to in...

  13. 14 CFR 401.1 - The Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The Office of Commercial Space... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL ORGANIZATION AND DEFINITIONS § 401.1 The Office of Commercial Space Transportation. The Office of Commercial Space Transportation, referred to in...

  14. 14 CFR 401.1 - The Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The Office of Commercial Space... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL ORGANIZATION AND DEFINITIONS § 401.1 The Office of Commercial Space Transportation. The Office of Commercial Space Transportation, referred to in...

  15. 14 CFR 401.1 - The Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Office of Commercial Space... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL ORGANIZATION AND DEFINITIONS § 401.1 The Office of Commercial Space Transportation. The Office of Commercial Space Transportation, referred to in...

  16. 76 FR 51461 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Commercial...

  17. 75 FR 16901 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Open Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory.... 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of the meetings of the Commercial...

  18. Commercial biotechnology processing on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuser, Mark S.; Vellinger, John C.; Hardin, Juanita R.; Lewis, Marian L.

    1998-01-01

    Commercial biotechnology processing in space has the potential to eventually exceed the $35 billion annual worldwide market generated by the current satellite communications industry (Parone 1997). The International Space Station provides the opportunity to conduct long-term, crew-tended biotechnology research in microgravity to establish the foundation for this new commercial biotechnology market. Industry, government, and academia are collaborating to establish the infrastructure needed to catalyze this biotechnology revolution that could eventually lead to production of medical and pharmaceutical products in space. The biotechnology program discussed herein is evidence of this collaborative effort, with industry involvement from Space Hardware Optimization Technology, Inc., government participation through the NASA Commercial Space program, and academic guidance from the Consortium for Materials Development in Space at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Blending the strengths and resources of each collaborator creates a strong partnership, that offers enormous research and commercial opportunities.

  19. Centers for the commercial development of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Susan E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, NASA initiated an innovative effort called Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). The CCDS program was designed to increase private-sector interest and investment in space-related activities, while encouraging U.S. economic leadership and stimulating advances in promising areas of research and development. Research conducted in the Centers handling the following areas is summarized: materials processing; life sciences; remote sensing; automation and robotics; space propulsion; space structures and materials; and space power.

  20. The Role of the FAA in US Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Patricia Grace

    2002-01-01

    The Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984 granted the United States (U.S.) Secretary of Transportation authority to regulate launch and launch site operations conducted by U.S. citizens or from the U.S. This authority is exercised only to the extent necessary to protect public health and safety, protect property, and preserve U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. The Secretary of Transportation has delegated this responsibility to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the FAA Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation carries out activities associated with this responsibility. Since 1984, the Commercial Space Launch Act has been amended several times and the FAA's responsibilities regarding U.S. commercial space transportation activities have been expanded to include regulation of reentry activities and operation of reentry sites by U.S. citizens. Additionally, the FAA can determine safety approval criteria for vehicles, safety systems, processes, services and personnel. Since 1984, there have been no fatalities or injuries suffered by the public resulting from U.S. commercial space launch activities. While public safety is its primary focus, the FAA also promotes launches by U.S. commercial space transportation entities in order to support U.S. competitiveness in the global marketplace.

  1. Commercial use of space - The space business era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    Progress and avenues being explored by NASA to hasten the commercialization of space are described. A task force has recommended that the effort begin at once, that bureaucratic barriers to commercial space activities be removed, and that a partnership between government and industry be seriously explored. The government role is to establish links with private industry, invest in high-leverage technologies and space facilities which will be attractive to commercial ventures, and contribute to commercial enterprises where risks are high and significant economic benefits can be foreseen. The government/industry relationship can be legally evinced by MOUs, joint endeavor agreements, technical exchange agreements and industrial guest investigator arrangements. The Space Station is the first step in that it allows Americans to live and work in space. It is expected that international participation in Space Station development and utilization will accelerate the space business era.

  2. Florida, National Space Club Embrace Commercial Endeavors

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Manager Ed Mango and Florida's Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll were guest speakers at the National Space Club Florida Committee's luncheon at the Radisson Resort at t...

  3. NewSpace: The Emerging Commercial Space Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Presenter will give a lecture on the emerging commercial space industry at International Space University's 2014 Space Studies Program (SSP) at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. The presentation consists of 38 Powerpoint slides and describes the emerging commercial space sector, key players and capabilities. The slides explain which areas that the commercial sector is taking hold, what new markets are attracting start up companies, and which companies are participating. A discussion of how governments can help with the new industry's development is offered.

  4. Leasecraft - A commercial space platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrowbridge, D. R.

    The Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) is the result of a NASA program concerned with the identification of new approaches to spacecraft design. A mandatory requirement regarding the MMS was flexibility to accommodatae a wide variety of payloads. MMS derived subsystems will provide a platform in low orbit for scientific, commercial, and government users on a leased or service contract basis. The payload may consist of scientific instruments, materials processing equipment, or remote sensors. Secondary payloads may be mounted in standard MMS module boxes. The platform forms a part of the 'Leasecraft' system, which was developed by an American aerospace company. Attention is given to the Leasecraft vehicle, details regarding the Leasecraft platform, and payload accommodations and Leasecraft missions.

  5. Commercial Space Research: Entering a New Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Mark E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Act which established NASA included direction that NASA is to foster to the maximum extent possible the commercial use of space. In order to achieve this, NASA began establishing in 1985, Commercial Space Centers (CSCs). These centers are a consortium of industry, academia, and government. Primarily university based, the CSCs are chartered to partner with industry to help companies learn how using space can improve their bottom line. Responsibility for the Commercial Space Centers rests with the Space Product Development Office at Marshall Space Flight Center. Since the program was established in 1985, SPD has sponsored nearly 180 commercial microgravity research payloads on 30 Shuttle missions. The vast majority of these missions were on the order of 6 days. Most companies have only had on average three flight opportunities to advance their product development efforts. From the product development standpoint of an individual company only three weeks of microgravity time have been obtained to date. Of key importance to a company is the fact that this time has not been continuous. Anywhere from one to three years elapses between flights. Despite these flight constraints, the companies in the SPD program have made considerable progress. For example, over the course of the program through 1999, industry has invested over half a billion dollars in cash and in-kind. Over a dozen new product lines are in development by the industrial partners of the Commercial Space Centers. Now the companies partnered with the SPD program have a new opportunity in the International Space Station. The long duration capability provided by the Station will provide double the amount of per company average microgravity time in just the first increment. Current planning through planning increment 5 shows that commercial investment in space research should now be positioned for greater returns.

  6. Multimegawatt power sources for commercial space operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dearien, J.A.; Martinell, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    There is a great deal of interest in commercial operation in space today, but very little consideration of where the power to run such an operation is to come from. For any commercial operation in space, the power source, especially those involving kilowatts and megawatts of power, must be considered at the very onset of the venture. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is working this problem in conjunction with the development of Strategic Defense Initiative needs. The same type of up-front power development program needs to be considered in all discussions associated with commercial development in space. A system developed for a commercial operation in space will most likely be a hybrid system utilizing both electrical and thermal energy. Even if the commercial process consists totally of high power thermal energy usage, there will be a certain amount of electricity required for controls, mass transport, environmental control (if manned), and communications. The optimum system will thus require a great deal of planning and coordination with the development of the commercial process. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. 78 FR 21003 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Availability of the Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... Licenses to Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) for Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy Commercial Launch... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Availability of the... Final Environmental Assessment for Falcon 9 and Falcon 9 Heavy Launch Vehicle Programs from Space...

  8. Space Resources Development: The Link Between Human Exploration and the Long-Term Commercialization of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2000-01-01

    In a letter to the NASA Administrator, Dan Goldin, in January of 1999, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) stated the following . OMB recommends that NASA consider commercialization in a broader context than the more focused efforts to date on space station and space shuttle commercialization. We suggest that NASA examine architectures that take advantage of a potentially robust future commercial infrastructure that could dramatically lower the cost of future human exploration." In response to this letter, the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise launched the BEDS Technology & Commercialization Initiative (HTCI) to link technology and system development for human exploration with the commercial development of space to emphasize the "D" (Development) in BEDS. The development of technologies and capabilities to utilize space resources is the first of six primary focus areas in this program. It is clear that Space Resources Development (SRD) is key for both long-term human exploration of our solar system and to the long-term commercialization of space since: a) it provides the technologies, products, and raw materials to support efficient space transportation and in-space construction and manufacturing, and b) it provides the capabilities and infrastructure to allow outpost growth, self-sufficiency, and commercial space service and utility industry activities.

  9. Does Commercial Space Really Need MOA?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    The Mission Operations Assurance (MOA) discipline actively participates as a project member to achieve their common objective of full mission success while also providing an independent risk assessment to the Project Manager. The cornerstone element of MOA is the independent assessment of the risks the project faces in executing its mission. Especially as the project approaches critical mission events, it becomes imperative to clearly identify and assess the risks the project faces. This has been the paradigm for robotic space exploration missions, but does the same apply to commercial space operations? This is the question which is the driver for this year's MOA track at the 18th Annual Improving Space Operations workshop in April at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the question we examine in this paper. Corollaries to this driving question are why shouldn't MOA apply and are there factors beyond mission success with acceptable risk which apply to commercial space operations that are not present in government scientific missions? To address these questions, areas we focus on include risk (both mission and profit) management for commercial space operations and the practical extension of robotic mission MOA to commercial space operations. Another key area to look at is command file errors which are a major concern for deep space robotic missions, but can we worry about them less with manned missions or unmanned supply mission? Further, with the growing concern about space debris, we delve into the role of MOA relative to End-of-Mission activities. This paper examines these topics and in particular the perspectives presented at the workshop to begin charting the appropriate course for MOA in the emerging sector of Commercial Space Operations.

  10. Commercialization is Required for Sustainable Space Exploration and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.; Olson, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration policy outlines an exciting new direction in space for human and robotic exploration and development beyond low Earth orbit. Pressed by this new visionary guidance, human civilization will be able to methodically build capabilities to move off Earth and into the solar system in a step-by-step manner, gradually increasing the capability for humans to stay longer in space and move further away from Earth. The new plans call for an implementation that would create an affordable and sustainable program in order to span over generations of explorers, each new generation pushing back the boundaries and building on the foundations laid by the earlier. To create a sustainable program it is important to enable and encourage the development of a selfsupporting commercial space industry leveraging both traditional and non-traditional segments of the industrial base. Governments will not be able to open the space frontier on their own because their goals change over relatively short timescales and because the large costs associated with human spaceflight cannot be sustained. A strong space development industrial sector is needed that can one day support the needs of commercial space enterprises as well as provide capabilities that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other national space agencies can buy to achieve their exploration goals. This new industrial space sector will someday provide fundamental capabilities like communications, power, logistics, and even cargo and human space transportation, just as commercial companies are able to provide these services on Earth today. To help develop and bolster this new space industrial sector, NASA and other national space agencies can enable and facilitate it in many ways, including reducing risk by developing important technologies necessary for commercialization of space, and as a paying customer, partner, or anchor tenant. This transition from all or mostly government

  11. 75 FR 70951 - NASA Advisory Council; NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  12. 76 FR 4743 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  13. 75 FR 71791 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  14. 75 FR 51332 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  15. 76 FR 15041 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  16. 75 FR 52058 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  17. 76 FR 67018 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  18. 75 FR 38866 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a teleconference of the...

  19. Economic consequences of commercial space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Wood, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The potential economic benefits generated from increased industry involvement and investment in space activities and the subsequent cost implications are discussed. A historical overview of commercial industry involvement in space is given and sources of new economic growth in space are discussed. These include communications satellites, small satellites, positioning and navigation services, space transportation and infrastructure, remote sensing, and materials processing in space such as the manufacturing of protein crystals and zeolites. Macroeconomic trends and principles such as limits on technology trade, eased restrictions on international joint ventures, foreign investments in U.S. firms, and increased foreign competition are discussed. Earth observations and mapping are considered. Opportunities for private sector involvement in building space infrastructure and space transportation are highlighted.

  20. Bonneville Power Administration`s Commercial Sector Conservation Market.

    SciTech Connect

    Gordan, Frederick M.

    1992-11-10

    Bonneville has, as part of its resource plan, accepted targets for commercial conservation which are quite ambitious. To meet these targets, Bonneville will need to acquire as much cost-effective conservation as possible over the next twelve years. With this in mind, this document explores the relative importance of different commercial market segments and the types of assistance each market needs to install as many cost-effective conservation measures in as many buildings as possible. This document reviews Bonneville`s marketing environment and position, and suggests goals for commercial sector conservation marketing at Bonneville. Then it presents a broad market segmentation and series of additional demographic analyses. These analyses assess what groups of consumers Bonneville must reach to achieve most of the commercial conservation potential and what is needed to reach them. A final section reviews the success of Bonneville programs at reaching various markets. The market segmentation identifies different types of consumers and opportunities which would require distinct program approaches. Four large market segments are identified that have distinct program needs. Then four ``building life-cycle events`` are identified which provide important conservation opportunities and also require distinct program services. This creates a matrix of 16 cells which delineate distinct needs for program marketing. Each of the four key market segments manages at least 20% of the Region`s commercial floorspace.

  1. Economic benefits of commercial space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the current and potential impact on the economy of selected private sector space activities including materials processing in space and satellite communications. Spacehab, a commercially developed and manufactured pressurized metal cylinder which fits in the Shuttle payload bay and connects to the crew compartment is examined along with potential uses of the Shuttle external tank. Private sector upper stage development, the privatization of expendable launch vehicles, and the transfer of NASA technology are discussed.

  2. Enterprise: an International Commercial Space Station Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounge, John M.

    2002-01-01

    In December 1999, the U.S. aerospace company SPACEHAB, Inc., (SPACEHAB) and the Russian aerospace company Rocket and Space Corporation Energia (RSC-Energia), initiated a joint project to establish a commercial venture on the International Space Station (ISS). The approach of this venture is to use private capital to build and attach a commercial habitable module (the "Enterprise Module") to the Russian Segment of the ISS. The module will become an element of the Russian Segment; in return, exclusive rights to use this module for commercial business will be granted to its developers. The Enterprise Module has been designed as a multipurpose module that can provide research accommodation, stowage and crew support services. Recent NASA budget decisions have resulted in the cancellation of NASA's ISS habitation module, a significant delay in its new ISS crew return vehicle, and a mandate to stabilize the ISS program. These constraints limit the ISS crew size to three people and result in very little time available for ISS research support. Since research activity is the primary reason this Space Station is being built, the ISS program must find a way to support a robust international research program as soon as possible. The time is right for a commercial initiative incorporating the Enterprise Module, outfitted with life support systems, and commercially procured Soyuz vehicles to provide the capability to increase ISS crew size to six by the end of 2005.

  3. 76 FR 30232 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance... associated with suborbital space flight. The reduced gravity levels are: --0.00 g 0.05 g for 17 continuous... Division (AST-200), FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), 800 Independence Avenue, SW.,...

  4. Economic benefits of commercial space activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    Space is not only an endless frontier for exploration, but also a potentially rich arena for profitable commerce to benefit all mankind. Access to the unique environment of space provides opportunities for unprecedented kinds of research to develop new products and services. This research can lead to commercially viable enterprises, which will become permanent businesses, which will provide good jobs for workers, pay taxes to their governments, and return dividends to their investors. Seeking superior products and processes is vital if the economy is to grow and prosper. This paper discusses the current and potential impact on the economy of selected private sector space activities.

  5. Commercial Space Travel, Ethics and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    For the past two decades interest in the possibilities of commercial (manned) space travel or space tourism has increased among engineers, scientists, entrepreneurs and also citizens. A continuously growing collection of papers is being published on space tourism itself and associated subjects, like new reusable launch vehicles, space habitats, space entertainment and corresponding law and regulation. Market research promises sufficient interest in tourist space travel to take off and develop into a multi billion-dollar business. The basic engineering knowledge and expertise is available to start development and designing of safe and affordable reusable vertical lift off and landing vehicles, like the Kankoh-Maru. However, many issues remain fairly untouched in literature. These include, for example, regulations, law, international agreement on space traffic control and also insurance policy. One important topic however has been barely touched upon. This concerns the ethical issues in commercial (manned) space travel, which need to be considered thoroughly, preferably before actual take off of the first regular space tourist services. The answer to the latter question comprises the major part of the paper. First, the paper deals with the issue of who wants, needs and will go to space at what stage in the development of the space tourism industry. A schematic pyramid differentiating between several community groups is made. Secondly, it discusses the way we can and should deal with our environment. Space is still fairly unspoiled, although there is a lot of (government) debris out there. Rules of the space tourist game need to be established. A few general directions are presented, for example on debris cleaning and garbage disposal. Also our right to exploit the asteroids and the moon for material is discussed. In the last part of this paper, the risks involved with the harsh environment of space are considered. Is it safe and responsible to eject people into outer

  6. A Technology Plan for Enabling Commercial Space Business

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry M.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Space Transportation Program is a customer driven, focused technology program that supports the NASA Strategic Plan and considers future commercial space business projections. The initial cycle of the Advanced Space Transportation Program implementation planning was conducted from December 1995 through February 1996 and represented increased NASA emphasis on broad base technology development with the goal of dramatic reductions in the cost of space transportation. The second planning cycle, conducted in January and February 1997, updated the program implementation plan based on changes in the external environment, increased maturity of advanced concept studies, and current technology assessments. The program has taken a business-like approach to technology development with a balanced portfolio of near, medium, and long-term strategic targets. Strategic targets are influenced by Earth science, space science, and exploration objectives as well as commercial space markets. Commercial space markets include those that would be enhanced by lower cost transportation as well as potential markets resulting in major increases in space business induced by reductions in transportation cost. The program plan addresses earth-to-orbit space launch, earth orbit operations and deep space systems. It also addresses all critical transportation system elements; including structures, thermal protection systems, propulsion, avionics, and operations. As these technologies are matured, integrated technology flight experiments such as the X-33 and X-34 flight demonstrator programs support near-term (one to five years) development or operational decisions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program and the flight demonstrator programs combine business planning, ground-based technology demonstrations and flight demonstrations that will permit industry and NASA to commit to revolutionary new space transportation systems

  7. The first decade of commercial space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Wei

    2015-03-01

    In order to provide a basis for assessing the future prospects and challenges of space tourism, this paper begins with a brief overview of the history of space tourism. This is followed by a discussion on market demand and current developments in the academic community, as well as the status of traffic tools, regulations and legalization. In market demand, although studies conducted in 1990s assumed the possibility of 500,000 per year in space tourists and several billion USD of annual revenue, in 2008 a relatively modest 13,000 per year was predicted. At this time traffic transport tools including the Soyuz system, CST-100, DragonRider and International Space Station (ISS) can only provide a few tens in spare seats for space tourists per year compared to the projected 20,000 plus seat capacity of the Lynx, Dream Chaser and SpaceShipTwo (SS2) fleets, which have the potential to conduct their first full suborbital test flight and first commercial flight within the coming decade. Added to this, the US government has only a regulatory regime that supports privately owned suborbital space tourism (SST) and no government funded orbital space tourism (OST). These evidences reveal a very high and advantageous potential for SST to form a space tourism industry in the coming decade, whereas the possibility of OST is relatively low. However, even though the prosperity of SST in the coming years is expectable, its maturity, reliability and safety still need to win the confidence of the general public. For examples, the announcement of changes to fuel used in the SS2 rocket engine in May 2014 and the crash of one SS2 while performing test flight on 31 October 2014 indicated the need for much careful preparation, as any accident in commercial operation could seriously damage or even kill its future prospects.

  8. Commercial space policy - Theory and practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freibaum, Jerry

    1986-01-01

    NASA policy toward commercial space ventures is summarized and illustrated with a proposed system for mobile communications through satellite links (MSAT). The government's, i.e., NASA's, role in commercial space ventures is to provide funding and expertise to high risk projects with prospective large returns, provided no vital public services are displaced. MSAT would be realized with a relay spacecraft in GEO, linking mobile radios costing in the range $500-2500. The experimental ATS-6 satellite would be the first generation relay. It is estimated that by the 1990s a spacecraft with a 20-55 m antenna could provide transmission relays for between 640,000 to about 2.5 million nonurban communications units.

  9. Commercial use of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.; Brown, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the scientific and commercial aspects of Materials Processing in the Space program. The elimination of gravity driven convection in molten materials can preclude undesirable stirring and mixing during crystal growth, and improve the casting of alloys and composites, chemical reactions, and the separation of biological materials. The elimination of hydrostatic pressure will allow alloy heat-treatment without distortion and growth of heavy crystals, such as thorium oxide, and containerless processing of liquids and molten materials. On the other hand, more sophisticated process control and diagnostic methods in sample preparation and temperature control must be developed, concluding that space made products of commercial interest are likely to be low volume, high value items.

  10. (abstract) Space Science with Commercial Funding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The world-wide recession, and other factors, have led to reduced or flat budgets in real terms for space agencies around the world. Consequently space science projects and proposals have been under pressure and seemingly will continue to be pressured for some years into the future. A new concept for space science funding is underway at JPL. A partnership has been arranged with a commercial, for-profit, company that proposes to implement a (bandwidth-on-demand) information and telephone system through a network of low earth orbiting satellites (LEO). This network will consist of almost 1000 satellites operating in polar orbit at Ka-band. JPL has negotiated an agreement with this company that each satellite will also carry one or more science instruments for astrophysics, astronomy, and for earth observations. This paper discussed the details of the arrangement and the financial arrangements. It describes the technical parameters, such as the 60 GHz wideband inter-satellite links and the frequency, time, and position control, on which the science is based, and it also discusses the complementarity of this commercially funded space science with conventional space science.

  11. Concept for a commercial space station laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. W.; Stark, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of a privately owned and operated fee-for-service laboratory as an element of a civil manned space station, envisioned as the venture of a group of private investors and an experienced laboratory operator to be undertaken with the cooperation of NASA is discussed. This group would acquire, outfit, activate, and operate the labortory on a fee-for-service basis, providing laboratory services to commercial firms, universities, and government agencies, including NASA. This concept was developed to identify, stimulate, and assist potential commercial users of a manned space station. A number of the issues which would be related to the concept, including the terms under which NASA might consider permitting private ownership and operation of a major space station component, the policies with respect to international participation in the construction and use of the space station, the basis for charging users for services received from the space station, and the types of support that NASA might be willing to provide to assist private industry in carrying out such a venture are discussed.

  12. The design of a commercial space infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Space Services and Logistics, Inc. represents the complete engineering design of a technically and financially viable commercial space company. The final proposal offers an economically sound program of space vehicles and systems designed to substantially affect a variety of space markets and produce a vertically integrated structure within the next 20 years. Throughout this design process, particular stress has been placed on attaining the highest possible levels of safety and reliability. The final program financial design requires a considerable initial outlay, but promises a relatively quick return on invested capital, culminating in large annual profits by the end of the 20-year scope of the cost outlook. The overall design has been extensively researched and was primarily driven by the present and near-term projected market demands for services uniquely or competitively offered only by space-oriented operations. Heretofore, available capabilities, rather than these market demands, have determined the degree and type of commercial market access. Removing this limitation through extensive use of modularity and reconfigurability allows the company to gear itself to the market, while still remaining extremely competitive with existing systems. The markets identified as lucrative, and that have governed much of the design requirements, are: low-cost launch services to LEO over a wide range of payload masses and inclinations; upper stage payload delivery from LEO to GEO; manned space operations and human transport to and from orbit; EVA assembly and maintenance of large space structures; satellite servicing and repair by both humans and telerobotic operations; a line of customized satellites designed for extended life and capable of reconfiguration or technology upgrade on orbit; small-scale microgravity experimentation and manufacturing supported by spacecraft retrieval capabilities for experimental specimens and manufactured goods; and a full-range of payload

  13. Business in orbit - The commercial use of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, I. T., IV

    1985-01-01

    Current and proposed business opportunities in space are discussed. The advantages offered by the zero gravity environment of space are examined. The roles of the Space Shuttle and the Space Station in space commercialization are described. International development and use of the Space Station is proposed. It is observed that the communications satellite industry is a successful space venture, and opportunities for materials processing and pharmaceuticals production in space are considered. The relationship between NASA's Office of Commercial Programs, which assists businesses in space commercialization, and industry is studied. The impact of space commercialization on the national economy and international trade is analyzed.

  14. Space Phase III - The commercial era dawns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    After the 'Phase I' of space activities, the period bounded by Sputnik and Apollo, 'Phase II', has been entered, a phase in which concerns over the use and the protection of space assets which support national security predominate. However, it is only when the commercial motive becomes prominent that human activity in new regions truly prospers and enters periods of exponential growth. It is believed that there are increasing signs that such a period, called 'Space Phase III', may be coming soon. A description is presented of developments and results upon which this conclusion is based. Since 1980, there have been three developments of great importance for the future of space activities. Six highly successful flights have demonstrated that the Space Shuttle concept works. A series of Soviet missions are related to the emergence of a capability to construct and service modular space stations. Successful tests of the European Ariane 1 indicate an end to U.S. monopoly with respect to the provision of launch services to the Western World.

  15. 76 FR 59768 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST); Notice of Availability and Request for Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... from Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX). Under the Proposed Action, the FAA would... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST); Notice of Availability... to SpaceX for Operation of the Grasshopper Vehicle at the McGregor Test Site, Texas AGENCY:...

  16. Titan III - Commercial access to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizinski, Stephen J., III; Herrington, Douglas B.

    1988-06-01

    The commercial Titan III launch vehicle is discussed, reviewing the history of the Titan program, the technical aspects of the launcher, and the market outlook. The solid rocket motors of the boost vehicle, core, attitude control system, and payload carrier are described. The vehicle can carry one or two payloads taking up a space of up to 3.65 m in diameter and 10.7 m in length. The avionics, communications, and electrical power systems of the vehicle are examined and the range of perigree stages with which the vehicle is compatible is given. An overview of the mission and the launch facilities is presented and future markets for commercial satellites are considered.

  17. Commercial Optics for Space Surveillance and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Kopit, E.; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.

    Since the first days of the space program, there have been both amateur and government satellite watchers. Large, expensive government systems with custom optics are still the most capable, but with modern sensors and high speed computers, amateur trackers are easily pushing the limits of what government systems achieved only a decade ago. A very recent trend in the space world is the emergence of commercial space operations centers. Once the exclusive purview of governments, corporations are now providing orbital environment awareness services to the operators of commercial satellites. The requirement for synoptic satellite observations has led to corporations developing world-wide observing networks. A problem facing both amateur and corporate observers is the limited availability of suitable optical systems. Most observing efforts rely on long focus (f/8 or greater) optical systems with focal reducers, and a somewhat limited field of view. Often, the cameras in use are not ideally matched to the optical system. While there are a few exceptions, the choices are not many. Celestron recently introduced the C-11 RASA optical system, with an 11-inch aperture and an f/2.2 focal ratio. This optical system is designed for dedicated imaging and is ideally suited for both wide-field astronomy and the detection and tracking of satellites. The larger C-14 RASA, to be introduced later this year, was specifically designed for wide-field imaging with large commercial CCDs. It offers greater sensitivity and a wider field of view than the smaller C-11 RASA and should prove to be the instrument of choice for both amateur and corporate satellite observers. We present data from satellite observations with a production model C-11 RASA and estimated performance for the new C-14 RASA.

  18. Participating in commercial space ventures: Introduction to NASA Centers for the Commercial Development of Space and the Cooperative Agreements Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In response to a Presidential directive, NASA has implemented a space policy which actively supports and encourages U.S. industry investment and participation in commercial space ventures. NASA's Office of Commercial Programs (OCP) has played a significant role in stimulating the growth of commercial space activity. Through a variety of programs, OCP encourages commercial interest and involvement in space endeavors by providing access to NASA resources and opportunities for the emerging space industry to reduce the technical, financial, and business risks associated with space-related activities. This manual describes NASA's Commercial Uses of Space Program and introduces participants to four major OCP Commercial programs: Technology Utilization (TU), Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), Centers for the Commercial Development of Space Flight Agreement (CCDSFA), and Cooperative Agreements Programs. The objective of this manual is to assist U.S. industry identify and pursue the appropriate agreement for participation in a commercial space venture.

  19. An evolutionary approach to space launch commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Brian G.

    The findings and recommendations of this study fall into two groups: Department of Defense (DoD) space launch procurement and DoD steps to strengthen U.S. launch competitiveness. Our analytic results support the choices that the Air Force and the Navy have made since 1985 in the methods of procuring launch services and in the degree of government oversight stipulated in these launch contracts. We further found that the Air Force's upcoming Medium Launch Vehicle-3 (MLV-3) procurement is DoD's most suitable major program to be procured with commercial practices over the next ten years. We recommend that the MLV-3 Request For Proposal (RFP) include commercial launches as an option and that the Air Force consider this option. To help strengthen launch competitiveness, we recommend that DoD concentrate its new launcher development on the most commercially relevant (MCR) range, which is the capability to lift 10,000 to 50,000 lbs of payload into low earth orbits (LEO's).

  20. Global commercial space industry indicators and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Ethan E.; Christensen, Carissa Bryce; Cate, Hans Ten

    2002-06-01

    This paper will provide a description of the current size and production levels of space-related industries, based on a global survey of firms undertaken by Futron Corporation and the Satellite Industry Association. In addition, the paper provides a forecast of future space activity by commercial and government entities, focusing on commercial growth. The industry indicators included in the paper include revenue, employment, and production level associated with satellite manufacturing, launch services, and ground systems and revenue and employment associated with different types of satellite services. These data are based on a survey of more than 600 firms worldwide and represent primary research of a type not available from any other source. The forecast presented in the paper will be based on a proprietary Futron methodology that considers both underlying demand for satellite telecommunication services, by country or region, and the proposed supply of satellites currently known. The analysis assesses whether proposed satellite systems are likely, based on financing, satellite manufacturing and launch services contract status, and track record of the operator. The analysis then compares projected demand to likely supply, identifies over- or under-supply by region and application, and predicts the number of satellites that will be required to meet demand.

  1. Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.; Looke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being sponsored and coordinated by the Texas Aerospace Commission (TAC). The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) at the University of Houston is providing research, planning and design support to TAC and is a member of each of the three regional development teams. Planning must carefully consider special support requirements and operational characteristics of all prospective launch systems along with geographic, infrastructure and environmental factors at each site. Two of the candidate sites are in coastal areas; a priority for certain launch service providers; whereas the third inland site is more attractive to others. Candidate launch systems include winged horizontal takeoff air-launch vehicles, vertical multi-stage reusable launch vehicles, and expendable sub-orbital surrounding rockets. Important research and planning activities include environmental impact assessments, analyses of overflight hazards, investigations of economic impacts and business plan development. The results of these activities will guide master plan development for each site, including: a physical plan (site layout, infrastructure improvements and facility construction); and a strategic plan (user agreements, licenses, finance sources and participants). Commercial spaceport development demands compliance with stringent FAA regulations established by the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) which exceed minimum standards allowed for U.S. Government spaceport facilities. Key among these requirements are 15,000 ft. radius on-site clear zones

  2. Commercial space development needs cheap launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James William

    1998-01-01

    SpaceDev is in the market for a deep space launch, and we are not going to pay $50 million for it. There is an ongoing debate about the elasticity of demand related to launch costs. On the one hand there are the ``big iron'' NASA and DoD contractors who say that there is no market for small or inexpensive launchers, that lowering launch costs will not result in significantly more launches, and that the current uncompetitive pricing scheme is appropriate. On the other hand are commercial companies which compete in the real world, and who say that there would be innumerable new launches if prices were to drop dramatically. I participated directly in the microcomputer revolution, and saw first hand what happened to the big iron computer companies who failed to see or heed the handwriting on the wall. We are at the same stage in the space access revolution that personal computers were in the late '70s and early '80s. The global economy is about to be changed in ways that are just as unpredictable as those changes wrought after the introduction of the personal computer. Companies which fail to innovate and keep producing only big iron will suffer the same fate as IBM and all the now-extinct mainframe and minicomputer companies. A few will remain, but with a small share of the market, never again to be in a position to dominate.

  3. Commercial Use of Space: a New Economic Strength for America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Space commerce is composed of diverse activities which fall into four broad areas: satellite communications, earth and ocean observations, materials research and processing, and space transportation and industrial services. Space has become an industrial laboratory for materials research and processing. NASA's role in the commercial use of space is discussed through its commercial development program.

  4. 75 FR 75621 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Waiver of Autonomous Reentry Restriction for a Reentry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Commercial Space Transportation Reusable Launch Vehicle and Reentry Licensing Regulations, 64 FR 19626, 19645... the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) by Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX): A petition... initiation of reentry in the absence of active human control. Reentry NPRM, 64 FR at 19645. The FAA...

  5. NASA's approach to the commercial use of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, I. T., IV

    1984-01-01

    NASA planning activities in the area of commercial development of space resources are reviewed. Examples of specific types of commercial space ventures are given, according to three different categories: new commercial high-technology ventures; new commercial application of existing space technology, and commercial ventures resulting from the transfer of existing space programs to the private sector. Basic objectives for reducing technical, financial and institutional risks for commercial space operations are considered. Attention is given to the cooperative working environment encouraged by Joint Endeavor Agreements (JEAs) and Technical Exchange Agreements (TEAs) between industrial organizations in the development of space systems. Benefits of the commercial development of space resources include the production of purer pharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancers, kidney diseases, and diabetes; and the development of ultra-pure semiconductor crystals for use in next generation electronic equipment.

  6. NASA's Commercial Space Centers: Bringing Together Government and Industry for "Out of this World" Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Keith; Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is making significant effort to accommodate commercial research in the utilization plans of the International Space Station (ISS)[1]. NASA is providing 30% of the research accommodations in the ISS laboratory modules to support commercial endeavors. However, the availability of resources alone does not necessarily translate into significant private sector participation in NASA's ISS utilization plans. Due to the efforts of NASA's Commercial Space Centers (CSC's), NASA has developed a very robust plan for involving the private sector in ISS utilization activities. Obtaining participation from the private sector requires a demonstrated capability for obtaining commercially significant research results. Since 1985, NASA CSC's have conducted over 200 commercial research activities aboard parabolic aircraft, sounding rockets, the Space Shuttle, and the ISS. The success of these activities has developed substantial investment from private sector companies in commercial space research.

  7. Commercial Research Results from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Mark

    2003-01-01

    As part of NASA's mission of enabling commercial opportunities in space, the Space Product Development Office has sponsored the flight of twelve commercial payloads to the International Space Station (ISS) during calendar year 2002. These twelve follow seven commercial payloads flown to the ISS during 2001. Many of these payloads, which were among the first users of this new laboratory, built upon successful commercial investigations that previously were restricted to the limited flight duration of the Space Shuttle. While the majority of early commercial use of the ISS is in the area of biotechnology, there is a significant shift towards commercial materials research over the next two years. New commercial payloads such as Space-DRUMS and Vulcan will advance commercial materials research on the ISS. Commercial flight hardware is available to the broader NASA community in order to provide benefit to the entire NASA microgravity program, and the scientific community on a space available basis and at very low cost. The first commercial operations on the ISS provides not only a needed capability to the commercial development of space program, it will also augment the science program as well.

  8. Progression of Space Transportation - Transitioning from Government to Commercial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight began as the exclusive province of government, however, starting in the 1980's the United States began to promote commercial participation in space transportation. Beginning with Executive policy and extending through legislation and regulation, NASA has embarked on facilitating the commercialization of space transportation to serve NASA needs and enable a non-NASA market place. This presentation provides background on the transition to commercial space transportation and the specific role NASA is playing in that endeavor.

  9. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Prohibition on guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. Public Law 102-139, title III... customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. 1812.7000 Section 1812.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND...

  10. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Prohibition on guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. Public Law 102-139, title III... customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. 1812.7000 Section 1812.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND...

  11. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Prohibition on guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... guaranteed customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. Public Law 102-139, title III... customer bases for new commercial space hardware or services. 1812.7000 Section 1812.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND...

  12. U.S. commercial space policies - Implications for developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV; Stone, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    Recent U.S. policy developments on the commercial use of space are summarized and their international implications are considered. Attention is given to successful applications of technology developed in space, including an implantable cancer medication system, an implantable defibrillator, an ultrasonic residual stress monitor, and aquaculture treatment techniques. NASA projects involving bioengineering and rehabilitation applications are summarized, and plans to investigate high-temperature superconductors in space are addressed. Recent agreements entred into by NASA for space commercial studies are reviewed.

  13. Leasing Commercial Space for Your Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keith

    1987-01-01

    Covers leasing of commercial space for child care centers, either as an enhancement to a developer's project or on a commercial basis in competition with other types of commercial development. Discusses different negotiating psychologies and key negotiating points to be used in each leasing situation. (NH)

  14. U.S. commercial space activities - Returning the U.S. to preeminence in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of NASA's activities related to the commercial development of space is reviewed with particular reference to the emerging new commercial space activities and the post-Challenger policy developments affecting space commerce. The discussion covers the development of U.S. private sector launching capabilities, cooperative agreements with the private sector, the NASA technology utilization program, the technology applications activities of the Office of Commercial Programs, and the activities of the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space program.

  15. Commercial space opportunities - Advanced concepts and technology overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Gregory M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the status of current and future commercial space opportunities. The goal is to pioneer innovative, customer-focused space concepts and technologies, leveraged through industrial, academic, and government alliance, to ensure U.S. commercial competitiveness and preeminence in space. The strategy is to develop technologies which enable new products and processes, deploy existing technology into commercial and military products and processes, and integrate military and commercial research and production activities. Technology development areas include information infrastructure, electronics design and manufacture, health care technology, environment technology, and aeronautical technologies.

  16. Human-Rating Implementation for Commercial Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Kubicek, Kate; Berdich, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the appropriate NASA standards and Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) standards for human rated spacecraft developed by commercial vendors. Included are the HMTA requirements for the Constellation Program (CxP)

  17. NASA's Earth Observations Commercialization Applications Program: A model for government promotion of commercial space opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macauley, Molly K.

    1995-01-01

    The role of government in promoting space commerce is a topic of discussion in every spacefaring nation. This article describes a new approach to government intervention which, based on its five-year track record, appears to have met with success. The approach, developed in NASA's Earth Observations Commercialization Application Program (EOCAP), offer several lessons for effective government sponsorship of commercial space development in general and of commercial remote sensing in particular.

  18. NASA's commercial space program - Initiatives for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, James T.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's commercial development of the space program aimed at the stimulation and assistance of expanded private sector involvement and investment in civil space activities is discussed, focusing on major new program initiatives and their implementation. NASA's Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) program, composed of competitively selected consortia of universities, industries, and government involved in early research and testing phases of potentially commercially viable technologies is described. The 16 centers concentrate on seven different technical areas such as automation and robotics; remote sensing; life sciences; and space power, propulsion, and structures. Private sector participation, CCDS technology development, government and commercially supplied access to space in support of CCDS programs, CCDS hardware development, and CCDS spinoffs are discussed together with various cooperative and reimbursable agreements between NASA and the private sector.

  19. Space commercialization trends and consequences for the workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, W.

    2003-08-01

    Space Commercialization has considerably changed the space era over the last few years. Besides a number of facilitators, such as improved regulatory frameworks, it can clearly be demonstrated that reduced public funding has been the prime catalyst for this commercialization process. Space industry has proactively reacted to this new situation by forming strategic alliances, in the first place to be able to reach the global space market. This effect, in turn, induces a number of new skills which are needed for the future space work force. Transnational activities require a more international approach and better understanding of cultural differences, far beyond linguistic ones. Transfer of workforce from other sectors remains difficult, mainly due to the uniqueness of the space sector. Tailored space education curricula will therefore be needed to prepare the new space workforce for timely take over from the present — rapidly aging — space professionals without the risk of losing know-how.

  20. NewSpace: The Emerging Commercial Space Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary

    2016-01-01

    A lecture to students at the International Space University. Topics include: - We are at a turning point in the history of space exploration and development the cusp of a revolution, new industries are being born that use space in many non-traditional ways - The established military industrial space sector is no longer the only game in town - Increased competition and new capabilities will change the marketplace forever - Everyone interested in working in the space sector will be affected.

  1. From suborbital space tourism to commercial personal spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Walter

    2010-06-01

    Excellent essays have been recently published on the profitability and the future of space tourism. This paper is intended to supplement the considerations in this field and emphasizes the further potential evolution of commercial personal spaceflights. Indeed, based upon work done at the International Space University (ISU) the oligopolistic character of suborbital space tourism has been linked to marketing and product life cycle (PLC) considerations and has led to the thesis that space tourism as a profitable sector will require a follow-on strategy. Orbital space tourism, on one hand, could become an extension of the PLC but, on the other hand, it is assumed that point-to-point (P2P) commercial space transport will become the long term sustainable market. Without ignoring technical challenges, this paper will mainly concentrate on marketing and commercial aspects of personal spaceflight.

  2. Commercial infrastructure participation in the Space Station Freedom program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Alison; Barquinero, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of the private sector in developing the infrastructure for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) is analyzed, and approaches are proposed for initiating commercial infrastructural input. The opportunities for commercial infrastructure in the SSF program include power, transportation, and communication services that are ground-based and on-orbit. SSF commercial activities reduce NASA's up-front expenditures, expands the support base for the SSF, and creates new markets and technological possibilities for the private sector. NASA can identify opportunities for the SSF commercial infrastructure by: (1) receiving unsolicited proposals; (2) soliciting proposals for commercial development; and (3) soliciting proposals for commercial operation. Contributions to the SSF program from the private sector can enhance both the efficiency of the program itself and of the emerging space industry.

  3. Informed consent v. ITAR: Regulatory conflicts that could constrain commercial human space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, P. J.

    2010-06-01

    The Human Space Flight Requirements (promulgated by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) seek to protect the fledgling commercial space flight industry by shifting risk from the operator to the space flight participants. However, in order to do this effectively the regulations require a great deal of information to be given to the participants. The information required might be extensive enough that it could be considered "technical data" under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations. If this is the case then commercial spaceflight companies will have to get export licenses for non-U.S. participants on their flights which could cause additional costs as well as other problems.

  4. Space station needs, attributes, and architectural options: Commercial opportunities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbers, H. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The roles of government and industry in the commercialization of space are examined and an approach for stimulating the interests of potential users is described. Several illustrative examples of potential commercial developments are presented. The role of manned space systems in space commercialization is discussed as well as some of the issues and opportunities that are likely to be encountered in the commercial exploitation of the unique characteristics of space. Results suggest that interest in space facilities can be found among a number of commercially oriented users. In order to develop and maintain the involvement of these potential users, however, space demonstrations are required, and commercial growth or evolution depends on the results of the initial in situ experience. Manned facilities are required for the conceptual research and development phases and for maintenance and servicing operations during production or operational missions. Space facilities must be easily accessible by dependable and regularly scheduled means.

  5. Commercial 'Nanorack' Installed on Space Station's National Lab

    NASA Video Gallery

    In July, Astronaut Shannon Walker activated a fully commercial research facility designed to make access to the International Space Station easy and cost-effective for scientists and educators. Dev...

  6. Evaluation criteria for commercially oriented materials processing in space proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. F.; Mcdowell, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    An approach and criteria for evaluating NASA funded experiments and demonstrations which have commercial potential were developed. Methods for insuring quick initial screening of commercial proposals are presented. Recommendations are given for modifying the current evaluation approach. New criteria for evaluating commercially orientated materials processing in space (MPS) proposals are introduced. The process for selection of qualified individuals to evaluate the phases of this approach and criteria is considered and guidelines are set for its implementation.

  7. Collaboration Between Government and Commercial Space Weather Information Providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie

    2007-10-01

    Many systems and situations require up-to-date space weather information. These include navigation systems in cars, boats, and commercial freight; the specific location information needed for construction and oil drilling; communications; airline navigation; avionic systems; and passengers and personnel on polar airline flights. Thus, as the world's industries become increasingly more reliant on satellite data and more vulnerable to space weather conditions, new collaborations will have to be formed between commercial providers of space weather information and the government scientists who monitor space weather.

  8. Space Radiation Environmental Considerations for Commercial Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steve; Zapp, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews basic environmental information regarding solar energetic particle events and includes some discussion slides regarding the operational impacts application as it may apply to commercial spaceflight.

  9. Commercial Development Plan for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The long term objective of the development plan for the International Space Station (ISS) is to establish the foundation for a marketplace and stimulate a national economy for space products and services in low-Earth orbit, where both demand and supply are dominated by the private sector. The short term objective is to begin the transition to private investment and offset a share of the public cost for operating the space shuttle fleet and space station through commercial enterprise in open markets.

  10. Alternative Architecture for Commercial Space Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This presentation discuss the space solar power (SSP) concept. It takes us step by step through the process: the use of sunlight and solar cells to create power, the conversion of the sunlight into electricity, the conversion of electricity to microwaves, and finally the from microwaves back to electricity by the Rectennas on Earth.

  11. Commercial Platforms Allow Affordable Space Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    At an altitude of about 240 miles, its orbital path carries it over 90 percent of the Earth s population. It circles the Earth in continuous free fall; its crew of six and one Robonaut pass the days, experiencing 16 sunrises and 16 sunsets every 24 hours, in microgravity, an environment in which everything from bodily functions to the physical behavior of materials changes drastically from what is common on the ground. Outside its shielded confines, temperatures cycle from one extreme to the other, radiation is rampant, and atomic oxygen corrodes everything it touches. A unique feat of engineering, the International Space Station (ISS) also represents the most remarkable platform for scientific research ever devised. In 2005, anticipating the space station s potential for NASA and non-NASA scientists alike, the NASA Authorization Act designated the US segment of the ISS as a national laboratory, instructing the Agency to "increase the utilization of the ISS by other Federal entities and the private sector." With the ISS set to maintain operations through at least 2020, the station offers an unprecedented long-term access to space conditions, enabling research not previously possible. "There will be new drug discoveries, new pharmaceuticals, a better understanding of how we affect the planet and how we can maintain it," says Marybeth Edeen, the ISS National Laboratory manager, based at Johnson Space Center. The ISS, she says, represents a major example of the government s role in making such advancements possible. "The government is key in that researchers cannot afford to build the kind of infrastructure that the government can provide. But we then have to make that infrastructure available at a reasonable cost." Enter Jeff Manber, who saw in the ISS National Lab an extraordinary opportunity to advance science, education, and business in ways never before seen.

  12. 3 CFR - Designation of Officers of the National Aeronautics And Space Administration To Act as Administrator

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... And Space Administration To Act as Administrator Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 16, 2009 Designation of Officers of the National Aeronautics And Space Administration... Administration By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United...

  13. 76 FR 12403 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Availability of the Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Availability of the... for Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicles at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida AGENCY: Federal... Environmental Assessment (EA), Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. The 1988 EA evaluates...

  14. Commercial potential of European and Japanese space programs, task 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The current and expected future competitive status in the commercialization of space of the two principal programs competitive with NASA: the European Space Agency (ESA) and the program sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan are evaluated, quantitatively assessed, and presented in usable format.

  15. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  16. Space Commercial Opportunities for Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavert, R.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity research at NASA has been an undertaking that has included both science and commercial approaches since the late 80s and early 90s. The Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community has been developed, through NASA's science grants, into a valuable base of expertise in microgravity science. This was achieved through both ground and flight scientific research. Commercial microgravity research has been primarily promoted thorough NASA sponsored Centers for Space Commercialization which develop cost sharing partnerships with industry. As an example, the Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP)at Northeastern University has been working with cost sharing industry partners in developing Zeolites and zeo-type materials as an efficient storage medium for hydrogen fuel. Greater commercial interest is emerging. The U.S. Congress has passed the Commercial Space Act of 1998 to encourage the development of a commercial space industry in the United States. The Act has provisions for the commercialization of the International Space Station (ISS). Increased efforts have been made by NASA to enable industrial ventures on-board the ISS. A Web site has been established at http://commercial/nasa/gov which includes two important special announcements. One is an open request for entrepreneurial offers related to the commercial development and use of the ISS. The second is a price structure and schedule for U.S. resources and accommodations. The purpose of the presentation is to make the Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community, which understands the importance of microgravity experimentation, aware of important aspects of ISS commercial development. It is a desire that this awareness will be translated into a recognition of Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena application opportunities coordinated through the broad contacts of this community with industry.

  17. Space Biotechnology and Commercial Applications University of Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Winfred; Evanich, Peggy L.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Biotechnology and Commercial Applications grant was funded by NASA's Kennedy Space Center in FY 2002 to provide dedicated biotechnology and agricultural research focused on the regeneration of space flight environments with direct parallels in Earth-based applications for solving problems in the environment, advances in agricultural science, and other human support issues amenable to targeted biotechnology solutions. This grant had three project areas, each with multiple tasks. They are: 1) Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education, 2) Integrated Smart Nanosensors for Space Biotechnology Applications, and 3) Commercial Applications. The Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and Education (SABRE) Center emphasized the fundamental biology of organisms involved in space flight applications, including those involved in advanced life support environments because of their critical role in the long-term exploration of space. The SABRE Center supports research at the University of Florida and at the Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL) at the Kennedy Space Center. The Integrated Smart Nanosensors for Space Biotechnology Applications component focused on developing and applying sensor technologies to space environments and agricultural systems. The research activities in nanosensors were coordinated with the SABRE portions of this grant and with the research sponsored by the NASA Environmental Systems Commercial Space Technology Center located in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. Initial sensor efforts have focused on air and water quality monitoring essential to humans for living and working permanently in space, an important goal identified in NASA's strategic plan. The closed environment of a spacecraft or planetary base accentuates cause and effect relationships and environmental impacts. The limited available air and water resources emphasize the need for reuse, recycling, and system monitoring. It is essential to

  18. Defining Operational Space Suit Requirements for Commercial Orbital Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    As the commercial spaceflight industry transitions from suborbital brevity to orbital outposts, spacewalking will become a major consideration for tourists, scientists, and hardware providers. The challenge exists to develop a space suit designed for the orbital commercial spaceflight industry. The unique needs and requirements of this industry will drive space suit designs and costs that are unlike any existing product. Commercial space tourists will pay for the experience of a lifetime, while scientists may not be able to rely on robotics for all operations and external hardware repairs. This study was aimed at defining space suit operational and functional needs across the spectrum of spacewalk elements, identifying technical design drivers and establishing appropriate options. Recommendations from the analysis are offered for consideration

  19. Commercial Development Plan for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The long term objective is to establish the foundation for a marketplace and stimulate a national economy for space products and services in low-Earth orbit, where both demand and supply are dominated by the private sector. The short term objective is to begin the transition to private investment and offset a share of the public cost for operating the space shuttle fleet and space station through commercial enterprise in open markets.

  20. Superconductivity devices: Commercial use of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Furman, Eugene; Li, Guang

    1995-01-01

    The work described in this report covers various aspects of the Rainbow solid-state actuator technology. It is presented in six parts dealing with materials, processing, fabrication, properties and associated phenomena. The Rainbow actuator technology is a relatively new materials development which had its inception in 1992. It consists of a new processing technology for preparing piezoelectric and electrostrictive ceramic materials. It involves a high temperature chemical reduction process which leads to an internal pre-stressing of the oxide wafer, thus the name Rainbow, an acronym for Reduced And INternally Biased Oxide Wafer. Ceramics fabricated by this method produce bending-mode actuator devices which possess several times more displacement and load bearing capacity than present-day benders (unimorphs, bimorphs). It is anticipated that these solid-state, electromechanical actuators which can be used in a number of applications in space such as cryopump motors, anti-vibration active structures, autoleveling platforms, telescope mirror correctors and autofocusing devices. When considering any of these applications, the key to the development of a successful device is the successful development of a ceramic material which can produce maximum displacement per volt input; hence, this initiative involving a solid-state means for achieving unusually high electromechanical displacement can be significant and far reaching. An additional benefit obtained from employing the piezoelectric effect in these actuator devices is the ability to also utilize them as sensors; and, indeed, they can be used as both motor (actuator) and generator (sensor) in multifunction devices.

  1. Implications of previous space commercialization experiences for the reusable launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Richard M.; Williamson, Ray A.

    2003-07-01

    The United States' 1994 National Space Transportation Policy directed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to work with industry on the development of technologies required for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). In the partnership that has evolved from that directive, NASA envisions its role as providing support for technological risk reduction and for developing space transportation to serve government needs. NASA officials assume that the development of an operational, commercial RLV will be carried out by the private sector without use of government funds. Under that scenario, the Federal government will simply become a customer for commercial RLV services. In evaluating the prospects for the development of a commercially viable RLV, it may be useful to examine "lessons learned" from previous space commercialization efforts—both those that succeeded and those that did not. It can be argued that several distinct streams of market and technological development may have to converge for successful commercialization of space systems to occur. Potential factors influencing the prospects for commercialization include the size and growth rate of the potential customer base, the extent to which a governmental customer exists to underpin the market, the development of associated "value-added" markets, the stability of governmental policies, the levels of technological and business risk, and the degree to which competitive markets exist. This paper examines two previous space commercialization experiences, evaluates the relative importance of the various factors that influence the prospects for success of commercialization efforts, and assesses the implications of those factors for the commercial viability of the proposed RLV.

  2. International cooperation in the commercial era of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    NASA plans permitting international participation in space activities are reviewed, with an emphasis on the increasing commercialization of these endeavors. The potential indicated by the recent success of the STS, long-term and large-scale Soviet missions, and the Ariane launcher is discussed; the development of the Space Station concept is traced; the increasing use of remote-sensing and telecommunications satellites is documented; currently planned space science missions are listed; and the NASA policy on international cooperation (full payment by the second nation, clean payload-spacecraft interfaces to prevent technology transfer, and open availability of scientific results) is outlined. It is argued that space activity, having passed through first and second phases dominated by exploration and military goals, respectively, will now soon enter a primarily commercial phase, with competition in telecommunications and remote-sensing services and private investment in space processing, manufacturing, and even launchers.

  3. Space Station Workshop: Commercial Missions and User Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The topics of discussion addressed during a three day workshop on commercial application in space are presented. Approximately half of the program was directed towards an overview and orientation to the Space Station Project; the technical attributes of space; and present and future potential commercial opportunities. The remaining time was spent addressing technological issues presented by previously-formed industry working groups, who attempted to identify the technology needs, problems or issues faced and/or anticipated by the following industries: extraction (mining, agriculture, petroleum, fishing, etc.); fabrication (manufacturing, automotive, aircraft, chemical, pharmaceutical and electronics); and services (communications, transportation and retail robotics). After the industry groups presented their technology issues, the workshop divided into smaller discussion groups composed of: space experts from NASA; academia; industry experts in the appropriate disciplines; and other workshop participants. The needs identified by the industry working groups, space station technical requirements, proposed commercial ventures and other issues related to space commercialization were discussed. The material summarized and reported are the consensus from the discussion groups.

  4. A business man views commercial ventures in space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarff, D. D.; Bloom, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Paper reviews technical, resource planning and marketing steps an industrial organization must perform in arriving at a decision to undertake space development and production of commercial products or services for Users on the ground. Technical elements are supported by particular examples. Analysis of required resources emphasizes facility and financial inter-relationships between commercial organizations and NASA. Marketing planning covers elements of profitability. Paper addresses questions related to protection of corporate stockholders and public interest, investment decision timing, budget variations. Paper concludes with observations on timeliness of planning shuttle-based commercial ventures and on key industry/NASA problems and decisions.

  5. Commercial Spacewalking: Designing an EVA Qualification Program for Space Tourism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, accessibility to space will be opened to anyone with the means and the desire to experience the weightlessness of microgravity, and to look out upon both the curvature of the Earth and the blackness of space, from the protected, shirt-sleeved environment of a commercial spacecraft. Initial forays will be short-duration, suborbital flights, but the experience and expertise of half a century of spaceflight will soon produce commercial vehicles capable of achieving low Earth orbit. Even with the commercial space industry still in its infancy, and manned orbital flight a number of years away, there is little doubt that there will one day be a feasible and viable market for those courageous enough to venture outside the vehicle and into the void, wearing nothing but a spacesuit, armed with nothing but preflight training. What that Extravehicular Activity (EVA) preflight training entails, however, is something that has yet to be defined. A number of significant factors will influence the composition of a commercial EVA training program, but a fundamental question remains: 'what minimum training guidelines must be met to ensure a safe and successful commercial spacewalk?' Utilizing the experience gained through the development of NASA's Skills program - designed to qualify NASA and International Partner astronauts for EVA aboard the International Space Station - this paper identifies the attributes and training objectives essential to the safe conduct of an EVA, and attempts to conceptually design a comprehensive training methodology meant to represent an acceptable qualification standard.

  6. Commercial aspects of epitaxial thin film growth in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatiev, Alex; Chu, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    A new concept for materials processing in space exploits the ultra vacuum component of space for thin film epitaxial growth. The unique low earth orbit space environment is expected to yield 10 to the -14th torr or better pressures, semiinfinite pumping speeds and large ultra vacuum volume (about 100 cu m) without walls. These space ultra vacuum properties promise major improvement in the quality, unique nature, and the throughput of epitaxially grown materials especially in the area of semiconductors for microelectronics use. For such thin film materials there is expected a very large value added from space ultra vacuum processing, and as a result the application of the epitaxial thin film growth technology to space could lead to major commercial efforts in space.

  7. Summary results of the Industry Conference on the Commercial Use of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    REUSE; Thuerbach, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The future intentions of the Federal Republic of Germany in the area of the commercialization of space are presented. It is shown that significant advances in microgravity research, particulary in the areas of materials science, composite materials, physical chemistry, crystal growth, biology, and process engineering will have an effect on future plans for establishing sponsoring organizations to guide commercial interests in German space research. An organizational and functional outline of a proposed sponsoring organization to promote space commercialization under German supervision, including the objectives, the target group to be served, and the administrative structure, is presented. The role of the DFVLR (German Aerospace Research Establishment) and the BMFT (German Ministry for Research and Technology) as sponsoring organizations representing the interests of the German government is shown.

  8. Space Colony from a Commercial Asteroid Mining Company Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Thomas C.; Grandl, Werner; Pinni, Martina; Benaroya, Haym

    2008-01-01

    Commercial mining towns on Earth become cities. Company towns need commerce to drive the growth and economy of early space colonies. Water is an early resource for camp consumables plus propellant export sales from asteroid mining operations at proposed burned out comets with water methane ice cores for sustainable growth over 50 years, financed from profits and capable with affordable logistics to support resource recovery. One co-author's perspective includes remote resource recovery sites on Earth. Other co-authors' experiences include architecture, lunar habitation, and architectural space colony concepts. This paper combines these experiences to propose commercial opportunities possible as mankind moves beyond one planet. Alaska's North Slope commercial history indicates that different multiple logistics transportation systems are required to reduce the risk to humans and families moved in before the oil flowed. Commercial enterprises have risked $20 billion and spent hundreds of billions in private money after profits were created. The lessons learned are applied to a burned out comet designated Wilson-Harrington (1979) and explores the architecture for early living within the burned out comet disk created from ice recovery and later sealed with an expected methane ice interior. Considered is the recovery of the resources, the transport of water back to Earth orbit or L-1, plus later the development of more comfortable space colony living. Commercial markets produce cities on Earth and the same can happen on Space Colonies. The key is an ``in place'' affordable commercial logistics system that can service, stimulate and sustain a 50-year commercial propellant market.

  9. Heat Shield Paves the Way for Commercial Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Phenolic-Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heat shield, a lightweight material designed to withstand high temperatures, was used for the Stardust’s reentry into Earth’s atmosphere. Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX later worked with the inventors at Ames Research Center to outfit PICA on its Dragon capsule, which is now delivering cargo to and from the International Space Station through NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contracts program.

  10. Collaborative Approaches in Developing Environmental and Safety Management Systems for Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Stacey; Murray, D.

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) licenses and permits U.S. commercial space launch and reentry activities, and licenses the operation of non-federal launch and reentry sites. ASTs mission is to ensure the protection of the public, property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States during commercial space transportation activities and to encourage, facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space transportation. AST faces unique challenges of ensuring the protection of public health and safety while facilitating and promoting U.S. commercial space transportation. AST has developed an Environmental Management System (EMS) and a Safety Management System (SMS) to help meet its mission. Although the EMS and SMS were developed independently, the systems share similar elements. Both systems follow a Plan-Do-Act-Check model in identifying potential environmental aspects or public safety hazards, assessing significance in terms of severity and likelihood of occurrence, developing approaches to reduce risk, and verifying that the risk is reduced. This paper will describe the similarities between ASTs EMS and SMS elements and how AST is building a collaborative approach in environmental and safety management to reduce impacts to the environment and risks to the public.

  11. Financial issues for commercial space ventures: Paying for the dreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Various financial issues involved in commercial space enterprise are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the materials processing area: the current state of business plan and financial developments, what is needed for enhanced probability of success of future materials development efforts in attracting financial backing, and finally, the risks involved in this entire business area.

  12. Use of space for development of commercial plant natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draeger, Norman A.

    1997-01-01

    Plant experiments conducted in environments where conditions are carefully controlled reveal fundamental information about physiological processes. An important environmental parameter is gravity, the effects of which may be better understood in part through experiments conducted in space. New insights gained can be used to develop commercial plant natural products in industries such as pharmaceuticals and biocontrol.

  13. Use of space for development of commercial plant natural products

    SciTech Connect

    Draeger, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    Plant experiments conducted in environments where conditions are carefully controlled reveal fundamental information about physiological processes. An important environmental parameter is gravity, the effects of which may be better understood in part through experiments conducted in space. New insights gained can be used to develop commercial plant natural products in industries such as pharmaceuticals and biocontrol. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Hyperspectral Imaging on the International Space Station: An Innovative Approach to Commercial Development of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Space Partnership Division (SPD) was established to promote the commercial development of space by providing access to space ai opportunity to perform commercial research in the microgravity environment. NASA, through SPD, has established Research Partnership Centers (RPC s) that bring the government, universities at private industry together to perform research in space for commercial applica!.!lons. The SPD Office has fostered a re!ationship between an RPC and an aerospace company to perform hyperspectral imaging on the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) on board the International Space Station (ISS). As a result of this relationship and M the capabilities of the WORF, the ISS will serve the private sector with platform to conduct hyperspectral imaging for commercial research.

  15. BioServe space technologies: A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), was established in 1987. As is characteristic of each CCDS designated by NASA, the goals of this commercial center are aimed at stimulating high technology research that takes advantage of the space environment and at leading in the development of new products and services which have commercial potential or that contribute to possible new commercial ventures. BioServe's efforts in these areas focus upon space life science studies and the development of enabling devices that will facilitate ground-based experiments as well as the conversion of such to the microgravity environment. A direct result of BioServe's hardware development and life sciences studies is the training of the next generation of bioengineers who will be knowledgeable and comfortable working with the challenges of the space frontier.

  16. Government and Industry Issues for Expanding Commercial Markets into Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, the Foresight and Governance Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C, organized a "Global Foresight Workshop" in partnership with NASA and in cooperation with other Federal Agencies to provide integrated consideration of broad challenges for the 2lst century. Many long-range goals for the nation were discussed and selected, among them were space related goals of interest to NASA. During much of the Agency's history, NASA advanced studies have focused consistently on the challenges of science-driven space exploration and operations. However, workshop findings indicate little interest in these goals unless they can also solve national and global issues. Many technologies and space development studies indicate great potential to enable new, important commercial markets in space that could address the many global challenges facing America in this century. But communication of these ideas are lacking. In conclusion, it appears that the commercial development of space could have broad implications on many impending problems, including energy resources, environmental impact, and climate changes. The challenge will be to develop a consistent coordinated effort among the many industries and Agencies that should be involved in opening this new frontier for these new commercial markets.

  17. An Administrator's Checklist for Open-Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Robert R.; Roper, Susan Stavert

    A checklist is provided of practical steps to be considered and acted upon in planning and implementing an open-space school. The document divides the process into three phases: initial planning, just prior to moving, and post-move. Considerations in the planning stage involve: staff and community input in deciding upon open space; clarification…

  18. Commercial combustion research aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) is planning a number of combustion experiments to be done on the International Space Station (ISS). These experiments will be conducted in two ISS facilities, the SpaceDRUMS™ Acoustic Levitation Furnace (ALF) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) portion of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The experiments are part of ongoing commercial projects involving flame synthesis of ceramic powders, catalytic combustion, water mist fire suppression, glass-ceramics for fiber and other applications and porous ceramics for bone replacements, filters and catalyst supports. Ground- and parabolic aircraft-based experiments are currently underway to verify the scientific bases and to test prototype flight hardware. The projects have strong external support.

  19. Materials processing in space - A strategy for commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Major aerospace companies are talking about space factories manufacturing billions of dollars worth of high technology materials per year. On the other hand, a recent National Academy of Sciences study team saw little prospect for space manufacturing because, in their opinion, most of the disturbing effects of gravity in the processes they considered could be overcome on the ground for much less expenditure. This paper presents a current assessment of the problems and promises of the Materials Processing in Space Program and outlines a strategy for developing the first products of commercial value. These early products are expected to serve as paradigms of what can be accomplished by manufacturing in space and should stimulate industry to develop space manufacturing to whatever degree is economically justifiable.

  20. Transplantable tissue growth-a commercial space venture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Ronald E.; Vardaman, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Rantek was incorporated in 1984 to pursue research toward product development in space based biotechnology. The company has maintained an aggressive experiment flight program since 1989 having flown biotechnology experiments in six Consort rockets flights, one Joust rocket flight and eight Space Shuttle missions. The objective of these flights was to conduct a series of research experiments to resolve issues affecting transplantable tissue growth feasibility. The purpose of the flight research was to determine the behavior of lymphocyte mixing, activation, magnetic mixing and process control, drug studies in a model leukemia cell line, and various aspects of the hardware system process control in the low gravity of space. The company is now preparing for a two Space Shuttle flight program as precursors to a sustained, permanent, commercial venture at the Space Station. The shuttle flights will enable new, larger scale tissue growth systems to be tested to determine fundamental process control sensitivity and growth rates unique to a number of tissue types. The answer to these issues will ultimately determine the commercial viability of the Rantek Biospace program. This paper addresses considerations that will drive the cost of a space venture-the largest cost driver will be the cost to and from the station and the cost at the station.

  1. Space commerce in a global economy - Comparison of international approaches to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Kleber, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A historical perspective, current status, and comparison of national government/commercial space industry relationships in the United States and Europe are presented. It is noted that space technology has been developed and used primarily to meet the needs of civil and military government initiatives. Two future trends of space technology development include new space enterprises, and the national drive to achieve a more competitive global economic position.

  2. The Texas space flight liability act and efficient regulation for the private commercial space flight era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2011, the American state of Texas passed into law an act limiting the liability of commercial space flight entities. Under it, those companies would not be liable for space flight participant injuries, except in cases of intentional injury or injury proximately caused by the company's gross negligence. An analysis within the framework of international and national space law, but especially informed by the academic discipline of law and economics, discusses the incentives of all relevant parties and attempts to understand whether the law is economically "efficient" (allocating resources so as to yield maximum utility), and suited to further the development of the fledgling commercial suborbital tourism industry. Insights into the Texas law are applicable to other states hoping to foster commercial space tourism and considering space tourism related legislation.

  3. The opportunity for hybrid rocket motors in commercial space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, Paul N.; Hughes, Brian G. R.

    1992-07-01

    Hybrid rocket motors which utilize a liquid oxidizer and a solid fuel offer the potential of significantly reducing the cost of propulsion systems for space launch vehicles. Hybrid propulsion systems have a high energy efficiency, a robust combustion process and because of the separation of the propellants both physically and by phase, hybrids cannot explode. This fundamental safety feature enables the hybrid system to be fabricated and operated at costs below those of competitive solid and liquid systems. Due to the safety and low-cost nature of hybrids, they are very attractive to commercial operators. The basics of the hybrid propulsion system and its operation are discussed along with a brief history and status of hybrid motor development. Potential applications of the hybrid rocket motor for commercial space launch vehicles are presented.

  4. Legal considerations and cooperative opportunities for space commercial activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    It is a national policy to make the capabilities of the Space Transportation System available to a wide range of potential users. This includes its availability as a space manufacturing facility for commercial activities, which may be carried out on a reimbursable basis or as a joint endeavor with NASA, but with substantial private investment. In any high risk, long lead-time research and development activity directed towards commercialization, the protection afforded the results of the research and development under the laws relating to intellectual property rights may provide an important incentive for private investment. The policies and practices of NASA directed towards the protection of privately-established intellectual property rights involved in STS use are reviewed with particular emphasis on reimbursable launch agreements and joint endeavor agreements.

  5. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research and internship programs in technology transfer, space commercialization, and information and communications policy are described. The intern's activities are reviewed. On-campus research involved work on the costs of conventional telephone technology in rural areas, an investigation of the lag between the start of a research and development project and the development of new technology, using NASA patent and patent waiver data, studies of the financial impact and economic prospects of a space operation center, a study of the accuracy of expert forecasts of uncertain quantities and a report on frequency coordination in the fixed and fixed satellite services at 4 and 6 GHz.

  6. Conestoga 2: A low cost commercial space transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Conestoga 2 is currently under development. It is capable of inserting 500 Kg satellites into 800 Km circular polar orbits. Conestoga 2 makes maximum use of existing (developed) technology and hardware. Its commercial objective is to fill a need for low cost low Earth orbital transport not efficiently served by Shuttle or larger space transport systems. Low Earth orbit markets, foreign participation, and launch site considerations are discussed along with technical and economic trade-offs.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration technology application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Contracts are reported between the RTI TATeam and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other governmental, educational, and industrial organizations participating in NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

  8. 78 FR 13383 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory (SCI) AGENCY: Office of Procurement, National Aeronautics and Space... National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is publishing this notice to advise the public of...

  9. In-Space Internet-Based Communications for Space Science Platforms Using Commercial Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Fabian, Theodore P.; Griner, James H.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Richard, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    The continuing technological advances in satellite communications and global networking have resulted in commercial systems that now can potentially provide capabilities for communications with space-based science platforms. This reduces the need for expensive government owned communications infrastructures to support space science missions while simultaneously making available better service to the end users. An interactive, high data rate Internet type connection through commercial space communications networks would enable authorized researchers anywhere to control space-based experiments in near real time and obtain experimental results immediately. A space based communications network architecture consisting of satellite constellations connecting orbiting space science platforms to ground users can be developed to provide this service. The unresolved technical issues presented by this scenario are the subject of research at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Assessment of network architectures, identification of required new or improved technologies, and investigation of data communications protocols are being performed through testbed and satellite experiments and laboratory simulations.

  10. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  11. Space Commercialization Trends and Consequences for the Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, W.

    2002-01-01

    The major trend we are currently witnessing in space activities is an increasing level of commercialization. This trend is emphasized by: consolidation, mergers and forming strategic alliances. In USA, from the 20 major space companies in the 80's only 3 `prime' ones were left by 1997. A similar effect took place in Europe in the 90's, where at present only primarily 2 major space conglomerates are operating at prime contractor level. Such strategic alliances in the first place result in the creation of end-to-end capabilities, with larger internal R&D and broader access to technologies. Due to the bigger financial volume of such conglomerates there is also better access to new capital and sharing of risks. In a second step, we can at present observe the creation of transatlantic alliances to enter the worldwide market. These trends have a considerable effect on the workforce requirements in industry:

  12. Space industrialization. [space flight and environment for commercial/utilitarian purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Space industrialization is defined as the use of space flight and the space environment for commercial or utilitarian purposes in contrast to other uses such as gains in basic scientific knowledge, national defense, or exploration. Some unique attributes of space that make it amenable to industrial use include overview of the earth, the 'zero gravity' effect, potential for near perfect vacuum, unlimited reservoir for disposal of waste products, availability of essentially uninterrupted flow of solar energy, and the 'perpetual motion' characteristic of orbital mechanics. The role of human participation in assembling and maintaining the large sophisticated systems that will be required for future space industrialization needs is considered.

  13. Three near term commercial markets in space and their potential role in space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2001-02-01

    Independent market studies related to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) commercialization have identified three near term markets that have return-on-investment potential. These markets are: (1) Entertainment (2) Education (3) Advertising/sponsorship. Commercial activity is presently underway focusing on these areas. A private company is working with the Russians on a commercial module attached to the ISS that will involve entertainment and probably the other two activities as well. A separate corporation has been established to commercialize the Russian Mir Space Station with entertainment and promotional advertising as important revenue sources. A new startup company has signed an agreement with NASA for commercial media activity on the International Space Station (ISS). Profit making education programs are being developed by a private firm to allow students to play the role of an astronaut and work closely with space scientists and astronauts. It is expected that the success of these efforts on the ISS program will extend to exploration missions beyond LEO. The objective of this paper is to extrapolate some of the LEO commercialization experiences to see what might be expected in space exploration missions to Mars, the Moon and beyond. .

  14. Center for the development of commercial crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The second year of operation of the Center for Commercial Crystal Growth in Space is described. This center is a consortium of businesses, universities and national laboratories. The primary goal of the Center's research is the development of commercial crystal growth in space. A secondary goal is to develop scientific understanding and technology which will improve commercial crystal growth on earth. In order to achieve these goals the Center's research is organized into teams by growth technique; melt growth, solution growth, and vapor growth. The melt growth team is working on solidification and characterization of bulk crystals of gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride. They used high resolution X-ray topography performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Streak-like features were found in the diffraction images of semi-insulating undoped LEC GaAs. These were shown to be (110) antiphase boundaries, which have not been reported before but appear to be pervasive and responsible for features seen via less-sensitive characterization methods. The results on CdTe were not as definitive, but indicate that antiphase boundaries may also be responsible for the double peaks often seen in X-ray rocking curves of this material. A liquid encapsulated melt zone system for GaAs has been assembled and techniques for casting feed rods developed. It was found that scratching the inside of the quartz ampoules with silicon carbide abrasive minimized sticking of the GaAs to the quartz. Twelve floating zone experiments were done.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans for space communication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A program plan is presented for a space communications application utilizing the 30/20 GHz frequency bands (30 GHz uplink and 20 GHz downlink). Results of market demand studies and spacecraft systems studies which significantly affect the supporting research and technology program are also presented, along with the scheduled activities of the program plan.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scientific and Technical Information Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven articles discuss informational and educational programs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Some of the areas discussed include scientific and technical information management, the new Space and Earth Science Information Systems, transfer of technology to other industries, intellectual property issues, and the…

  17. Preliminary Evaluation Of Commercial Supercapacitors For Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineste, Valery; Loup, Didier; Mattesco, Patrick; Neugnot, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Supercapacitors are identified since years as a new technology enabling energy storage together with high power delivery capability to the system. A recent ESA study [1] led by Astrium has demonstrated the interest of these devices for space application, providing that reliability and end of life performances are demonstrated. A realistic commercial on the shelf (COTS) approach (or with limited design modification approved by potential suppliers) has been favoured (as for batteries). This paper presents preliminary test results done by Astrium on COTS supercapacitors: accelerated life tests, calendar life tests, technology analyses. Based on these results, assessment and lessons learnt are drawn in view of future exhaustive supercapacitor validation and future qualification.

  18. Funding to Boost the Commercialization of Space Weather Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2009-03-01

    Space weather research at Utah State University (USU), in Logan, has been awarded a grant from the state of Utah to help transition models originally developed for the U.S. Department of Defense into commercially viable products. The grant, awarded by the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative (USTAR), will distribute US$4 million over 5 years to the USU team working on a research effort called Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). GAIM creates specifications and forecasts for global, regional, and local distributions of upper atmospheric and ionospheric densities, temperatures, and winds. It is the operational space weather model for the U.S. Air Force Weather Agency and is used in studies at air force and naval research laboratories.

  19. Space Environment Stability and Physical Properties of New Materials for Space Power and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    To test and evaluate suitability of materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, and to achieve sufficient understanding of the mechanisms by which, the materials perform in their intended applications. Materials and proposed applications included but were not limited to: Improved anodes for lithium ion batteries, highly-transparent arc-proof solar array coatings, and improved surface materials for solar dynamic concentrators and receivers. Cooperation and interchange of data with industrial companies as appropriate.

  20. 76 FR 52732 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation Notice of Intent To Publish Current and Future Launch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is changing the way the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) makes its permits, licenses, and all accompanying orders (authorizations) available to the public. The FAA intends to post all current and future authorizations online on the AST Web site \\1\\ beginning on October 24, 2011. The FAA will not publish license or permit applications or......

  1. A Milestone in Commercial Space Weather: USTAR Center for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Zhu, L.; Gardner, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    As of 2009, Utah State University (USU) hosts a new organization to develop commercial space weather applications using funding that has been provided by the State of Utah’s Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The USTAR Center for Space Weather (UCSW) is located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah and is developing innovative applications for mitigating adverse space weather effects in technological systems. Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects communication and navigation systems. The UCSW has developed products for users of systems that are affected by space weather-driven ionospheric changes. For example, on September 1, 2009 USCW released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world’s first real-time space weather via an iPhone app. Space WX displays the real-time, current global ionosphere total electron content along with its space weather drivers; it is available through the Apple iTunes store and is used around the planet. The Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system is now being run operationally in real-time at UCSW with the continuous ingestion of hundreds of global data streams to dramatically improve the ionosphere’s characterization. We discuss not only funding and technical advances that have led to current products but also describe the direction for UCSW that includes partnering opportunities for moving commercial space weather into fully automated specification and forecasting over the next half decade.

  2. The Impact of Space Commercialization on Space Agencies: the Case of NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Vasilis

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the hypothesis that commercialisation of space results in inefficient contracting policies by the space agencies, using the US NASA as a case study. Though commercialisation is seen by many as a way to reduce costs in space programmes, as the space industry is seen as a decreasing costs industry, this is not a problem-free process. Commercialisation of space has affected the US and European space industries and policies in two major ways. The first is that the public sector actively encourages mergers and acquisitions of major contractors, confined, however, within the geographical borders of the US and Europe. This follows largely from the perceived benefits of economies of size when competing in global commercial markets. The second is the formation of an increasing number of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in space programmes and a more `cosy' relationship between the two within a public-assistance strategic trade theoretic framework. As ESA's contracting policy of `juste retour' is marked by limited competition, the paper focuses on the case of NASA, which is expected to be more pro- competitive, to examine the impact of commercialisation. With the use of quantitative methods based on time series econometric analysis, the paper shows that NASA's contracting policy, results in increasingly less competition and more rent-favouring contracting. This is attributed to the decreasing number of major contractors in conjunction with the preferential treatment of the domestic space industry (`Buy American'). The results of the paper verify that the support of the domestic space industry in commercial and public space markets results in inefficient contracting policies, with NASA facing the conflicting tasks of a stated policy of enhancing competition and efficiency in contracting, as well as, supporting the competitiveness of the domestic space industry. The paper concludes with an analysis and assessment of solutions to this

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  5. Utilization of commercial communications systems for space based research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overmyer, Carolyn; Thompson, Clark

    1998-01-01

    With the increase in utilization of space for research and development activities, the need for a communication system which improves the availability of payload uplink and downlink with the ground becomes increasingly more critical. At the same time, experiment developers are experiencing a tightening of their budgets for space based research. They don't have the capability to develop a unique communication interface that requires unique software and hardware packages. They would prefer to use commercial protocols and standards available through off-the-shelf components. Also, the need for secure communication is critical to keep proprietary data from being distributed to competing organizations. In order to meet the user community needs, SPACEHAB is currently in the process of developing and testing a system designed specifically for the user community called the SPACEHAB Universal Communication System (SHUCS). The purpose of this paper is to present customer requirements, the SHUCS design approach and top level operations, terrestrial test results, and flight testing scheduled for STS-91 and -95.

  6. SP-100 nuclear space power systems with application to space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to familiarize the Space Commercialization Community with the status and characteristics of the SP-100 space nuclear power system. The program is a joint undertaking by the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and NASA. The goal of the program is to develop, validate, and demonstrate the technology for space nuclear power systems in the range of 10 to 1000 kWe electric for use in the future civilian and military space missions. Also discussed are mission applications which are enhanced and/or enabled by SP-100 technology and how this technology compares to that of more familiar solar power systems. The mission applications include earth orbiting platforms and lunar/Mars surface power.

  7. Proceedings of the Goddard Space Flight Center Workshop on Robotics for Commercial Microelectronic Processes in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Potential applications of robots for cost effective commercial microelectronic processes in space were studied and the associated robotic requirements were defined. Potential space application areas include advanced materials processing, bulk crystal growth, and epitaxial thin film growth and related processes. All possible automation of these processes was considered, along with energy and environmental requirements. Aspects of robot capabilities considered include system intelligence, ROM requirements, kinematic and dynamic specifications, sensor design and configuration, flexibility and maintainability. Support elements discussed included facilities, logistics, ground support, launch and recovery, and management systems.

  8. 77 FR 7183 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Public... 2010 (Pub. L. 111-117), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is publishing this...

  9. SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM : Building a Commercial Space Launch System and the Role of Space Tourism in the Future (exceptionally on Tuesday)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

    The talk will explore a little of the history of space launch systems and rocketry, will explain why commercial space tourism did not take off after Apollo, and what is happening right now with commercial space systems such as Virgin's, utilising advances in aerospace technology not exploited by conventional ground-based rocket systems. I will then explain the Virgin Galactic technology, its business plan as a US-regulated space tourism company, and the nature of its applications. I will then go on to say a little of how our system can be utilised for sub-orbital space science based on a commercial business plan

  10. SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM : Building a Commercial Space Launch System and the Role of Space Tourism in the Future (exceptionally on Tuesday)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    The talk will explore a little of the history of space launch systems and rocketry, will explain why commercial space tourism did not take off after Apollo, and what is happening right now with commercial space systems such as Virgin's, utilising advances in aerospace technology not exploited by conventional ground-based rocket systems. I will then explain the Virgin Galactic technology, its business plan as a US-regulated space tourism company, and the nature of its applications. I will then go on to say a little of how our system can be utilised for sub-orbital space science based on a commercial business plan

  11. Reliable commercial high temperature superconductor wire for space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masur, Lawrence J.; Kellers, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are widely considered for large power applications used by industrial end-users and electric utilities. The prominent application areas include power transmission cables, electric motors, generators, current limiters, and transformers. The promising design concepts rely on HTS to be a flexible composite conductor, robust enough to handle an industrial environment. Currently, the most advanced manufacturing method for flexible composite conductor is the Bi-2223-OPIT, used by many organizations. Significant advances in HTS technology have been made, with average critical current performance of 130 A at 77 K which is equivalent to an engineering current density of 15.1 kA/cm2. During the past 18 months, American Superconductor increased its HTS wire manufacturing capacity from 250 km to 500 km per year to meet the increased demand for development and demonstrations. While this level of quality and quantity enables impressive demonstrations of prototype power applications, it does not fully meet the requirements of commercial economic viability. Therefore, to further decrease wire price to the range of $50/kA-m, American Superconductor is currently siting a new facility dedicated to the manufacturing of Bi-OPIT-2223 wire in quantities of 10,000 km per year. The purpose of this paper is to examine the functional, reliable, and economical aspects of today's HTS materials with an eye towards application in space missions. .

  12. Space-Hotel Early Bird - Visions for a Commercial Space Hotel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.; Apel, U.

    2002-01-01

    rachid.amekrane@astrium-space.com/Fax: +49 421 539-24801, cholze@zarm.uni-bremen.de/Fax: +49 421 218-7473, The International Space Station was planed for research purposes. In 2001 the first private man, Denis Tito,visited the ISS and the second private man, Mark Shuttleworth is following him. The gate towards the commercial utilization of manned space flight has been pushed open. Space pioneers as Wernher von Braun and Sir Arthur C. Clarke had the dream that one day a space station in earth orbit will host tourists. It is evident that the ISS is not designed to host tourists. Therefore the dream of the pioneers is still open. By asking the question "how should a space station should look like to host tourists?", the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. organized a contest under the patronage of Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA) in April 2001. Because the definition and design of living space is the content of architecture the approach was to gather new ideas from young architects in cooperation with space experts. This contest was directed at students of architecture and the task set was to design a hotel for the earth orbit and to accommodate 220 guests. The contest got the name "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel". The results and models of the student's work were shown in an exhibition in Hamburg/Germany, which was open to the public from September 19th till October 20th 2001. During the summer term of 2001 seventeen designs were completed. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within this interdisciplinary project both parties learned from each other. The 17 different designs were focused on the expectations and needs of a future space tourist. The designs are for sure not feasible today, but the designs are in that sense realistic that they could be

  13. Highlights from Commercial Flights to the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    A little more than two years after the end of the Space Shuttle Program, the United States now has two space transportation systems -- SpaceX's Falcon rocket and Dragon spacecraft and Orbital's Ant...

  14. Traffic model for commercial payloads in the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA). [market research in commercial space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietzel, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    One hundred individuals representing universities, technical institutes, government agencies, and industrial facilities were surveyed to determine potential commercial use of a self-contained, automated assembly for the space processing of materials during frequent shuttle flights for the 1981 to 1987 period. The approach used and the results of the study are summarized. A time time-phased projection (traffic model) of commercial usage of the materials experiment assembly is provided.

  15. Modeling of Space Radiation Exposure Estimation Program for Pilots, Crew and Passengers on Commercial Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Junga; Dokgo, Kyunghwan; Choi, Enjin; Park, Jong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Kim, Hang-Pyo

    2014-03-01

    There has been a rapid increase of the concern on the space radiation effect on pilots, crew and passengers at the commercial aircraft altitude (~ 10 km) recently. It is because domestic airline companies, Korean Air and Asiana Airlines have just begun operating the polar routes over the North Pole since 2006 and 2009 respectively. CARI-6 and CARI-6M are commonly used space radiation estimation programs which are provided officially by the U.S. federal aviation administration (FAA). In this paper, the route doses and the annual radiation doses for Korean pilots and cabin crew were estimated by using CARI-6M based on 2012 flight records. Also the modeling concept was developed for our own space radiation estimation program which is composed of GEANT4 and NRLMSIS00 models. The GEANT4 model is used to trace the incident particle transports in the atmosphere and the NRLMSIS00 model is used to get the background atmospheric densities of various neutral atoms at the aircraft altitude. Also presented are the results of simple integration tests of those models and the plan to include the space weather variations through the solar proton event (SPE) prediction model such as UMASEP and the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) prediction model such as Badhwar-O¡¯Neill 2010.

  16. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study commercialization working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The benefits for each of the following commercial areas was investigated: communications, remote sensing, materials processing in space, low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite assembly, testing, and servicing, and space tourism. In each case, where economic benefits are derived, the costs for accomplishing tasks with the Space Station are compared with the cost with the Space Transportation System only.

  17. Economic Metrics for Commercial Reusable Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.; Hamaker, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    baseline. Still, economic metrics for technology development in these Programs and projects remain fairly straightforward, being based on reductions in acquisition and operating costs of the Systems. One of the most challenging requirements that NASA levies on its Programs is to plan for the commercialization of the developed technology. Some NASA Programs are created for the express purpose of developing technology for a particular industrial sector, such as aviation or space transportation, in financial partnership with that sector. With industrial investment, another set of goals, constraints and expectations are levied on the technology program. Economic benefit metrics then expand beyond cost and cost savings to include the marketability, profit, and investment return requirements of the private sector. Commercial investment criteria include low risk, potential for high return, and strategic alignment with existing product lines. These corporate criteria derive from top-level strategic plans and investment goals, which rank high among the most proprietary types of information in any business. As a result, top-level economic goals and objectives that industry partners bring to cooperative programs cannot usually be brought into technical processes, such as systems engineering, that are worked collaboratively between Industry and Government. In spite of these handicaps, the top-level economic goals and objectives of a joint technology program can be crafted in such a way that they accurately reflect the fiscal benefits from both Industry and Government perspectives. Valid economic metrics can then be designed that can track progress toward these goals and objectives, while maintaining the confidentiality necessary for the competitive process.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Science and Engineering Apprentice Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Science and Engineering Apprentice Program for high school students is one of NASA's many efforts toward a goal of scientific literacy. It embraces science, mathematics, and technology as keys to purposeful and sustained progress and security for our nation and its people. It serves as a model for helping reform education by striving to address mechanisms to influence the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of our students. It focuses on what to do today to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this Report.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Fiscal Year 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events. The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this report.

  1. Creating Processes Associated with Providing Government Goods and Services Under the Commercial Space Launch Act at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Janet F.

    2011-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has decided to write its agreements under the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA) authority to cover a broad range of categories of support that KSC could provide to our commercial partner. Our strategy was to go through the onerous process of getting the agreement in place once and allow added specificity and final cost estimates to be documented on a separate Task Order Request (TOR). This paper is written from the implementing engineering team's perspective. It describes how we developed the processes associated with getting Government support to our emerging commercial partners, such as SpaceX and reports on our success to date.

  2. Space Station Crew Welcomes World's First Commercial Cargo Craft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA, Flight Engineer Andre Kuipers of the European Space Agency and Flight Engineer Joe Acaba of NASA grappled a...

  3. International space research perspectives of commercialization for German industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    A brief overview of space flight activities is presented. West German contributions to satellite mapping, communication satellites, navigation, Spacelab, diffusion under weightlessness, crystal growth in space, metal bonding, and biochemistry are described. The future of the research in the space station is analyzed.

  4. The commercial development of space: is an international regulatory framework needed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, Corinne M.; Logsdon, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The commercial space sector to date has failed to develop comprehensive regulations—"rules of the road"—for its international activities. Within the next 5 years, conflicts with respect to international trade in satellite sales and launch services could emerge, highlighting the need for such a regulatory framework. If the commercial space sector is to continue to develop, it is important to begin discussions now, before these conflicts become significant, on the elements of an appropriate international regulatory framework. The existing framework for space activities was developed when government, not commercial, space activities were dominant, or was adapted from regulations in other sectors such as terrestrial telecommunications.

  5. The administration of the NASA space tracking system and the NASA space tracking system in Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollander, N.

    1973-01-01

    The international activities of the NASA space program were studied with emphasis on the development and maintenance of tracking stations in Australia. The history and administration of the tracking organization and the manning policies for the stations are discussed, and factors affecting station operation are appraised. A field study of the Australian tracking network is included.

  6. The U.S. Commercial Space Launch Program and the Department of Defense Dilemma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, William G.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. space launch program no longer dominates the world and is now playing 'catch-up' with the world's first commercial launch company, Arianespace. A healthy U.S. commercial launch program is essential and will assure continued low-cost military access to space. The effort to regain the lead in commercial space launch market has been hindered by declining Department of Defense budgets. President Clinton's space policy prohibits expensive new launch vehicles and limits the Department of Defense to low cost upgrades of existing launch vehicles. The U.S. government created the space sector and must ensure a smooth and effective split from the emerging commercial space program in order to regain world dominance. Until U.S. government and commercial ties are severed, the Department of Defense must consider commercial space launch interests when making military decisions. Ariane provides an excellent 'bench mark' for the U.S. to base future launch vehicle upgrades. Ariane advantages were identified and low-cost recommendations have been made. If the U.S. sets the target of first equaling and then surpassing Ariane by incorporating these recommendations, then the U.S. could once again dominate the world commercial launch market and ensure low cost military access to space.

  7. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D. A.; Agnew, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Spectrum management, models for evaluating communication systems, the communications regulatory environment, expert prediction and consensus, remote sensing, and manned space operations research are discussed.

  8. 76 FR 6827 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration FY 2010 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautic and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of public... of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-117), National Aeronautic and...

  9. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer and communications, vol. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D. A.; Agnew, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Spectrum management, models for evaluating communications systems, and implications of communications regulations for NASA are considered as major parts of communications policy. Marketing LANDSAT products in developing countries, a political systems analysis of LANDSAT, and private financing and operation of the space operations center (space station) are discussed. Investment requirements, risks, government support, and other primary business and management considerations are examined.

  10. Proceedings of the Second Annual Symposium on Industrial Involvement and Successes in Commercial Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. It is proposed that commercial development in space is an important element in the future competitive posture of the industrial nations of the world. The resources and characteristics of space will play a major role in opening a new economic frontier for all the spacefaring nations of the world. Some topics of discussion are as follow: NASA's mission and the role of CCD's; A balanced commercial access to space; Systems for COMET; SPACEHAB; Space Station Freedom; The center for macromolecular crystallography; Center for space power and advanced electronics; and The center for mapping.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 1999 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Accountability Report consolidates reports required by various statutes and summarizes NASA's program accomplishments and its stewardship over budget and financial resources. It is a culmination of NASA's management process, which begins with mission definition and program planning, continues with the formulation and justification of budgets for the President and Congress, and ends with the resulting scientific and engineering program accomplishments. The report covers activities from October 1, 1998, through September 30, 1999, with a discussion of some subsequent events. Program accomplishments included the deployment and operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the delivery of supplies and equipment needed to live and operate on the International Space Station, and the development of the first global 3-D map of Mars. Achievements are highlighted in the Statement of the Administrator and summarized in the performance section of this report.

  12. Report of the committee on a commercially developed space facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Joseph F.; Stever, H. Guyford; Cutter, W. Bowman, III; Demisch, Wolfgang H.; Fink, Daniel J.; Flax, Alexander H.; Gatos, Harry C.; Glicksman, Martin E.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Logsdon, John M., III

    1989-01-01

    Major facilities that could support significant microgravity research and applications activity are discussed. The ground-based facilities include drop towers, aircraft flying parabolic trajectories, and sounding rockets. Facilities that are intrinsically tied to the Space Shuttle range from Get-Away-Special canisters to Spacelab long modules. There are also orbital facilities which include recoverable capsules launched on expendable launch vehicles, free-flying spacecraft, and space stations. Some of these existing, planned, and proposed facilities are non-U.S. in origin, but potentially available to U.S. investigators. In addition, some are governmentally developed and operated whereas others are planned to be privately developed and/or operated. Tables are provided to show the facility, developer, duration, estimated gravity level, crew interaction, flight frequency, year available, power to payload, payload volume, and maximum payload mass. The potential of direct and indirect benefits of manufacturing in space are presented.

  13. Part 3: NASA Future Forum: How Commercial Space Benefits U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA Future Forum panel moderated by Doug King of The Museum of Flight in Seattle examines how commercial investments in space exploration and research will help build the American economy. (Part...

  14. Accessing space: A catalogue of process, equipment and resources for commercial users, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A catalogue is presented which is intended for commercial developers who are considering, or who have in progress, a project involving the microgravity environment of space or remote sensing of the Earth. An orientation is given to commercial space activities along with a current inventory of equipment, apparatus, carriers, vehicles, resources, and services available from NASA, other government agencies and U.S. industry. The information describes the array of resources that commercial users should consider when planning ground or space based developments. Many items listed have flown in space or been tested in labs and aboard aircraft and can be reused, revitalized, or adapted to suit specific requirements. New commercial ventures are encouraged to exploit existing inventory and expertise to the greatest extent possible.

  15. Synergistic control center development utilizing commercial technology and industry standards. [NASA space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Control Center Complex (CCC), a synergistic control center supporting both the Space Station Freedom and the Space Shuttle Program, is described. To provide maximum growth and flexibility, the CCC uses commercial off-the-shelf technology and industry standards. The discussion covers the development philosophy, CCC architecture, data distribution, the software platform concept, workstation platform, commercial tools for the CCC, and benefits of synergy.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) education 1993--2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivie, Christine M.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993 -- 2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that time period. Constant changes in education leadership at NASA resulted in changes in direction in the education program and the documents produced by each administration reflected both small and some significant changes in program direction. The result of the analysis of documents and interview data was the identification of several trends in the NASA education program. This study identified three significant trends in NASA education. First, the approach that NASA took in both its EPO efforts and in the efforts directed by the Office of Education is disjointed and seems to reflect individual preferences in education approaches designed to reach populations that are of interest to the individuals in decision-making positions rather than reflect a systematic approach designed to meet identified goals and outcomes. Second, this disjointed and person-driven approach led to a lack of consistent evaluation data available for review and planning purposes. Third, there was an ongoing assumption made by the education community that NASA education efforts were tied to larger education reports, concerns, needs, initiatives and evidence collected and presented in Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education-related studies over the past twenty years. In fact, there is no evidence that the programs and projects initiated were a response to these identified needs or initiatives. That does not mean that NASA's efforts did not contribute to STEM education initiatives in the United States. This study, however, indicates that contributions to those initiatives occurred as a byproduct of the effort and not because of specific

  17. Sub-orbital commercial Human space flight and informed consent in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Maria-Vittoria « Giugi »; Griffith, Doug; Campbell, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    Commercial space flight is expected to rapidly develop in the near future. This will begin with sub-orbital missions and then progress to orbital flights. In the United States, technical informed consent of space flight participants is required by the commercial space flight operator for regulatory purposes. Additionally, though not required by U.S. regulation, the aerospace medicine professional involved in the medical screening of both space flight participants and crewmembers will be asked to assist operators in obtaining medical informed consent for liability purposes. The various US federal and state regulations regarding informed consent for sub-orbital commercial space flight are evolving and are unfamiliar to most aerospace medical professionals and are reviewed and discussed.

  18. Case Study of Using High Performance Commercial Processors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Olivas, Zulema

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade project (1999 2004) was to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness. The upgrade was to augment the Shuttle avionics system with new hardware and software. A major success of this project was the validation of the hardware architecture and software design. This was significant because the project incorporated new technology and approaches for the development of human rated space software. An early version of this system was tested at the Johnson Space Center for one month by teams of astronauts. The results were positive, but NASA eventually cancelled the project towards the end of the development cycle. The goal to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness resulted in the need for high performance Central Processing Units (CPUs). The choice of CPU selected was the PowerPC family, which is a reduced instruction set computer (RISC) known for its high performance. However, the requirement for radiation tolerance resulted in the re-evaluation of the selected family member of the PowerPC line. Radiation testing revealed that the original selected processor (PowerPC 7400) was too soft to meet mission objectives and an effort was established to perform trade studies and performance testing to determine a feasible candidate. At that time, the PowerPC RAD750s were radiation tolerant, but did not meet the required performance needs of the project. Thus, the final solution was to select the PowerPC 7455. This processor did not have a radiation tolerant version, but had some ability to detect failures. However, its cache tags did not provide parity and thus the project incorporated a software strategy to detect radiation failures. The strategy was to incorporate dual paths for software generating commands to the legacy Space Shuttle avionics to prevent failures due to the softness of the upgraded avionics.

  19. Potential Commercial Applications from Combustion and Fire Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Lyons, Valerie J.

    1996-01-01

    The near-zero (microgravity) environment of orbiting spacecraft minimizes buoyant flows, greatly simplifying combustion processes and isolating important phenomena ordinarily concealed by the overwhelming gravity-driven forces and flows. Fundamental combustion understanding - the focus to date of the NASA microgravity-combustion program - has greatly benefited from analyses and experiments conducted in the microgravity environment. Because of the economic and commercial importance of combustion in practice, there is strong motivation to seek wider applications for the microgravity-combustion findings. This paper reviews selected technology developments to illustrate some emerging applications. Topics cover improved fire-safety technology in spacecraft and terrestrial systems, innovative combustor designs for aerospace and ground propulsion, applied sensors and controls for combustion processes, and self-sustaining synthesis techniques for advanced materials.

  20. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  1. The Virginia Space Flight Center model for an integrated federal/commercial launch range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Billie M.

    2000-01-01

    Until 1998, the federal government has been the predominant purchaser of space launches in the U.S. through the purchase of hardware and services. Historically, the government provided the necessary infrastructure for launches from the federal DoD and NASA launch ranges. In this historical model, the federal government had complete ownership, responsibility, liability, and expense for launch activities. In 1998, commercial space launches accounted for 60% of U.S. launches. This growth in commercial launches has increased the demand for launch range services. However, the expense, complexity of activities, and issues over certification of flight safety have deterred the establishment of purely commercial launch sites, with purely commercial being defined as without benefit of capabilities provided by the federal government. Provisions of the Commercial Space Launch Act have enabled DoD and NASA to support commercial launches from government launch ranges on a cost-reimbursable, non-interference basis. The government provides services including use of facilities, tracking and data services, and range and flight safety. In the 1990's, commercial space market projections indicated strong potential for large numbers of commercial satellites to be launched well into the first decade of the 21st century. In response to this significant opportunity for economic growth, several states established spaceports to provide the services necessary to meet these forecast commercial needs. In 1997, NASA agreed to the establishment of the Virginia Space Flight Center (VSFC), a commercial spaceport, at its Wallops Flight Facility. Under this arrangement, NASA agreed to allow the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority (VCSFA) to construct facilities on NASA property and agreed to provide launch range and other services in accordance with the Space Act and Commercial Space Launch Act in support of VSFC launch customers. A partnership relationship between NASA and VCSFA has emerged

  2. Commercial Production of Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass Fiber in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1998-01-01

    International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will provide a platform not only for materials research but also a possible means to produce products in space which cannot be easily produced on the ground. Some products may even be superior to those now produced in unit gravity due to the lack of gravity induced convection effects. Our research with ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN glass) has shown that gravity does indeed play a major role in the crystallization behavior of this material. At the present time ZBLAN is being produced on earth in fiber optic form for use in surgical lasers and fiber optic lasers among other applications. High attenuation coefficients, however, have kept this material from being used in other applications such as long haul data transmission links. The high attenuation coefficients are due to impurities which can be removed through improved processing techniques and crystals which can only be removed or prevented from forming by processing in a reduced gravity environment.

  3. Space Flight Qualification Program for the AMS-2 Commercial Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Breon, S. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, momentum, charge, and path. The AMS-02 experiment will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS-02 will be installed on the International Space Station on Utilization Flight-4. The experiment will be run for at least three years. To extend the life of the stored cryogen and minimize temperature gradients around the magnet, four Stirling-cycle Sunpower M87N cryocoolers will be integrated with AMS-02. The cryocooler cold tip will be connected via a flexible strap to the outer vapor cooled shield of the dewar. Initial thermal analysis shows the lifetime of the experiment is increased by a factor of 2.8 with the use of the cryocooler. The AMS-02 project selected the Sunpower M87 cryocoolers and has asked NASA Goddard to qualify the cryocoolers for space flight use. This paper describes the interfaces with the cryocoolers and presents data collected during testing of the two engineering model cryocoolers. Tests include thermal performance characterization and launch vibration testing. Magnetic field compatibility testing will be presented in a separate paper at the conference.

  4. Physical Properties and Durability of New Materials for Space and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    To develop and test new materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, to assist industry in the application of these materials, and to achieve an adequate understanding of the mechanisms by which the materials perform in their intended applications.

  5. Space Station Freedom Workshop Opportunities for Commercial Users and Providers: Issues and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The responses to issues and questions raised at the Space Station Freedom Workshops are compiled. The findings are presented under broad divisions of general, materials processing in space, commercial earth and ocean observations, life sciences, infrastructure services, and infrastructure policy. The responses represent the best answers available at this time and future modifications may be expected. Contact names, telephone numbers, and organizations are included.

  6. NASA in-house Commercially Developed Space Facility (CDSF) study report. Volume 1: Concept configuration definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deryder, L. J.; Chiger, H. D.; Deryder, D. D.; Detweiler, K. N.; Dupree, R. L.; Gillespie, V. P.; Hall, J. B.; Heck, M. L.; Herrick, D. C.; Katzberg, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a NASA in-house team effort to develop a concept definition for a Commercially Developed Space Facility (CDSF) are presented. Science mission utilization definition scenarios are documented, the conceptual configuration definition system performance parameters qualified, benchmark operational scenarios developed, space shuttle interface descriptions provided, and development schedule activity was assessed with respect to the establishment of a proposed launch date.

  7. 75 FR 50036 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Availability of Finding of No Significant Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Spaceport (MARS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (WFF). As the MARS expansion... (1) licensing the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority (VCSFA) which operates MARS as a... at MARS. The FAA has formally adopted the EA and is using the FONSI/ROD to support the...

  8. "From Bricks to Clicks": Hybrid Commercial Spaces in the Landscape of Early Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Helen

    2011-01-01

    In their quest for resources to support children's early literacy learning and development, parents encounter and traverse different spaces in which discourses and artifacts are produced and circulated. This paper uses conceptual tools from the field of geosemiotics to examine some commercial spaces designed for parents and children that…

  9. Space commercialization: Analysis of R and D investments with long time horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheahen, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    By following a single hypothetical example through a series of variations, the way different potential investors might look at the opportunity to participate in space commercialization is described. The example itself is fairly typical of commercial opportunities in space. The chief characteristics are a steadily increasing requirement for capital infusion over an 8 year period, followed by a very generous stream of profits running another decade or more beyond. There is a decision point at 3 years, at the conclusion of laboratory R&D; and another at 6 years, following 2 initial space flights.

  10. Commercial suborbital space tourism-proposal on passenger's medical selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Götz; Stern, Claudia; Trammer, Martin; Chaudhuri, Indra; Tuschy, Peter; Gerzer, Rupert

    2013-12-01

    Commercial human spaceflight has excellent economic and technical perspectives in the next decades. Passengers will be persons from a general population differing from culture, age, gender and health status. They all will have to withstand physical loads of spaceflight such as acceleration and deceleration forces, microgravity, vibration, noise and radiation. There is a necessity to mitigate all negative impacts on the passengers' health. Besides precautionary measures in construction and equipment, a diligent medical selection and pre-flight training is recommended. To ensure an easy and at the same time qualified selection procedure, it is necessary to define medical selection criteria and training methods. As experiences with suborbital spaceflight of private passengers are still few we recommend to implement in the beginning of this new era maximum safety standards. Having performed a satisfactory number of successful flights, some of the selection criteria and training sessions might be loosened or modified. This judicious approach is in the interest of the spaceflight participants as well as of the providing companies. As a guideline we propose a four step approach that allows a quick decision concerning the fitness of participants to fly as well as an intensive preparation of the passengers. For the first two steps positive experiences from medical screening and examination of professional pilots can be utilised. According to JAR-FCL 3 (Joint Aviation Requirements-Flight Crew Licensing, Chapter 3) a questionnaire with medical interview targeting the medical background of the respective person and including no-go criteria provides a first estimation for applicants and medical examiners whether there will be a chance to be accepted as a passenger. The second step of selection comprises the physical examination of the applicant adjusted to the professional pilot's examination procedure. As the physical challenges of the suborbital flight will exceed the impact

  11. The Commercial Application of Missile/Space Technology, Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welles, John G.; Marts, Lloyd G.; Waterman, Robert H., Jr.; Gilmore, John S.; Venuti, Robert

    1963-01-01

    This report is concerned with the transfer of technology from missile and space programs to non-missile/space applications in the United States. It presents the findings of a University of Denver Research Institute study sponsored by a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) grant awarded in November 1961. Initial stimulation for the unsolicited proposal leading to this study came from a 1960 Brookings Institution report to NASA, Proposed Studies on the Implications of Peaceful Space Activities for Human Affairs.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation Synthetic Aperture Radar Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Dubayah, R.; Hager, B. H.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation are planning a synthetic aperture radar (currently named NISAR) mission for launch in 2020. The mission is a dual L- and S-band polarimetric SAR satellite with a 12-day interferometric orbit and 240 km wide ground swath. The 3-year mission will have a circular sun synchronous orbit (6 am and 6 pm) with a 98° inclination and 747 km altitude that will provide systematic global coverage. Its primary science objectives are to: measure solid Earth surface deformation (earthquakes, volcanic unrest, land subsidence/uplift, landslides); track and understand cryosphere dynamics (glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, and permafrost); characterize and track changes in vegetation structure and wetlands for understanding ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle; and support global disaster response. We will describe the current mission concept: the satellite design/capabilities, spacecraft, launch vehicle, and data flow.

  13. Leadership in Space: Selected Speeches of NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, May 2005 - October 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Speech topics include: Leadership in Space; Space Exploration: Real and Acceptable Reasons; Why Explore Space?; Space Exploration: Filling up the Canvas; Continuing the Voyage: The Spirit of Endeavour; Incorporating Space into Our Economic Sphere of Influence; The Role of Space Exploration in the Global Economy; Partnership in Space Activities; International Space Cooperation; National Strategy and the Civil Space Program; What the Hubble Space Telescope Teaches Us about Ourselves; The Rocket Team; NASA's Direction; Science and NASA; Science Priorities and Program Management; NASA and the Commercial Space Industry; NASA and the Business of Space; American Competitiveness: NASA's Role & Everyone's Responsibility; Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration; The Next Generation of Engineers; System Engineering and the "Two Cultures" of Engineering; Generalship of Engineering; NASA and Engineering Integrity; The Constellation Architecture; Then and Now: Fifty Years in Space; The Reality of Tomorrow; and Human Space Exploration: The Next 50 Years.

  14. Commercialization of Kennedy Space Center Instrumentation Developed to Improve Safety, Reliability, Cost Effectiveness of Space Shuttle Processing, Launch, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, William R.; Starr, Stanley O.

    1997-01-01

    Priorities and achievements of the Kennedy Space Center (KSF) Instrumentation Laboratories in improving operational safety and decreasing processing costs associated with the Shuttle vehicle are addressed. Technologies that have been or are in the process of technology transfer are reviewed, and routes by which commercial concerns can obtain licenses to other KSF Instrumentation Laboratory technologies are discussed.

  15. Commercial Space Policy in the 1980s: Proceedings of a Roundtable Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlstrom, Neil (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Business Archives and the NASA History Office signed a Memorandum of Understanding in March of 1999. The MOU outlines several opportunities for cooperative endeavors between the two agencies in historical programming. This oral history, and subsequently this publication, are the first products of that cooperation. In accordance with the purpose of the Space Business Archives--to provide an impartial forum for lessons learned in the development of the commercial space industry--the idea for this roundtable discussion seemed appropriate as the Archives first public program. With the combined resources of the Archives and the NASA History Office we were fortunate to assemble a panel of individuals that served in both industry and government during the 1980s, many working in both sectors during that time. When envisioning the focus of this oral history, we decided that it was appropriate to highlight space policy in the 1980s, with an emphasis on the emerging commercial industry. Panelists were sent several documents in preparation, such as the Land Remote Sensing Commercialization Act and the Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984, President Reagan's 1982 National Space Policy, and other memoranda and letters that outline important policy issues of the decade. This discussion, we think, fills in some of the gaps that would otherwise be left unfilled when simply reading through the documents themselves. Some of these gaps include: how were these policy directives, legislation and decisions introduced and developed, by whom, and at what political and financial cost? This transcript is meant to serve as a reference to some of the issues, organizations and individuals involved in the creation and development of space policy during the 1980s. It is also the result of the first of many future roundtable discussions aimed at providing an open exchange of ideas concerning past success and failure in order to provide a stronger base for future endeavors in governmental

  16. Accessing space: A catalogue of process, equipment and resources for commercial users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalogue, produced by NASA's Office of Commercial Programs, provides a broad source of information for the commercial developer interested in the areas of microgravity research and remote sensing. Methods for accessing space for research are reviewed including the shuttle, expendable launch vehicles, suborbital sounding rockets, experimental aircraft, and drop towers and other ground-based facilities. Procedures for using these vehicles and facilities are described along with funding options to pay for their use. Experiment apparatus and carriers for microgravity research are also described. A separate directory of resources and services is also included which contains a listing of transportation products and services, a listing of businesses and industries which provide space-related services and products, and a listing of the NASA and CCDS (Center for the Commercial Development of Space) points of contact.

  17. The US commercial space launch program and the Department of Defense dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, William G.

    1994-08-01

    A scenario by which the United States might regain its lost advantage in launching commercial satellites is developed using the Ariane space commercial launch company as a benchmark. Ariane's advantages are identified and low-cost recommendations for countering them are presented The four areas selected for analysis inidentifying an American strategy are launch vehicle: (1) payload characteristics; (2) delivery costs; (3) selection process; and (4) technology. Several of the recommendations require Department of Defense funding even though the primary beneficiary appears to be the commercial space sector. But this will ensure that the military has affordable access to space and it is part of a dual purpose strategy whereby government spending benefits both the public and private sector. There is also a brief discussion of other foreign launch vehicle competition.

  18. Benefits Awareness: Educating Industry, Finance, and the Public About Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Blake; Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph C.; Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For space to be truly commercialized, businesses of all sizes and types must be involved, from foundries to agricultural research initiatives. Achieving this goal, however, requires three separate but integrated educational efforts to support it. The first is to educate industry leaders about the possibilities available through such research, while dispelling some of the myths and misinformation educate the financial community about the economic benefits that result both from the research and the leveraging of private research dollars through the use of space and microgravity research. The third is to educate the public about the tangible benefits that come directly to them from such efforts, the economic benefits to national economies from same, and the other less tangible benefits that will cascade from commercial operations. Together, these steps will educate and provide the framework necessary to help advance space commercialization.

  19. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2E: Commercial equipment utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Examination of commercial equipment technologies revealed that the functional performance requirements of space processing equipment could generally be met by state-of-the-art design practices. Thus, an apparatus could be evolved from a standard item or derived by custom design using present technologies. About 15 percent of the equipment needed has no analogous commercial base of derivation and requires special development. This equipment is involved primarily with contactless heating and position control. The derivation of payloads using commercial equipment sources provides a broad and potentially cost-effective base upon which to draw. The derivation of payload equipment from commercial technologies poses other issues beyond that of the identifiable functional performance, but preliminary results on testing of selected equipment testing appear quite favorable. During this phase of the SPA study, several aspects of commercial equipment utility were assessed and considered. These included safety, packaging and structural, power conditioning (electrical/electronic), thermal and materials of construction.

  20. An Initial Strategy for Commercial Industry Awareness of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Catherine A.

    1999-01-01

    While plans are being developed to utilize the ISS for scientific research, and human and microgravity experiments, it is time to consider the future of the ISS as a world-wide commercial marketplace developed from a government owned, operated and controlled facility. Commercial industry will be able to seize this opportunity to utilize the ISS as a unique manufacturing platform and engineering testbed for advanced technology. NASA has begun the strategic planning of the evolution and commercialization of the ISS. The Pre-Planned Program Improvement (P3I) Working Group at NASA is assessing the future ISS needs and technology plans to enhance ISS performance. Some of these enhancements will allow the accommodation of commercial applications and the Human Exploration and Development of Space mission support. As this information develops, it is essential to disseminate this information to commercial industry, targeting not only the private and public space sector but also the non-aerospace commercial industries. An approach is presented for early distribution of this information via the ISS Evolution Data book that includes ISS baseline system information, baseline utilization and operations plans, advanced technologies, future utilization opportunities, ISS evolution and Design Reference Missions (DRM). This information source and tool can be used as catalyst in the commercial world for the generation of ideas and options to enhance the current capabilities of the ISS.

  1. A comparison of radiosity with current methods of sound level prediction in commercial spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamer, C. Walter, IV; Muehleisen, Ralph T.

    2002-11-01

    The ray tracing and image methods (and variations thereof) are widely used for the computation of sound fields in architectural spaces. The ray tracing and image methods are best suited for spaces with mostly specular reflecting surfaces. The radiosity method, a method based on solving a system of energy balance equations, is best applied to spaces with mainly diffusely reflective surfaces. Because very few spaces are either purely specular or purely diffuse, all methods must deal with both types of reflecting surfaces. A comparison of the radiosity method to other methods for the prediction of sound levels in commercial environments is presented. [Work supported by NSF.

  2. Comparing Best Practices to Standards in the Context of Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, D.

    2012-01-01

    Best practices are often discussed as preferred over more formal standards to create order when dealing with safety issues in commercial space transportation. Looking at best practices in other global commercial contexts, the paper examines, inter alia, whom best practices protect, whether they provide enough of a definable minimum standard, whether they can be used to limit liability of a private space actor, and whether they hinder innovation. Though these are broad issues, the study is intended to briefly introduce some of the legal ramifications of these concepts to the marketplace employing them.

  3. Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tether activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA research concerning the use of tethers in space is reviewed, including joint research with the Italian Space Agency. Tether applications under consideration are described, such as a tethered fuel depot and a tethered gravity laboratory platform for the Space Station, providing artificial gravity to and from Mars, payload recovery and waste management, aerothermodynamic magnetospheric physics, and electrodynamic propulsion, braking, and power generation for the Space Shuttle. Also, tether flight demonstrations are examined, including the Small Expendable Deployer System, the Get-Away Tether Experiment, the Tether Elevator Crawler System, and the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment.

  4. COTS/CRS: KSC Evolving Host Initiatives with Commercial Space Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yohpe, Megan

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo Program Office (C3PO) leads the agency's commercial efforts to stimulate United States private companies as the shuttle program comes to a close. Through the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program, two companies, SpaceX and Orbital, were selected to demonstrate their ability to perform flights to the International Space Station. The Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) Project leverages off the COTS experience, and awarded these two private companies contracts to resupply the International Space Station after shuttle fly out. As a 2010 summer intern, I supported the COTS/CRS team in their team meetings, attended and contributed to project discussions and planning, and assisted in developing visual representations for the variety of processes and organizational endeavors required for the program to run smoothly. One aspect of the COTS/CRS program gives the involved private companies the opportunity to request available services from Kennedy Space Center (KSC); one of my projects included assisting in the development of a related Task Order Request (TOR) process. In addition, an integral part of the project was to maintain and enhance the team database for processing the variety of TORS. My experience in the project gave me great insight into the growing field of commercial space activities. The development of the TOR process involved coordinating representatives from a variety of backgrounds at KSC. A clear and concise visual representation of the TOR process in the form of a flow chart was necessary to successfully implement a task order request from one of NASA's commercial partners. The goals of the process charts were to communicate the team's ideas and foster a common thought process while at the same time allow the process to grow and evolve. It was critical that the requests from the private companies were addressed quickly and thoroughly as the process developed this summer is expected to have extensive

  5. Development of a shuttle recovery Commercial Materials Processing in Space (CMPS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The work performed has covered the following tasks: update commercial users requirements; assess availability of carriers and facilities; shuttle availability assessment; development of optimum accommodations plan; and payload documentation requirements assessment. The results from the first four tasks are presented. To update commercial user requirements, contacts were made with the JEA and CCDS partners to obtain copies of their most recent official flight requests. From these requests the commercial partners' short and long range plans for flight dates, flight frequency, experiment hardware and carriers was determined. A 34 by 44 inch chart was completed to give a snapshot view of the progress of commercialization in space. Further, an assessment was made of the availability of carriers and facilities. Both existing carriers and those under development were identified for use by the commercial partners. A data base was compiled to show the capabilities of the carriers. A shuttle availability assessment was performed using the primary and secondary shuttle manifests released by NASA. Analysis of the manifest produced a flight-by-flight list of flight opportunities available to commercial users. Using inputs from the first three tasks, an Optimum Accommodations Plan was developed. The Accommodation Plan shows the commercial users manifested by flight, the experiment flown, the carrier used and complete list of commercial users that could not be manifested in each calendar year.

  6. Microgravity polymer and crystal growth at the Advanced Materials Center for the Commercial Development of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The microgravity research programs currently conducted by the Advanced Materials Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) are briefly reviewed. Polymer processing in space, which constitutes the most active microgravity program at the Advanced Materials CCDS, is conducted in three areas: membrane processing, multiphase composite behavior, and plasma polymerization. Current work in microgravity crystal growth is discussed with particular reference to the development of the Zeolite Crystal Growth facility.

  7. Economic benefits of the Space Station to commercial communication satellite operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Dixson, John E.; Weyandt, Charles J.

    1987-01-01

    The economic and financial aspects of newly defined space-based activities, procedures, and operations (APOs) and associated satellite system designs are presented that have the potential to improve economic performance of future geostationary communications satellites. Launch insurance, launch costs, and the economics of APOs are examined. Retrieval missions and various Space Station scenarios are addressed. The potential benefits of the new APOs to the commercial communications satellite system operator are quantified.

  8. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of the commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is examined. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is presented. Antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon were studied. Production mass balances for antihemophilic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space verus ground operation.

  9. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 3: Product data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is analyzed and the study results are presented. The chronology of the study process is discussed. The separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process is investigated. The production requirements of twelve candidate products including antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and interferon are evaluated.

  10. Administrator Bolden on the SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    While rocket launches from the Cape are considered a common occurrence to some, the historic significance of today’s achievement by SpaceX should not be lost. This is the first in a new generat...

  11. Commercial opportunities in bioseparations and physiological testing aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Cell Research (CCR) is a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space which has as its main goal encouraging industry-driven biomedical/biotechnology space projects. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide long duration, crew-tended microgravity environments which will enhance the opportunities for commercial biomedical/biotechnology projects in bioseparations and physiological testing. The CCR bioseparations program, known as USCEPS (for United States Commercial Electrophoresis Program in Space), is developing access for American industry to continuous-flow electrophoresis aboard SSF. In space, considerable scale-up of continuous free-flow electrophoresis is possible for cells, sub cellular particles, proteins, growth factors, and other biological products. The lack of sedemination and buoyancy-driven convection flow enhances purity of separations and the amount of material processed/time. Through the CCR's physiological testing program, commercial organizations will have access aboard SSF to physiological systems experiments (PSE's); the Penn State Biomodule; and telemicroscopy. Physiological systems experiments involve the use of live animals for pharmaceutical product testing and discovery research. The Penn State Biomodule is a computer-controlled mini lab useful for projects involving live cells or tissues and macro molecular assembly studies, including protein crystallization. Telemicroscopy will enable staff on Earth to manipulate and monitor microscopic specimens on SSF for product development and discovery research or for medical diagnosis of astronaut health problems. Space-based product processing, testing, development, and discovery research using USCEPS and CCR's physiological testing program offer new routes to improved health on Earth. Direct crew involvement-in biomedical/biotechnology projects aboard SSF will enable better experimental outcomes. The current data base shows that there is reason for considerable optimism

  12. Early commercial demonstration of space solar power using ultra-lightweight arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Kevin; Willenberg, Harvey J.

    2009-11-01

    Space solar power shows great promise for future energy sources worldwide. Most central power stations operate with power capacity of 1000 MW or greater. Due to launch size limitations and specific power of current, rigid solar arrays, the largest solar arrays that have flown in space are around 50 kW. Thin-film arrays offer the promise of much higher specific power and deployment of array sizes up to several MW with current launch vehicles. An approach to early commercial applications for space solar power to distribute power to charge hand-held, mobile battery systems by wireless power transmission (WPT) from thin-film solar arrays in quasi-stationary orbits will be presented. Four key elements to this prototype will be discussed: (1) Space and near-space testing of prototype wireless power transmission by laser and microwave components including WPT space to space and WPT space to near-space HAA transmission demonstrations; (2) distributed power source for recharging hand-held batteries by wireless power transmission from MW space solar power systems; (3) use of quasi-geostationary satellites to generate electricity and distribute it to targeted areas; and (4) architecture and technology for ultra-lightweight thin-film solar arrays with specific energy exceeding 1 kW/kg. This approach would yield flight demonstration of space solar power and wireless power transmission of 1.2 MW. This prototype system will be described, and a roadmap will be presented that will lead to still higher power levels.

  13. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A technical analysis on the feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is presented. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is described. The candidate products are antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon. Production mass balances for antihemophelic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space versus ground operation. A conceptual description of a multiproduct processing system for space operation is discussed. Production requirements for epidermal growth factor of alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon are presented.

  14. Potential commercial use of the International Space Station by the biotechnology/pharmaceutical/biomedical sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Stodieck, Louis

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the linch-pin of NASA's future space plans. It emphasizes scientific research by providing a world-class scientific laboratory in which to perform long-term basic science experiments in the space environment of microgravity, radiation, vacuum, vantage-point, etc. It will serve as a test-bed for determining human system response to long-term space flight and for developing the life support equipment necessary for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. The ISS will also provide facilities (up to 30% of the U.S. module) for testing material, agricultural, cellular, human, aquatic, and plant/animal systems to reveal phenomena heretofore shrouded by the veil of 1-g. These insights will improve life on Earth and will provide a commercial basis for new products and services. In fact, some products, e.g., rare metal-alloys, semiconductor chips, or protein crystals that cannot now be produced on Earth may be found to be sufficiently valuable to be manufactured on-orbit. Biotechnology, pharmaceutical and biomedical experiments have been regularly flown on 10-16 day Space Shuttle flights and on three-month Mir flights for basic science knowledge and for life support system and commercial product development. Since 1985, NASA has created several Commercial Space Centers (CSCs) for the express purpose of bringing university, government and industrial researchers together to utilize space flight and space technology to develop new industrial products and processes. BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, is such a NASA sponsored CSC that has worked with over 65 companies and institutions in the Biotech Sector in the past 11 years and has successfully discovered and transferred new product and process information to its industry partners. While tests in the space environment have been limited to about two weeks on Shuttle or a few

  15. Risk Mitigation Approach to Commercial Resupply to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koons, Diane S.; Schreiber, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In August 2006, NASA awarded Space Act Agreements (SAAs) for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) under the Commercial Crew and Cargo Project Office at Johnson Space Center. One of the goals of the SAAs is to facilitate U.S. private industry demonstration of cargo transportation capabilities, ultimately achieving reliable, cost effective access to low-Earth orbit (LEO). Each COTS provider is required to complete International Space Stations (ISS) Integration activities, which includes meeting the physical and functional interfaces and interface requirements between the ISS and COTS vehicles. These requirements focus on the areas of risk to the ISS during rendezvous and proximity operations, as well as the integration operations while the COTS vehicle is berthed to the ISS. On December 23, 2008, NASA awarded Commercial Resupply Service (CRS) contracts to provide resupply services to the ISS, following the Shuttle retirement. In addition to performing any ISS Integration activities, NASA will be performing independent assessments of the launch vehicle and orbital vehicle to evaluate the readiness of the contractor to deliver NASA cargo safely to the ISS. This paper will address the activities NASA Centers, both JSC and KSC, in the oversight and insight function over commercial visiting vehicles to the ISS.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exploration Systems Interim Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate within NASA. Enabling the Vision for Space Exploration. The Role of the Directorate. 2. Strategic Context and Approach. Corporate Focus. Focused, Prioritized Requirements. Spiral Transformation. Management Rigor. 3. Achieving Directorate Objectives. Strategy to Task Process. Capability Development. Research and Technology Development. 4. Beyond the Horizon. Appendices.

  17. Office of Commercial Programs' research activities for Space Station Freedom utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, James A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP) is to encourage, enable, and help implement space research which meets the needs of the U.S. industrial sector. This is done mainly through seventeen Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS's) which are located throughout the United States. The CCDS's are composed of members from U.S. companies, universities, and other government agencies. These Centers are presently engaged in industrial research in space using a variety of carriers to reach low Earth orbit. One of the goals is to produce a body of experience and knowledge that will allow U.S. industrial entities to make informed decisions regarding their participation in commercial space endeavors. A total of 32 items of payload hardware were built to date. These payloads have flown in space a total of 73 times. The carriers range from the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and expendable launch vehicles to the Space Shuttle. This range of carriers allows the experimenter to evolve payloads in complexity and cost by progressively extending the time in microgravity. They can start with a few seconds in the parabolic aircraft and go to several minutes on the rocket flights, before they progress to the complexities of manned flight on the Shuttle. Next year, two new capabilities will become available: COMET, an expendable-vehicle-launched experiment capsule that can carry experiments aloft for thirty days; and SPACEHAB, a new Shuttle borne module which will greatly add to the capability to accommodate small payloads. All of these commercial research activities and carrier capabilities are preparing the OCP to evolve those experiments that prove successful to Space Station Freedom. OCP and the CCDS's are actively involved in Space Station design and utilization planning and have proposed a set of experiments to be launched in 1996 and 1997. These experiments are to be conducted both internal and external to Space Station Freedom and will

  18. Two new advanced forms of spectrometry for space and commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Reagentless ultraviolet absorption spectrometry (UVAS) and Liquid Atomic Emission Spectrometry (LAES) represent new forms of spectrometry with extensive potential in both space and commercial applications. Originally developed under KSC sponsorship for monitoring nutrient solutions for the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), both UVAS and LAES have extensive analytical capabilities for both organic and inorganic chemical compounds. Both forms of instrumentation involve the use of remote fiber optic probes and real-time measurements for on-line process monitoring. Commercial applications exist primarily in environmental analysis and for process control in the chemical, pulp and paper, food processing, metal plating, and water/wastewater treatment industries.

  19. SP-100 nuclear space power systems with application to space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the SP-100 space nuclear power system program is compared to that of more familiar solar-power systems. The SP-100 program develops, validates, and demonstrates the technology for space nuclear power systems in the range of 10 to 1000 kilowatts electric for use in future military and civilian space missions. Mission applications, including earth orbiting platforms and lunar/Mars surface power, are enhanced or made possible by SP-100 technology. Attention is given to the SP-100 reference flight system design, the SP-100 nuclear reactor and nuclear-reactor shield, the platform-mounted, tethered, and free-flying reactors, and installation, operation, and disposal options, as well as lunar-Mars surface applications. The SP-100 is presented as one of the nuclear energy sources needed for long-life, compact, lightweight, continuous high power independent of solar orientation, specific orbits, or missions.

  20. The law applicable to the use of space for commercial activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    The general principles of space law that have an impact on commercial space activities are discussed. The Outer Space Treaty guaranteed the right of private enterprise in space, with jurisdiction over the participating parties residing in the country of origin. The liability for damages caused to a third party is also assigned to the country of origin. Government consent is necessary in the U.S. before a private firm is permitted to launch an object into space, with the relevant statute sections being part of the Arms Export Control Act; launches are legally treated as exports. FAA regulations define the safe area and flight conditions that must be satisfied for a private launch, although NASA, in the 1958 act which formed the agency, potentialy has the power to regulate space launch activities. The DoD must be notified of any launches in order to notify the U.S.S.R., filings must be made with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, and fees must be paid to the IRS. It is presently U.S. government policy to encourage and facilitate private sector development of commercial launch services.

  1. Tropospheric Wind Monitoring During Day-of-Launch Operations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Leach, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environments Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) monitors the winds aloft at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the countdown for all Space Shuttle launches. Assessment of tropospheric winds is used to support the ascent phase of launch. Three systems at KSC are used to generate independent tropospheric wind profiles prior to launch; 1) high resolution Jimsphere balloon system, 2) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) and 3) low resolution radiosonde system. Data generated by the systems are used to assess spatial and temporal wind variability during launch countdown to ensure wind change observed does not violate wind change criteria constraints.

  2. Qualification of Commercial XIPS(R) Ion Thrusters for NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Wirz, Richard E.; Snyder, J.Steven; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Anderson, John

    2008-01-01

    Electric propulsion systems based on commercial ion and Hall thrusters have the potential for significantly reducing the cost and schedule-risk of Ion Propulsion Systems (IPS) for deep space missions. The large fleet of geosynchronous communication satellites that use solar electric propulsion (SEP), which will approach 40 satellites by year-end, demonstrates the significant level of technical maturity and spaceflight heritage achieved by the commercial IPS systems. A program to delta-qualify XIPS(R) ion thrusters for deep space missions is underway at JPL. This program includes modeling of the thruster grid and cathode life, environmental testing of a 25-centimeter electromagnetic (EM) thruster over DAWN-like vibe and temperature profiles, and wear testing of the thruster cathodes to demonstrate the life and benchmark the model results. This paper will present the delta-qualification status of the XIPS thruster and discuss the life and reliability with respect to known failure mechanisms.

  3. Prospects for commercialization of SELV-based in-space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J. (Compiler); Garrison, James L., Jr. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop was hosted by the Langley Research Center as a part of an activity to assess the commercialization potential of Small Expendible Launch Vehicle-based in-space operations. Representatives of the space launch insurance industry, industrial consultants, producers of spacecraft, launch vehicle manufacturers, and government researchers constituted the participants. The workshop was broken into four sessions: Customers Small Expendible Launch Systems, Representative Missions, and Synthesis-Government role. This publication contains the presentation material, written synopses of the sessions, and conclusions developed at the workshop.

  4. Prospects for commercialization of SELV-based in-space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Garrison, James L., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop was hosted by the Langley Research Center as a part of an activity to assess the commercialization potential of Small Expendible Launch Vehicle-based in-space operations. Representatives of the space launch insurance industry, industrial consultants, producers of spacecraft, launch vehicle manufacturers, and government researchers constituted the participants. The workshop was broken into four sessions: Customers Small Expendible Launch Systems, Representative Missions, and Synthesis-Government role. This publication contains the presentation material, written synopses of the sessions, and conclusions developed at the workshop.

  5. Acquisition of a Biomedical Database of Acute Responses to Space Flight during Commercial Personal Suborbital Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2010-01-01

    There is currently too little reproducible data for a scientifically valid understanding of the initial responses of a diverse human population to weightlessness and other space flight factors. Astronauts on orbital space flights to date have been extremely healthy and fit, unlike the general human population. Data collection opportunities during the earliest phases of space flights to date, when the most dynamic responses may occur in response to abrupt transitions in acceleration loads, have been limited by operational restrictions on our ability to encumber the astronauts with even minimal monitoring instrumentation. The era of commercial personal suborbital space flights promises the availability of a large (perhaps hundreds per year), diverse population of potential participants with a vested interest in their own responses to space flight factors, and a number of flight providers interested in documenting and demonstrating the attractiveness and safety of the experience they are offering. Voluntary participation by even a fraction of the flying population in a uniform set of unobtrusive biomedical data collections would provide a database enabling statistical analyses of a variety of acute responses to a standardized space flight environment. This will benefit both the space life sciences discipline and the general state of human knowledge.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2003 Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Imagine knowing that we are not alone, but that life is abundant in our solar system and throughout the universe. Imagine a world where we can safely travel anywhere, anytime, on our home planet, and in space. Imagine a world in which long-term weather forecasts are reliable, and natural disasters are predictable and perhaps even preventable. NASA is changing our understanding of the world, exploring the unknown, and creating new awareness about who we are and what our place is in the cosmos. For the first time in history, we have the tools, the insight and ability to seek answers to some of humanity's most profound questions: 1) How did we get here? 2) Where are we going? 3) Are we alone? In addition to pursuing these compelling questions, NASA helps the Nation to meet its challenges and address its urgent national needs. Among these are the requirements to improve the security and safety of our air transportation system and counter the looming shortage of U.S. scientists and engineers in our next generation of Americans.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Training Grant Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The following section summarizes the impact of the Ohio Space Grant Consortium (OSGC) in Ohio and to NASA over the last four-year period (February 1, 2001 to April 30, 2005) and highlights the important accomplishments of the consortium. The strength of the OSGC network of universities, community colleges, government agencies, industry, and outreach affiliates is well-established and is growing. The OSGC Consortium Management Structure was designed and remains committed to using the talents and diversity of everyone within this collaborative network, and operational policies and procedures are such that all consortium members are active contributors resulting in quality OSGC programs in research, education and service, while receiving a relatively small amount of NASA funds. The number of quality activities, both on- and off-campus, and collaborations/partnerships that OSGC has established with NASA and government agencies, state and local government, educational institutions, and private industry, has been impressive. Further desired university affiliate expansion requires additional funds. Diversity is shown in the OSGC 12-member Executive Committee by the presence of three campus representatives from Central State University, Wilberforce University, and The Ohio State University (two underrepresented minority, one female). One additional female campus representative (Cleveland State University) is currently on sabbatical leave and a valuable alternate member attends. Other additional female and underrepresented minority members are on the larger OSGC Advisory committee. All committee members participate fully in all consortium management and policy decisions. The OSGC Executive Committee strives to achieve and communicate a culture of trust, respect, teamwork, open communication, creativity, and empowerment. These programs have shown results and impact by their visibility and importance to Ohio and to NASA, resulting in strategic alliances created throughout

  8. A low cost commercial approach to space systems development and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, T. F.; Faget, M. A.; Allen, J. P.; Langstaff, D. H.

    In recent years a number of factors have led to increased attention to the lowering of costs for space flight systems and the operation of those systems. To that end Space Industries Inc. (SII), a small commercial space company based in Houston, Tex., is employing proven methods derived from over three decades of space flight development and space operations. These methods are based on a philosophy that is cost-sensitive focused with a primary objective to drive the cost of space systems and their operations down to the lowest level practical, consistent with the mission objectives, acceptable risk and safety considerations. This approach involves a process of: (1) addressing the basic requirements in the simplest and most cost effective manner, i.e. limit new development wherever possible, maximize use of proven and existing technology and eliminate non-essential requirements; (2) incorporation of proven industrial practices where possible, i.e. focus on performance envelopes (not on restrictive, specific and detailed specifications) and streamline program management, documentation, testing and other procedures; and (3) delivery of the "best" price, i.e. maximum customer utility at minimum cost with emphasis on customer service. The overriding factor, and indeed the most important aspect of the low cost commercial approach, is the willingness to accept greater risks to achieve all of the user's objectives. Our development approach is customer focused with emphasis on fully understanding the customer needs while striving constantly to limit new development requirements and, consequently, additional costs. This approach involves a process of designing for operations, i.e. low operation and life-cycle costs, while ensuring a reliability level consistent with customer budget constraints, mission objectives and safety consideration. In executing this low cost, customer-focused approach, we strive to maintain minimal overheads, simple interfaces, reduced documentation

  9. NASA's Commercial Crew Program, The Next Step in U.S. Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.; Thomas, Rayelle E.

    2013-01-01

    The Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is leading NASA's efforts to develop the next U.S. capability for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station (ISS) by the mid-decade timeframe. The outcome of this capability is expected to stimulate and expand the U.S. space transportation industry. NASA is relying on its decades of human space flight experience to certify U.S. crewed vehicles to the ISS and is doing so in a two phase certification approach. NASA Certification will cover all aspects of a crew transportation system, including development, test, evaluation, and verification; program management and control; flight readiness certification; launch, landing, recovery, and mission operations; sustaining engineering and maintenance/upgrades. To ensure NASA crew safety, NASA Certification will validate technical and performance requirements, verify compliance with NASA requirements, validate the crew transportation system operates in appropriate environments, and quantify residual risks.

  10. Space Environment Stability and Physical Properties of New Materials for Space Power and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    Useful and informative results were obtained on virtually all materials investigated. For example, the stability of ITO-based arc-proof transparent coatings was greatly improved by substitution of silicon oxide for magnesium fluoride as a dopant. Research on 'air-doped' ITO films has yielded new insight into their conduction mechanism which will help in further development of these coatings. Some air-doped films were found to be extremely pressure sensitive. This work may lead to improved, low-cost gas sensors and vacuum gauges. Work on another promising transparent arc-proof coating (titanium oxide) was initiated in collaboration with industry. Graphite oxide-like materials were synthesized and tested for possible use in high energy-density batteries and other applications. We also started a high-priority project to find the cause of unexpected environmental damage to the exterior of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) discovered on a recent Shuttle mission. Materials were characterized before and after exposure to soft x-rays and other threats in ground-based simulators.

  11. The Deployment of a Commercial RGA to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowitt, Matt; Hawk, Doug; Rossetti, Dino; Woronowicz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses ammonia as a medium for heat transport in its Active Thermal Control System. Over time, there have been intermittent component failures and leaks in the ammonia cooling loop. One specific challenge in dealing with an ammonia leak on the exterior of the ISS is determining the exact location from which ammonia is escaping before addressing the problem. Together, researchers and engineers from Stanford Research Systems (SRS) and NASA's Johnson Space Center and Goddard Space Flight Center have adapted a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) residual gas analyzer (RGA) for repackaging and operation outside the ISS as a core component in the ISS Robotic External Leak Locator, a technology demonstration payload currently scheduled for launch during 2015. The packaging and adaptation of the COTS RGA to the Leak Locator will be discussed. The collaborative process of adapting a commercial instrument for spaceflight will also be reviewed, including the build-­-up of the flight units. Measurements from a full-­-scale thermal vacuum test will also be presented demonstrating the absolute and directional sensitivity of the RGA.

  12. An operational near-space ballooncraft constellation for scientific and commercial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frische, E.

    The long lead times and high costs of placing satellites in orbit has led both the commercial industry and researchers to look for alternative platforms for their payloads For missions where the primary requirement is a wide geographical view or where placement above most of the earth s atmosphere is critical an alternative exists Lighter than air LTA systems operating in the near space or stratospheric environment can fill these requirements at a fraction of the cost of traditional space-borne systems Stratospheric LTA systems provide the additional benefits of payload recovery improved link budget adjustable altitudes and significantly reduced launch schedules In order to exploit these advantages Space Data Corporation has developed and placed in operation a stratospheric LTA constellation of free drifting ballooncraft This operational commercial system utilizes weather balloons to carry small telecommunications packages at controlled altitudes of 20 to 38 km The ballooncraft called SkySite mbox textregistered Platforms operate as a controlled constellation to provide wireless telecommunications coverage in remote regions currently not covered by terrestrial wireless systems Over 8000 SkySite mbox textregistered Platforms have been launched in support of this mission to date The SkySite mbox textregistered Constellation is designed to be extremely mission flexible and has been used for missions including earth imagery weather data collection and military communications The

  13. Twelve Channel Optical Fiber Connector Assembly: From Commercial Off the Shelf to Space Flight Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melaine N.

    1998-01-01

    The commercial off the shelf (COTS) twelve channel optical fiber MTP array connector and ribbon cable assembly is being validated for space flight use and the results of this study to date are presented here. The interconnection system implemented for the Parallel Fiber Optic Data Bus (PFODB) physical layer will include a 100/140 micron diameter optical fiber in the cable configuration among other enhancements. As part of this investigation, the COTS 62.5/125 microns optical fiber cable assembly has been characterized for space environment performance as a baseline for improving the performance of the 100/140 micron diameter ribbon cable for the Parallel FODB application. Presented here are the testing and results of random vibration and thermal environmental characterization of this commercial off the shelf (COTS) MTP twelve channel ribbon cable assembly. This paper is the first in a series of papers which will characterize and document the performance of Parallel FODB's physical layer from COTS to space flight worthy.

  14. NASA's Commercial Crew Program, the Next Step in U.S. Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is leading NASA's efforts to develop the next U.S. capability for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station (ISS) by the middecade timeframe. The outcome of this capability is expected to stimulate and expand the U.S. space transportation industry. NASA is relying on its decades of human space flight experience to certify U.S. crewed vehicles to the ISS and is doing so in a two phase certification approach. NASA certification will cover all aspects of a crew transportation system, including: Development, test, evaluation, and verification. Program management and control. Flight readiness certification. Launch, landing, recovery, and mission operations. Sustaining engineering and maintenance/upgrades. To ensure NASA crew safety, NASA certification will validate technical and performance requirements, verify compliance with NASA requirements, validate that the crew transportation system operates in the appropriate environments, and quantify residual risks. The Commercial Crew Program will present progress to date and how it manages safety and reduces risk.

  15. Impact of the Near-Earth Space Environment on Human Radiation Exposure at Commercial Airline Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Kunches, J.; Kress, B. T.; Murray, J. J.; Wilson, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    There is a growing concern for the health and safety of commercial aircrew and passengers due to their exposure to ionizing radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET), particularly at high latitudes. The International Commission of Radiobiological Protection (ICRP), the EPA, and the FAA consider the crews of commercial aircraft as radiation workers. The FAA reports that pregnant crew members may run a risk as high as 1.3 per thousand births of severe illness to their children as a result of background radiation exposure. During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, radiation exposure can exceed annual limits, and the number of serious health effects is expected to be quite high if precautions are not taken. Health concerns for frequent-flyer passengers are similar to the health concerns of the crew. There is a need for a capability to monitor background radiations levels at commercial airline altitudes and to provide analytical input for airline operations decisions for altering flight paths and altitudes for the mitigation and reduction of radiation exposure levels during a SEP event. Efforts are currently underway to develop a global, nowcast (real-time) capability for calculating ionizing radiation exposure at commercial airline altitudes. The state-of-the-art in physics-based transport of high energy galactic cosmic ray and solar cosmic ray particles will be presented. Paramount to reliable real-time transport calculations is an accurate and timely specification of the boundary conditions, such as the incident differential energy flux and geomagnetic cutoff rigidity, using a combination of satellite observations and empirical space radiation environment models. However, empirical models of the near-Earth radiation environment can only advance with continued observations and development of physics-based models of the heliosphere and the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In this paper we also discuss the state-of-the-art in space

  16. An economic analysis of a commercial approach to the design and fabrication of a space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, Z.; Been, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses a commercial approach to the design and fabrication of an economical space power system. With the advent of the space shuttle, steps can be taken to back away from the presently used space qualified approach in order to reduce cost of space hardware by incorporating, where possible, commercial design, fabrication, and quality assurance methods. Cost reductions are projected through the conceptual design of a 2 kW space power system built with the capability for having serviceability. The approach to system costing that has been used takes into account both the constraints of operation in space and commercial production engineering approaches. The cost of this power system reflects a variety of cost/benefit tradeoffs that would reduce system cost as a function of system reliability requirements, complexity, and the impact of rigid specifications. A breakdown of the system design, documentation, fabrication and reliability and quality assurance cost estimates are detailed.

  17. Computers for Manned Space Applications Base on Commercial Off-the-Shelf Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, T.; Gronowski, M.

    2009-05-01

    Similar to the consumer markets there has been an ever increasing demand in processing power, signal processing capabilities and memory space also for computers used for science data processing in space. An important driver of this development have been the payload developers for the International Space Station, requesting high-speed data acquisition and fast control loops in increasingly complex systems. Current experiments now even perform video processing and compression with their payload controllers. Nowadays the requirements for a space qualified computer are often far beyond the capabilities of, for example, the classic SPARC architecture that is found in ERC32 or LEON CPUs. An increase in performance usually demands costly and power consuming application specific solutions. Continuous developments over the last few years have now led to an alternative approach that is based on complete electronics modules manufactured for commercial and industrial customers. Computer modules used in industrial environments with a high demand for reliability under harsh environmental conditions like chemical reactors, electrical power plants or on manufacturing lines are entered into a selection procedure. Promising candidates then undergo a detailed characterisation process developed by Astrium Space Transportation. After thorough analysis and some modifications, these modules can replace fully qualified custom built electronics in specific, although not safety critical applications in manned space. This paper focuses on the benefits of COTS1 based electronics modules and the necessary analyses and modifications for their utilisation in manned space applications on the ISS. Some considerations regarding overall systems architecture will also be included. Furthermore this paper will also pinpoint issues that render such modules unsuitable for specific tasks, and justify the reasons. Finally, the conclusion of this paper will advocate the implementation of COTS based

  18. Understanding the cost bases of Space Shuttle pricing policies for commercial and foreign customers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    1984-01-01

    The principles and underlying cost bases of the 1977 and 1982 Space Shuttle Reimbursement Policies are compared and contrasted. Out-of-pocket cost recovery has been chosen as the base of the price for the 1986-1988 time period. With this cost base, it is NASA's intent to recover the total cost of consumables and the launch and flight operations costs added by commercial and foreign customers over the 1986-1988 time period. Beyond 1988, NASA intends to return to its policy of full cost recovery.

  19. Space crew radiation exposure analysis system based on a commercial stand-alone CAD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Matthew H.; Golightly, Michael J.; Hardy, Alva C.

    1992-07-01

    Major improvements have recently been completed in the approach to spacecraft shielding analysis. A Computer-Aided Design (CAD)-based system has been developed for determining the shielding provided to any point within or external to the spacecraft. Shielding analysis is performed using a commercially available stand-alone CAD system and a customized ray-tracing subroutine contained within a standard engineering modeling software package. This improved shielding analysis technique has been used in several vehicle design projects such as a Mars transfer habitat, pressurized lunar rover, and the redesigned Space Station. Results of these analyses are provided to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the system.

  20. Safety Evaluation of Two Commercial Lithium-ion Batteries for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Collins, Jacob; Cook, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have been used for applications on the Shuttle and Station for the past six years. A majority of the li-ion batteries flown are Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) varieties. The COTS batteries and cells were tested under nominal and abusive conditions for performance and safety characterization. Within the past six months two batteries have been certified for flight and use on the Space Station. The first one is a Hand Spring PDA battery that had a single prismatic li-ion cell and the second is an Iridium satellite phone that had a two-cell pack with prismatic li-ion cells.

  1. Space crew radiation exposure analysis system based on a commercial stand-alone CAD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew H.; Golightly, Michael J.; Hardy, Alva C.

    1992-01-01

    Major improvements have recently been completed in the approach to spacecraft shielding analysis. A Computer-Aided Design (CAD)-based system has been developed for determining the shielding provided to any point within or external to the spacecraft. Shielding analysis is performed using a commercially available stand-alone CAD system and a customized ray-tracing subroutine contained within a standard engineering modeling software package. This improved shielding analysis technique has been used in several vehicle design projects such as a Mars transfer habitat, pressurized lunar rover, and the redesigned Space Station. Results of these analyses are provided to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the system.

  2. Cryogenic magnetostrictive transducers and devices for commercial, military, and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisensel, G. N.; McMasters, O. D.; Chave, Robert G.

    1998-06-01

    The unique attributes of magnetostrictive materials have been used to develop a wide variety of electromechanical transducers and devices. Most of these applications have been at or above room temperature. However, many applications at cryogenic temperatures also require high authority, high precision, efficient actuation. Other technologies, including all piezoelectric systems, tend to be inoperable or impractical and unreliable at cryogenic temperatures. Magnetostrictive materials have already demonstrated improved performance at low temperature down to near absolute zero with strains as high as 1% possible. These unique material attributes combine with novel magnetic field generation, transducer and mechanism concepts to meet the challenges of resolution, size, weight, power, thermal and reliability requirements of actuators for many cryogenic applications. Positioning and shaping optics in space, cryogen valving and pumping, heat switches, industrial processing, and active vibration control are just some examples of the many commercial, military and space applications where cryogenic magnetostrictive technologies are overcoming barriers to provide solutions.

  3. Recent developments in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space tracking facilities in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleby, R. S.

    Following NASA's announcement in 1979 of a plan to consolidate its deep space tracking and earth orbiting spacecraft tracking networks into three centers - Canberra, Madrid and Goldstone - substantial engineering changes have been made to the NASA facilities within Australia. The paper describes these engineering and organizational changes and recent developments which strengthen the capabilities of the Australian facilities at the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex.

  4. Space Heaters, Computers, Cell Phone Chargers: How Plugged In AreCommercial Buildings?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie; Brown, Richard; Busch, John; Pinckard, Margaret; Roberson, Judy

    2007-02-28

    Evidenceof electric plug loads in commercial buildings isvisible everyday: space heaters, portable fans, and the IT technician'stwo monitors connected to one PC. The Energy Information Administrationestimates that office and miscellaneous equipment together will consume2.18 quads in 2006, nearly 50 percent of U.S. commercial electricity use.Although the importance of commercial plug loads is documented, its verynature (diverse product types, products not installed when buildinginitially constructed, and products often hidden in closets) makes itdifficult to accurately count and categorize the end use.We auditedsixteen buildings in three cities (San Francisco, Atlanta, Pittsburgh)including office, medical and education building types. We inventoriedthe number and types of office and miscellaneous electric equipment aswell as estimated total energy consumption due to these product types. Intotal, we audited approximately 4,000 units of office equipment and 6,000units of miscellaneous equipment and covered a diverse range of productsranging from electric pencil sharpeners with a unit energy consumption(UEC) of 1 kWh/yr to a kiln with a UEC of 7,000 kWh/yr. Our paperpresents a summary of the density and type of plug load equipment foundas well as the estimated total energy consumption of the equipment.Additionally, we present equipment trends observed and provide insightsto how policy makers can target energy efficiency for this growing enduse.

  5. Reducing airborne pathogens and dust in commercial hatching cabinets with an electrostatic space charge system.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B W; Waltman, W D

    2003-01-01

    Commercial hatcheries typically infuse hydrogen peroxide or formaldehyde gas into hatching cabinets to reduce airborne pathogens that may lead to disease transmission during the hatch. A nonchemical option, an electrostatic space charge system (ESCS), was customized for full-sized commercial hatching cabinets and was tested extensively in broiler hatcheries. The ESCS cleans air by transferring a strong negative electrostatic charge to dust and microorganisms that are aerosolized during the hatch and collecting the charged particles on grounded plates or surfaces. In studies with three poultry companies, the ESCS resulted in significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of airborne dust of 77%-79%, in Enterobacteriaceae and fungus levels not significantly different (P > or = 0.05) from those with formaldehyde, and in 93%-96% lower Enterobacteriaceae than with no treatment or with hydrogen peroxide treatment (P < 0.01). The ESCS significantly (P < 0.05) reduced airborne Salmonella by 33%-83% compared with no treatment or hydrogen peroxide treatment. Results of this study suggest that the ESCS is a viable alternative to chemical treatment for reducing airborne pathogens in full-sized commercial hatchers, and it also provides dust control and containment, which should be helpful in reducing cross contamination and loading of ventilation ducts within different areas of the hatchery. PMID:12887184

  6. MOSES: a modular sensor electronics system for space science and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Harald; Behnke, Thomas; Tschentscher, Matthias; Mottola, Stefano; Neukum, Gerhard

    1999-10-01

    The camera group of the DLR--Institute of Space Sensor Technology and Planetary Exploration is developing imaging instruments for scientific and space applications. One example is the ROLIS imaging system of the ESA scientific space mission `Rosetta', which consists of a descent/downlooking and a close-up imager. Both are parts of the Rosetta-Lander payload and will operate in the extreme environment of a cometary nucleus. The Rosetta Lander Imaging System (ROLIS) will introduce a new concept for the sensor electronics, which is referred to as MOSES (Modula Sensor Electronics System). MOSES is a 3D miniaturized CCD- sensor-electronics which is based on single modules. Each of the modules has some flexibility and enables a simple adaptation to specific application requirements. MOSES is mainly designed for space applications where high performance and high reliability are required. This concept, however, can also be used in other science or commercial applications. This paper describes the concept of MOSES, its characteristics, performance and applications.

  7. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration interdisciplinary studies in space technology at the University of Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    A broad range of research projects contained in a cooperative space technology program at the University of Kansas are reported as they relate to the following three areas of interdisciplinary interest: (1) remote sensing of earth resources; (2) stability and control of light and general aviation aircraft; and (3) the vibrational response characteristics of aeronautical and space vehicles. Details of specific research efforts are given under their appropriate departments, among which are aerospace engineering, chemical and petroleum engineering, environmental health, water resources, the remote sensing laboratory, and geoscience applications studies.

  8. Space technology: A study of the significance of recognition for innovators of spinoff technologies. Commercial Space Expo-USA, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the data collected at the Commercial Space Expo. The Expo was held 13-14 April 1993, in conjunction with the National Space Symposium. There were two modes of data gathering: surveys of expo registrants and exhibit feedback. In addition, exhibitors were interviewed to get their perspectives on the format of the expo and exhibits. Expo registrants were given a paper-pencil survey instrument at the beginning of the day and were asked to turn in the survey when they left for the day. Of the approximately 100 registrants, 22 surveys were returned. In the exhibit hall were five computers set up to collect people's reactions to specific exhibits. It was envisioned that people would react to each (or several) exhibits they visited. In fact, few people did this: almost everyone who visited a computer responded to one exhibit and did not stop by another computer. Therefore, we did not get a large number of responses for any particular exhibit. Nevertheless, there are some interesting data.

  9. Space Station needs, attributes and architectural options. Volume 2, book 1, part 3: Manned Space Station relevance to commercial telecommunications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A document containing a forecast of satellite traffic and revelant technology trends to the year 2000 was prepared which includes those space station capabilities and characteristics that should be provided to make the station useful to commercial satellite owners. The document was circulated to key representative organizations within the commercial telecommunications satellite and related communities of interest, including spacecraft manufacturers, commercial satellite owners, communications carriers, networks and risk insurers. The prospectus document is presented as well as the transmittal letter and the mailing list of the people and companies that were asked to review it. Key commercial telecommunications comments are summarized the actual response letters from the industry are included.

  10. 78 FR 37648 - Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching (STIM) Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching (STIM) Grants Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of non-availability of Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching Grants in FY 2013. SUMMARY: The Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) will...

  11. 77 FR 14462 - Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Space Transportation Infrastructure Matching Grants Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request for grant proposals for the Space... proposals to continue the development of a Commercial Space Transportation infrastructure system...

  12. Quality improvement prototype: Johnson Space Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Johnson Space Flight Center was recognized by the Office of Management and Budget as a model for its high standards of quality. Included are an executive summary of the center's activities, an organizational overview, techniques for improving quality, the status of the quality effort and a listing of key personnel.

  13. Of Status and Suits: Personal Space Invasions in an Administrative Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Paul; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined whether status would affect avoidance of personal space invasions. Drinking behavior of male passersby at water fountain in administration building was recorded while either low status, high status, or no confederate stood near fountain. Results showed a significantly lower rate of drinking when high status confederate stood nearby than…

  14. Space allowance during commercial long distance transport of cattle in North America.

    PubMed

    González, L A; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; Bryan, M; Silasi, R; Brown, F

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present work was to study space allowance in cattle during commercial long haul transport (≥400 km; n = 6,152 journeys). Surveys, delivered to livestock transport carriers, gathered information on the number, BW, and distribution of cattle by trailer compartment as well as the characteristics of the transport vehicles used. Space allowance (SA; m(2)/animal), allometric coefficient (k = SA / BW(0.6667)), and the percentage of deviation from recommended SA (DRSA; %) in the Canadian Codes of Practice were calculated for each compartment of the trailers. All quad-axle (77%) and tri-axle (23%) cattle trailers were reported with 5 compartments (nose, deck, belly, back, and doghouse). Sixty percent of all animals were carried in the middle compartments (deck and belly), 30% in the rear (back and doghouse), and 10% in the front or nose. Approximately 30% of the journeys required that the cattle be redistributed at the Canada-USA border to comply with different axle weight regulations, and most journeys moved them between the deck and the doghouse. Total loaded weight increased and the number of animals decreased with increasing BW of the animals. space allowance, k-value, and DRSA were least for calves and feeders compared with fat and cull cattle (p < 0.01). Both total loaded weight and number of animals increased with the number of axles in the trailer, being greatest in quad-axle trailers pulled by push tractors, which were most frequently used. Space allowance (k-value) was least in vehicles with greater number of axles and transporting the lightest cattle (i.e., quad-axles trailers transporting calves and feeders). Space allowance, k-value, and variability among journeys were least in the middle compartments (belly and deck), followed by the back, then doghouse and nose compartments of the trailers showing the largest values (p < 0.05). Many factors contributed to the variability in SA such as body size (smaller animals are placed more densely

  15. Space-Derived Imagery and a Commercial Remote Sensing Industry: Impossible Dream or Inevitable Reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Felsher

    Landsat-1 was launched in 1972 as a research satellite. Many of us viewed this satellite as a precursor to remote sensing "commercialization." Indeed since that time, the birth, growth and maturation of a remote sensing "industry" has been an ongoing objective for much of the U.S. private sector engaged in space and ground-segment activities related to the acquisition, analysis, and dissemination of imagery. In September 1999 a U.S. commercial entity, Space Imaging, Inc. launched its 1-meter pan/4-meter multispectral IKONOS sensor. DigitalGlobe, Inc. (nee EarthWatch, Inc.) matched this feat in October 2001. Thus, a full 30 years later, we are finally on the brink of building a true remote sensing information industry based on the global availability of competitively-priced space- derived imagery of the Earth. The upcoming availability of similar imagery from non-U.S. sources as ImageSat and U.S. sources as ORBIMAGE will only strengthen that reality. However, a remote sensing industry can only grow by allowing these entities (in times of peace) unencumbered access to a world market. And that market continues to expand -- up 11% in 2001, with gross revenues of U.S. commercial remote sensing firms alone reaching 2.44 billion, according to a joint NASA/ASPRS industry survey. However, the 30-year gap between the research-labeled Landsat-1 and our current commercial successes was not technology-driven. That lacuna was purely political -- driven by valid concerns related to national security. Although the world's governments have cooperated thoroughly and completely in areas related to satellite telecommunications, cooperation in space-derived image information is still today done cautiously and on a case-by-case basis -- and then only for science- based undertakings. It is still a fact that, except for the United States, all other Earth-imaging satellites/sensors flying today are owned, operated, and their products disseminated, by national governments -- and not private

  16. An economic analysis of a commercial approach to the design and fabrication of a space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, Z.; Been, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A commercial approach to the design and fabrication of an economical space power system is presented. Cost reductions are projected through the conceptual design of a 2 kW space power system built with the capability for having serviceability. The approach to system costing that is used takes into account both the constraints of operation in space and commercial production engineering approaches. The cost of this power system reflects a variety of cost/benefit tradeoffs that would reduce system cost as a function of system reliability requirements, complexity, and the impact of rigid specifications. A breakdown of the system design, documentation, fabrication, and reliability and quality assurance cost estimates are detailed.

  17. Space Research Data Management in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Space related scientific research has passed through a natural evolutionary process. The task of extracting the meaningful information from the raw data is highly involved and will require data processing capabilities that do not exist today. The results are presented of a three year examination of this subject, using an earlier report as a starting point. The general conclusion is that there are areas in which NASA's data management practices can be improved and recommends specific actions. These actions will enhance NASA's ability to extract more of the potential data and to capitalize on future opportunities.

  18. Project Mercury: Man-In-Space Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [Report of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences United States Senate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The purpose of this staff study, made at the request of the chairman, is to serve members of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences as a source of basic information on Project Mercury, the man-in-space program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The study is largely derived from unclassified information released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and testimony concerning Project Mercury given during hearings before this committee. The program descriptions are based upon current program planning. Since this is a highly advanced research and development program, the project is obviously subject to changes that may result from future developments and accomplishments characteristic of such research activities. Certain information with respect to revised schedules, obtained on a classified basis by the committee during inspection trips, is necessarily omitted. The appendixes to the study include information that may prove helpful on various aspects of space flight and exploration. Included are unofficial comments and observations relating to Russia's manned space flight activities and also a complete chronology of all satellites, lunar probes, and space probes up to the present.

  19. Commercial-energy-use model for the ten US Federal regions. [Floor-space-demand forecast to 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.M.; Corum, K.R.; Kurish, J.; Emerson, C.

    1981-03-01

    Development of a regional forecasting tool for energy demand in the commercial sector of the US is described. Data bases for each of the ten Federal regions are developed as input to the ORNL commercial energy-demand model to evaluate conservation policies, new technologies, and fuel-price strategies on a regional basis from 1970 to 2000. Commercial-floor-space econometric models for each of ten commercial building types in each of the ten Federal regions are estimated to forecast the growth of energy using capital on a regional basis. In addition, regional energy-use indices (Btu/ft/sup 2/) are calculated using revised commercial energy-use and floor-space estimates. Comparisons are made between the commercial-floor-space forecasts of the regional models and the national commercial-energy-use model. In addition, validation of the forecasting accuracy of the regional models is made for a historical period. All regions show fuel switching away from fuel oil and natural gas to electricity. Regions 4, 6, and 10 (Southeastern, Southwestern, and Lower Western States) show the largest growth rates of projected primary energy consumption for the ten Federal regions with the Great Lakes states the lowest.

  20. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  1. Space Suit Electrocardiographic Electrode Selection: Are commercial electrodes better than the old Apollo technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D.; Schuette, M.; Guttromson, J.; Guess, T.; Smith, B.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Manned Space Program uses an electrocardiograph (ECG) system to monitor astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). This ECG system, called the Operational Bioinstrumentation System (OBS), was developed during the Apollo era. Throughout the Shuttle program these electrodes experienced failures during several EVAs performed from the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) airlocks. An attempt during Shuttle Flight STS-109 to replace the old electrodes with new commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) disposable electrodes proved unsuccessful. One assumption for failure of the STS-109 COTS electrodes was the expansion of trapped gases under the foam electrode pad, causing the electrode to be displaced from the skin. Given that our current electrodes provide insufficient reliability, a number of COTS ECG electrodes were tested at the NASA Altitude Manned Chamber Test Facility. Methods: OBS disposable electrodes were tested on human test subjects in an altitude chamber simulating an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) operating pressure of 4.3 psia with the following goals: (1) to confirm the root cause of the flight certified, disposable electrode failure during flight STS-109. (2) to identify an adequate COTS replacement electrode and determine if further modifications to the electrodes are required. (3) to evaluate the adhesion of each disposable electrode without preparation of the skin with isopropyl alcohol. Results: There were several electrodes that failed the pressure testing at 4.3psia, including the electrodes used during flight STS-109. Two electrodes functioned well throughout all testing and were selected for further testing in an EMU at altitude. A vent hole placed in all electrodes was also tested as a possible solution to prevent gas expansion from causing electrode failures. Conclusions: Two failure modes were identified: (1) foam-based porous electrodes entrapped air bubbles under the pad (2) poor adhesion caused some electrodes to

  2. A Tribute to National Aeronautics and Space Administration Minority Astronauts: Past and Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been selecting astronauts since 1959. The first group was called the "Mercury Seven." These seven men were chosen because of their performance as military officers and test pilots, their character, their intelligence, and their guts. Six of these seven flew in the Mercury capsule. Several additional groups were chosen between 1959 and 1978. It was an exciting period in the American space program. Many of these astronauts participated in the Gemini and Apollo programs, traveled and walked on the Moon, docked with the Russians during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, and occupied America's first space station, the Skylab. With the onset of the Space Shuttle, a new era began. The astronauts selected in 19 78 broke the traditional mold. For the first time, minorities and women became part of America's astronaut corps. Since then, eight additional groups have been selected, with an increasing mix of African American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American men and women. These astronauts will continue the American space program into the new millennium by continuing flights on the Space Shuttle and participating in the construction and occupancy of the International Space Station. These astronauts, and those who will be chosen in the future, will lead America and its partners to future voyages beyond the influence of Earth's gravity.

  3. Profile of software engineering within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Craig C.; Jeletic, Kellyann F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents findings of baselining activities being performed to characterize software practices within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It describes how such baseline findings might be used to focus software process improvement activities. Finally, based on the findings to date, it presents specific recommendations in focusing future NASA software process improvement efforts. The findings presented in this paper are based on data gathered and analyzed to date. As such, the quantitative data presented in this paper are preliminary in nature.

  4. First intramuscular administration in the U.S. space program. [of motion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagian, James P.

    1991-01-01

    In the past, the only kind of medicines used for symptomatic treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) in space had been oral, transdermal, or suppositories. This paper describes the effect of the first intramuscular (IM) administration of Phenergan (50-mg in single dose) on SMS in one subject who exhibited grade-3 symptoms and signs which persisted unabated throughout the first and the second flight days aboard the Space Shuttle. Thirty minutes after the injection, the subject had completely recovered. His symptoms were gone, his appetite was back, and he had no recurrences for the remainder of the flight. Since that experiment, intramuscular injections have been given nine more times on subsequent flights, with similar results.

  5. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nondestructive Evaluation Program for Safe and Reliable Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program is presented. As a result of the loss of seven astronauts and the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003, NASA has undergone many changes in its organization. NDE is one of the key areas that are recognized by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) that needed to be strengthened by warranting NDE as a discipline with Independent Technical Authority (iTA). The current NASA NDE system and activities are presented including the latest developments in inspection technologies being applied to the Space Transportation System (STS). The unfolding trends and directions in NDE for the future are discussed as they apply to assuring safe and reliable operations.

  6. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  7. The New Anechoic Shielded Chambers Designed for Space and Commercial Applications at LIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Benjamim; Galvao, M. C.; Pereira, Clovis Solano

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present the capabilities of the new anechoic shielded rooms designed for space and commercial applications as part of the Integration and Testing Laboratory (LIT, Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) in Brazil. A new anechoic shielded room named CBA2 has been in full operation since March 2007 and a remodeled chamber CBA1 is planned to be ready by the end of 2008, replacing an old facility which was in operation for the last 18 years. The Brazilian Space Program started with very small and simple satellites and the old CBA1 chamber was conceived in 1987 to accomplish the EMI/EMC tests not requiring significant volumes. Since the very beginning this facility was also used by the private sector for other applications mainly due to the absorption of digital electronics in all kind of products. The intense use of this facility during the last years, operating three shifts a day, caused a normal degradation and imposed several limitations. Therefore, a new totally remodeled chamber was designed considering the state of the art in terms of absorbers and associated instrumentation. On the other hand the facility CBA2 was conceived, designed and implemented to test large satellites taking into account the advance of the technology in terms of RF frequencies, power level, testing methodologies and several other factors. A very interesting and unique aspect of this project was the partnership between the private sector and governmental institution. As a result, the total investment was shared between several companies and consequently a time-sharing use of the facility as well.

  8. The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on six commercially available composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on microdamage induced by the environment in a series of commercially available graphite-fiber-reinforced composite materials were determined. Composites with both thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems were studied. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) exposures were simulated by thermal cycling; geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) exposures were simulated by electron irradiation plus thermal cycling. The thermal cycling temperature range was -250 F to either 200 F or 150 F. The upper limits of the thermal cycles were different to ensure that an individual composite material was not cycled above its glass transition temperature. Material response was characterized through assessment of the induced microcracking and its influence on mechanical property changes at both room temperature and -250 F. Microdamage was induced in both thermoset and thermoplastic advanced composite materials exposed to the simulated LEO environment. However, a 350 F cure single-phase toughened epoxy composite was not damaged during exposure to the LEO environment. The simuated GEO environment produced microdamage in all materials tested.

  9. Commercial off the Shelf Ground Control Supports Calibration and Conflation from Ground to Space Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielová, M.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    The need for rapid deployment of aerial and satellite imagery in support of GIS and engineering integration projects require new sources of geodetic control to ensure the accuracy for geospatial projects. In the past, teams of surveyors would need to deploy to project areas to provide targeted or photo identifiable points that are used to provide data for orthorecificaion, QA/QC and calibration for multi-platform sensors. The challenge of integrating street view, UAS, airborne and Space based sensors to produce the common operational picture requires control to tie multiple sources together. Today commercial off the shelf delivery of existing photo identifiable control is increasing the speed of deployment of this data without having to revisit sites over and over again. The presentation will discuss the processes developed by CompassData to build a global library of 40,000 control points available today. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) based processes and initiatives ensure consistent quality of survey data, photo identifiable features selected and meta data to support photogrammetrist, engineers and GIS professionals to quickly deliver projects with better accuracy.

  10. Advanced space design program to the Universities Space Research Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Fall 1987 class of EGM 4000 was the investigation of engineering aspects contributing to the development of NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The areas investigated were the geometry of plant growth chambers, automated seeding of plants, remote sensing of plant health, and processing of grain into edible forms. The group investigating variable spacing of individual soybean plants designed growth trays consisting of three dimensional trapezoids arranged in a compact circular configuration. The automated seed manipulation and planting group investigated the electrical and mechanical properties of wheat seeds and developed three seeding concepts based upon these properties. The plant health and disease sensing group developed a list of reliable plant health indicators and investigated potential detection technologies.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Twenty-Fifth Anniversary, 1958-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This year marks a major milestone for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration: its silver anniversary. It seems appropriate, on this occasion, to sum up how NASA has responded to the legislative charter that established the agency. Among the responsibilities the Congress assigned NASA in the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 were these: preservation of U.S. leadership in aerospace science and technology; cooperation with other nations in the peaceful application of technology; expansion of human knowledge of phenomena in the atmosphere and in space; pursuit of the practical benefits to be gained from aeronautical and space activities. There can be no doubt that NASA's quarter century of effort has preserved the nation's leadership role and strengthened its posture in aerospace science and technology. As for international cooperation. NASA has - since its inception - fostered the concept that the fruits of civil space research are to be shared with all mankind. The agency has provided technical assistance to scores of nations and has actively promoted cooperative ventures; indeed, virtually every major NASA space project today boasts some degree of foreign participation. In the last 25 years, man has teamed more about his planet, the near-Earth environment, and the universe than in all the prior years of history. NASA's space science program has spearheaded this great expansion of human knowledge. And, from the beginning, NASA has vigorously pursued the practical benefits that aerospace research offers. The agency pioneered in weather, communications and Earth resources survey satellites, the prime examples of space technology applied for Earth benefit, and it has built a broad base for expanding into new applications, some of which promise direct benefits of exceptional order. In aeronautical research, NASA has contributed in substantial degree to safer, better performing, more efficient, more environmentally acceptable aircraft.

  12. Commercial LANDSAT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Private industry should assume responsibility either for the United States' land satellite (LANDSAT) system or for both the land and the weather satellite systems, recommends the Land Remote Sensing Satellite Advisory Committee. The committee (Eos, June 29, 1982, p. 553), composed of representatives from academia, industry, and government, has a working group that is evaluating the potential for commercialization of remote sensing satellites.The recommendations call for industry ownership or operation of either or both of the remote sensing systems, but only up to and including the holding of raw, unprocessed data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) currently operates LANDSAT but will be relinquishing its responsibility to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on January 31. NOAA already operates the U.S. civilian weather satellite service, which includes the NOAA-5, NOAA-6, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellites (Eos, June 2, 1981, p. 522).

  13. New Strategy for Exploration Technology Development: The Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In FY 2001, NASA will undertake a new research and technology program supporting the goals of human exploration: the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploration/Commercialization Technology Initiative (HTCI). The HTCI represents a new strategic approach to exploration technology, in which an emphasis will be placed on identifying and developing technologies for systems and infrastructures that may be common among exploration and commercial development of space objectives. A family of preliminary strategic research and technology (R&T) road maps have been formulated that address "technology for human exploration and development of space (THREADS). These road maps frame and bound the likely content of the HTCL Notional technology themes for the initiative include: (1) space resources development, (2) space utilities and power, (3) habitation and bioastronautics, (4) space assembly, inspection and maintenance, (5) exploration and expeditions, and (6) space transportation. This paper will summarize the results of the THREADS road mapping process and describe the current status and content of the HTCI within that framework. The paper will highlight the space resources development theme within the Initiative and will summarize plans for the coming year.

  14. Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles: A Small Business Innovation Research Topic and Its Commercial Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1997-01-01

    Under its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (and with NASA Headquarters support), the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a topic entitled "Fuels and Space Propellants for Reusable Launch Vehicles." The aim of this project would be to assist in demonstrating and then commercializing new rocket propellants that are safer and more environmentally sound and that make space operations easier. Soon it will be possible to commercialize many new propellants and their related component technologies because of the large investments being made throughout the Government in rocket propellants and the technologies for using them. This article discusses the commercial vision for these fuels and propellants, the potential for these propellants to reduce space access costs, the options for commercial development, and the benefits to nonaerospace industries. This SBIR topic is designed to foster the development of propellants that provide improved safety, less environmental impact, higher density, higher I(sub sp), and simpler vehicle operations. In the development of aeronautics and space technology, there have been limits to vehicle performance imposed by traditionally used propellants and fuels. Increases in performance are possible with either increased propellant specific impulse, increased density, or both. Flight system safety will also be increased by the use of denser, more viscous propellants and fuels.

  15. Integrating Commercially-Available Educational Software into a Learning Environment with the QuiltSpace Builder Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mary

    The QuiltSpace Builder enables Microsoft's multimedia encyclopedia "Encarta" to "fit" into an established home or institutional learning environment so that "Encarta" can be used for productive research. Early observations of the difficulties encountered by Encarta users, coupled with a survey of presently available commercial software products,…

  16. Guidelines for Selection, Screening and Qualification of Low-Voltage Commercial Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors for Space Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    This document has been developed in the course of NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program and is not an official endorsement of the insertion of commercial capacitors in space programs or an established set of requirements for their testing. The purpose of this document is to suggest possible ways for selection, screening, and qualification of commercial capacitors for NASA projects and open discussions in the parts engineering community related to the use of COTS ceramic capacitors. This guideline is applicable to commercial surface mount chip, simple parallel plate design, multi-layer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) rated to voltages of 100V and less. Parts with different design, e.g. low inductance ceramic capacitors (LICA), land grid array (LGA) etc., might need additional testing and tailoring of the requirements described in this document. Although the focus of this document is on commercial MLCCs, many procedures discussed below would be beneficial for military-grade capacitors

  17. Impact of the 1985 Space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (Consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  18. Impact of the 1985 space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts: (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  19. Private Astronaut Training Prepares Commercial Crews of Tomorrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    A new company that includes a handful of former NASA personnel is already taking applications for the first comprehensive commercial astronaut training approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Waypoint 2 Space, located at Johnson Space Center, hopes to draw space tourists and enthusiasts and future commercial crewmembers with first-hand NASA know-how, as well as agency training technology.

  20. Intellectual Property Rights at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Vernon E.

    1994-01-01

    At a fundamental level, intellectual property is the core work product of a technical organization. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), produces a variety of intellectual property including: patents, trademarks, data rights, copyright and rights associated with National Security. For a scientific organization to properly manage its work product it has to manage its intellectual property. This paper endeavors to describe how the intellectual property rights are generated and allocated at NASA. The author then goes on to discuss how the intellectual property might be managed to meet the objectives of program implementation, technology transfer and security.

  1. Testing of Commercial Hollow Fiber Membranes for Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Hanford, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Three commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane evaporators, modified for low pressure, were tested in a vacuum chamber at pressures below 33 pascals as potential space suit water membrane evaporator (SWME) heat rejection technologies. Water quality was controlled in a series of 25 tests, first simulating potable water reclaimed from waste water and then changing periodically to simulate the ever concentrating make-up of the circulating coolant over that is predicted over the course of 100 EVAs. Two of the systems, comprised of non-porous tubes with hydrophilic molecular channels as the water vapor transport mechanism, were severely impacted by the increasing concentrations of cations in the water. One of the systems, based on hydrophobic porous polypropylene tubes was not affected by the degrading water quality, or the presence of microbes. The polypropylene system, called SWME 1, was selected for further testing. An inverse flow configuration was also tested with SWME 1, with vacuum exposure on the inside of the tubes, provided only 20% of the performance of the standard configuration. SWME 1 was also modified to block 50% and 90% of the central tube layers, and tested to investigate performance efficiency. Performance curves were also developed in back-pressure regulation tests, and revealed important design considerations arising from the fully closed valve. SWME 1 was shown to be insensitive to air bubbles injected into the coolant loop. Development and testing of a full-scale prototype based on this technology and these test results is in progress.

  2. Education and public outreach initiatives from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Doris

    2011-06-01

    From the dawn of consciousness, humans have looked up and wondered about what the universe holds. It is that sense of wonder and thirst for knowledge that astronomy has helped fuel. In this paper we look at how education and public outreach has been a major element in preparing the next generation of astronomers and in sharing with the public the excitement of discoveries we make when we explore the Universe. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a clear set of goals and objectives related to education and public outreach. These goals follow directly from NASA's mission ``to inspire the next generation of explorers''. Making progress towards achieving these goals has become an important part of the broad justification for public support of space science. Here we will describe a number of education and public outreach initiatives that are examples of the plethora of NASA funded programs and resources.

  3. Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

    1995-12-01

    In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

  4. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  5. Measures for minimizing radiation hazardous to the environment in the advent of large-scale space commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, S. Nataraja

    The nature of hazardous effects from radio-frequency (RF), light, infrared, and nuclear radiation on human and other biological species in the advent of large-scale space commercialization is considered. Attention is focused on RF/microwave radiation from earth antennas and domestic picture phone communication links, exposure to microwave radiation from space solar-power satellites, and the continuous transmission of information from spacecraft as well as laser radiation from space. Measures for preventing and/or reducing these effects are suggested, including the use of interlocks for cutting off radiation toward ground, off-pointing microwave energy beams in cases of altitude failure, limiting the satellite off-axis gain data-rate product, the use of reflective materials on buildings and in personnel clothing to protect from space-borne lasers, and underwater colonies in cases of high-power lasers. For nuclear-power satellites, deposition in stable points in the solar system is proposed.

  6. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study. Volume 7-2: Data book. Commercial missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The history of NASA's materials processing in space activities is reviewed. Market projections, support requirements, orbital operations issues, cost estimates and candidate systems (orbiter sortie flight, orbiter serviced free flyer, space station, space station serviced free flyer) for the space production of semiconductor crystals are examined. Mission requirements are identified for materials processing, communications missions, bioprocessing, and for transferring aviation maintenance training technology to spacecraft.

  7. The Attached Payload Facility Program: A Family of In-Space Commercial Facilities for Technology, Science and Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Kearney, Michael E.; Howard, Trevor P.

    1996-01-01

    It is anticipated that as the utilization of space increases in both the government and commercial sec tors the re will be a high degree of interest in materials and coatings research as well as research in space environment definition, deployable structures, multi-functional structures and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) is an excellent platform for long-term technology development because it provides large areas for external attached payloads, power and data capability, and ready access for experiment exchange and return. An alliance of SPACEHAB, MicroCraft, Inc. and SpaceTec, Inc. has been formed to satisfy this research need through commercial utilization of the capabilities of ISS. The alliance will provide a family of facilities designed to provide low-cost, reliable access to space for experimenters. This service would start as early as 1997 and mature to a fully functional attached facility on ISS by 2001. The alliances facilities are based on early activities by NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of a Material Exposure Facility (MEF).

  8. An Architecture to Promote the Commercialization of Space Mission Command and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a command and control architecture that encompasses space mission operations centers, ground terminals, and spacecraft. This architecture is intended to promote the growth of a lucrative space mission operations command and control market through a set of open standards used by both gevernment and profit-making space mission operators.

  9. Acquisition of Earth Science Remote Sensing Observations from Commercial Sources: Lessons Learned from the Space Imaging IKONOS Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Townshend, John R.; Zanoni, Vicki; Policelli, Fritz; Stanley, Tom; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Underwood, Lauren; Pagnutti, Mary; Fletcher, Rose

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to more full explore the potential of commercial remotely sensed land data sources, the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) implemented an experimental Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) that solicited bids from the private sector to meet ESE-user data needs. The images from the Space Imaging IKONOS system provided a particularly good match to the current ESE missions such as Terra and Landsat 7 and therefore serve as a focal point in this analysis.

  10. Outside Of Normal Operating Conditions: Using Commercial Hardware In Space Computing Platforms For Ubiquitous Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been useful in speeding up digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms, and FPGA implementations can be orders of magnitude faster than microprocessor implementations. As many national security satellites are DSP-oriented, many organizations have started using commercial FPGAs to process data closer to the sensor. Using commercial technology successfully in this environment has lead to new research into fault tolerance and resilience.

  11. Remarks of Ruth Bates Harris, Deputy Assistant Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration at summer institute closing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of experience and knowledge gained from aeronautical and space research and exploration are discussed briefly. Spinoffs are presented which improve the quality of life by contributing to advances in health, transportation, foods, communications, energy, safety, and manufacturing.

  12. Update of Ulysses FSAR results using updated NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-18

    The mission risk results reported in the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) issued on March 14, 1990, were based on initiating accident probabilities the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) on July 13, 1988. These probabilities were provided in terms of ranges; the geometric mean of these ranges were used in the development and presentation of the results in the FSAR for source terms, radiological consequences and risks. Subsequent to the issuance of the FSAR, DOE received a revised set of probabilities from NASA. These probabilities were presented in terms of distributions for each initiating accident and characterized by a mean and cumulative percentile values. NASA recommended that DOE use the updated probabilities to update the Ulysses FSAR results. Accordingly, at the request of DOE, this letter report has been prepared to evaluate the changes in the Ulysses FSAR results when the updated mean probabilities are used.

  13. Rapid transport within cerebral perivascular spaces underlies widespread tracer distribution in the brain after intranasal administration

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Pizzo, Michelle E; Thorne, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The intranasal administration route is increasingly being used as a noninvasive method to bypass the blood–brain barrier because evidence suggests small fractions of nasally applied macromolecules may reach the brain directly via olfactory and trigeminal nerve components present in the nasal mucosa. Upon reaching the olfactory bulb (olfactory pathway) or brainstem (trigeminal pathway), intranasally delivered macromolecules appear to rapidly distribute within the brains of rodents and primates. The mechanisms responsible for this distribution have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we have used ex vivo fluorescence imaging to show that bulk flow within the perivascular space (PVS) of cerebral blood vessels contributes to the rapid central distribution of fluorescently labeled 3 and 10 kDa dextran tracers after intranasal administration in anesthetized adult rats. Comparison of tracer plasma levels and fluorescent signal distribution associated with the PVS of surface arteries and internal cerebral vessels showed that the intranasal route results in unique central access to the PVS not observed after matched intravascular dosing in separate animals. Intranasal targeting to the PVS was tracer size dependent and could be regulated by modifying nasal epithelial permeability. These results suggest cerebral perivascular convection likely has a key role in intranasal drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25492117

  14. Rapid transport within cerebral perivascular spaces underlies widespread tracer distribution in the brain after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Pizzo, Michelle E; Thorne, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    The intranasal administration route is increasingly being used as a noninvasive method to bypass the blood-brain barrier because evidence suggests small fractions of nasally applied macromolecules may reach the brain directly via olfactory and trigeminal nerve components present in the nasal mucosa. Upon reaching the olfactory bulb (olfactory pathway) or brainstem (trigeminal pathway), intranasally delivered macromolecules appear to rapidly distribute within the brains of rodents and primates. The mechanisms responsible for this distribution have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we have used ex vivo fluorescence imaging to show that bulk flow within the perivascular space (PVS) of cerebral blood vessels contributes to the rapid central distribution of fluorescently labeled 3 and 10 kDa dextran tracers after intranasal administration in anesthetized adult rats. Comparison of tracer plasma levels and fluorescent signal distribution associated with the PVS of surface arteries and internal cerebral vessels showed that the intranasal route results in unique central access to the PVS not observed after matched intravascular dosing in separate animals. Intranasal targeting to the PVS was tracer size dependent and could be regulated by modifying nasal epithelial permeability. These results suggest cerebral perivascular convection likely has a key role in intranasal drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25492117

  15. NASA Historical Data Book. Volume 6; NASA Space Applications, Aeronautics and Space Research and Technology, Tracking and Data Acquisition/Support Operations, Commercial Programs and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumerman, Judy A.

    2000-01-01

    This sixth volume of the NASA Historical Data Book is a continuation of those earlier efforts. This fundamental reference tool presents information, much of it statistical, documenting the development of several critical areas of NASA responsibility for the period between 1979 and 1988. This volume includes detailed information on the space applications effort, the development and operation of aeronautics and space research and technology programs, tracking and data acquisition/space operations, commercial programs, facilities and installations, personnel, and finances and procurement during this era. Special thanks are owed to the student research assistants who gathered and input much of the tabular material-a particularly tedious undertaking. There are numerous people at NASA associated with historical study, technical information, and the mechanics of publishing who helped in myriad ways in the preparation of this historical data book.

  16. Automation of orbit determination functions for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardirossian, H.; Heuerman, K.; Beri, A.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides spacecraft trajectory determination for a wide variety of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions, using the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and Ground Spaceflight and Tracking Data Network (GSTDN). To take advantage of computerized decision making processes that can be used in spacecraft navigation, the Orbit Determination Automation System (ODAS) was designed, developed, and implemented as a prototype system to automate orbit determination (OD) and orbit quality assurance (QA) functions performed by orbit operations. Based on a machine-resident generic schedule and predetermined mission-dependent QA criteria, ODAS autonomously activates an interface with the existing trajectory determination system using a batch least-squares differential correction algorithm to perform the basic OD functions. The computational parameters determined during the OD are processed to make computerized decisions regarding QA, and a controlled recovery process isactivated when the criteria are not satisfied. The complete cycle is autonomous and continuous. ODAS was extensively tested for performance under conditions resembling actual operational conditions and found to be effective and reliable for extended autonomous OD. Details of the system structure and function are discussed, and test results are presented.

  17. Automation of orbit determination functions for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardirossian, H.; Beri, A. C.; Doll, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides spacecraft trajectory determination for a wide variety of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions, using the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and Ground Spaceflight and Tracking Data Network (GSTDN). To take advantage of computerized decision making processes that can be used in spacecraft navigation, the Orbit Determination Automation System (ODAS) was designed, developed, and implemented as a prototype system to automate orbit determination (OD) and orbit quality assurance (QA) functions performed by orbit operations. Based on a machine-resident generic schedule and predetermined mission-dependent QA criteria, ODAS autonomously activates an interface with the existing trajectory determination system using a batch least-squares differential correction algorithm to perform the basic OD functions. The computational parameters determined during the OD are processed to make computerized decisions regarding QA, and a controlled recovery process is activated when the criteria are not satisfied. The complete cycle is autonomous and continuous. ODAS was extensively tested for performance under conditions resembling actual operational conditions and found to be effective and reliable for extended autonomous OD. Details of the system structure and function are discussed, and test results are presented.

  18. 76 FR 52016 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety... International Space Station Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. The purpose of this... consideration by NASA for Commercial Resupply Services for the International Space Station (ISS),...

  19. Practicality of Evaluating Soft Errors in Commercial sub-90 nm CMOS for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to: Highlight space memory evaluation evolution, Review recent developments regarding low-energy proton direct ionization soft errors, Assess current space memory evaluation challenges, including increase of non-volatile technology choices, and Discuss related testing and evaluation complexities.

  20. 78 FR 78467 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...This Notice provides information to Federal, State, and local agencies, Native American tribes, and other interested persons regarding the FAA's intent to prepare an EIS that will evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the issuance of a Launch Site Operator License to Space Florida. Space Florida, an independent special district and a subdivision of the State of Florida,......

  1. Bioculture System Expanding ISS Capabilities for Space Biosciences Research and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Kevin Y.

    2013-01-01

    Oral presentation at the ASGSR 2013 Annual Meeting. The presentation describes the NASA Bioculture System hardware design, capabilities, enabling science research capabilities, and flight concept of operations. The presentation is part of the Enabling Technologies special session and will be presented to perspective users in both academics and commercial communities.

  2. Dynamic Space for Rent: Using Commercial Web Hosting to Develop a Web 2.0 Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The explosion of Web 2.0 into libraries has left many smaller academic libraries (and other libraries with limited computing resources or support) to work in the cloud using free Web applications. The use of commercial Web hosting is an innovative approach to the problem of inadequate local resources. While the idea of insourcing IT will seem…

  3. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation: Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goering, S. W.; Garing, K. L.; Coury, G. E.; Fritzler, E. A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The institutional and environmental analyses indicate that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  4. Concepts, strategies and potentials using hypo-g and other features of the space environment for commercialization using higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for releasing, capturing, constructing and/or fixing the differential expressions or response potentials of the higher plant genome in the hypo-g environment for commercialization are explored. General strategies include improved plant-growing, crop and forestry production systems which conserve soil, water, labor and energy resources, and nutritional partitioning and mobilization of nutrients and synthates. Tissue and cell culture techniques of commercial potential include the growing and manipulation of cultured plant cells in vitro in a bioreactor to produce biologicals and secondary plants of economic value. The facilitation of plant breeding, the cloning of specific pathogen-free materials, the elimination of growing point or apex viruses, and the increase of plant yield are other O-g applications. The space environment may be advantageous in somatic embryogenesis, the culture of alkaloids, and the development of completely new crop plant germ plasm.

  5. Administration of commercial Rhodococcus equi specific hyperimmune plasma results in variable amounts of IgG against pathogenic bacteria in foals.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M G; Oliveira, A F; Page, A; Horohov, D W

    2014-11-15

    Rhodococcus equi is the most common cause of pneumonia in young foals. A vaccine is not available and the use of R equi-specific hyperimmune plasma (HIP) is common. Despite its widespread use, the efficacy of HIP in preventing disease remains controversial. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the virulence associate protein A (VapA)-specific IgG and IgG subclasses in commercially available R equi HIP and (2) to evaluate serum VapA-specific IgG and IgG subclasses in foals following administration of commercial R equi HIP. Three different lots from four commercial R equi HIP were sampled. VapA-specific IgG and IgG subclasses were evaluated in all samples using an ELISA. Serum was collected from newborn foals either after commercial R equi HIP was administered (n=97) or not (n=70). Serum was also collected from each mare. Administration of HIP significantly (P<0.001) increased VapA-specific IgGs in recipient foals, however, there was a marked variation in VapA-specific IgGs in foals receiving the same product. VapA-specific IgGs were significantly different (P<0.001) between products and varied between lots, with coefficients of variation ranging from 17 to 123 per cent. These results may explain previously reported disparities in HIP efficacy. PMID:25117301

  6. Space Station Workshop Commercial Missions and User Requirements: Issues and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The issues and recommendations of a conference on the Space Station are presented. The subjects are organized under three headings of: materials and processing in space, earth and ocean observations, and industrial services. One hundred and two issues and recommendations which resulted from the workskop are categorized for each discipline subpanel. Responses to these issues and recommendations are based on more than twenty interviews with highly qualified NASA personnel and represent the best answers available at this time.

  7. Interactions between lighting and space conditioning energy use in U.S. commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1998-04-01

    Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling and heating energy consumption. In general, lighting energy reductions increase heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. The net change in a building`s annual energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and climate. This paper characterizes the effects of lighting/HVAC interactions on the annual heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using the DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Twelve building types of two vintages and five climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination of building type, vintage, and climate, a prototypical building is simulated with varying lighting power densities, and the resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. These loads are used together with market information on the saturation of the different HVAC equipment in the commercial buildings to determine the changes i energy use and expenditures for heating and cooling. Results are presented by building type for the US as a whole. Therefore, the data presented in this paper can be utilized to assess the secondary effects of lighting-related federal policies with widespread impacts, like minimum efficiency standards. Generally, in warm climates the interactions will induce monetary savings and in cold climates the interactions will induce monetary penalties. For the commercial building stock in the US, a reduction in lighting energy that is well distributed geographically will induce neither significant savings nor significant penalties from associated changes in HVAC primary energy and energy expenditures.

  8. Economic analysis of commercial solar combined space-heating and hot-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-23

    Typical commercial solar energy systems are described, outlining typical cost and performance lvels. The economic performance of solar energy systems are described through the use of Cash Flow Diagrams. These diagrams indicate the cumulative cash situation of a solar investment over the life of the investment. The economic performance of solar energy systems is described through the calculation of equivalent Return-on-Investment (ROI). Appendices are included that enable one to calculate the ROI for any particular solar energy system investment. (MHR)

  9. The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program at Marshall Space Flight Center - Some problems and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program by the Department of Energy and the Marshall Space Flight Center activities supporting this program from its conception are defined and discussed. Problems are summarized in the design and financial areas. It is concluded that the program has significantly assisted the creation of a viable solar testing and cooling industry. The cost effective procedures evolving from the program are expected to make a major contribution to reducing the effective life cycle cost of solar installation.

  10. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  11. Design by Prototype: Examples from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Gundo, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes and provides exa.mples of a technique called Design-by-Prototype used in the development of research hardware at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ames Research Center. This is not a new idea. Artisans and great masters have used prototyping as a design technique for centuries. They created prototypes to try out their ideas before making the primary artifact they were planning. This abstract is itself a prototype for others to use in determining the value of the paper it describes. At the Ames Research Center Design-by-Prototype is used for developing unique, one-of-a-kind hardware for small, high-risk projects. The need tor this new/old process is the proliferation of computer "design tools" that can result in both excessive time expended in design, and a lack of imbedded reality in the final product. Despite creating beautiful three-dimensional models and detailed computer drawings that can consume hundreds of engineering hours, the resulting designs can be extremely difficult to make, requiring many changes that add to the cost and schedule. Much design time can be saved and expensive rework eliminated using Design-by-Prototype.

  12. Contribution of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, W. B., III; Runckel, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a special international effort, three nozzles were designed and tested on single nacelle models in wind tunnels of several nations belonging to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. All three of these nozzles were investigated in the Langley 16-foot transonic wind tunnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center. Langley Research Center also contributed theoretical calculations of the jet plume boundary and afterbody pressures. The calculations were obtained using an iterative solution which combined the inviscid Douglas Neumann method for the external flow with the method of characteristics for the flow in the jet plume. For the investigation, the nozzles were mounted on a single nacelle model 15.24 centimeters in diameter and 162.56 centimeters long. Tests were made at free stream Mach number from 0.4 to 1.2, and at Reynolds numbers per meter from 7.38 million to 13.78 million depending on the Mach number. Four types of data were recorded: afterbody pressure data, afterbody force data, model boundary layer data, and tunnel wall pressure data. The ratio of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure ranged up to 8.5. A description of the wind tunnel, model, and test procedure is included.

  13. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Stage (NTPS): A Key Space Asset for Human Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Burke, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been discussed as a key space asset that can bridge the gap between a sustained human presence on the Moon and the eventual human exploration of Mars. Recently, a human mission to a near Earth asteroid (NEA) has also been included as a "deep space precursor" to an orbital mission of Mars before a landing is attempted. In his "post-Apollo" Integrated Space Program Plan (1970 to 1990), Wernher von Braun, proposed a reusable Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Stage (NTPS) to deliver cargo and crew to the Moon to establish a lunar base initially before sending human missions to Mars. The NTR was selected because it was a proven technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp approx. 900 s)-twice that of today's best chemical rockets. During the Rover and NERVA programs, 20 rocket reactors were designed, built and successfully ground tested. These tests demonstrated the (1) thrust levels; (2) high fuel temperatures; (3) sustained operation; (4) accumulated lifetime; and (5) restart capability needed for an affordable in-space transportation system. In NASA's Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the "Copernicus" crewed NTR Mars transfer vehicle used three 25 klbf "Pewee" engines-the smallest and highest performing engine tested in the Rover program. Smaller lunar transfer vehicles-consisting of a NTPS with three approx. 16.7 klbf "SNRE-class" engines, an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload-can be delivered to LEO using a 70 t to LEO upgraded SLS, and can support reusable cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. The NTPS can play an important role in returning humans to the Moon to stay by providing an affordable in-space transportation system that can allow initial lunar outposts to evolve into settlements capable of supporting commercial activities. Over the next decade collaborative efforts between NASA and private industry could open up new exploration and commercial

  14. Forecast of space shuttle flight requirements for launch of commercial communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The number of communication satellites required over the next 25 years to support domestic and regional communication systems for telephony, telegraphy and other low speed data; video teleconferencing, new data services, direct TV broadcasting; INTELSAT; and maritime and aeronautical services was estimated to determine the number of space shuttle flights necessary for orbital launching.

  15. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  16. 14 CFR 414.41 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. 414.41 Section 414.41 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING SAFETY APPROVALS Appeal Procedures § 414.41 Administrative law...

  17. 14 CFR 406.5 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions. 406.5 Section 406.5 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE...

  18. Case Study of Using High Performance Commercial Processors in a Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Olivas, Zulema

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade project was to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness. The upgrade was to augment the Shuttle avionics system with new hardware and software. A major success of this project was the validation of the hardware architecture and software design. This was significant because the project incorporated new technology and approaches for the development of human rated space software. An early version of this system was tested at the Johnson Space Center for one month by teams of astronauts. The results were positive, but NASA eventually cancelled the project towards the end of the development cycle. The goal to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness resulted in the need for high performance Central Processing Units (CPUs). The choice of CPU selected was the PowerPC family, which is a reduced instruction set computer (RISC) known for its high performance. However, the requirement for radiation tolerance resulted in the reevaluation of the selected family member of the PowerPC line. Radiation testing revealed that the original selected processor (PowerPC 7400) was too soft to meet mission objectives and an effort was established to perform trade studies and performance testing to determine a feasible candidate. At that time, the PowerPC RAD750s where radiation tolerant, but did not meet the required performance needs of the project. Thus, the final solution was to select the PowerPC 7455. This processor did not have a radiation tolerant version, but faired better than the 7400 in the ability to detect failures. However, its cache tags did not provide parity and thus the project incorporated a software strategy to detect radiation failures. The strategy was to incorporate dual paths for software generating commands to the legacy Space Shuttle avionics to prevent failures due to the softness of the upgraded avionics.

  19. 77 FR 27111 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST); Notice of Availability of the Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Council on Environmental Quality NEPA implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations parts 1500 to 1508), and FAA Order 1050.1E, Change 1, the FAA is announcing the availability of the Final EA and FONSI for the Launch and Reentry of SpaceShipTwo Reusable Suborbital Rockets at......

  20. Benefits of the integrated solar upper stage (ISUS) to commercial space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, John; Miles, Barry

    1997-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar thermal system that provides both propulsion and electric power. Using hydrogen as the propellant, ISUS can provide average specific impulses between 750 and 800 seconds. Once in final orbit, the stage uses thermionic diodes to produce electricity for the satellite payload throughout its operating lifetime. Because of its high specific impulse, ISUS can increase the total mass delivered to GEO by any launch vehicle by up to 250%. ISUS can provide benefits to commercial system in lower orbits as well. These orbits are particularly demanding on battery system because of the short orbit periods and the resulting number of battery cycles. Thermal storage in the ISUS receiver can accommodate these cycles without increasing system mass. ISUS also provide more efficient propulsion for station keeping and for separation of satellites when multiple satellites are launched for a single launch vehicle.

  1. The University of Arizona Nanosat Program: Making Space accessible to scientific and commercial packages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, U.; Fevig, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    For the last couple of years we have been engaged in building nanosatellites within a student-mentor framework. The satellites are 10x10x10cm cubes, have a maximum mass of 1 kg, and power of a few watts. The standardized "cube-sat" form factor was suggested by Bob Twiggs of Stanford University so that a common launch platform could be utilized and more Universities could participate. We have now built four "cube-sats': a launchable Engineering model, Rincon 1 & 2, (funded by Rincon corporation), and Alcatel funded by Alcatel Espace. The costs for the four satellites are \\250,000. Launch costs using a Russian SS-18 are typically \\10,000 per kg. The payload for Rincon 1 & 2 is a sophisticated telecommunications board using only 10 mw of transmitting power. The Alcatel payload consists of three communications IC's whose radiation exposure and annealing properties will be studied over a period of years. Future nanosatellites will have considerable value in providing low cost access to space for experiments in nanotechnology, space electronics, micropropulsion, radiation experiments, astrobionics and climate change studies. For the latter area we are considering experiments to monitor the solar constant, the solar UV spectrum, the chromospheric activity through the Mg II index, the Earth's Albedo, etc. For this purpose we are developing a slightly larger satellite, 20x20x20cm and 10 kg. We have built a C-MOS camera with a 1 ms exposure time for attitude determination, and we are working with Honeywell Industries to develop micro-reaction wheels for attitude control. We are also working on micro-propulsion units with the Air Force and several aerospace companies. Preliminary calculations show that we can develop delta-V's of 5km/s which will allow us to visit 5% (about 100) of the NEA population or possibly some comets. We firmly believe a vigorous nanosatellite program will allow useful space experiments for costs of millions of Dollars instead of the present tens of

  2. Aerospace century XXI: Space sciences, applications, and commercial developments; Proceedings of the Thirty-third Annual AAS International Conference, Boulder, CO, Oct. 26-29, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenthaler, G.W.; Koster, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on rocket UV observations of Comet Halley, a space system for microgravity research, transitioning from Spacelab to Space Station science, and assemblers and future space hardware. Also considered are spatial and temporal scales of atmospheric disturbances, Doppler radar for prediction and warning, data management for the Columbus program, communications satellites of the future, and commercial launch vehicles. Other topics include space geodesy and earthquake predictions, inverted cellular radio satellite systems, material processing in space, and potential for earth observations from the manned Space Station.

  3. NASA's commercial research plans and opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Ray J.

    1992-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) commercial space development plan is to encourage the development of space-based products and markets, along with the infrastructure and transportation that will support those products and markets. A three phased program has been instituted to carry out this program. The first phase utilizes government grants through the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) for space-related, industry driven research; the development of a technology data base; and the development of commercial space transportation and infrastructure. The second phase includes the development of these technologies by industry for new commercial markets, and features unique industry/government collaborations such as Joint Endeavor Agreements. The final phase will feature technical applications actually brought to the marketplace. The government's role will be to support industry required infrastructure to encourage start-up markets and industries through follow-on development agreements such as the Space Systems Development Agreement. The Office of Commercial Programs has an aggressive flight program underway on the Space Shuttle, suborbital rockets, orbital expendable launch vehicles, and the Commercial Middeck Accommodation Module with SPACEHAB Inc. The Office of Commercial Program's has been allocated 35 percent of the U.S. share of the Space Station Freedom resources for 1997 utilization. A utilization plan has been developed with the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space and has identified eleven materials processing and biotechnology payloads occupying 5 double racks in the pressurized module as well as two payloads external to the module in materials exposure and environment monitoring. The Office of Commercial Programs will rely on the Space Station Freedom to provide the long duration laboratory component for space-based commercial research.

  4. On Using Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Electronic Products in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, William X.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) has utilized COTS products in its programs since the early 1990's. Recently it has become evident that, of all failure modes possible, radiation will probably dominate; sometimes to the point of driving system architecture. It is now imperative that radiation susceptibility be addressed when writing the system requirements. Susceptibility assessment, e.g. testing, must begin early in the design phase to establish performance and continue through the hardware qualification program to prove satisfaction of the original requirements(s). Examples of requirements, testing, and architecture versus failure rate will be given.

  5. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  6. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters are essential in assessing the flight performance of aerospace vehicles. The effects of the Earth's atmosphere on aerospace vehicles influence various aspects of the vehicle during ascent ranging from its flight trajectory to the structural dynamics and aerodynamic heatmg on the vehicle. Atmospheric databases charactenzing the wind and thermodynamic environments, known as Range Reference Atmospheres (RRA), have been developed at space launch ranges by a governmental interagency working group for use by aerospace vehicle programs. The National Aeronantics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle Program (SSP), which launches from Kennedy Space Center, utilizes atmosphenc statistics derived from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere (CCAFS RRA) database to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehlcle during ascent.

  7. The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Merry, Carl; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The 2006 Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model summarizing the wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 kin. Launches of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle from Kennedy Space Center utilize CCAFS RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the CCAFS RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, a validation study on the 2006 version was conducted as well as a comparison analysis of the 2006 version to the existing CCAFS RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  8. 14 CFR 406.109 - Administrative law judges-powers and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative law judges-powers and limitations. 406.109 Section 406.109 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.109 Administrative law...

  9. 14 CFR 406.109 - Administrative law judges-powers and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative law judges-powers and limitations. 406.109 Section 406.109 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.109 Administrative law...

  10. 14 CFR 406.109 - Administrative law judges-powers and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative law judges-powers and limitations. 406.109 Section 406.109 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.109 Administrative law...

  11. 14 CFR 406.109 - Administrative law judges-powers and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative law judges-powers and limitations. 406.109 Section 406.109 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.109 Administrative law...

  12. Inductive knowledge acquisition experience with commercial tools for space shuttle main engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modesitt, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1984, an effort has been underway at Rocketdyne, manufacturer of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), to automate much of the analysis procedure conducted after engine test firings. Previously published articles at national and international conferences have contained the context of and justification for this effort. Here, progress is reported in building the full system, including the extensions of integrating large databases with the system, known as Scotty. Inductive knowledge acquisition has proven itself to be a key factor in the success of Scotty. The combination of a powerful inductive expert system building tool (ExTran), a relational data base management system (Reliance), and software engineering principles and Computer-Assisted Software Engineering (CASE) tools makes for a practical, useful and state-of-the-art application of an expert system.

  13. Bioculture System: Expanding ISS Space Bioscience Capabilities for Fundamental Stem Cell Research and Commercial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Fitzpatrick, Garret; Ellingson, Lance; Mitchell, Sarah; Yang, Anthony; Kosnik, Cristine; Rayl, Nicole; Cannon, Tom; Austin, Edward; Sato, Kevin

    With the recent call by the 2011 Decadal Report and the 2010 Space Biosciences Roadmap for the International Space Station (ISS) to be used as a National Laboratory for scientific research, there is now a need for new laboratory instruments on ISS to enable such research to occur. The Bioculture System supports the extended culturing of multiple cell types and microbiological specimens. It consists of a docking station that carries ten independent incubation units or ‘Cassettes’. Each Cassette contains a cooling chamber (5(°) C) for temperature sensitive solutions and samples, or long duration fluids and sample storage, as well as an incubation chamber (ambient up to 42(°) C). Each Cassette houses an independent fluidics system comprised of a biochamber, medical-grade fluid tubing, medium warming module, oxygenation module, fluid pump, and sixteen solenoid valves for automated biochamber injections of sampling. The Bioculture System provides the user with the ability to select the incubation temperature, fluid flow rate and automated biochamber sampling or injection events for each separate Cassette. Furthermore, the ISS crew can access the biochamber, media bag, and accessory bags on-orbit using the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The Bioculture System also permits initiation of cultures, subculturing, injection of compounds, and removal of samples for on-orbit processing using ISS facilities. The Bioculture System therefore provides a unique opportunity for the study of stem cells and other cell types in space. The first validation flight of the Bioculture System will be conducted on SpaceX5, consisting of 8 Cassettes and lasting for 30-37 days. During this flight we plan to culture two different mammalian cell types in bioreactors: a mouse osteocytic-like cell line, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived cardiomyocytes. Specifically, the osteocytic line will enable the study of a type of cell that has been flown on the Bioculture System

  14. Compelled commercial speech: the Food and Drug Administration's effort to smoke out the tobacco industry through graphic warning labels.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Bryan M; Andrews, Anne Hampton; Jacob, C Reade

    2013-01-01

    FDA's proposed graphic warning labels for cigarette packages have been scrutinized for potentially violating the First Amendment's free speech clause. This article addresses the distinction between the commercial speech and compelled speech doctrines and their applicability in analyzing the constitutionality of the labels. The government's position is that the labels evoke an emotional response and educate consumers, while tobacco companies argue that the labels forcibly promote the government's message. Two federal appellate courts, applying different legal standards, have arrived at different conclusions. This article advocates that the Supreme Court, if faced with review of the labels, should apply strict scrutiny and declare the labels unconstitutional. PMID:24552078

  15. Ambivalent spaces--the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between notions of the commercial and the political in the Swedish gay press, 1969-1986.

    PubMed

    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna; Arnberg, Klara

    2015-01-01

    Within sexual geographies, sexual struggles over urban public spaces are frequently explored. Less common is research on sexual struggles within sexually shared spaces and gay spaces. The aim of the article is to examine discursive struggles of meanings of gay male identity enacted in discussions of commodification/capitalism, disclosure, and space in Swedish gay press during 1969-1986. We trace the ambivalent feelings or the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between commercialism and non-commercialism within the Swedish gay press back to the 1970s. In the article we show how a monosexualization process was taking place in both the Swedish gay press as well as within sexual spaces. We explore rhetorical struggles between two competing discursive meanings of (ideal homonormative) male homosexuality, gay culture, and space: one wider (inclusive) and one narrower (exclusive). PMID:25532031

  16. MOA2—an R&D paradigm buster enabling space propulsion by commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hettmer, Manfred; Koudelka, Otto; Löb, Horst

    2012-04-01

    More than 60 years after the late Nobel laureate Hannes Alfvén had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfvén waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. Consequently improved since then, the name of the latest concept, relying on magneto-acoustic waves to accelerate electric conductive matter, is MOA2—Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified Accelerator. Based on computer simulations, which were undertaken to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA2 is a corrosion free and highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted in operation, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable of delivering a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. First tests—that are further described in this paper—have been conducted successfully with a 400 W prototype system at an ambient pressure of 0.20 Pa, delivered 9.24 mN of thrust at 1472 s ISP, thereby underlining the feasibility of the concept. Based on these results, space propulsion is expected to be a prime application for MOA2—a claim that is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion. However, MOA2 has so far seen most of its R&D impetus from terrestrial applications, like coating, semiconductor implantation and manufacturing as well as steel cutting. Based on this observation, MOA2 resembles an R&D paradigm buster, as it is the first space propulsion system, whose R&D is driven primarily by its terrestrial applications. Different terrestrial applications exist, but

  17. The Spatial Practices of School Administrative Clerks: Making Space for Contributive Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the work practices of the much neglected phenomenon of the work of school administrative clerks in schools. Popular accounts of school administrative clerks portray them as subjectified--assigned roles with limited power and discretion--as subordinate and expected to be compliant, passive and deferent to the principal and…

  18. Using Commercial Off-the-Shelf Software Tools for Space Shuttle Scientific Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In October 1993, the Astronaut Science Advisor (ASA) was on board the STS-58 flight of the space shuttle. ASA is an interactive system providing data acquisition and analysis, experiment step re-scheduling, and various other forms of reasoning. As fielded, the system runs on a single Macintosh PowerBook 170, which hosts the six ASA modules. There is one other piece of hardware, an external (GW Instruments, Sommerville, Massachusetts) analog-to-digital converter connected to the PowerBook's SCSI port. Three main software tools were used: LabVIEW, CLIPS, and HyperCard: First, a module written in LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, Texas) controls the A/D conversion and stores the resulting data in appropriate arrays. This module also analyzes the numerical data to produce a small set of characteristic numbers or symbols describing the results of an experiment trial. Second, a forward-chaining inference system written in CLIPS (NASA) uses the symbolic information provided by the first stage with a static rule base to infer decisions about the experiment. This expert system shell is used by the system for diagnosis. The third component of the system is the user interface, written in HyperCard (Claris Inc. and Apple Inc., both in Cupertino, California).

  19. 14 CFR 460.51 - Space flight participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Space flight participant training. 460.51 Section 460.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with a Space...

  20. 14 CFR 435.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human space flight. 435.8 Section 435.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Human space flight. An applicant for a license to conduct a reentry with flight crew or a space...

  1. 14 CFR 435.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human space flight. 435.8 Section 435.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Human space flight. An applicant for a license to conduct a reentry with flight crew or a space...

  2. 14 CFR 435.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human space flight. 435.8 Section 435.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Human space flight. An applicant for a license to conduct a reentry with flight crew or a space...

  3. 14 CFR 435.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human space flight. 435.8 Section 435.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Human space flight. An applicant for a license to conduct a reentry with flight crew or a space...

  4. 14 CFR 460.51 - Space flight participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Space flight participant training. 460.51 Section 460.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with a Space...

  5. 14 CFR 460.51 - Space flight participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Space flight participant training. 460.51 Section 460.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with a Space...

  6. 14 CFR 460.51 - Space flight participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Space flight participant training. 460.51 Section 460.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with a Space...

  7. 14 CFR 435.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human space flight. 435.8 Section 435.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Human space flight. An applicant for a license to conduct a reentry with flight crew or a space...

  8. 14 CFR 460.51 - Space flight participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Space flight participant training. 460.51 Section 460.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS Launch and Reentry with a Space...

  9. Re-Living Dangerous Memories: Online Journaling to Interrogate Spaces of "Otherness" in an Educational Administration Program at a Midwestern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Jennifer; Caruthers, Loyce; McCarther, Shirley Marie

    2009-01-01

    This theoretical paper explores the use of online journaling in an educational administration program to interrogate spaces of "otherness"--the geographical spaces of cities where poor children and children of color live--and the dangerous memories prospective administrators may have about diversity. The cultures of most educational administration…

  10. Flight Computer Processing Avionics for Space Station Microgravity Experiments: A Risk Assessment of Commercial Off-the-Shelf Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Howard; Liggin, Karl; Crawford, Kevin; Humphries, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is continually looking for ways to reduce the costs and schedule and minimize the technical risks during the development of microgravity programs. One of the more prominent ways to minimize the cost and schedule is to use off-the-shelf hardware (OTS). However, the use of OTS often increases the risk. This paper addresses relevant factors considered during the selection and utilization of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) flight computer processing equipment for the control of space station microgravity experiments. The paper will also discuss how to minimize the technical risks when using COTS processing hardware. Two microgravity experiments for which the COTS processing equipment is being evaluated for are the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) and the Self-diffusion in Liquid Elements (SDLE) experiment. Since MSFC is the lead center for Microgravity research, EDSE and SDLE processor selection will be closely watched by other experiments that are being designed to meet payload carrier requirements. This includes the payload carriers planned for the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of EDSE is to continue to investigate microstructural evolution of, and thermal interactions between multiple dendrites growing under diffusion controlled conditions. The purpose of SDLE is to determine accurate self-diffusivity data as a function of temperature for liquid elements selected as representative of class-like structures. In 1999 MSFC initiated a Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) effort to investigate and determine the optimal commercial data bus architecture that could lead to faster, better, and lower cost data acquisition systems for the control of microgravity experiments. As part of this effort various commercial data acquisition systems were acquired and evaluated. This included equipment with various form factors, (3U, 6U, others) and equipment that utilized various bus structures, (VME

  11. Private, commercial and student-oriented low-cost deep-space missions: A global survey of activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenoure, Rex; Polk, Kevin

    1999-11-01

    Primary mission objectives for most deepspace missions to date have emphasized acquiring scientific data and expanding our understanding of the solar system; some contemporary missions target advanced technology demonstration with science as a secondary objective. All missions so far have been sponsored by one or more government agencies, organizations or consortia. Now a new class of deep-space missions is emerging: those motivated and sponsored by private, commercial and student-oriented interests and organizations. Several such missions — the first to actually be executed — are likely to occur in the 2000-2005 period. Underlying motivations for these unconventional ventures are summarized. For context, this survey starts with similar activities during 1970-95. Lunar Prospector is perhaps the most visible success story here: it was initially a privately financed venture before being selected as a NASA Discovery mission. Why few of these early efforts succeeded in meeting their objectives — and why some did — is explored. Next, a worldwide snapshot of current activity in this arena is provided, highlighting the most visible and credible developments, most of which are in the U.S. and Europe. Principal mission attributes, team composition and unconventional features are summarized for each. All are still in the conceptual or preliminary design phase, but least one (NEAP is expected to move into development and implementation this year. Implications of this emerging trend to the conventional space-science mission community are addressed. Included here are the continued need for science instruments and scientific talent, the prospect of expanding the array of space technologies and infrastructure, new teaming relationships and funding mechanisms, and various cost and risk issues.

  12. Inter-Module Ventilation Changes to the International Space Station Vehicle to Support Integration of the International Docking Adapter and Commercial Crew Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Dwight E., Jr.; Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) is continuing to evolve in the post-Space Shuttle era. The ISS vehicle configuration that is in operation was designed for docking of a Space Shuttle vehicle, and designs currently under development for commercial crew vehicles require different interfaces. The ECLSS Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem (THC) Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) must be modified in order to support two docking interfaces at the forward end of ISS, to provide the required air exchange. Development of a new higher-speed IMV fan and extensive ducting modifications are underway to support the new Commercial Crew Vehicle interfaces. This paper will review the new ECLSS IMV development requirements, component design and hardware status, subsystem analysis and testing performed to date, and implementation plan to support Commercial Crew Vehicle docking.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  14. 14 CFR 1274.508 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contract administration. 1274.508 Section... WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Procurement Standards § 1274.508 Contract administration. A system for contract... of the contract and to ensure adequate and timely follow-up of all purchases. Recipients...

  15. Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Office of Safety and Mission Assurance sponsors an Agency-wide NDE Program that supports Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology, Human Exploration and Development of Space, Earth Science, and Space Science Enterprises. For each of these Enterprises, safety is the number one priority. Development of the next generation aero-space launch and transportation vehicles, satellites, and deep space probes have highlighted the enabling role that NDE plays in these advanced technology systems. Specific areas of advanced component development, component integrity, and structural heath management are critically supported by NDE technologies. The simultaneous goals of assuring safety, maintaining overall operational efficiency, and developing and utilizing revolutionary technologies to expand human activity and space-based commerce in the frontiers of air and space places increasing demands on the Agencies NDE infrastructure and resources. In this presentation, an overview of NASA's NDE Program will be presented, that includes a background and status of current Enterprise NDE issues, and the NDE investment areas being developed to meet Enterprise safety and mission assurance needs through the year 2009 and beyond.

  16. The astrophysics program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Three broad themes characterize the goals of the Astrophysics Division at NASA. These are obtaining an understanding of the origin and evolution of the universe, the fundamental laws of physics, and the birth and evolutionary cycle of galaxies, stars, planets and life. These goals are pursued through contemporaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum with high sensitivity and resolution. The strategy to accomplish these goals is fourfold: the establishment of long term space based observatories implemented through the Great Observatories program; attainment of crucial bridging and supporting measurements visa missions of intermediate and small scope conducted within the Explorer, Spacelab, and Space Station Attached Payload Programs; enhancement of scientific access to results of space based research activities through an integrated data system; and development and maintenance of the scientific/technical base for space astrophysics programs through the research and analysis and suborbital programs. The near term activities supporting the first two objectives are discussed.

  17. Address by James C. Fletcher, Administrator National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the National Academy of Engineering, Washington, D.C., 10 November 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Future plans and programs of the space agency are discussed. Topics discussed include solar energy, space stations, planetary exploration, interstellar exploration, the space shuttles, and satellites.

  18. 14 CFR § 1274.508 - Contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contract administration. § 1274.508... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Procurement Standards § 1274.508 Contract administration. A system for contract administration shall be maintained to ensure contractor conformance with the terms, conditions...

  19. Shifting Spaces and Emerging Voices: Participation, Support, and Conflict in One School Administrative Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Manila S.; Harkins, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Collaborative work and supportive relationships are highly valued by teachers and school administrators. Collaboration, however, necessitates constructive conflict resolution (P. M. Senge, 1990); yet conflict is often experienced as interpersonally threatening and undermining supportive working conditions. This contradiction is…

  20. Why commercial broadband satellites absolutely must have laser intersatellite links (ISLs) and how the free-space laser communications community could let them down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidell, James E.

    1998-05-01

    Large commercial satellite programs needing high bandwidth inter-satellite links (ISLs) are growing rapidly in number. Precious few are visibly maturing. These commercial needs present greater customer diversity and opportunity for free- space laser communications application than the current plans of all the world's governments combined, multiplied manyfold. However, commercial customers generally do not have access to the independent, knowledgeable, but often heterogeneous laser communications expertise upon which government programs have historically relied. Moreover, commercial needs differ substantially from those of governments, particularly in the areas of price sensitivity and assured delivery on schedule and meeting all requirements. And the number of would-be laser ISL terminal suppliers also grows despite little verifiable expertise in actually delivering complete, working space-based laser ISL terminals, regardless of price or performance. Consequently, the opportunity for mistakes, disappointments, and outright failure is intensified. More 'red meatballs' are unfortunately on the horizon and neither customers nor suppliers recognize the warning signs. Is ignorance bliss? Virtually the entire space communications community appears oblivious to emerging terrestrial broadband communications projects which appear better backed with superior management far more attentive to time-to-market and other schedule and business considerations than any space venture. Space systems offer advantages through realizing global network operations not possible terrestrially, yet few promoters recogni the potential. Might these be omens worth capitalizing upon, or perhaps from which escape may be warranted? This paper provides a commercial market status update to that presented in preceding years' papers. Laser ISL applications are reviewed which enable commercial broadband satellite customer opportunities not yet recognized among most in the customer community, despite

  1. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  3. Aeronautical concerns and National Aeronautics and Space Administration atmospheric electricity projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenology of lightning and lightning measurement techniques are briefly examined with a particular reference to aeronautics. Developments made in airborne and satellite detection methods are reported. NASA research efforts are outlined which cover topics including in-situ measurements, design factors and protection, remote optical and radio frequency measurements, and space vehicle design.

  4. Third National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and climate program science review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Research results of developing experimental and prototype operational systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring, and understanding the atmosphere are reported. Major aspects include: (1) detection, monitoring, and prediction of severe storms; (2) improvement of global forecasting; and (3) monitoring and prediction of climate change.

  5. 14 CFR 414.41 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. 414.41 Section 414.41 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... Procedures § 414.41 Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. (a)...

  6. 14 CFR 406.5 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions. 406.5 Section 406.5 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  7. 14 CFR 406.5 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions. 406.5 Section 406.5 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  8. 14 CFR 406.5 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions. 406.5 Section 406.5 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  9. 14 CFR 414.41 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. 414.41 Section 414.41 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... Procedures § 414.41 Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. (a)...

  10. 14 CFR 414.41 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. 414.41 Section 414.41 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... Procedures § 414.41 Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. (a)...

  11. 14 CFR 406.5 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in license, permit, and payload actions. 406.5 Section 406.5 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  12. 14 CFR 414.41 - Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. 414.41 Section 414.41 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... Procedures § 414.41 Administrative law judge's recommended decision in safety approval actions. (a)...

  13. 14 CFR 121.517 - Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... flying: airplanes. 121.517 Section 121.517 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.517 Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes. No... commercial flying, if that commercial flying plus his flying in operations under this part will exceed...

  14. 14 CFR 121.489 - Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... flying. 121.489 Section 121.489 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.489 Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying. No pilot that is employed as a pilot by a certificate holder conducting flag operations may do any other commercial flying if that commercial...

  15. 14 CFR 121.489 - Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... flying. 121.489 Section 121.489 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 121.489 Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying. No pilot that is employed as a pilot by a certificate holder conducting flag operations may do any other commercial flying if that commercial...

  16. 14 CFR 121.517 - Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... flying: airplanes. 121.517 Section 121.517 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.517 Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes. No... commercial flying, if that commercial flying plus his flying in operations under this part will exceed...

  17. Implementation of the Enhanced Flight Termination System at National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology, requirements, tests, and results of the implementation of the current operating capability for the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The implementation involves the development of the EFTS at NASA DFRC starting from the requirements to system safety review to full end to end system testing, and concluding with the acceptance of the system as an operational system. The paper discusses the first operational usage and subsequent flight utilizing EFTS successfully.

  18. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An expanded role for the U.S. private sector in America's space future has emerged as a key national objective, and NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is providing a focus for action. The Office supports new high technology commercial space ventures, the commercial application of existing aeronautics and space technology, and expanded commercial access to available NASA capabilities and services. The progress NASA has made in carrying out its new assignment is highlighted.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  3. The Characteristics of Project Managers: An Exploration of Complex Projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.

    2000-01-01

    Study of characteristics and relationships of project managers of complex projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Study is based on Research Design, Data Collection, Interviews, Case Studies, and Data Analysis across varying disciplines such as biological research, space research, advanced aeronautical test facilities, aeronautic flight demonstrations, and projects at different NASA centers to ensure that findings were not endemic to one type of project management, or to one Center's management philosophies. Each project is treated as a separate case with the primary data collected during semi-structured interviews with the project manager responsible for the overall project. Results of the various efforts show some definite similarities of characteristics and relationships among the project managers in the study. A model for how the project managers formulated and managed their projects is included.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  7. Assessment of Intelligent Processing Equipment in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here is an assessment of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) within NASA. An attempt is made to determine the state of IPE development and research in specific areas where NASA might contribute to the national capability. Mechanisms to transfer NASA technology to the U.S. private sector in this critical area are discussed. It was concluded that intelligent processing equipment is finding extensive use in the manufacture of space hardware, especially in the propulsion components of the shuttle. The major benefits are found in improved process consistency, which lowers cost as it reduces rework. Advanced feedback controls are under development and being implemented gradually into shuttle manufacturing. Implementation is much more extensive in new programs, such as in the advanced solid rocket motor and the Space Station Freedom.

  8. Assessment of intelligent processing equipment in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. S.

    1992-04-01

    Summarized here is an assessment of intelligent processing equipment (IPE) within NASA. An attempt is made to determine the state of IPE development and research in specific areas where NASA might contribute to the national capability. Mechanisms to transfer NASA technology to the U.S. private sector in this critical area are discussed. It was concluded that intelligent processing equipment is finding extensive use in the manufacture of space hardware, especially in the propulsion components of the shuttle. The major benefits are found in improved process consistency, which lowers cost as it reduces rework. Advanced feedback controls are under development and being implemented gradually into shuttle manufacturing. Implementation is much more extensive in new programs, such as in the advanced solid rocket motor and the Space Station Freedom.

  9. 14 CFR 417.19 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 417.19 Section 417.19 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Registration of space objects. (a) To assist the U.S. Government in implementing Article IV of the...

  10. 14 CFR 415.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human space flight. 415.8 Section 415.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.8 Human space flight. To obtain a launch license,...

  11. 14 CFR 431.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human space flight. 431.8 Section 431.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.8 Human space...

  12. 14 CFR 417.19 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 417.19 Section 417.19 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Registration of space objects. (a) To assist the U.S. Government in implementing Article IV of the...

  13. 14 CFR 415.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human space flight. 415.8 Section 415.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.8 Human space flight. To obtain a launch license,...

  14. 14 CFR 431.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human space flight. 431.8 Section 431.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.8 Human space...

  15. 14 CFR 417.19 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 417.19 Section 417.19 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Registration of space objects. (a) To assist the U.S. Government in implementing Article IV of the...

  16. 14 CFR 415.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human space flight. 415.8 Section 415.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.8 Human space flight. To obtain a launch license,...

  17. 14 CFR 431.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human space flight. 431.8 Section 431.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.8 Human space...

  18. 14 CFR 417.19 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 417.19 Section 417.19 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Registration of space objects. (a) To assist the U.S. Government in implementing Article IV of the...

  19. 14 CFR 431.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human space flight. 431.8 Section 431.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.8 Human space...

  20. 14 CFR 415.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human space flight. 415.8 Section 415.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.8 Human space flight. To obtain a launch license,...

  1. 14 CFR 415.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human space flight. 415.8 Section 415.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE General § 415.8 Human space flight. To obtain a launch license,...

  2. 14 CFR 417.19 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 417.19 Section 417.19 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Registration of space objects. (a) To assist the U.S. Government in implementing Article IV of the...

  3. 14 CFR 431.8 - Human space flight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human space flight. 431.8 Section 431.8 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.8 Human space...

  4. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  5. Access to space studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently considering possible directions in Earth-to-orbit vehicle development under a study called 'Access to Space.' This agency-wide study is considering commercial launch vehicles, human transportation, space station logistics, and other space transportation requirements over the next 40 years. Three options are being considered for human transportation: continued use of the Space Shuttle; development of a small personnel carrier (personnel logistics system (PLS)); or development of an advanced vehicle such as a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO). Several studies related to the overall Access to Space study are reported in this document.

  6. Swamp Works: A New Approach to Develop Space Mining and Resource Extraction Technologies at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; Sibille, L.; Leucht, K.; Smith, J. D.; Townsend, I. I.; Nick, A. J.; Schuler, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The first steps for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on target bodies such as the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), and even comets, involve the same sequence of steps as in the terrestrial mining of resources. First exploration including prospecting must occur, and then the resource must be acquired through excavation methods if it is of value. Subsequently a load, haul and dump sequence of events occurs, followed by processing of the resource in an ISRU plant, to produce useful commodities. While these technologies and related supporting operations are mature in terrestrial applications, they will be different in space since the environment and indigenous materials are different than on Earth. In addition, the equipment must be highly automated, since for the majority of the production cycle time, there will be no humans present to assist or intervene. This space mining equipment must withstand a harsh environment which includes vacuum, radical temperature swing cycles, highly abrasive lofted dust, electrostatic effects, van der Waals forces effects, galactic cosmic radiation, solar particle events, high thermal gradients when spanning sunlight terminators, steep slopes into craters / lava tubes and cryogenic temperatures as low as 40 K in permanently shadowed regions. In addition the equipment must be tele-operated from Earth or a local base where the crew is sheltered. If the tele-operation occurs from Earth then significant communications latency effects mandate the use of autonomous control systems in the mining equipment. While this is an extremely challenging engineering design scenario, it is also an opportunity, since the technologies developed in this endeavor could be used in the next generations of terrestrial mining equipment, in order to mine deeper, safer, more economical and with a higher degree of flexibility. New space technologies could precipitate new mining solutions here on Earth. The NASA KSC Swamp Works is an innovation

  7. A Primer for the talk ""Outside of Normal Operating Conditions: Using Commercial Hardware in Space Computing Platforms for Ubiquitous Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been useful in speeding up digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms, and FPGA implementations can be orders of magnitude faster than microprocessor implementations. As many commercial and national security satellites are DSP-oriented, many organizations have started using commercial FPGAs to process data closer to the sensor. Using commercial technology successfully in this environment has lead to new research into fault tolerance and resilience.

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center data base requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the types of data that the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) should automate in order to make available essential management and technical information to support MSC's various functions and missions. In addition, the software and hardware capabilities to best handle the storage and retrieval of this data were analyzed. Based on the results of this study, recommendations are presented for a unified data base that provides a cost effective solution to MSC's data automation requirements. The recommendations are projected through a time frame that includes the earth orbit space station.

  9. Fourth National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and Climate Program Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Weather and Climate Program has two major thrusts. The first involves the development of experimental and prototype operational satellite systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring and understanding the atmosphere. The second thrust involves basic scientific investigation aimed at studying the physical and chemical processes which control weather and climate. This fourth science review concentrated on the scientific research rather than the hardware development aspect of the program. These proceedings contain 65 papers covering the three general areas: severe storms and local weather research, global weather, and climate.

  10. The applicability and availability of Former Soviet Union (FSU) space-related capabilities and facilities to energy-related space activities of Department of Energy, Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellechi, M.

    1993-01-01

    A senior-level Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team visited the former Soviet Union (FSU) from 16-28 Oct. 1992. The purpose of the visit was to investigate the applicability and availability of FSU space-related capabilities and facilities to the energy-related space activities of the three agencies. This included renewable energy, nuclear power and propulsion, radiation effects, remote sensing, optics, and lasers. The U.S. delegation was successful in identifying some capabilities that would be useful to the three organizations. Efforts to utilize some of the FSU capabilities viewed are being initiated. Concurrently, there will be a technical assessment performed on the information gained from this and other recent visits to the FSU relative to space research.

  11. 14 CFR 93.319 - Commercial air tour limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Commercial air tour limitations. 93.319 Section 93.319 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ...

  12. Natural Atmospheric Environment Model Development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank; Overbey, Glenn; Batts, Glen W.; Parker, Nelson (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently began development of a new reusable launch vehicle. The program office is located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and is called the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV). The purpose of the program is to improve upon the safety and reliability of the first generation reusable launch vehicle, the Space Shuttle. Specifically, the goals are to reduce the risk of crew loss to less than 1-in-10,000 missions and decreased costs by a factor of 10 to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched to low Earth orbit. The program is currently in the very early stages of development and many two-stage vehicle concepts will be evaluated. Risk reduction activities are also taking place. These activities include developing new technologies and advancing current technologies to be used by the vehicle. The Environments Group at MSFC is tasked by the 2GRLV Program to develop and maintain an extensive series of analytical tools and environmental databases which enable it to provide detailed atmospheric studies in support of structural, guidance, navigation and control, and operation of the 2GRLV.

  13. The past, present, and future of National Aeronautics and Space Administration spaceflight diet in support of microgravity rodent experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gwo-Shing; Tou, Janet C; Yu, Diane; Girten, Beverly E; Cohen, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Rodents have been the most frequently flown animal model used to study physiological responses to the space environment. In support of future of space exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) envisions an animal research program focused on rodents. Therefore, the development of a rodent diet that is suitable for the spaceflight environment including long duration spaceflight is a high priority. Recognizing the importance of nutrition in affecting spaceflight physiological responses and ensuring reliable biomedical and biological science return, NASA developed the nutrient-upgraded rodent food bar (NuRFB) as a standard diet for rodent spaceflight. Depending on future animal habitat hardware and planned spaceflight experiments, modification of the NuRFB or development of a new diet formulation may be needed, particularly for long term spaceflights. Research in this area consists primarily of internal technical reports that are not readily accessible. Therefore, the aims of this contribution are to provide a brief history of the development of rodent spaceflight diets, to review the present diet used in rodent spaceflight studies, and to discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions for diets to be used in future long-term rodent spaceflight studies. PMID:24012282

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  16. A systems approach to the commercialization of space communications technology - The NASA/JPL Mobile Satellite Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, William J., III; Gray, Valerie W.; Jackson, Byron; Steele, Laura C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusss the systems approach taken by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the commercialization of land-mobile satellite services (LMSS) in the United States. As the lead center for NASA's Mobile Satellite Program, JPL was involved in identifying and addressing many of the key barriers to commercialization of mobile satellite communications, including technical, economic, regulatory and institutional risks, or uncertainties. The systems engineering approach described here was used to mitigate these risks. The result was the development and implementation of the JPL Mobile Satellite Experiment Project. This Project included not only technology development, but also studies to support NASA in the definition of the regulatory, market, and investment environments within which LMSS would evolve and eventually operate, as well as initiatives to mitigate their associated commercialization risks. The end result of these government-led endeavors was the acceleration of the introduction of commercial mobile satellite services, both nationally and internationally.

  17. 78 FR 23629 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Notice of Availability and Request for Comment on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Request for Comment on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the SpaceX Texas Launch Site AGENCY... requesting comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the SpaceX Texas Launch Site (Draft EIS.... Stacey M. Zee, FAA Environmental Specialist, SpaceX EIS c/o Cardno TEC Inc., 275 West Street, Suite...

  18. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Science Applications Program: Exploring Partnerships to Enhance Decision Making in Public Health Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Timi S.; Venezia, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Earth Science Enterprise is engaged in applications of NASA Earth science and remote sensing technologies for public health. Efforts are focused on establishing partnerships with those agencies and organizations that have responsibility for protecting the Nation's Health. The program's goal is the integration of NASA's advanced data and technology for enhanced decision support in the areas of disease surveillance and environmental health. A focused applications program, based on understanding partner issues and requirements, has the potential to significantly contribute to more informed decision making in public health practice. This paper intends to provide background information on NASA's investment in public health and is a call for partnership with the larger practice community.

  19. Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Approaches Used in Development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Max Launch Abort System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Schuster, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineering and Safety Center was chartered to develop an alternate launch abort system (LAS) as risk mitigation for the Orion Project. Its successful flight test provided data for the design of future LAS vehicles. Design of the flight test vehicle (FTV) and pad abort trajectory relied heavily on modeling and simulation including computational fluid dynamics for vehicle aero modeling, 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics models for flight trajectory modeling, and 3-degree-of-freedom kinematics models for parachute force modeling. This paper highlights the simulation techniques and the interaction between the aerodynamics, flight mechanics, and aerodynamic decelerator disciplines during development of the Max Launch Abort System FTV.

  20. 14 CFR 406.165 - Argument before the administrative law judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Argument before the administrative law judge. 406.165 Section 406.165 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.165 Argument before the...

  1. 14 CFR 406.165 - Argument before the administrative law judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Argument before the administrative law judge. 406.165 Section 406.165 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.165 Argument before the...

  2. 14 CFR 406.165 - Argument before the administrative law judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Argument before the administrative law judge. 406.165 Section 406.165 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.165 Argument before the...

  3. 14 CFR 406.165 - Argument before the administrative law judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Argument before the administrative law judge. 406.165 Section 406.165 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.165 Argument before the...

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  5. Uniform administrative requirements for grants and agreements with institutions of higher education, hospitals, other non-profit, and commercial organizations--Department of Commerce. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    This interim final rule implements the revisions to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-110, "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations" which was published in the Federal Register on November 29, 1993. The revised Circular was developed by an interagency task force for governmentwide use in a model rule format to facilitate regulatory adoption by executive departments and agencies. In the published revised Circular, OMB specified as "required action" that Federal agencies responsible for awarding and administering grants and other agreements to recipients described therein, shall adopt the language of the Circular unless other provisions are required by Federal statute or exceptions or deviations are approved by OMB. This interim final rule adopts the provisions of the Circular and its language to the maximum extent feasible. However, minor changes were made to update the procedures, clarify the language, and make the language apply specifically to the DoC and its operating units. No changes are intended to deviate from the substance of Circular A-110. The Circular covers both grants and cooperative agreements made by Federal agencies and subawards, unless sections of the Circular specifically exclude subrecipients from coverage. Consistent with guidance provided in the Circular, DoC will apply its provisions to grants and agreements with institutions of higher education, hospitals, other nonprofit, and commercial organizations. The provisions of the interim final rule will also apply to foreign governments, organizations under the jurisdiction of foreign governments, and international organizations when appropriate. PMID:10182710

  6. Characterization of Seven Outbreaks of Hemorrhagic Hepatopathy Syndrome in Commercial Pullets Following the Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis Bacterin in California.

    PubMed

    Carnaccini, S; Shivaprasad, H L; Cutler, G; Bland, M; Meng, X J; Kenney, S P; Bickford, A A; Cooper, G; Charlton, B; Sentíes-Cué, C G

    2016-03-01

    Between April 2013 and April 2015, seven flocks belonging to three different major commercial egg producers inCalifornia experienced a mild increase in mortality 2 to 3 wk after administration of Salmonella Enteritidis bacterins. Strains of chickens involved were H&N (flock A1, A2, B2, C1, C2, and C3) and Lohmann white (flock B1). Vaccination was administered individually through injection either in the breast muscles or subcutis in the legs between 11 and 18 wk of age in all flocks. Clinical signs ranged from inapparent to lameness, reluctance to walk, greenish diarrhea, and retching-like symptoms. The mortality ranged from 0.16% to 1.38% per week, with the highest peaks occurring usually 2 to 3 wk postvaccination, and then declined rapidly. Postmortem examinations revealed enlarged livers with disseminated hemorrhages and pale foci of necrosis. Also, severe extensive hemorrhages in the intestine, heart, and proventriculus were observed in a few birds. Various degrees of productive, exudative giant cell granulomatous myositis were observed invading deeply the muscles and subcutis at the site of vaccination. The myositis was always associated with optically empty vacuoles positive for neutral lipids by Oil Red O stain. Droplets of Oil Red O material were also noticed in the affected livers and intestines. Congo red stain highlighted the presence of amyloid in moderate to severe amounts in the breast muscles and moderate amounts in livers, spleens, and intestines. Salmonella antigens were detected in the injection sites and livers by immunohistochemical staining. No viruses or toxic substances were recovered from the liver, spleen, intestine, and pectoral muscles, and the few bacteria isolated were interpreted as secondary postmortem invaders. In addition, livers and bile tested for hepatitis E virus were negative by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26953941

  7. Dietary administration of a commercial mixed-species probiotic improves growth performance and modulates the intestinal immunity of tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Standen, B T; Peggs, D L; Rawling, M D; Foey, A; Davies, S J; Santos, G A; Merrifield, D L

    2016-02-01

    The growth performance, immunological status, intestinal morphology and microbiology of tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, were investigated after dietary administration of the commercial probiotic AquaStar(®) Growout. Tilapia (29.02 ± 0.33 g) were split into five treatments; control (CON), 1.5 g kg(-1) probiotic (PRO-1.5), 3 g kg(-1) probiotic (PRO-3), pulsed probiotic feeding (PRO-PULSE) or an initial probiotic feed followed by control feeding (PRO-INI). After six weeks of experimental feeding, fish fed PRO-3 displayed significantly higher final weight, weight gain and SGR compared to the CON or PRO-INI treatments. Supplementation of the probiotic at this dose induced an up-regulation of intestinal caspase-3, PCNA and HSP70 mRNA levels compared to the CON fed fish. Immuno-modulatory pathways were also affected; significantly higher expression of TLR2, pro-inflammatory genes TNFα and IL-1β, and anti-inflammatory genes IL-10 and TGFβ suggest that the probiotic may potentiate a higher state of mucosal tolerance and immuno-readiness. Histological appraisal revealed significantly higher numbers of intraepithelial leucocytes in the intestine of PRO-3 fed fish compared with treatments CON, PRO-PULSE and PRO-INI but not PRO-1.5. Additionally, fish receiving PRO-3 had a significantly higher abundance of goblet cells in their mid-intestine when compared with fish from all other treatments. Together, these data suggest that continuous provision of AquaStar(®) Growout at 3 g kg(-1) can improve tilapia growth and elevate the intestinal immunological status of the host. PMID:26672904

  8. Status of the space-cooling-equipment market in the commercial sector. Topical report, November 1985-March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.; Katsenelenbogen, S.; Bernstein, H.; Bluestein, J.

    1986-04-01

    The report covers the cooling equipment market for commercial applications as characterized by a data base on shipments (with adjustment for U.S. exports and foreign imports), highlighting activities in the absorption chiller market, and predicting scenarios for future equipment shipments. An analysis of unitary air-conditioning equipment and commercial liquid chillers was performed to determine the population of domesticaly shipped equipment by type and capacity. A review of absorption liquid chiller marketing was performed to identify marketing techniques used to enhance absorption liquid chiller sales and to determine decision-making criteria used to evaluate replacement of existing equipment with absorption liquid chillers. Finally, cooling-market projections were made to forecast the future sales trends of commercial air-conditioning equipment.

  9. 14 CFR 431.85 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 431.85 Section 431.85 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.85 Registration of...

  10. 14 CFR 431.85 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 431.85 Section 431.85 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.85 Registration of...

  11. 14 CFR 431.85 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 431.85 Section 431.85 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.85 Registration of...

  12. 14 CFR 431.85 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 431.85 Section 431.85 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.85 Registration of...

  13. 14 CFR 431.85 - Registration of space objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registration of space objects. 431.85 Section 431.85 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements-Reusable Launch Vehicle Mission License Terms and Conditions § 431.85 Registration of...

  14. 76 FR 8629 - Clarification of Reciprocal Waivers of Claims for Multiple-Customer Commercial Space Launch and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...' customers. See Human Space Flight Requirements for Crew and Space Flight Participants, 71 FR 75616 (Dec. 5... government. See Financial Responsibility Requirements for Licensed Launch Activities, 63 FR 45592 (Aug. 26, 1998) (final rule); and Financial Responsibility Requirements for Licensed Launch Activities, 61...

  15. 14 CFR 1260.68 - Invoices and payments under grants with commercial firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Invoices and payments under grants with commercial firms. 1260.68 Section 1260.68 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... original invoice shall be sent directly to the payment office designated on the grant cover page....

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-05-14

    We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

  17. 14 CFR 404.3 - Filing of petitions to the Associate Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... section may request, under 14 CFR 413.9, that the Department withhold certain trade secrets or proprietary... Administrator. 404.3 Section 404.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE REGULATIONS AND LICENSING REQUIREMENTS General §...

  18. 14 CFR 404.3 - Filing of petitions to the Associate Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... section may request, under 14 CFR 413.9, that the Department withhold certain trade secrets or proprietary... Administrator. 404.3 Section 404.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE REGULATIONS AND LICENSING REQUIREMENTS General §...

  19. Industry and Government Officials Meet for Space Weather Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2008-10-01

    Commercial airlines, electric power grids, cell phones, handheld Global Positioning Systems: Although the Sun is less active due to solar minimum, the number and types of situations and technologies that can benefit from up-to-date space weather information are growing. To address this, the second annual summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) was held on 1 May 2008 during Space Weather Workshop (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  20. An Analysis for the Use of Research and Education Networks and Commercial Network Vendors in Support of Space Based Mission Critical and Non-Critical Networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements are being used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate using other approaches to providing mission services for space ground operations. The current NASA approach is not in keeping with the evolution of network technologies. In the past decade various research and education networks dedicated to scientific and educational endeavors have emerged, as well as commercial networking providers, that employ advanced networking technologies. These technologies have significantly changed networking in recent years. Significant advances in network routing techniques, various topologies and equipment have made commercial networks very stable and virtually error free. Advances in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing will provide tremendous amounts of bandwidth for the future. The question is: Do these networks, which are controlled and managed centrally, provide a level of service that equals the stringent NASA performance requirements. If they do, what are the implication(s) of using them for critical space based ground operations as they are, without adding high cost contractual performance requirements? A second question is the feasibility of applying the emerging grid technology in space operations. Is it feasible to develop a Space Operations Grid and/or a Space Science Grid? Since these network's connectivity is substantial, both nationally and internationally, development of these sorts of grids may be feasible. The concept of research and education networks has evolved to the international community as well. Currently there are international RENs connecting the US in Chicago to and from Europe, South America, Asia and the Pacific rim, Russia and Canada. And most countries in these areas have their