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Sample records for administration fda-approved drugs

  1. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products FDA Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA - FAQ | Instructions | ... 6332) Contact FDA For Government For Press Combination Products Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency ...

  2. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158937.html FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer Tecentriq boosted survival ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat bladder cancer was approved by ...

  3. Possible FDA-approved drugs to treat Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shu

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for the Ebola virus (EBOV) thus far. Most drugs and vaccines developed to date have not yet been approved for human trials. Two FDA-approved c-AbI1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors Gleevec and Tasigna block the release of viral particles; however, their clinical dosages are much lower than the dosages required for effective EBOV suppression. An α-1,2-glucosidase inhibitor Miglustat has been shown to inhibit EBOV particle assembly and secretion. Additionally, the estrogen receptor modulators Clomiphene and Toremifene prevent membrane fusion of EBOV and 50-90% of treated mice survived after Clomiphene/Toremifene treatments. However, the uptake efficiency of Clomiphene by oral administration is very low. Thus, I propose a hypothetical treatment protocol to treat Ebola virus infection with a cumulative use of both Miglustat and Toremifene to inhibit the virus effectively and synergistically. EBOV infection induces massive apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes. Also, cytolysis of endothelial cells triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and subsequent multiple organ failures. Therefore, blood transfusions and active treatments with FDA-approved drugs to treat DIC are also recommended. PMID:25984303

  4. Interactive perspective: drug development and FDA approval, 1938-2013.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Interactive Perspective: Drug Development and FDA Approval, 1938-2013 (June 26, 2014;370:e39). The order of authors was incorrect; Dr. Darrow should have been listed first, and Dr. Kesselheim second. The article is correct at NEJM.org. PMID:25651270

  5. New Role for FDA-Approved Drugs in Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jourdan A; Fitts, Eric C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Peniche, Alex G; Dann, Sara M; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance in medically relevant bacterial pathogens, coupled with a paucity of novel antimicrobial discoveries, represents a pressing global crisis. Traditional drug discovery is an inefficient and costly process; however, systematic screening of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics for other indications in humans offers a rapid alternative approach. In this study, we screened a library of 780 FDA-approved drugs to identify molecules that rendered RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resistant to cytotoxicity induced by the highly virulent Yersinia pestis CO92 strain. Of these compounds, we identified 94 not classified as antibiotics as being effective at preventing Y. pestis-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 17 prioritized drugs, based on efficacy in in vitro screens, were chosen for further evaluation in a murine model of pneumonic plague to delineate if in vitro efficacy could be translated in vivo Three drugs, doxapram (DXP), amoxapine (AXPN), and trifluoperazine (TFP), increased animal survivability despite not exhibiting any direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect on Y. pestis and having no modulating effect on crucial Y. pestis virulence factors. These findings suggested that DXP, AXPN, and TFP may modulate host cell pathways necessary for disease pathogenesis. Finally, to further assess the broad applicability of drugs identified from in vitro screens, the therapeutic potential of TFP, the most efficacious drug in vivo, was evaluated in murine models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile infections. In both models, TFP treatment resulted in increased survivability of infected animals. Taken together, these results demonstrate the broad applicability and potential use of nonantibiotic FDA-approved drugs to combat respiratory and gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27067323

  6. FDA Approves New Drug for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Patients with a Specific Chromosomal Abnormality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Press Announcements FDA News Release FDA approves new drug for chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with ... of leukemia in adults, with approximately 15,000 new cases diagnosed each year. CLL is characterized by ...

  7. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Merkel, Janie

    2015-08-01

    The term 'inflammation' captures a variety of disease processes linked with the immune system. An analysis of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nuclear molecular entities (NMEs) reveals notable trends in terms of acute and chronic inflammatory indications. The number of NMEs peaked during the 1990s and has since declined by more than 50%. Whereas pharmaceutical companies have dominated the field, biotechnology companies now receive half of new approvals and academia has a relatively large role in terms of pivotal first patents. Another notable trend is that the relative number of NMEs targeting allergy has been decreasing, whereas those targeting autoimmune indications is increasing. Unlike other indications, NMEs for inflammation tend towards nuclear receptors and cytokines, and a disproportionate number of biologics target cytokine pathways. PMID:25701283

  8. 2015 in review: FDA approval of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The myriad new molecular entities (NMEs) approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 reflected both the opportunities and risks associated with the development of new medicines. On the one hand, the approval of 45 NMEs was among the highest ever recorded. Likewise, the diversity underlying the mechanistic basis of new medicines suggests continued broadening relative to the predominate trends of the past few decades. On the other hand, closer inspection indicates that business model decisions surrounding orphan indications and consolidation could be placing the industry in an ever-more precarious position, with severe implications for the sustainability of the entire enterprise. PMID:27109618

  9. JAMA Patient Page: FDA Approval of New Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... how the drug might be toxic to cells). Animal testing: Adrug that shows potential in laboratory test- ing ... IND application sum- marizes information from laboratory and animal testing and pro- vides aproposal for obtaining clinical data ...

  10. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  11. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing eliminates need to take ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. ...

  12. Repurposing the FDA-Approved Pinworm Drug Pyrvinium as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent for Intestinal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I.; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1α. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1α agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  13. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients. PMID:26038747

  14. Top 100 bestselling drugs represent an arena struggling for new FDA approvals: drug age as an efficiency indicator.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed a list of the top 100 bestselling drugs as a struggling market for new FDA approvals. Using the time from drug approval by the FDA as a measure of drug age, our analysis showed that the top 100 bestselling drugs are getting older. This reflects the stalled launch of new drugs into the market during recent years. PMID:26160060

  15. Consumers' Understanding of FDA Approval Requirements and Composite Scores in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Sullivan, Helen W; Williams, Pamela A; Squire, Claudia; Betts, Kevin R; Fitts Willoughby, Jessica; Parvanta, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how laypersons perceive the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, FDA authority, and the presentation of composite scores in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug print ads. The 1st study consisted of 4 focus groups (N = 38) in 2 cities. Using a semi-structured guide, a moderator led participants through the viewing of 3 existing DTC print ads that differed in the presence or absence of composite score information, and participants discussed their views of the ads and their understanding of composite scores. The 2nd study surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,629 individuals from the general population who saw a fictitious DTC print ad and answered closed-ended questions about the same topics. Results showed that knowledge of FDA approval and authority was mixed, with several misconceptions apparent. Many consumers were not familiar with the use of composite scores in a medical context or in advertising and, in the 1st study, expressed distrust of the product and the ad after learning about how composite scores are used. In the 2nd study, receiving composite score information changed the perceived clarity of the ad but not the perceived risk or benefits. Implications for the presentation of complex medical information are discussed. PMID:27414000

  16. Screening of FDA-Approved Drugs for Treatment of Emerging Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Jeanne M; Frieman, Matthew B

    2015-09-11

    The current outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Ebolavirus (EboV) have revealed a gap in the development and availability of drugs to treat these infections. To date, there are no approved treatments for patients infected with MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a virus that continues to infect new patients and that has now spread from the Middle East to Asia. Despite a downward trend in the number of new EboV cases in West Africa, new infections are still occurring, and many patients continue to suffer from this illness. People infected with MERS and Ebola viruses receive only supportive care in hopes of recovery. Investigation into repurposing drugs approved by the FDA is gaining interest. To identify better treatment strategies, several groups have used drug screens to repurpose FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of MERS-CoV and EboV. PMID:27617922

  17. A Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Nicholas J; Campos, Rafael K; Powell, Steven T; Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Schott-Lerner, Geraldine; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; McGrath, Erica L; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Menon, Ramkumar; Saade, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Routh, Andrew; Bradrick, Shelton S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2016-08-10

    Currently there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We interrogated a library of FDA-approved drugs for their ability to block infection of human HuH-7 cells by a newly isolated ZIKV strain (ZIKV MEX_I_7). More than 20 out of 774 tested compounds decreased ZIKV infection in our in vitro screening assay. Selected compounds were further validated for inhibition of ZIKV infection in human cervical, placental, and neural stem cell lines, as well as primary human amnion cells. Established anti-flaviviral drugs (e.g., bortezomib and mycophenolic acid) and others that had no previously known antiviral activity (e.g., daptomycin) were identified as inhibitors of ZIKV infection. Several drugs reduced ZIKV infection across multiple cell types. This study identifies drugs that could be tested in clinical studies of ZIKV infection and provides a resource of small molecules to study ZIKV pathogenesis. PMID:27476412

  18. Recognizing drug targets using evolutionary information: implications for repurposing FDA-approved drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Drug repurposing to explore target space has been gaining pace over the past decade with the upsurge in the use of systematic approaches for computational drug discovery. Such a cost and time-saving approach gains immense importance for pathogens of special interest, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. We report a comprehensive approach to repurpose drugs, based on the exploration of evolutionary relationships inferred from the comparative sequence and structural analyses between targets of FDA-approved drugs and the proteins of M. tuberculosis. This approach has facilitated the identification of several polypharmacological drugs that could potentially target unexploited M. tuberculosis proteins. A total of 130 FDA-approved drugs, originally intended against other diseases, could be repurposed against 78 potential targets in M. tuberculosis. Additionally, we have also made an attempt to augment the chemical space by recognizing compounds structurally similar to FDA-approved drugs. For three of the attractive cases we have investigated the probable binding modes of the drugs in their corresponding M. tuberculosis targets by means of structural modelling. Such prospective targets and small molecules could be prioritized for experimental endeavours, and could significantly influence drug-discovery and drug-development programmes for tuberculosis. PMID:26429199

  19. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch. PMID:27125384

  20. A Systematic Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Biological Threat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Peter B.; Chopra, Sidharth; Manger, Ian D.; Gilfillan, Lynne; Keepers, Tiffany R.; Shurtleff, Amy C.; Green, Carol E.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Dilks, Holli Hutcheson; Davey, Robert A.; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.; Warren, Travis K.; Wells, Jay B.; Moos, Walter H.; Burke, RaeLyn L.; Tanga, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency. Methodology/Principal Findings A large systematic effort to determine whether existing drugs can be used against high containment bacterial and viral pathogens is described. We assembled and screened 1012 FDA-approved drugs for off-label broad-spectrum efficacy against Bacillus anthracis; Francisella tularensis; Coxiella burnetii; and Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fever viruses using in vitro cell culture assays. We found a variety of hits against two or more of these biological threat pathogens, which were validated in secondary assays. As expected, antibiotic compounds were highly active against bacterial agents, but we did not identify any non-antibiotic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Lomefloxacin and erythromycin were found to be the most potent compounds in vivo protecting mice against Bacillus anthracis challenge. While multiple virus-specific inhibitors were identified, the most noteworthy antiviral compound identified was chloroquine, which disrupted entry and replication of two or more viruses in vitro and protected mice against Ebola virus challenge in vivo. Conclusions/Significance The feasibility of repurposing existing drugs to face novel threats is demonstrated and this represents the first effort to apply this approach to high containment bacteria and viruses. PMID:23577127

  1. State-of-the-art in design rules for drug delivery platforms: lessons learned from FDA-approved nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M; Kim, Chloe; Park, Jea Ho; Russell, Luisa M; Lee, Kwan Hyi; Pomper, Martin G; Searson, Peter C

    2014-08-10

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of physiologically imposed design constraints. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery vehicles where these design constraints can be decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing targeting efficiency and efficacy. Here we review the design strategies of the two FDA-approved antibody-drug conjugates (Brentuximab vedotin and Trastuzumab emtansine) and the four FDA-approved nanoparticle-based drug delivery platforms (Doxil, DaunoXome, Marqibo, and Abraxane) in the context of the challenges associated with systemic targeted delivery of a drug to a solid tumor. The lessons learned from these nanomedicines provide an important insight into the key challenges associated with the development of new platforms for systemic delivery of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24874289

  2. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown ‘mitoactives’ represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  3. Pharmacogenomic information in FDA-approved drug labels: Application to pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Green, D J; Mummaneni, P; Kim, I W; Oh, J M; Pacanowski, M; Burckart, G J

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacogenomic (PGx) information is increasingly being incorporated into US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug labels. We reviewed the data source (adults vs. pediatrics) of PGx information in approved drug labels and assessed the suitability of applying adult-derived PGx information and related prescribing recommendations to the care of pediatric patients. We identified 65 drugs with labels containing PGx information and that have also been evaluated in children and found that in the majority of cases (56/65, 86%), the PGx information described was derived from adult studies. The application of PGx information from adults to pediatrics was deemed suitable for 71.4% (n = 40) of the drugs and unclear for 28.6% (n = 16). An ontogeny effect, limited or conflicting data regarding ontogeny of the genetic biomarker, or a difference in the pathophysiology or progression of the adult vs. pediatric disease were the primary reasons for deeming direct application from adults to pediatrics unclear. PMID:26693845

  4. Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells from aminoglycosides and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Vlasits, Anna L.; Simon, Julian A.; Raible, David W.; Rubel, Edwin W; Owens, Kelly N.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of mechanosensory hair cells in the inner ear accounts for many hearing loss and balance disorders. Several beneficial pharmaceutical drugs cause hair cell death as a side effect. These include aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as neomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin, and several cancer chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Discovering new compounds that protect mammalian hair cells from toxic insults is experimentally difficult because of the inaccessibility of the inner ear. We used the zebrafish lateral line sensory system as an in vivo screening platform to survey a library of FDA-approved pharmaceuticals for compounds that protect hair cells from neomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin and cisplatin. Ten compounds were identified that provide protection from at least two of the four toxins. The resulting compounds fall into several drug classes, including serotonin and dopamine-modulating drugs, adrenergic receptor ligands, and estrogen receptor modulators. The protective compounds show different effects against the different toxins, supporting the idea that each toxin causes hair cell death by distinct, but partially overlapping, mechanisms. Furthermore, some compounds from the same drug classes had different protective properties, suggesting that they might not prevent hair cell death by their known target mechanisms. Some protective compounds blocked gentamicin uptake into hair cells, suggesting that they may block mechanotransduction or other routes of entry. The protective compounds identified in our screen will provide a starting point for studies in mammals as well as further research discovering the cellular signaling pathways that trigger hair cell death. PMID:22967486

  5. Repackaging FDA-approved drugs for degenerative diseases: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Zhong, Kate

    2014-03-01

    Repurposing refers to the therapeutic use of a drug or drug candidate for a disease other than that for which it was originally intended. Repurposing is attractive as a drug development strategy since much is known about approved agents including their drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic features, dosing, safety, tolerability, formulation and manufacturing. Time savings are also robust accounting for several years of the drug development cycle. Tissue and cell-based assays, epidemiologic information and human studies identify approved drugs that might be repurposed from use in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The total number of compounds available for repurposing that are brain-penetrant is relatively small. Intellectual property and patent protection issues for repurposed drugs are hurdles for this approach to drug development. Repurposing may contribute importantly to development of new therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24502586

  6. Identification of Novel Activators of Constitutive Androstane Receptor from FDA-approved Drugs by Integrated Computational and Biological Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Xia, Menghang; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a xenobiotic sensor governing the transcription of numerous hepatic genes associated with drug metabolism and clearance. Recent evidence suggests that CAR also modulates energy homeostasis and cancer development. Thus, identification of novel human (h) CAR activators is of both clinical importance and scientific interest. Methods Docking and ligand-based structure-activity models were used for virtual screening of a database containing over 2000 FDA-approved drugs. Identified lead compounds were evaluated in cell-based reporter assays to determine hCAR activation. Potential activators were further tested in human primary hepatocytes (HPHs) for the expression of the prototypical hCAR target gene CYP2B6. Results Nineteen lead compounds with optimal modeling parameters were selected for biological evaluation. Seven of the 19 leads exhibited moderate to potent activation of hCAR. Five out of the seven compounds translocated hCAR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of HPHs in a concentration-dependent manner. These compounds also induce the expression of CYP2B6 in HPHs with rank-order of efficacies closely resembling that of hCAR activation. Conclusion These results indicate that our strategically integrated approaches are effective in the identification of novel hCAR modulators, which may function as valuable research tools or potential therapeutic molecules. PMID:23090669

  7. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  8. Is It Really FDA Approved?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and implantable infusion pumps, require FDA approval before marketing. To receive FDA approval for these devices, the ... and many types of catheters) are cleared for marketing based on an FDA determination that they are ...

  9. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics. PMID:26155740

  10. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions. PMID:25771206

  11. A high-throughput chemical screen with FDA approved drugs reveals that the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone impairs cancer cell survival by inhibiting homology directed repair

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Or David; Kalousi, Alkmini; Eini, Lital; Fisher, Benoit; Weiss, Amelie; Darr, Jonatan; Mazina, Olga; Bramson, Shay; Kupiec, Martin; Eden, Amir; Meshorer, Eran; Mazin, Alexander V.; Brino, Laurent; Goldberg, Michal; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining or homology directed repair (HDR). Identifying novel small molecules that affect HDR is of great importance both for research use and therapy. Molecules that elevate HDR may improve gene targeting whereas inhibiting molecules can be used for chemotherapy, since some of the cancers are more sensitive to repair impairment. Here, we performed a high-throughput chemical screen for FDA approved drugs, which affect HDR in cancer cells. We found that HDR frequencies are increased by retinoic acid and Idoxuridine and reduced by the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone. We further revealed that Spironolactone impairs Rad51 foci formation, sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents, to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and cross-linking agents and inhibits tumor growth in xenografts, in mice. This study suggests Spironolactone as a new candidate for chemotherapy. PMID:24682826

  12. FDA Approval for Imiquimod

    Cancer.gov

    On July 15, 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of a new indication for Aldara® (imiquimod) topical cream for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), a type of skin cancer.

  13. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... and acronyms) Brand Name FDA Approval Date Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV ... AZT, ZDV) Retrovir March 19, 1987 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and later alter reverse ...

  14. Off-label or out of bounds? Prescriber and marketer liability for unapproved uses of FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, James; Dalal, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Professor O'Reilly's study of recent drug review legislation applies a historical and holistic view of promotion practices for unapproved uses of prescription drugs. He faults Congress for moving public health protections away from a strictly protective mode and toward assistance to drug marketers. He argues that the adverse health consequences of "off-label" promotion of drugs are not well understood, and that the 1997 amendments deserved the public health interest while expanding pharmaceutical company profits. PMID:12856461

  15. FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159362.html FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device Surgically implanted port allows obese patients to ... have been unable to lose weight and maintain weight loss using nonsurgical treatments. The FDA approval is for ...

  16. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-05-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  17. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C

    PubMed Central

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S. Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J.; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  18. Target selection for FDA-approved medicines.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Hoyer, Denton; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The biopharmaceutical industry translates fundamental understanding of disease into new medicines. As part of a comprehensive analysis of FDA-approved new molecular entities (NMEs), we assessed the mechanistic basis of drug efficacy, with emphasis on target selection. Three target families capture almost half of all NMEs and the leading ten families capture more than three-quarters of NME approvals. Target families were related to their clinical application and identify dynamic trends in targeting over time. These data suggest increasing attention toward novel target families, which presumably reflects increased understanding of disease etiology. We also suggest the need to balance the ongoing emphasis on target-based drug discovery with phenotypic approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25462532

  19. Assessment of foetal risk associated with 93 non-US-FDA approved medications during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-jedai, Ahmed H.; Balhareth, Sakra S.; Algain, Roaa A.

    2012-01-01

    Health care practitioners utilize the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) pregnancy categorization (A, B, C, D, X) for making decision on the appropriateness of certain medications during pregnancy. Many non US-FDA approved medications are registered and marketed in Saudi Arabia. However, these medications do not have an assigned pregnancy risk categorization like those approved in the US. The objective of this review is to evaluate, report, and categorize the foetal risk associated with non-US-FDA approved medications registered by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (S-FDA) according to the US-FDA pregnancy risk categorization system. We identified 109 non-US-FDA approved medications in the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) as of October 2007. We searched for data on functional or anatomical birth defects or embryocidal-associated risk using different databases and references. An algorithm for risk assessment was used to determine a pregnancy risk category for each medication. Out of 93 eligible medications, 73% were assigned category risk C, 10 medications (11%) were assigned category risk D, and 12 medications (13%) were assigned category risk B. Only three medications were judged to be safe during pregnancy based on the available evidence and were assigned category risk A. Inconsistencies in defining and reporting the foetal risk category among different drug regulatory authorities could create confusion and affect prescribing. We believe that standardization and inclusion of this information in the medication package insert is extremely important to all health care practitioners. PMID:23960803

  20. Insight into drug resistance mechanisms and discovery of potential inhibitors against wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK from FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Hao; Bao, Jinku

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays a crucial role in multiple malignant cancers. It is known as a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-dependent cancers. Even though substantial efforts have been made to develop ALK inhibitors, only crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary mutations with drug-resistance bring up difficulties to develop effective drugs for ALK-positive cancers. To give a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism underlying inhibitor response to ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, we established an accurate assessment for the extensive profile of drug against ALK mutations by means of computational approaches. The molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to calculate relative binding free energies for receptor-drug systems. In addition, the structure-based virtual screening was utilized to screen effective inhibitors targeting wild-type ALK and the gatekeeper mutation L1196M from 3180 approved drugs. Finally, the mechanism of drug resistance was discussed, several novel potential wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK inhibitors were successfully identified. PMID:27585676

  1. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing ... 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin ...

  2. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to ... 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small ...

  3. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to improve focus ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small print and nearby objects ...

  4. FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159721.html FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent Device is absorbed by the body after about ... July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has ...

  5. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets. PMID:26556207

  6. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets. PMID:26556207

  7. Comparison of FDA Approved Kinase Targets to Clinical Trial Ones: Insights from Their System Profiles and Drug-Target Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyu; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Hong; Li, Yinghong; Yu, Chunyan; Tian, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Kinase is one of the most productive classes of established targets, but the majority of approved drugs against kinase were developed only for cancer. Intensive efforts were therefore exerted for releasing its therapeutic potential by discovering new therapeutic area. Kinases in clinical trial could provide great opportunities for treating various diseases. However, no systematic comparison between system profiles of established targets and those of clinical trial ones was conducted. The reveal of probable difference or shift of trend would help to identify key factors defining druggability of established targets. In this study, a comparative analysis of system profiles of both types of targets was conducted. Consequently, the systems profiles of the majority of clinical trial kinases were identified to be very similar to those of established ones, but percentages of established targets obeying the system profiles appeared to be slightly but consistently higher than those of clinical trial targets. Moreover, a shift of trend in the system profiles from the clinical trial to the established targets was identified, and popular kinase targets were discovered. In sum, this comparative study may help to facilitate the identification of the druggability of established drug targets by their system profiles and drug-target interaction networks. PMID:27547755

  8. FDA Approval Summary: Ramucirumab for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Casak, Sandra J; Fashoyin-Aje, Ibilola; Lemery, Steven J; Zhang, Lillian; Jin, Runyan; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Dougherty, Michele; Novak, Rachel; Kennett, Sarah; Khasar, Sachia; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The FDA approved ramucirumab (CYRAMZA; Eli Lilly and Company) for previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma initially as monotherapy (April 21, 2014) and subsequently as combination therapy with paclitaxel (November 5, 2014). In the monotherapy trial, 355 patients in the indicated population were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. In the combination trial, 665 patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks, in combination with paclitaxel, 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of 28-day cycles. Overall survival (OS) was increased in patients who received ramucirumab in both the monotherapy [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.998; log rank P = 0.047] and combination trials (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.96; P = 0.017). The most common adverse reactions were hypertension and diarrhea in the monotherapy trial and fatigue, neutropenia, diarrhea, and epistaxis in the combination trial. Because of concerns about the robustness of the monotherapy trial results, FDA approved the original application after receiving the results of the combination trial confirming the OS effect. Based on exploratory exposure-response analyses, there is residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of ramucirumab. PMID:26048277

  9. Hospital Providers: The Day After FDA Approval

    PubMed Central

    DeKoven, Mitchell; McCagh, Brian; Zoch, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals have a lot at stake when new biologic drugs and devices hit the market. Cooperation among medical and administrative leaders can help providers avoid some harrowing financial pitfalls – while improving patient satisfaction. PMID:23393477

  10. Ultraviolet light-an FDA approved technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet Light (254 nm) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nonthermal intervention technology that can be used for decontamination of food and food contact surfaces. Ultraviolet light is a green technology that leaves no chemical residues. Results from our laboratory indicate that ex...

  11. FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations But agency still asks those who've possibly ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental test to check blood donations for the Zika virus has been approved by ...

  12. Review of non-FDA-approved fillers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David A F; Segall, Lorne

    2007-05-01

    The number of commercially available injectable soft tissue fillers has increased dramatically worldwide over the past decade. In the United States, a variety of temporary non-collagen-based fillers have been approved. However, no permanent soft tissue injectable fillers are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This article discusses some of the more popular soft tissue fillers, such as Restylane Fine Line, Restylane SQ, Perlane, Artecoll, Dermalive, Dermadeep, Bioalcamid, Bioplastique, Evolution, Outline, Argiform, and Aquamid, which are all available outside of the United States. PMID:17544940

  13. Generation of Recombinant Arenavirus for Vaccine Development in FDA-Approved Vero Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of arenavirus reverse genetics represents a significant breakthrough in the arenavirus field 4. The use of cell-based arenavirus minigenome systems together with the ability to generate recombinant infectious arenaviruses with predetermined mutations in their genomes has facilitated the investigation of the contribution of viral determinants to the different steps of the arenavirus life cycle, as well as virus-host interactions and mechanisms of arenavirus pathogenesis 1, 3, 11 . In addition, the development of trisegmented arenaviruses has permitted the use of the arenavirus genome to express additional foreign genes of interest, thus opening the possibility of arenavirus-based vaccine vector applications 5 . Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious arenaviruses capable of expressing reporter genes provides a new experimental tool to improve the safety of research involving highly pathogenic human arenaviruses 16 . The generation of recombinant arenaviruses using plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques has so far relied on the use of rodent cell lines 7,19 , which poses some barriers for the development of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccine or vaccine vectors. To overcome this obstacle, we describe here the efficient generation of recombinant arenaviruses in FDA-approved Vero cells. PMID:23928556

  14. Annual update: drugs, diagnostics and devices.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, Candace; Kupecz, Deborah

    2003-03-01

    As NPs continue to play an important role in health care as administers of prescriptions, the value of reviewing the latest Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for new drugs and devices is immeasurable. In 2002, the FDA approved several new drugs and devices, as well as monitored previously approved drugs for adverse reactions and untoward events. This article provides a brief review of relevant primary care topics. PMID:12800693

  15. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud ES

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV), a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, “loop docking” – an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach – followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =−9.2 kcal/mol) when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 μM). Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =−9.0, −8.6, and −8.5 kcal/mol, respectively). Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602) played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding mechanism of the FDA-approved HIV PIs binding to human Hsp90. Information gained from this study should also provide a route map toward the design, optimization, and further experimental investigation of

  16. Lectin approaches for glycoproteomics in FDA-approved cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; Alsadek, Dina M M; Darwish, Ashraf A; Elsayed, Abdelaleim I; Bekmanov, Bakhytzhan O; Khussainova, Elmira M; Zhang, Xueji; Cho, William C S; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-04-01

    The nine FDA-approved protein biomarkers for the diagnosis and management of cancer are approaching maturity, but their different glycosylation compositions relevant to early diagnosis still remain practically unexplored at the sub-glycoproteome scale. Lectins generally exhibit strong binding to specific sub-glycoproteome components and this property has been quite poorly addressed as the basis for the early diagnosis methods. Here, we discuss some glycoproteome issues that make tackling the glycoproteome particularly challenging in the cancer biomarkers field and include a brief view for next generation technologies. PMID:24611567

  17. Nanoparticle-Based Medicines: A Review of FDA-Approved Materials and Clinical Trials to Date.

    PubMed

    Bobo, Daniel; Robinson, Kye J; Islam, Jiaul; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we provide an up to date snapshot of nanomedicines either currently approved by the US FDA, or in the FDA clinical trials process. We define nanomedicines as therapeutic or imaging agents which comprise a nanoparticle in order to control the biodistribution, enhance the efficacy, or otherwise reduce toxicity of a drug or biologic. We identified 51 FDA-approved nanomedicines that met this definition and 77 products in clinical trials, with ~40% of trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov started in 2014 or 2015. While FDA approved materials are heavily weighted to polymeric, liposomal, and nanocrystal formulations, there is a trend towards the development of more complex materials comprising micelles, protein-based NPs, and also the emergence of a variety of inorganic and metallic particles in clinical trials. We then provide an overview of the different material categories represented in our search, highlighting nanomedicines that have either been recently approved, or are already in clinical trials. We conclude with some comments on future perspectives for nanomedicines, which we expect to include more actively-targeted materials, multi-functional materials ("theranostics") and more complicated materials that blur the boundaries of traditional material categories. A key challenge for researchers, industry, and regulators is how to classify new materials and what additional testing (e.g. safety and toxicity) is required before products become available. PMID:27299311

  18. Catching Up on New Medications: New FDA Approvals.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2016-01-01

    Despite all efforts of the Federal Drug Administration to release timely and accurate information about new drug approvals, marketing and media announcements about new drugs may be incomplete, misinterpreted, or misunderstood. Informed and knowledgeable nurses are able to educate patients about new medications: they can clarify misunderstandings or misconceptions and significantly reduce the potential for harm. In this article, selected examples of new brand name drugs and first-time generics approved this year are discussed. PMID:26814007

  19. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoma whose disease has worsened during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy, or within 12 months of receiving platinum-containing chemotherapy, either before or after surgery. Urothelial ...

  20. First FDA approval of dual anti-HER2 regimen: pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Gideon M; Scher, Nancy S; Cortazar, Patricia; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Ringgold, Kimberly; Pilaro, Anne M; Tilley, Amy; King, Kathryn E; Graham, Laurie; Rellahan, Barbara L; Weinberg, Wendy C; Chi, Bo; Thomas, Colleen; Hughes, Patricia; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-09-15

    On June 8, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pertuzumab (Perjeta, Genentech) for use in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech) and docetaxel for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who have not received prior anti-HER2 therapy or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Approval was based on the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 808 patients with HER2-positive MBC. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive pertuzumab (n = 402) or placebo (n = 406) in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) and a key secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A statistically significant improvement in PFS (difference in medians of 6.1 months) was observed in patients receiving pertuzumab [HR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.51-0.75; P < 0.0001]. A planned interim analysis suggested an improvement in OS (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.47-0.88; P = 0.0053) but the HR and P value did not cross the stopping boundary. Common adverse reactions (>30%) observed in patients on the pertuzumab arm included diarrhea, alopecia, neutropenia, nausea, fatigue, rash, and peripheral neuropathy. No additive cardiac toxicity was observed. Significant manufacturing issues were identified during the review. On the basis of substantial evidence of efficacy for pertuzumab in MBC and the compelling public health need, FDA did not delay availability to patients pending final resolution of all manufacturing concerns. Therefore, FDA approved pertuzumab but limited its approval to lots not affected by manufacturing problems. The applicant agreed to multiple manufacturing and testing postmarketing commitments under third-party oversight to resolve manufacturing issues. PMID:23801166

  1. Activity Profile of an FDA-Approved Compound Library against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan; Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background As plans to expand mass drug treatment campaigns to fight schistosomiasis form, worries about reliance on praziquantel as the sole available treatment motivate the investigation for novel antischistosomal compounds. Drug repurposing might be an inexpensive and effective source of novel antischistosomal leads. Methodology 1600 FDA approved compounds were first assayed against Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula at a concentration of 10 µM. Active compounds identified from this screen were advanced to the adult worm screen at 33.33 µM, followed by hit characterization. Leads with complementary pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles were then selected for in vivo studies. Principal Findings The in vitro screen identified 121 and 36 compounds active against the schistosomula and adult stage, respectively. Further, in vitro characterization and comparison with already available pharmacokinetic and toxicity data identified 11 in vivo candidates. Doramectin (10 mg/kg) and clofazimine (400 mg/kg) were found to be active in vivo with worm burden reductions of 60.1% and 82.7%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here expands the knowledge of antischistosomal properties of already approved compounds and underscores variations observed between target-based and phenotypic approaches and among laboratories. The two in vivo-active drugs identified in this study, doramectin and clofazimine are widely available and present as novel drug classes as starting points for further investigation. PMID:26230921

  2. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  3. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  4. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  5. Impact of a US Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety Communication on Zolpidem Dosing: An Observational Retrospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harward, Jonathan L.; Clinard, Valerie B.; Jiroutek, Michael R.; Lingerfeldt, Beverly H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction/background: Zolpidem is a sedative-hypnotic widely prescribed in the United States. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a drug safety communication regarding its dosing in women. Objective: To compare compliance with FDA-approved dosing for zolpidem in women before and after a drug safety communication, and to evaluate compliance based on pharmacy location and prescriber type. Method: This was a retrospective, observational cohort study. New prescriptions for Ambien, Ambien CR, Edluar, or Zolpimist or their respective generics dispensed from Kerr Drug pharmacies in North Carolina to women 18–64 years of age between April and September of 2012 (“before” cohort) or April and September of 2013 (“after” cohort) were included. χ2 tests were conducted to assess overall compliance, as well as compliance based on location (urban or rural) and prescriber type (physician or midlevel), with FDA-approved dosing for zolpidem. Trends in total prescription volume and total zolpidem prescription volume for all Kerr Drug pharmacies over the study period were also described. Results: A total of 14,156 prescriptions for zolpidem were included in the primary analysis. Sixteen percent of prescriptions dispensed were in compliance with FDA recommendations following the FDA alert. A statistically significant increase was observed in compliance with FDA-approved dosing for zolpidem (odds ratio = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.35–1.65; P < .0001) postdrug safety communication. Significant increases in compliance were also observed in the post-FDA communication subgroups based on location and prescriber type, though no subgroup was found to be significantly more compliant than another. Conclusions: The release of a drug safety communication by the FDA resulted in a statistically significant increase in proper dosing of zolpidem in women. Further research is needed in order to determine the impact of FDA alerts on prescribing patterns and the reasons for

  6. FDA Approval Summary: Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Whose Tumors Express Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On October 2, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval for pembrolizumab, a breakthrough therapy-designated drug, for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), as determined by an FDA-approved test, and who have disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy or targeted therapy against anaplastic lymphoma kinase or epidermal growth factor receptor, if appropriate. This indication was approved concurrently with the PD-L1 immunohistochemistry 22C3 pharmDx, a companion diagnostic test for patient selection based on PD-L1 tumor expression. The accelerated approval was granted based on durable objective response rate (ORR) and an acceptable toxicity profile demonstrated in a multicenter, open-label trial enrolling 550 patients with metastatic NSCLC. The efficacy population comprised 61 patients with tumors identified as strongly positive for PD-L1, and the confirmed ORR as determined by blinded independent central review was 41% (95% confidence interval: 28.6%, 54.3%); all were partial responses. At the time of the analysis, responses were ongoing in 21 of 25 patients (84%), with 11 patients (44%) having response duration of ≥6 months. The most commonly occurring (≥20%) adverse reactions included fatigue, decreased appetite, dyspnea, and cough. The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse drug reactions were pleural effusion, pneumonia, dyspnea, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonitis. Immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred in 13% of patients and included pneumonitis, colitis, hypophysitis, and thyroid disorders. The accelerated approval regulations describe approval of drugs and biologic products for serious and life-threatening illnesses based on a surrogate endpoint likely to predict clinical benefit. Under these regulations, a confirmatory trial or trials is required to verify and describe the benefit of pembrolizumab

  7. Flubendazole, FDA-approved anthelmintic, targets breast cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fei; Cui, Bai; Wu, Si-Jin; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Long, Zi-Jie; Wang, Xue-Ting; Li, Guo-Hui; Wan, Xian-Yao; Yang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cell (CS-like cell) is considered to be responsible for recurrence and drug resistance events in breast cancer, which makes it a potential target for novel cancer therapeutic strategy. The FDA approved flubendazole, has been widely used in the treatment of intestinal parasites. Here, we demonstrated a novel effect of flubendazole on breast CS-like cells. Flubendazole inhibited breast cancer cells proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and delayed tumor growth in xenograft models by intraperitoneal injection. Importantly, flubendazole reduced CD44high/CD24low subpopulation and suppressed the formation of mammosphere and the expression of self-renewal related genes including c-myc, oct4, sox2, nanog and cyclinD1. Moreover, we found that flubendazole induced cell differentiation and inhibited cell migration. Consistently, flubendazole reduced mesenchymal markers (β-catenin, N-cadherin and Vimentin) expression and induced epithelial and differentiation marker (Keratin 18) expression in breast cancer cells. Mechanism study revealed that flubendazole arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced monopolar spindle formation through inhibiting tubulin polymerization. Furthermore, flubendazole enhanced cytotoxic activity of conventional therapeutic drugs fluorouracil and doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In conclusion, our findings uncovered a remarkable effect of flubendazole on suppressing breast CS-like cells, indicating a novel utilization of flubendazole in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25811972

  8. Flubendazole, FDA-approved anthelmintic, targets breast cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhi-Jie; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Fei; Cui, Bai; Wu, Si-Jin; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Long, Zi-Jie; Wang, Xue-Ting; Li, Guo-Hui; Wan, Xian-Yao; Yang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Quentin

    2015-03-20

    Cancer stem-like cell (CS-like cell) is considered to be responsible for recurrence and drug resistance events in breast cancer, which makes it a potential target for novel cancer therapeutic strategy. The FDA approved flubendazole, has been widely used in the treatment of intestinal parasites. Here, we demonstrated a novel effect of flubendazole on breast CS-like cells. Flubendazole inhibited breast cancer cells proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and delayed tumor growth in xenograft models by intraperitoneal injection. Importantly, flubendazole reduced CD44high/CD24low subpopulation and suppressed the formation of mammosphere and the expression of self-renewal related genes including c-myc, oct4, sox2, nanog and cyclinD1. Moreover, we found that flubendazole induced cell differentiation and inhibited cell migration. Consistently, flubendazole reduced mesenchymal markers (β-catenin, N-cadherin and Vimentin) expression and induced epithelial and differentiation marker (Keratin 18) expression in breast cancer cells. Mechanism study revealed that flubendazole arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced monopolar spindle formation through inhibiting tubulin polymerization. Furthermore, flubendazole enhanced cytotoxic activity of conventional therapeutic drugs fluorouracil and doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In conclusion, our findings uncovered a remarkable effect of flubendazole on suppressing breast CS-like cells, indicating a novel utilization of flubendazole in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25811972

  9. 21 CFR 314.153 - Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application. 314.153 Section 314.153 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG...

  10. 21 CFR 314.162 - Removal of a drug product from the list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of a drug product from the list. 314.162 Section 314.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on...

  11. 21 CFR 314.170 - Adulteration and misbranding of an approved drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adulteration and misbranding of an approved drug. 314.170 Section 314.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications...

  12. 21 CFR 314.153 - Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application. 314.153 Section 314.153 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG...

  13. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  14. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  15. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  16. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  17. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Romaine, Patricia L P; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA. PMID:25905522

  18. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA. PMID:25905522

  19. FDA Approval of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices via Original and Supplement Premarket Approval Pathways, 1979-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rome, Benjamin N.; Kramer, Daniel B.; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) evaluates high-risk medical devices such as cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, via the premarket approval (PMA) process, during which manufacturers submit clinical data demonstrating safety and effectiveness. Subsequent changes to approved high-risk devices are implemented via “supplements,” which may not require additional clinical testing. OBJECTIVE To characterize the prevalence and characteristics of changes to CIEDs made through the PMA supplement process. DESIGN Using the FDA’s PMA database, we reviewed all CIEDs approved as original PMAs or supplements from 1979 through 2012. For each supplement, we collected the date approved, type of supplement (panel-track, 180-day, real-time, special, and 30-day notice), and the nature of the changes. We calculated the number of supplements approved per PMA and analyzed trends relating to different supplement regulatory categories overtime. For supplements approved via the 180-day regulatory pathway, which often involve significant design changes, from 2010-2012, we identified how often additional clinical data were collected. RESULTS From 1979-2012, the FDA approved 77 original and 5829 supplement PMA applications for CIEDs, with a median of 50 supplements per original PMA (interquartile range [IQR], 23-87). Excluding manufacturing changes that do not alter device design, the number of supplements approved each year was stable around a mean (SD) of 2.6 (0.9) supplements per PMA per year. Premarket approvals remained active via successive supplements over a median period of 15 years (IQR, 8-20), and 79% of the 77 original PMAs approved during our study period were the subject of at least 1 supplement in 2012. Thirty-seven percent of approved supplements involved a change to the device’s design. Among 180-day supplements approved from 2010

  20. Analysis of FDA-Approved Anti-Cancer Agents in the NCI60 Panel of Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, Susan L.; Collins, Jerry M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990's the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anti-cancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here results of screening current FDA-approved anti-cancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We have analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we have also performed hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anti-cancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP web site (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anti-cancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use. PMID:20442306

  1. Inhibition of Mycoplasma pneumoniae growth by FDA-approved anticancer and antiviral nucleoside and nucleobase analogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) is a human pathogen that causes acute and chronic respiratory diseases and has been linked to many extrapulmonary diseases. Due to the lack of cell wall, Mpn is resistant to antibiotics targeting cell wall synthesis such as penicillin. During the last 10 years macrolide-resistant Mpn strains have been frequently reported in Asian countries and have been spreading to Europe and the United States. Therefore, new antibiotics are needed. In this study, 30 FDA-approved anticancer or antiviral drugs were screened for inhibitory effects on Mpn growth and selected analogs were further characterized by inhibition of target enzymes and metabolism of radiolabeled substrates. Results Sixteen drugs showed varying inhibitory effects and seven showed strong inhibition of Mpn growth. The anticancer drug 6-thioguanine had a MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration required to cause 90% of growth inhibition) value of 0.20 μg ml-1, whereas trifluorothymidine, gemcitabine and dipyridamole had MIC values of approximately 2 μg ml-1. In wild type Mpn culture the presence of 6-thioguanine and dipyridamole strongly inhibited the uptake and metabolism of hypoxanthine and guanine while gemcitabine inhibited the uptake and metabolism of all nucleobases and thymidine. Trifluorothymidine and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, however, stimulated the uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled thymidine and this stimulation was due to induction of thymidine kinase activity. Furthermore, Mpn hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) was cloned, expressed, and characterized. The 6-thioguanine, but not other purine analogs, strongly inhibited HPRT, which may in part explain the observed growth inhibition. Trifluorothymidine and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine were shown to be good substrates and inhibitors for thymidine kinase from human and Mycoplasma sources. Conclusion We have shown that several anticancer and antiviral nucleoside and nucleobase analogs are potent

  2. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M.; Eddings, Wesley; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved (“off-label”) uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs). We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children. Methods Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003–2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone. Results During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications). Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63). Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79). Conclusions The FDA’s sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency’s expert judgments to clinical practice. PMID:27032095

  3. Retinal Neuroprotective Effects of Flibanserin, an FDA-Approved Dual Serotonin Receptor Agonist-Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, Renee C.; Ku, Cristy A.; Fischer, Cody M.; Patel, Rachel C.; Datta, Shreya; Yang, Paul; Wen, Yuquan; Hen, René; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the neuroprotective effects of flibanserin (formerly BIMT-17), a dual 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT2A antagonist, in a light-induced retinopathy model. Methods Albino BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or increasing doses of flibanserin ranging from 0.75 to 15 mg/kg flibanserin. To assess 5-HT1A-mediated effects, BALB/c mice were injected with 10 mg/kg WAY 100635, a 5-HT1A antagonist, prior to 6 mg/kg flibanserin and 5-HT1A knockout mice were injected with 6 mg/kg flibanserin. Injections were administered once immediately prior to light exposure or over the course of five days. Light exposure lasted for one hour at an intensity of 10,000 lux. Retinal structure was assessed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and retinal function was assessed using electroretinography. To investigate the mechanisms of flibanserin-mediated neuroprotection, gene expression, measured by RT-qPCR, was assessed following five days of daily 15 mg/kg flibanserin injections. Results A five-day treatment regimen of 3 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin significantly preserved outer retinal structure and function in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a single-day treatment regimen of 6 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin still provided significant protection. The action of flibanserin was hindered by the 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635, and was not effective in 5-HT1A knockout mice. Creb, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bcl-2, Cast1, Nqo1, Sod1, and Cat were significantly increased in flibanserin-injected mice versus vehicle-injected mice. Conclusions Intraperitoneal delivery of flibanserin in a light-induced retinopathy mouse model provides retinal neuroprotection. Mechanistic data suggests that this effect is mediated through 5-HT1A receptors and that flibanserin augments the expression of genes capable of reducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Since flibanserin is already FDA-approved for other indications, the potential to repurpose this drug for

  4. Anti-Obesity Agents and the US Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Casey, Martin F; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing market for obesity care, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved only two new pharmaceutical agents-lorcaserin and combination phentermine/topiramate-for weight reduction since 2000, while removing three agents from the market in the same time period. This article explores the FDA's history and role in the approval of anti-obesity medications within the context of a public health model of obesity. Through the review of obesity literature and FDA approval documents, we identified two major barriers preventing fair evaluation of anti-obesity agents including: (1) methodological pitfalls in clinical trials and (2) misaligned values in the assessment of anti-obesity agents. Specific recommendations include the use of adaptive (Bayesian) design protocols, value-based analyses of risks and benefits, and regulatory guidance based on a comprehensive, multi-platform obesity disease model. Positively addressing barriers in the FDA approval process of anti-obesity agents may have many beneficial effects within an obesity disease model. PMID:26626768

  5. Preclinical Reversal of Atherosclerosis by FDA-Approved Compound that Transforms Cholesterol into an Anti-Inflammatory "Prodrug".

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-06-01

    Although atherosclerosis is treatable with lipid-lowering drugs, not all patients respond. Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) is an FDA-approved compound for solubilizing, capturing, and delivering lipophilic drugs in humans. Zimmer et al. report that CD mediates regression of atherosclerotic plaques in two mouse models by solubilizing cholesterol crystals (CCs), and promoting metabolism of CCs into water-soluble 27-hydroxycholesterol, which, in turn, activates anti-inflammatory LXR receptor target genes, promotes active and passive efflux of cholesterol from macrophages, and increases metabolic processing of cholesterol. In effect, CD inverts the role of its cargo, cholesterol, from inflammatory to anti-inflammatory by converting cholesterol into a "prodrug" that when modified to 27-hydroxycholesterol reduces atherosclerosis. This mechanism defines a new class of pharmaceuticals, "inverters": compounds that cause innate biomolecules to act opposite to their normal function. However, chronic CD treatment in animal models damages auditory cells, which must be addressed before CD can be developed as a systemic drug for atherosclerosis. PMID:27241174

  6. Identification of the inhibitory mechanism of FDA approved selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: an insight from molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiwei; Wang, Panpan; Li, Bo; Li, Yinghong; Xu, Xiaofei; Yang, Fengyuan; Yao, Xiaojun; Chen, Yu Zong; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-28

    Antidepressants selectively inhibiting serotonin reuptake (SSRIs) represent a highly effective drug class, and novel therapeutic strategies were proposed to improve SSRIs' drug efficacy. The knowledge of the inhibitory mechanism of FDA approved SSRIs could provide great insights and act as important starting points to discover privileged drug scaffolds with improved efficacy. However, the structure of human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is yet to be determined and the inhibitory mechanism underlying SSRIs still needs to be further explored. In this study, the inhibitory mechanism of 4 approved SSRIs treating major depression (fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and escitalopram) was identified by integrating multiple computational methods. Firstly, a recently published template with high sequence identity was adopted for the first time to generate hSERT's homology model. Then, docking poses of 4 SSRIs were used as the initial conformation for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation followed by MM/GBSA binding free energy calculation and per-residue free energy decomposition. Finally, the binding mode shared by the 4 studied SSRIs was identified by hierarchically clustering per-residue free energies. The identified binding mode was composed of collective interactions between 3 chemical groups in SSRIs and 11 hot spot residues in hSERT. 6 out of these 11 were validated by previous mutagenesis studies or pharmacophore models, and the remaining 5 (Ala169, Ala173, Thr439, Gly442 and Leu443) found in this work were not yet been identified as common determinants of all the 4 studied SSRIs in binding hSERT. Moreover, changes in SSRIs' binding induced by mutation on hot spot residues were further explored, and 3 mechanisms underlining their drug sensitivity were summarized. In summary, the identified binding mode provided important insights into the inhibitory mechanism of approved SSRIs treating major depression, which could be further utilized as a framework for assessing and

  7. The Orphan Drug Act: Restoring the Mission to Rare Diseases.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Michael G; Pawlik, Timothy M; Fader, Amanda N; Esnaola, Nestor F; Makary, Martin A

    2016-04-01

    The Orphan Drug Act has fostered drug development for patients with rare cancers and other diseases; however, current data suggest that companies are gaming the system to use the law for mainstream drugs. We identify a pattern of pharmaceutical companies submitting drugs to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as orphan drugs but once approved, the drugs are used broadly off-label with the lucrative orphan drug protections and exclusivity benefits. Since the law was passed, the proportion of new FDA-approved drugs that were submitted as orphan drugs has increased with a peak last year of 41% of all FDA-approved drugs approved as orphan drugs. On the basis of the current data, we suggest that patients with rare cancers and other diseases may suffer due to dilution of the incentives and benefits. We propose reform to increase submission scrutiny, decrease benefits based on off-label use, and increase price transparency. PMID:26580246

  8. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for infectious disease: HIV/AIDS drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Patridge, Eric

    2014-10-01

    HIV/AIDS is one of the worst pandemics in history. According to the World Health Organization, 26 million people have died since 1981 - 1.6 million in 2012 alone. The dramatic rise in HIV/AIDS mobilized a swift and impressive coordination among governmental, academic and private sector organizations to identify the virus and develop new treatments. Herein, we assess the arsenal of 28 new molecular entities (NMEs) targeting HIV/AIDS. These data demonstrate that the first approval of zidovudine presaged an expansion of the antiviral repertoire over the following years. Whereas the rate of HIV/AIDS NMEs is rapidly declining, so is the number of organizations developing NMEs. We speculate that decisions to abandon further research reflect, in part, growing costs and time required for development. PMID:24880109

  9. 78 FR 24425 - Assay Migration Studies for In Vitro Diagnostic Devices; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Assay Migration Studies for In Vitro Diagnostic Devices.'' This guidance presents a least burdensome regulatory approach to gain FDA approval of Class III or certain licensed in vitro diagnostic devices in cases when a previously approved assay is migrating (i.e., transitioning) to a new system for......

  10. Can We Repurpose FDA-Approved Alefacept to Diminish the HIV Reservoir?

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Asifa; Meng, Qinglai; Popkin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Current anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV is effective in maintaining HIV at undetectable levels. However, cessation of ART results in immediate and brisk rebound of viremia to high levels. This rebound is driven by an HIV reservoir mainly enriched in memory CD4+ T cells. In order to provide any form of functional HIV Cure, elimination of this viral reservoir has become the focus of current HIV cure strategies. Alefacept was initially developed for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. Alefacept is a chimeric fusion protein consisting of the CD2-binding portion of human leukocyte function antigen-3 (LFA3) linked to the Fc region of human IgG1 (LFA3-Fc). Alefacept was designed to inhibit memory T cell activation that contributes to the chronic autoimmune disease psoriasis by blocking the CD2 coreceptor. However, it was found to deplete memory T cells that express high levels of CD2 via NK cell-mediated antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. Phase II and phase III clinical trials of alefacept with psoriasis patients demonstrated promising results and an excellent safety profile. Subsequently, alefacept has been successfully repurposed for other memory T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases including skin diseases other than psoriasis, organ transplantation and type I diabetes (T1D). Herein, we review our specific strategy to repurpose the FDA approved biologic alefacept to decrease and hopefully someday eliminate the HIV reservoir, for which CD2hi memory CD4+ T cells are a significant contributor. PMID:27110598

  11. Translation of proteomic biomarkers into FDA approved cancer diagnostics: issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made over the past few decades to discover novel cancer biomarkers for use in clinical practice. However, a striking discrepancy exists between the effort directed toward biomarker discovery and the number of markers that make it into clinical practice. One of the confounding issues in translating a novel discovery into clinical practice is that quite often the scientists working on biomarker discovery have limited knowledge of the analytical, diagnostic, and regulatory requirements for a clinical assay. This review provides an introduction to such considerations with the aim of generating more extensive discussion for study design, assay performance, and regulatory approval in the process of translating new proteomic biomarkers from discovery into cancer diagnostics. We first describe the analytical requirements for a robust clinical biomarker assay, including concepts of precision, trueness, specificity and analytical interference, and carryover. We next introduce the clinical considerations of diagnostic accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, positive and negative predictive values, and clinical utility. We finish the review by describing components of the FDA approval process for protein-based biomarkers, including classification of biomarker assays as medical devices, analytical and clinical performance requirements, and the approval process workflow. While we recognize that the road from biomarker discovery, validation, and regulatory approval to the translation into the clinical setting could be long and difficult, the reward for patients, clinicians and scientists could be rather significant. PMID:24088261

  12. Ceftriaxone, an FDA-approved cephalosporin antibiotic, suppresses lung cancer growth by targeting Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Haitao; Li, Shengqing; Zhu, Feng; Kim, Dong Joon; Xie, Hua; Li, Yan; Nadas, Janos; Oi, Naomi; Zykova, Tatyana A; Yu, Dong Hoon; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kim, Myoung Ok; Wang, Lei; Ma, Weiya; Lubet, Ronald A; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2012-12-01

    Ceftriaxone, an FDA-approved third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, has antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Generally, ceftriaxone is used for a variety of infections such as community-acquired pneumonia, meningitis and gonorrhea. Its primary molecular targets are the penicillin-binding proteins. However, other activities of ceftriaxone remain unknown. Herein, we report for the first time that ceftriaxone has antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Kinase profiling results predicted that Aurora B might be a potential 'off' target of ceftriaxone. Pull-down assay data confirmed that ceftriaxone could bind with Aurora B in vitro and in A549 cells. Furthermore, ceftriaxone (500 µM) suppressed anchorage-independent cell growth by targeting Aurora B in A549, H520 and H1650 lung cancer cells. Importantly, in vivo xenograft animal model results showed that ceftriaxone effectively suppressed A549 and H520 lung tumor growth by inhibiting Aurora B. These data suggest the anticancer efficacy of ceftriaxone for the treatment of lung cancers through its inhibition of Aurora B. PMID:22962305

  13. Zohydro approval by food and drug administration: controversial or frightening?

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Atluri, Sairam; Candido, Kenneth D; Boswell, Mark V; Simopoulos, Thomas T; Grider, Jay S; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    The actions and regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are crucial to the entire population of the U.S., specifically the public who take a multitude of drugs and providers who prescribe drugs and devices. Further, the FDA is relevant to investors, specifically in regards to biotech and pharmaceutical companies involved in developing new drugs. The FDA has been criticized for a lack of independence on the one hand and excessive regulatory and expanding authority without evidence and consistency of the actions on the other hand. The FDA approved a single-entity, long-acting, hydrocodone product (Zohydro, Zogenix, San Diego, CA) on October 25, 2013, against the recommendation of the FDA's own appointed scientific advisory panel, which voted 11 to 2 against the approval of Zohydro. Subsequent to the approval, multiple consumer safety organizations, health care agencies, addiction treatment providers, professional organizations, and other groups on the frontline of the opioid addiction epidemic have expressed concern. In addition, the US Congress and various state attorneys general raised serious concerns about the approval of Zohydro, which is highly addictive and may enhance the opioid addiction epidemic. Supporters of Zohydro contend that it is necessary and essential to manage chronic pain and improve functional status with no additional risk. Over the past 15 years, prescriptions for opioids have skyrocketed with the United States consuming more than 84% of the global oxycodone and more than 99% of the hydrocodone supply. The sharp increase in opioid prescribing has led to parallel increases in opioid addiction and overdose deaths, surpassing motor vehicle injuries in the U.S. Recent studies assessing the trends of medical use and misuse of opioid analgesics from 2000 to 2011 have concluded that the present trend of the continued increase in the medical use of opioid analgesics appears to contribute to increasing misuse, resulting in multiple health

  14. FDA Approval Summary: Lenvatinib for Progressive, Radio-iodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nair, Abhilasha; Lemery, Steven J; Yang, Jun; Marathe, Anshu; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Ladouceur, Gaetan; Mitra, Amit K; Zhou, Liang; Fox, Emily; Aungst, Stephanie; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The FDA approved lenvatinib (Lenvima, Eisai Inc.) for the treatment of patients with locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory (RAI-refractory) differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). In an international, multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (E7080-G000-303), 392 patients with locally recurrent or metastatic RAI-refractory DTC and radiographic evidence of disease progression within 12 months prior to randomization were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive either lenvatinib 24 mg orally per day (n = 261) or matching placebo (n = 131) with the option for patients on the placebo arm to receive lenvatinib following independent radiologic confirmation of disease progression. A statistically significant prolongation of progression-free survival (PFS) as determined by independent radiology review was demonstrated [HR, 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.28; P < 0.001, stratified log-rank test], with an estimated median PFS of 18.3 months (95% CI, 15.1, NR) in the lenvatinib arm and 3.6 months (95% CI, 2.2-3.7) in the placebo arm. The most common adverse reactions, in order of decreasing frequency, observed in the lenvatinib-treated patients were hypertension, fatigue, diarrhea, arthralgia/myalgia, decreased appetite, decreased weight, nausea, stomatitis, headache, vomiting, proteinuria, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome, abdominal pain, and dysphonia. Adverse reactions led to dose reductions in 68% of patients receiving lenvatinib at the 24 mg dose and 18% of patients discontinued lenvatinib for adverse reactions leading to residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of lenvatinib. PMID:26324740

  15. 21 CFR 314.107 - Effective date of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or abbreviated new drug application under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effective date of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j) of the act. 314.107 Section 314.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL...

  16. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine. PMID:20575403

  17. Comparison of Outcomes before and after Ohio's Law Mandating Use of the FDA-Approved Protocol for Medication Abortion: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Combellick, Sarah L.; Kohn, Julia E.; Roberts, Sarah C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In February 2011, an Ohio law took effect mandating use of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved protocol for mifepristone, which is used with misoprostol for medication abortion. Other state legislatures have passed or enacted similar laws requiring use of the FDA-approved protocol for medication abortion. The objective of this study is to examine the association of this legal change with medication abortion outcomes and utilization. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort design, comparing outcomes of medication abortion patients in the prelaw period to those in the postlaw period. Sociodemographic and clinical chart data were abstracted from all medication abortion patients from 1 y prior to the law’s implementation (January 2010–January 2011) to 3 y post implementation (February 2011–October 2014) at four abortion-providing health care facilities in Ohio. Outcome data were analyzed for all women undergoing abortion at ≤49 d gestation during the study period. The main outcomes were as follows: need for additional intervention following medication abortion (such as aspiration, repeat misoprostol, and blood transfusion), frequency of continuing pregnancy, reports of side effects, and the proportion of abortions that were medication abortions (versus other abortion procedures). Among the 2,783 medication abortions ≤49 d gestation, 4.9% (95% CI: 3.7%–6.2%) in the prelaw and 14.3% (95% CI: 12.6%–16.0%) in the postlaw period required one or more additional interventions. Women obtaining a medication abortion in the postlaw period had three times the odds of requiring an additional intervention as women in the prelaw period (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.11, 95% CI: 2.27–4.27). In a mixed effects multivariable model that uses facility-months as the unit of analysis to account for lack of independence by site, we found that the law change was associated with a 9.4% (95% CI: 4.0%–18.4%) absolute increase in

  18. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  19. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  20. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles. PMID:25492359

  1. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles. PMID:25492359

  2. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  3. Pantoprazole, an FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitor, suppresses colorectal cancer growth by targeting T-cell-originated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lin; Zheng, Mengzhu; Sun, Huimin; Xiao, Juanjuan; Lu, Tao; Huang, Guangqian; Chen, Pianpian; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Hua; Duan, Qiuhong

    2016-04-19

    T-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug treatment of tumor. Pantoprazole (PPZ) was identified to be a TOPK inhibitor from FDA-approved drug database by structure based virtual ligand screening. Herein, the data indicated that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities by directly binding with TOPK in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of TOPK in HCT 116 cells decreased their sensitivities to pantoprazole. Results of an in vivo study demonstrated that i.p. injection of pantoprazole in HCT 116 colon tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The TOPK downstream signaling molecule phospho-histone H3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after pantoprazole treatment. In short, pantoprazole can suppress growth of colorectal cancer cells as a TOPK inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26967058

  4. Pantoprazole, an FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitor, suppresses colorectal cancer growth by targeting T-cell-originated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huimin; Xiao, Juanjuan; Lu, Tao; Huang, Guangqian; Chen, Pianpian; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Hua; Duan, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug treatment of tumor. Pantoprazole (PPZ) was identified to be a TOPK inhibitor from FDA-approved drug database by structure based virtual ligand screening. Herein, the data indicated that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities by directly binding with TOPK in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of TOPK in HCT 116 cells decreased their sensitivities to pantoprazole. Results of an in vivo study demonstrated that i.p. injection of pantoprazole in HCT 116 colon tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The TOPK downstream signaling molecule phospho-histone H3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after pantoprazole treatment. In short, pantoprazole can suppress growth of colorectal cancer cells as a TOPK inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26967058

  5. Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the Determination of Two Recently FDA Approved TKIs in Human Plasma Using Diode Array Detection

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Marwa; Blankert, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Generally, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have narrow therapeutic window and large interpatient variability compared to intrapatient variability. In order to support its therapeutic drug monitoring, two fast and accurate methods were developed for the determination of recently FDA approved anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors, afatinib and ibrutinib, in human plasma using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to PDA detection. Diclofenac sodium was used as internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 analytical column using a mobile phase combining ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile at a constant flow rate of 0.4 mL/min using gradient elution mode. A µSPE (solid phase extraction) procedure, using Oasis MCX µElution plates, was processed and it gave satisfying and reproducible results in terms of extraction yields. Additionally, the methods were successfully validated using the accuracy profiles approach (β = 95% and acceptance limits = ±15%) over the ranges 5–250 ng/mL for afatinib and from 5 to 400 ng/mL for ibrutinib in human plasma. PMID:26101692

  6. DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION REGISTRATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), as part of its efforts to control the abuse and misuse of controlled substances and chemicals used in producing some over-the-counter drugs, maintains databases of individuals registered to handle these substances. These databases are av...

  7. A History of the Sonocare CST-100: The First FDA-approved HIFU Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert

    2006-05-01

    The Sonocare CST-100 Therapeutic Ultrasound System, designed for the treatment of glaucoma, was developed in the 1980s and became the first high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to receive Food and Drug Administration approval. The system arose from studies done by F.L. Lizzi, Eng.Sc.D., of Riverside Research Institute and D.J. Coleman, M.D., of Cornell Medical Center/New York Hospital on the safety of ultrasound diagnosis of the eye. As safety limits were probed, therapeutic regimes were discovered. Optimization of operational parameters, clinical experience, and engineering design came together through a spin-off company, Sonocare, Inc., formed to produce and market the ophthalmic device. Various precedents were set during the approval process, including the acceptance by the FDA of radiation momentum imparted to an absorber as a measure of acoustic power. Many devices were sold, but the laser industry, grandfathered into the therapeutic field, eventually out-marketed Sonocare. The CST-100 remains as a model of elegant industrial design, and existing units are used daily in HIFU laboratory experiments.

  8. FDA Approval Summary: Temsirolimus as Treatment for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prowell, Tatiana M.; Ibrahim, Amna; Farrell, Ann T.; Justice, Robert; Mitchell, Shan Sun; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s approval of temsirolimus (Torisel®), on May 30, 2007, for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Information provided includes regulatory history, study design, study results, and literature review. A multicenter, three-arm, randomized, open-label study was conducted in previously untreated patients with poor-prognosis, advanced RCC. The study objectives were to compare overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety in patients receiving interferon (IFN)-α versus those receiving temsirolimus alone or in combination with IFN-α. In the second planned interim analysis of the intent-to-treat population (n = 626), there was a statistically significant longer OS time in the temsirolimus (25 mg) arm than in the IFN-α arm (median, 10.9 months versus 7.3 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; p = .0078). The combination of temsirolimus (15 mg) and IFN-α did not lead to a significant difference in OS compared with IFN-α alone. There was also a statistically significant longer PFS time for the temsirolimus (25 mg) arm than for the IFN-α arm (median, 5.5 months versus 3.1 months; HR, 0.66, p = .0001). Common adverse reactions reported in patients receiving temsirolimus were rash, asthenia, and mucositis. Common laboratory abnormalities were anemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Serious but rare cases of interstitial lung disease, bowel perforation, and acute renal failure were observed. Temsirolimus has demonstrated superiority in terms of OS and PFS over IFN-α and provides an additional treatment option for patients with advanced RCC. PMID:20332142

  9. Long-term drug administration in the adult zebrafish using oral gavage for cancer preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Michelle; Henderson, Rachel E.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zebrafish are a major model for chemical genetics, and most studies use embryos when investigating small molecules that cause interesting phenotypes or that can rescue disease models. Limited studies have dosed adults with small molecules by means of water-borne exposure or injection techniques. Challenges in the form of drug delivery-related trauma and anesthesia-related toxicity have excluded the adult zebrafish from long-term drug efficacy studies. Here, we introduce a novel anesthetic combination of MS-222 and isoflurane to an oral gavage technique for a non-toxic, non-invasive and long-term drug administration platform. As a proof of principle, we established drug efficacy of the FDA-approved BRAFV600E inhibitor, Vemurafenib, in adult zebrafish harboring BRAFV600E melanoma tumors. In the model, adult casper zebrafish intraperitoneally transplanted with a zebrafish melanoma cell line (ZMEL1) and exposed to daily sub-lethal dosing at 100 mg/kg of Vemurafenib for 2 weeks via oral gavage resulted in an average 65% decrease in tumor burden and a 15% mortality rate. In contrast, Vemurafenib-resistant ZMEL1 cell lines, generated in culture from low-dose drug exposure for 4 months, did not respond to the oral gavage treatment regimen. Similarly, this drug treatment regimen can be applied for treatment of primary melanoma tumors in the zebrafish. Taken together, we developed an effective long-term drug treatment system that will allow the adult zebrafish to be used to identify more effective anti-melanoma combination therapies and opens up possibilities for treating adult models of other diseases. PMID:27482819

  10. Screening of an FDA-Approved Compound Library Identifies Four Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    de Wilde, Adriaan H.; Jochmans, Dirk; Posthuma, Clara C.; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Bestebroer, Theo M.; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses can cause respiratory and enteric disease in a wide variety of human and animal hosts. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first demonstrated the potentially lethal consequences of zoonotic coronavirus infections in humans. In 2012, a similar previously unknown coronavirus emerged, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), thus far causing over 650 laboratory-confirmed infections, with an unexplained steep rise in the number of cases being recorded over recent months. The human MERS fatality rate of ∼30% is alarmingly high, even though many deaths were associated with underlying medical conditions. Registered therapeutics for the treatment of coronavirus infections are not available. Moreover, the pace of drug development and registration for human use is generally incompatible with strategies to combat emerging infectious diseases. Therefore, we have screened a library of 348 FDA-approved drugs for anti-MERS-CoV activity in cell culture. If such compounds proved sufficiently potent, their efficacy might be directly assessed in MERS patients. We identified four compounds (chloroquine, chlorpromazine, loperamide, and lopinavir) inhibiting MERS-CoV replication in the low-micromolar range (50% effective concentrations [EC50s], 3 to 8 μM). Moreover, these compounds also inhibit the replication of SARS coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E. Although their protective activity (alone or in combination) remains to be assessed in animal models, our findings may offer a starting point for treatment of patients infected with zoonotic coronaviruses like MERS-CoV. Although they may not necessarily reduce viral replication to very low levels, a moderate viral load reduction may create a window during which to mount a protective immune response. PMID:24841269

  11. Pan-Pathway Based Interaction Profiling of FDA-Approved Nucleoside and Nucleobase Analogs with Enzymes of the Human Nucleotide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Egeblad, Louise; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Wang, Liya; Balzarini, Jan; Eriksson, Staffan; Nordlund, Pär

    2012-01-01

    To identify interactions a nucleoside analog library (NAL) consisting of 45 FDA-approved nucleoside analogs was screened against 23 enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism using a thermal shift assay. The method was validated with deoxycytidine kinase; eight interactions known from the literature were detected and five additional interactions were revealed after the addition of ATP, the second substrate. The NAL screening gave relatively few significant hits, supporting a low rate of “off target effects.” However, unexpected ligands were identified for two catabolic enzymes guanine deaminase (GDA) and uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1). An acyclic guanosine prodrug analog, valaciclovir, was shown to stabilize GDA to the same degree as the natural substrate, guanine, with a ΔTagg around 7°C. Aciclovir, penciclovir, ganciclovir, thioguanine and mercaptopurine were also identified as ligands for GDA. The crystal structure of GDA with valaciclovir bound in the active site was determined, revealing the binding of the long unbranched chain of valaciclovir in the active site of the enzyme. Several ligands were identified for UPP1: vidarabine, an antiviral nucleoside analog, as well as trifluridine, idoxuridine, floxuridine, zidovudine, telbivudine, fluorouracil and thioguanine caused concentration-dependent stabilization of UPP1. A kinetic study of UPP1 with vidarabine revealed that vidarabine was a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with the natural substrate uridine. The unexpected ligands identified for UPP1 and GDA imply further metabolic consequences for these nucleoside analogs, which could also serve as a starting point for future drug design. PMID:22662200

  12. Alirocumab for hyperlipidemia: ODYSSEY Phase III clinical trial results and US FDA approval indications.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M

    2016-03-01

    A new class of lipid-lowering drugs, inhibitors of PCSK9 has been generating impressive clinical trial data over the last several years, and alirocumab (Praluent) has become the first to be approved by the US FDA. Alirocumab has been shown to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 45-62% with a safety profile generally comparable to placebo. Alirocumab is a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 administered subcutaneously and has been evaluated in 16 Phase III clinical trials, the majority of which have been enrolled or completed. This article will be a review of the available Phase III safety and efficacy data of the ODYSSEY studies including a brief description of each of the 16 studies. PMID:26785741

  13. WE-G-BRE-06: New Potential for Enhancing External Beam Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Using FDA-Approved Concentrations of Cisplatin Or Carboplatin Nanoparticles Administered Via Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Altundal, Y; Sajo, E; Detappe, A; Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates, for the first time, the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs) and carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs) administered via inhalation route (IR) during external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using Monte Carlo generated 6 MV energy fluence spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumor due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from CNPs administered via IR in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung tumor via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5–14.6 times higher concentrations of CNPs can reach the lung tumors by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the dose with and without CNPs was calculated for field size of 10 cm × 10 cm (sweeping gap), for a range of tumor depths and tumor sizes. Similar calculations were done for CBNPs. Results: For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of 1.19–1.30 were obtained for CNPs at 3–10 cm depth, respectively, in comparison to 1.06–1.09 for IV. For CBNPs, DEF values of 1.26–1.41 were obtained in comparison to 1.07–1.12 for IV. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81–2.27 for CNPs. DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor size. Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that major dose enhancement to lung tumors can be achieved using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR, in contrast to IV administration during external beam radiotherapy. These findings highlight a potential new approach for radiation boosting to lung tumors using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR. This would, especially, be applicable during concomitant chemoradiotherapy, potentially allowing for dose enhancement while

  14. Mass drug administration for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Eugenie; Skarbinski, Jacek; Sinclair, David; Kachur, S Patrick; Slutsker, Laurence; Hwang, Jimee

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA), defined as the empiric administration of a therapeutic antimalarial regimen to an entire population at the same time, has been a historic component of many malaria control and elimination programmes, but is not currently recommended. With renewed interest in MDA and its role in malaria elimination, this review aims to summarize the findings from existing research studies and program experiences of MDA strategies for reducing malaria burden and transmission. Objectives To assess the impact of antimalarial MDA on population asexual parasitaemia prevalence, parasitaemia incidence, gametocytaemia prevalence, anaemia prevalence, mortality and MDA-associated adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE+, EMBASE, to February 2013. We also searched CABS Abstracts, LILACS, reference lists, and recent conference proceedings. Selection criteria Cluster-randomized trials and non-randomized controlled studies comparing therapeutic MDA versus placebo or no MDA, and uncontrolled before-and-after studies comparing post-MDA to baseline data were selected. Studies administering intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) to sub-populations (for example, pregnant women, children or infants) were excluded. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently reviewed studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were stratified by study design and then subgrouped by endemicity, by co-administration of 8-aminoquinoline plus schizonticide drugs and by plasmodium species. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Two cluster-randomized trials, eight non-randomized controlled studies and 22 uncontrolled before-and-after studies are included in this review. Twenty-two studies (29 comparisons) compared MDA to placebo or no intervention of which two comparisons were

  15. Drug Abuse Control--Administrative Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA.

    These guidelines were developed to assist administrators, teachers, and other staff members of the Los Angeles Public Schools in the formulation of an effective program designed to alleviate drug abuse. Staff responsibilities are spelled out. Specific attention is directed to the problems of drug abuse, drug possession and drug selling. The…

  16. RU-486: legal and policy issues confronting the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Muhl, C

    1993-06-01

    The debate surrounding access to RU-486 in the US resurfaced in July 1992 when a pregnant California Resident attempted to challenge the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) import ban by going through customs at Kennedy International Airport with 12 prescription RU-486 pills she obtained in England. The pills were confiscated and the US Supreme Court denied the woman's request to recover the pills by a 7-2 vote. In 1993, on the 20th anniversary of the Roe v Wade abortion decision, President Clinton instructed the FDA to assess the real health and safety risks of the drug and rescind the ban if politics turns out to be the central issue. FDA has no criteria for measuring acceptable levels of safety, and drug approval is a lengthy process. Moreover, clinical trials are not initiated until a pharmaceutical company applies for FDA approval, which Roussel-Uclaf, RU-486's developer, has not done despite a wealth of safety and effectiveness data amassed in Europe. In fact, fearing a consumer boycott of its other products by US anti-abortion groups, Roussel-Uclaf has limited American researchers' access to RU-486. Despite the pro-choice climate of the Clinton Administration, it is unlikely that RU-486 will be available any time soon to US women, and physicians are concerned that a black market for the drug will emerge. This likelihood has serious consequences for people with Cushing's disease, nonmalignant brain tumors, breast cancer, and other medical conditions that may be responsive to RU-486. Given the experience with the introduction of oral contraceptives, marketed before long-term health consequences had been sufficiently explored, it is essential that FDA researchers investigate the impact of RU-486 on future children, future fertility, its interaction with other medications and contraceptives, and its effects on other bodily systems. At the same time, any risk-benefit assessment must be based on scientific merit, and access to Ru-486 cannot be denied on political

  17. FDA Approval of Gefitinib for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kazandjian, Dickran; Blumenthal, Gideon M; Yuan, Weishi; He, Kun; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-03-15

    On July 13, 2015, the FDA approved gefitinib (Iressa; AstraZeneca UK Limited) for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have EGFR exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations as detected by an FDA-approved test. Concurrently, a labeling expansion of the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit (Qiagen) as a companion diagnostic test was approved. The approval was based on the results of a multicenter, single-arm, open-label clinical study of 106 treatment-naïve patients with metastatic EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC who received gefitinib, 250 mg daily, until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. The major efficacy outcome was RECIST v1.1 objective response rate (ORR). The blinded independent central review (BICR) ORR was 50% [95% confidence interval (CI), 41-59] with a median duration of response (DoR) of 6.0 months. Efficacy results were supported by a retrospective exploratory analysis of a subset of a randomized, multicenter, open-label trial on 1,217 patients with metastatic NSCLC. Of the patients randomized, 186 (15%) were retrospectively determined to be EGFR positive and evaluable for a BICR assessment. The HR for progression-free survival (PFS) was 0.54 (95% CI, 0.38-0.79), favoring gefitinib over platinum-doublet chemotherapy. The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions were skin reactions, increased aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, proteinuria, and diarrhea. Approximately 5% of patients discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction. Given the safety profile and clinically meaningful ORR, DoR, and PFS, the benefit-risk analysis was deemed favorable for FDA approval. Clin Cancer Res; 22(6); 1307-12. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980062

  18. The FDA-approved natural product dihydroergocristine reduces the production of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β peptides.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiling; Yu, Jing; Niu, Qi; Liu, Jianhua; Fraering, Patrick C; Wu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Known γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators display an undesirable pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity and have therefore not been successful in clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD). So far, no compounds from natural products have been identified as direct inhibitors of γ-secretase. To search for bioactive molecules that can reduce the amount of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and that have better pharmacokinetics and an improved safety profile, we completed a screen of ~400 natural products by using cell-based and cell-free γ-secretase activity assays. We identified dihydroergocristine (DHEC), a component of an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug, to be a direct inhibitor of γ-secretase. Micromolar concentrations of DHEC substantially reduced Aβ levels in different cell types, including a cell line derived from an AD patient. Structure-activity relationship studies implied that the key moiety for inhibiting γ-secretase is the cyclized tripeptide moiety of DHEC. A Surface Plasmon Resonance assay showed that DHEC binds directly to γ-secretase and Nicastrin, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 25.7 nM and 9.8 μM, respectively. This study offers DHEC not only as a new chemical moiety for selectively modulating the activity of γ-secretase but also a candidate for drug repositioning in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26567970

  19. The FDA-approved natural product dihydroergocristine reduces the production of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiling; Yu, Jing; Niu, Qi; Liu, Jianhua; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Known γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators display an undesirable pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity and have therefore not been successful in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). So far, no compounds from natural products have been identified as direct inhibitors of γ-secretase. To search for bioactive molecules that can reduce the amount of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and that have better pharmacokinetics and an improved safety profile, we completed a screen of ~400 natural products by using cell-based and cell-free γ-secretase activity assays. We identified dihydroergocristine (DHEC), a component of an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug, to be a direct inhibitor of γ-secretase. Micromolar concentrations of DHEC substantially reduced Aβ levels in different cell types, including a cell line derived from an AD patient. Structure-activity relationship studies implied that the key moiety for inhibiting γ-secretase is the cyclized tripeptide moiety of DHEC. A Surface Plasmon Resonance assay showed that DHEC binds directly to γ-secretase and Nicastrin, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 25.7 nM and 9.8 μM, respectively. This study offers DHEC not only as a new chemical moiety for selectively modulating the activity of γ-secretase but also a candidate for drug repositioning in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26567970

  20. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Wagh, Dhananjay; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Solow-Cordero, David; Kim, Kwang-Min; Samineni, Aneesh V; Parekh, Mansi B; Tayebi, Lobat; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%–20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved) that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150 unique compounds, which inhibited >90% of B. burgdorferi growth at a concentration of <25 µM. These 150 unique compounds comprise many safe antibiotics, chemical compounds, and also small molecules from plant sources. Of the 150 unique compounds, 101 compounds are FDA approved. We selected the top 20 FDA-approved molecules based on safety and potency and studied their minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The promising safe FDA-approved candidates that show low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values can be chosen as

  1. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Wagh, Dhananjay; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Solow-Cordero, David; Kim, Kwang-Min; Samineni, Aneesh V; Parekh, Mansi B; Tayebi, Lobat; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%-20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved) that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150 unique compounds, which inhibited >90% of B. burgdorferi growth at a concentration of <25 µM. These 150 unique compounds comprise many safe antibiotics, chemical compounds, and also small molecules from plant sources. Of the 150 unique compounds, 101 compounds are FDA approved. We selected the top 20 FDA-approved molecules based on safety and potency and studied their minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The promising safe FDA-approved candidates that show low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values can be chosen as lead

  2. Regulatory approval of pharmaceuticals without a randomised controlled study: analysis of EMA and FDA approvals 1999–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hatswell, Anthony J; Baio, Gianluca; Berlin, Jesse A; Irs, Alar; Freemantle, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of pharmaceuticals is most often demonstrated by randomised controlled trials (RCTs); however, in some cases, regulatory applications lack RCT evidence. Objective To investigate the number and type of these approvals over the past 15 years by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods Drug approval data were downloaded from the EMA website and the ‘Drugs@FDA’ database for all decisions on pharmaceuticals published from 1 January 1999 to 8 May 2014. The details of eligible applications were extracted, including the therapeutic area, type of approval and review period. Results Over the period of the study, 76 unique indications were granted without RCT results (44 by the EMA and 60 by the FDA), demonstrating that a substantial number of treatments reach the market without undergoing an RCT. The majority was for haematological malignancies (34), with the next most common areas being oncology (15) and metabolic conditions (15). Of the applications made to both agencies with a comparable data package, the FDA granted more approvals (43/44 vs 35/44) and took less time to review products (8.7 vs 15.5 months). Products reached the market first in the USA in 30 of 34 cases (mean 13.1 months) due to companies making FDA submission before EMA submissions and faster FDA review time. Discussion Despite the frequency with which approvals are granted without RCT results, there is no systematic monitoring of such treatments to confirm their effectiveness or consistency regarding when this form of evidence is appropriate. We recommend a more open debate on the role of marketing authorisations granted without RCT results, and the development of guidelines on what constitutes an acceptable data package for regulators. PMID:27363818

  3. [Drug administration through enteral feeding catheters].

    PubMed

    Goñi Viguria, R; Sánchez Sanz, L; Asiain Erro, M; Baztán Indave, A

    2001-01-01

    Because of easiness and accessibility, the oral route of administration is usually the route of choice for medication delivery, as long as the oral drug form is available and the patients' circumstances allow it.In patients admitted to the intensive care unit this route is frequently altered. This provokes difficulties in swallowing and consequently an enteral feeding catheter must be inserted to supply the patient's nutritional requirements. This catheter is also used for the drug administration, which necessitates opening capsules or crushing pills before dilution. When added to drug-nutrient interactions, this process alters the drug's properties and modifies its pharmacokinetic profile, its pharmacological effect and the intensity of side effects. It can also provoke catheter obstruction. The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for drug administration through enteral feeding catheters. We provide a thorough review of the literature, describe oral drug forms, present a protocol for correct drug administration and provide a guide to the most commonly used drugs in our unit. For each of these drugs we include recommendations on administration and possible alternatives. PMID:11459545

  4. 76 FR 79194 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug Product Labeling: Medication Guide Requirements AGENCY: Food... concern requiring distribution of FDA-approved patient medication. DATES: Submit either electronic or... information technology. Prescription Drug Product Labeling; Medication Guide Requirements (OMB Control...

  5. Anticipating designer drug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frangione, Mark L; Lockhart, John H; Morton, Daniel T; Pava, Libia M; Blanck, George

    2015-07-01

    Successful use of anticancer designer drugs is likely to depend on simultaneous combinations of these drugs to minimize the development of resistant cancer cells. Considering the knowledge base of cancer signaling pathways, mechanisms of designer drug resistance should be anticipated, and early clinical trials could be designed to include arms that combine new drugs specifically with currently US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs expected to blunt alternative signaling pathways. In this review, we indicate examples of alternative signal pathways for recent anticancer drugs, and the use of original, Python-based software to systematically identify signaling pathways that could facilitate resistance to drugs targeting a particular protein. Pathway alternatives can be assessed at http://www.alternativesignalingpathways.com, developed with this review article. PMID:25697478

  6. 78 FR 69133 - Drug Enforcement Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... International, Inc. By Notice dated May 14, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on May 22, 2013, 78 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug... renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of...

  7. Time Course of the Changes in Novel Trioxane Antimalarial 99/411 Pharmacokinetics upon Antiepileptic Drugs Co-Administration in SD Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yeshwant; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Misra, Anamika; Hidau, Mahendra Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed to evaluate the influences of coadministration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on an antimalarial candidate 99/411 pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Method. For this, single oral dose PK drug interaction studies were conducted between 99/411 and FDA approved AEDs, namely, Phenytoin (PHT), Carbamazepine (CBZ), and Gabapentin (GB) in both male and female SD rats, to assess the coadministered and intersexual influences on 99/411 PK profile. Results. Studies revealed that there were no significant alterations in the PK profile of 99/411 upon PHT and CBZ coadministration in both male and female rats, while systemic exposure of 99/411 was significantly increased by about 80% in female rats upon GB coadministration. In terms of AUC, there was an increase from 2471 ± 586 to 4560 ± 1396 ng·h/mL. Overall, it was concluded that simultaneous administration of AEDs with 99/411 excludes the requirements for dose adjustment, additional therapeutic monitoring, contraindication to concomitant use, and/or other measures to mitigate risk, except for GB coadministration in females. These findings are further helpful to predict such interactions in humans, when potentially applied through proper allometric scaling to extrapolate the data. PMID:25383231

  8. Toward better drug repositioning: prioritizing and integrating existing methods into efficient pipelines.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangxu; Wong, Stephen T C

    2014-05-01

    Recycling old drugs, rescuing shelved drugs and extending patents' lives make drug repositioning an attractive form of drug discovery. Drug repositioning accounts for approximately 30% of the newly US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and vaccines in recent years. The prevalence of drug-repositioning studies has resulted in a variety of innovative computational methods for the identification of new opportunities for the use of old drugs. Questions often arise from customizing or optimizing these methods into efficient drug-repositioning pipelines for alternative applications. It requires a comprehensive understanding of the available methods gained by evaluating both biological and pharmaceutical knowledge and the elucidated mechanism-of-action of drugs. Here, we provide guidance for prioritizing and integrating drug-repositioning methods for specific drug-repositioning pipelines. PMID:24239728

  9. Antifungal Drugs for Onychomycosis: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    In 1996, oral terbinafine joined itraconazole and fluconazole on the short list of systemic medications that could be used to treat onychomycosis (although fluconazole was not approved for this indication by the US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], it was commonly used for this purpose). In 1999, ciclopirox was the first topical treatment to be FDA approved. The addition of the topical antifungal agents efinaconazole and tavaborole in 2014 expanded the roster of medications available to more effectively manage onychomycosis in a wide range of patients, including those for whom comorbid conditions, concomitant medications, or patient preference limited the use of systemic antifungals. PMID:27074700

  10. Systematic identification of synergistic drug pairs targeting HIV.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J; Elledge, Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present multiplex screening for interacting compounds (MuSIC), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pairwise compound interactions. We examined ∼500,000 drug pairs from 1,000 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to inhibit HIV replication. Our analysis reveals an enrichment of anti-inflammatory drugs in drug combinations that synergize against HIV. As inflammation accompanies HIV infection, these findings indicate that inhibiting inflammation could curb HIV propagation. Multiple drug pairs identified in this study, including various glucocorticoids and nitazoxanide (NTZ), synergize by targeting different steps in the HIV life cycle. MuSIC can be applied to a wide variety of disease-relevant screens to facilitate efficient identification of compound combinations. PMID:23064238

  11. 76 FR 82311 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Food and Drug Administration Report on Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ..., 2009, (74 FR 4685, January 26, 2009)). In response, the following June FDA launched its Transparency... Register (75 FR 76011, December 7, 2010) online at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-30623.pdf... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative:...

  12. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  13. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  14. Comparison of Three Different FDA-Approved Plasma HIV-1 RNA Assay Platforms Confirms the Virologic Failure Endpoint of 200 Copies per Milliliter Despite Improved Assay Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Cheryl; Johnson, Victoria A.; Coombs, Robert W.; McKinnon, John E.; Bremer, James W.; Cobb, Bryan R.; Cloherty, Gavin A.; Mellors, John W.; Ribaudo, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies between HIV-1 RNA results assayed by different FDA-approved platforms have been reported. Plasma samples collected from 332 randomly selected clinical trial participants during the second year of antiretroviral treatment were assayed with three FDA-approved platforms: UltraSensitive Roche Amplicor Monitor, v1.5 (Monitor), the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 test on the m2000 system (Abbott), and the Roche TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0 (TaqMan). Samples from 61 additional participants with confirmed HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml during trial follow-up were also included. Endpoints were HIV-1 RNA quantification of ≤50 copies/ml versus >50 copies/ml at an individual-sample level (primary) and determination of confirmed virologic failure (VF) from longitudinal samples. A total of 389 participants had results obtained from all assays on at least one sample (median = 6). Proportions of results of >50 copies/ml were 19% (Monitor), 22% (TaqMan), and 25% (Abbott). Despite indication of strong agreement (Cohen's kappa, 0.76 to 0.82), Abbott was more likely to detect HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml than Monitor (matched-pair odds ratio [mOR] = 4.2; modified Obuchowski P < 0.001) and TaqMan (mOR = 2.1; P < 0.001); TaqMan was more likely than Monitor (mOR = 2.6; P < 0.001). Despite strong agreement in classifying VF across assay comparisons (kappa, 0.75 to 0.92), at a 50-copies/ml threshold, differences in the probability of VF classification (in the same direction as primary) were apparent (all McNemar's P < 0.007). At a 200-copies/ml VF threshold, no differences between assays were apparent (all P > 0.13). Despite strong agreement among assays, significant differences were observed with respect to detecting HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml and identifying VF at the 50-copies/ml threshold. This has important implications for the definition of VF in clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26063861

  15. Comparison of Three Different FDA-Approved Plasma HIV-1 RNA Assay Platforms Confirms the Virologic Failure Endpoint of 200 Copies per Milliliter Despite Improved Assay Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lalama, Christina M; Jennings, Cheryl; Johnson, Victoria A; Coombs, Robert W; McKinnon, John E; Bremer, James W; Cobb, Bryan R; Cloherty, Gavin A; Mellors, John W; Ribaudo, Heather J

    2015-08-01

    Discrepancies between HIV-1 RNA results assayed by different FDA-approved platforms have been reported. Plasma samples collected from 332 randomly selected clinical trial participants during the second year of antiretroviral treatment were assayed with three FDA-approved platforms: UltraSensitive Roche Amplicor Monitor, v1.5 (Monitor), the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 test on the m2000 system (Abbott), and the Roche TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0 (TaqMan). Samples from 61 additional participants with confirmed HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml during trial follow-up were also included. Endpoints were HIV-1 RNA quantification of ≤50 copies/ml versus >50 copies/ml at an individual-sample level (primary) and determination of confirmed virologic failure (VF) from longitudinal samples. A total of 389 participants had results obtained from all assays on at least one sample (median = 6). Proportions of results of >50 copies/ml were 19% (Monitor), 22% (TaqMan), and 25% (Abbott). Despite indication of strong agreement (Cohen's kappa, 0.76 to 0.82), Abbott was more likely to detect HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml than Monitor (matched-pair odds ratio [mOR] = 4.2; modified Obuchowski P < 0.001) and TaqMan (mOR = 2.1; P < 0.001); TaqMan was more likely than Monitor (mOR = 2.6; P < 0.001). Despite strong agreement in classifying VF across assay comparisons (kappa, 0.75 to 0.92), at a 50-copies/ml threshold, differences in the probability of VF classification (in the same direction as primary) were apparent (all McNemar's P < 0.007). At a 200-copies/ml VF threshold, no differences between assays were apparent (all P > 0.13). Despite strong agreement among assays, significant differences were observed with respect to detecting HIV-1 RNA levels of >50 copies/ml and identifying VF at the 50-copies/ml threshold. This has important implications for the definition of VF in clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26063861

  16. Blasé about drug administration.

    PubMed

    Castledine, Sir George

    The trouble with some tasks and procedures in nursing is that you get too used to them, and errors inevitably set in. No other area is as vulnerable to this as drug administration. A recent report from the National Patient Safety Agency highlighted that dozens of patients are killed every year by drug errors. In 2007, the watchdog received reports from NHS staff of 86 000 mistakes in prescribing or administering medicines, compared with 36 335 errors in 2005. In England and Wales, in 96% of cases the incidents caused low or no harm, but 37 patients died during 2007, and another 63 suffered severe harm. PMID:19966750

  17. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and Supplier Controls; Public Educational Forum AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public educational forum. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  18. FDA Approval Summary: Olaparib Monotherapy in Patients with Deleterious Germline BRCA-Mutated Advanced Ovarian Cancer Treated with Three or More Lines of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geoffrey; Ison, Gwynn; McKee, Amy E; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Shenghui; Gwise, Thomas; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Lee, Eunice; Tzou, Abraham; Philip, Reena; Chiu, Haw-Jyh; Ricks, Tiffany K; Palmby, Todd; Russell, Anne Marie; Ladouceur, Gaetan; Pfuma, Elimika; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Qi; Venugopal, Rajesh; Ibrahim, Amna; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-10-01

    On December 19, 2014, the FDA approved olaparib capsules (Lynparza; AstraZeneca) for the treatment of patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm) advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. The BRACAnalysis CDx (Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc.) was approved concurrently. An international multicenter, single-arm trial enrolled 137 patients with measurable gBRCAm-associated ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. Patients received olaparib at a dose of 400 mg by mouth twice daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The objective response rate (ORR) was 34% with median response duration of 7.9 months in this cohort. The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with olaparib were anemia, nausea, fatigue (including asthenia), vomiting, diarrhea, dysgeusia, dyspepsia, headache, decreased appetite, nasopharyngitis/pharyngitis/upper respiratory infection, cough, arthralgia/musculoskeletal pain, myalgia, back pain, dermatitis/rash, and abdominal pain/discomfort. Myelodysplatic syndrome and/or acute myeloid leukemia occurred in 2% of the patients enrolled on this trial. PMID:26187614

  19. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107... Administration manuals. (a) Food and Drug Administration administrative staff manuals and instructions that affect a member of the public are available for public disclosure. An index of all such manuals...

  20. Bioadhesion: new possibilities for drug administration?

    PubMed

    Woodley, J

    2001-01-01

    Bioadhesion (and mucoadhesion) is the process whereby synthetic and natural macromolecules adhere to mucosal surfaces in the body. If these materials are then incorporated into pharmaceutical formulations, drug absorption by mucosal cells may be enhanced or the drug released at the site for an extended period of time. For synthetic polymers, such as the chitosans, carbopols and carbomers, the mechanism of bio/mucoadhesion is the result of a number of different physicochemical interactions. Biological bio/mucoadhesives, such as plant lectins, show specific interactions with cell surfaces and mucin and are seen as the 'second generation' bioadhesives. Bioadhesive systems for drug administration via the buccal and nasal cavities are nearing the market; in the case of nasal bioadhesion, bioadhesive microparticles are used. A bioadhesive formulation for drug administration to the vagina is in use. The gastrointestinal tract is proving a more difficult site because of the rapid turnover of mucus, and relatively constant transit time, but intensive research is in progress. Micro- and nano-particles, coated with either bio/mucoadhesive polymers or specific biological bioadhesives, are showing some promise, but will require considerable research and development before reaching the market. PMID:11286325

  1. FDA Approval: Belinostat for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyon-Zu; Kwitkowski, Virginia E; Del Valle, Pedro L; Ricci, M Stacey; Saber, Haleh; Habtemariam, Bahru A; Bullock, Julie; Bloomquist, Erik; Li Shen, Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Brown, Janice; Mehrotra, Nitin; Dorff, Sarah; Charlab, Rosane; Kane, Robert C; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Justice, Robert; Farrell, Ann T; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-06-15

    On July 3, 2014, the FDA granted accelerated approval for belinostat (Beleodaq; Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). A single-arm, open-label, multicenter, international trial in the indicated patient population was submitted in support of the application. Belinostat was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 mg/m(2) over 30 minutes once daily on days 1 to 5 of a 21-day cycle. The primary efficacy endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) based on central radiology readings by an independent review committee. The ORR was 25.8% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18.3-34.6] in 120 patients that had confirmed diagnoses of PTCL by the Central Pathology Review Group. The complete and partial response rates were 10.8% (95% CI, 5.9-17.8) and 15.0% (95% CI, 9.1-22.7), respectively. The median duration of response, the key secondary efficacy endpoint, was 8.4 months (95% CI, 4.5-29.4). The most common adverse reactions (>25%) were nausea, fatigue, pyrexia, anemia, and vomiting. Grade 3/4 toxicities (≥5.0%) included anemia, thrombocytopenia, dyspnea, neutropenia, fatigue, and pneumonia. Belinostat is the third drug to receive accelerated approval for the treatment of relapsed or refractory PTCL. PMID:25802282

  2. Intrathecal drug administration in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ver Donck, Ann; Vranken, Jan H; Puylaert, Martine; Hayek, Salim; Mekhail, Nagy; Van Zundert, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Chronic pain may recur after initial response to strong opioids in both patients with cancer and patients without cancer or therapy may be complicated by intolerable side effects. When minimally invasive interventional pain management techniques also fail to provide satisfactory pain relief, continuous intrathecal analgesic administration may be considered. Only 3 products have been officially approved for long-term intrathecal administration: morphine, baclofen, and ziconotide. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide for the management of patients with severe chronic refractory noncancer pain was illustrated in 3 placebo-controlled trials. A randomized study showed this treatment option to be effective over a short follow-up period for patients with pain due to cancer or AIDS. The efficacy of intrathecal opioid administration for the management of chronic noncancer pain is mainly derived from prospective and retrospective noncontrolled trials. The effect of intrathecal morphine administration in patients with pain due to cancer was compared with oral or transdermal treatment in a randomized controlled trial, which found better pain control and fewer side effects with intrathecal opioids. Other evidence is derived from cohort studies. Side effects of chronic intrathecal therapy may either be technical (catheter or pump malfunction) or biological (infection). The most troublesome complication is, however, the possibility of granuloma formation at the catheter tip that may induce neurological damage. Given limited studies, the evidence for intrathecal drug administration in patients suffering from cancer-related pain is more compelling than that of chronic noncancer pain. PMID:24118774

  3. FDA-Approved Biosimilar Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    If a biosimilar insulin is discovered postmarketing to be subpotent, superpotent, or contaminated or the contents mislabeled, it is an adulterated product and must be quarantined for removal including from a patient’s home. Adulterated products could be considered “counterfeit” since they do not meet the original standards established by the FDA. The FDA must establish a method of regularly assaying samples of biosimilar insulin drawn directly from the supply pipeline to help ensure patient safety and evaluate clinical performance. Independent groups without conflict of interest would perform confidential comparison assay. For less than 5 cents per vial/pen, manufacturers could easily support an independent, FDA-recognized, random sample program and create a functional postmarket surveillance system that better protects the public and the manufacturer from undesired outcomes. PMID:25172881

  4. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  5. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  6. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  7. 21 CFR 314.104 - Drugs with potential for abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs with potential for abuse. 314.104 Section... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse. The Food and...

  8. 21 CFR 314.104 - Drugs with potential for abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drugs with potential for abuse. 314.104 Section... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse. The Food and...

  9. 21 CFR 314.104 - Drugs with potential for abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs with potential for abuse. 314.104 Section... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse. The Food and...

  10. 21 CFR 314.104 - Drugs with potential for abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drugs with potential for abuse. 314.104 Section... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse. The Food and...

  11. 21 CFR 314.104 - Drugs with potential for abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drugs with potential for abuse. 314.104 Section... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.104 Drugs with potential for abuse. The Food and...

  12. DrugE-Rank: improving drug–target interaction prediction of new candidate drugs or targets by ensemble learning to rank

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingjun; Gao, Junning; Wu, Dongliang; Zhang, Shihua; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying drug–target interactions is an important task in drug discovery. To reduce heavy time and financial cost in experimental way, many computational approaches have been proposed. Although these approaches have used many different principles, their performance is far from satisfactory, especially in predicting drug–target interactions of new candidate drugs or targets. Methods: Approaches based on machine learning for this problem can be divided into two types: feature-based and similarity-based methods. Learning to rank is the most powerful technique in the feature-based methods. Similarity-based methods are well accepted, due to their idea of connecting the chemical and genomic spaces, represented by drug and target similarities, respectively. We propose a new method, DrugE-Rank, to improve the prediction performance by nicely combining the advantages of the two different types of methods. That is, DrugE-Rank uses LTR, for which multiple well-known similarity-based methods can be used as components of ensemble learning. Results: The performance of DrugE-Rank is thoroughly examined by three main experiments using data from DrugBank: (i) cross-validation on FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) approved drugs before March 2014; (ii) independent test on FDA approved drugs after March 2014; and (iii) independent test on FDA experimental drugs. Experimental results show that DrugE-Rank outperforms competing methods significantly, especially achieving more than 30% improvement in Area under Prediction Recall curve for FDA approved new drugs and FDA experimental drugs. Availability: http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/DrugE-Rank Contact: zhusf@fudan.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307615

  13. FDA designations for therapeutics and their impact on drug development and regulatory review outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, A S; Darrow, J J

    2015-01-01

    New prescription drugs receive approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based on tests establishing safety and adequate and well-controlled trials demonstrating "substantial evidence" of efficacy. However, a number of legislative and regulatory initiatives, the most recent being the breakthrough therapy designation created in 2012, give the FDA flexibility to approve drugs on the basis of less rigorous data in situations of greater clinical need. These expedited development and review pathways now contribute to a majority of all new drug approvals and have important benefits in encouraging efficient availability of transformative drugs. They also have a number of risks, including a heightened possibility that the drugs will be discovered to be ineffective or unsafe after widespread use, and confusion by patients and physicians over what it means for a product to be "FDA approved." PMID:25670381

  14. Accelerated Approval of Cancer Drugs: Improved Access to Therapeutic Breakthroughs or Early Release of Unsafe and Ineffective Drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Richey, Elizabeth A.; Lyons, E. Alison; Nebeker, Jonathan R.; Shankaran, Veena; McKoy, June M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Trifilio, Steven; Sartor, Oliver; Benson, Al B.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Tallman, Martin S.; West, Dennis P.; Hirschfeld, Steven; Grillo-Lopez, Antonio J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated approval (AA) was initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to shorten development times of drugs for serious medical illnesses. Sponsors must confirm efficacy in postapproval trials. Confronted with several drugs that received AA on the basis of phase II trials and for which confirmatory trials were incomplete, FDA officials have encouraged sponsors to design AA applications on the basis of interim analyses of phase III trials. Methods We reviewed data on orphan drug status, development time, safety, and status of confirmatory trials of AAs and regular FDA approvals of new molecular entities (NMEs) for oncology indications since 1995. Results Median development times for AA NMEs (n = 19 drugs) and regular-approval oncology NMEs (n = 32 drugs) were 7.3 and 7.2 years, respectively. Phase III trials supported efficacy for 75% of regular-approval versus 26% of AA NMEs and for 73% of non–orphan versus 45% of orphan drug approvals. AA accounted for 78% of approvals for oncology NMEs between 2001 and 2003 but accounted for 32% in more recent years. Among AA NMEs, confirmatory trials were nine-fold less likely to be completed for orphan drug versus non–orphan drug indications. Postapproval, black box warnings were added to labels for four oncology NMEs (17%) that had received AA and for two oncology NMEs (9%) that had received regular approval. Conclusion AA oncology NMEs are safe and effective, although development times are not accelerated. A return to endorsing phase II trial designs for AA for oncology NMEs, particularly for orphan drug indications, may facilitate timely FDA approval of novel cancer drugs. PMID:19636013

  15. Antimalarial mass drug administration: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; White, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Falciparum malaria is a major cause of death and illness in tropical countries, particularly in childhood. In endemic countries, a significant proportion of the community is infected with malaria asymptomatically. One promising way to eliminate malaria is to give the entire population malaria treatment. This is called mass drug administration (MDA) and it raises a number of ethical issues, as possible long-term benefits are uncertain. The effectiveness of MDA is critically dependent on level of participation, so the promised benefits to the community can be annulled by non-participation of a small number of individuals. These potential benefits range a wide spectrum, from the permanent elimination of malaria (success) to a transient reduction in the prevalence of infection and the incidence of illness (failure). The drawbacks of MDA are: inconvenience, potential toxicity, loss of confidence in the elimination campaign, possible drug resistance (though highly unlikely), and the potential for a rebound of malaria illness (if immunity is lost and malaria is reintroduced later). Other ethical issues are related to balancing individual and public health interests, and potentially limiting individual autonomy by making MDA compulsory. PMID:27481834

  16. Compartmentalized Accumulation of cAMP near Complexes of Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Contributes to Drug-induced Diarrhea*

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D.; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M.; Buddington, Randal K.; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea. PMID:25762723

  17. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug.... Written requests are to be sent to Division of Freedom of Information (ELEM-1029), Food and...

  18. Approval of Raxibacumab for the Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax Under the US Food and Drug Administration “Animal Rule”

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    On December 14, 2012, the FDA approved Raxibacumab, the first monoclonal antibody product developed under Project BioShield to achieve this milestone, and the first biologic product to be approved through the FDA animal efficacy rule (or “Animal Rule”). Raxibacumab is approved for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with inhalational anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis in combination with appropriate antibiotic drugs and for prophylaxis of inhalational anthrax when alternative therapies are not available or not appropriate. The developmental process required for approval of Raxibacumab illustrates many of the challenges that product developers may encounter when pursuing approval under the Animal Rule and highlights a number of important regulatory and policy issues. PMID:26648915

  19. The role of local drug delivery in the management of periodontal diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, G; Polson, A

    1998-05-01

    This review article evaluates the role of local drug delivery systems in the management of periodontal diseases. The efficacy of several local delivery devices (i.e., tetracycline fibers, metronidazole and minocycline gels, chlorhexidine chips, and doxycycline polymer) which are either commercially available in the United States or abroad, or are currently under consideration for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval are discussed. The drug delivery systems are assessed with regard to their functional characteristics, effectiveness as a monotherapy, as compared to scaling and root planing, and ability to enhance conventional therapy. Furthermore, controversies associated with local delivery are addressed (e.g., induction of bacterial resistant strains, the efficacy of systemic versus local drug delivery, and whether local drug delivery should function as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional treatment). PMID:9623893

  20. Exploring the pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB) for repositioning breast cancer drugs by leveraging Web ontology language (OWL) and cheminformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qian; Tao, Cui; Shen, Feichen; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Computational drug repositioning leverages computational technology and high volume of biomedical data to identify new indications for existing drugs. Since it does not require costly experiments that have a high risk of failure, it has attracted increasing interest from diverse fields such as biomedical, pharmaceutical, and informatics areas. In this study, we used pharmacogenomics data generated from pharmacogenomics studies, applied informatics and Semantic Web technologies to address the drug repositioning problem. Specifically, we explored PharmGKB to identify pharmacogenomics related associations as pharmacogenomics profiles for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved breast cancer drugs. We then converted and represented these profiles in Semantic Web notations, which support automated semantic inference. We successfully evaluated the performance and efficacy of the breast cancer drug pharmacogenomics profiles by case studies. Our results demonstrate that combination of pharmacogenomics data and Semantic Web technology/Cheminformatics approaches yields better performance of new indication and possible adverse effects prediction for breast cancer drugs. PMID:24297544

  1. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling Section 522 Postmarket Surveillance Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  2. 78 FR 44574 - Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  3. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  4. 77 FR 47652 - Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  5. Investigating drug repositioning opportunities in FDA drug labels through topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning offers an opportunity to revitalize the slowing drug discovery pipeline by finding new uses for currently existing drugs. Our hypothesis is that drugs sharing similar side effect profiles are likely to be effective for the same disease, and thus repositioning opportunities can be identified by finding drug pairs with similar side effects documented in U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels. The safety information in the drug labels is usually obtained in the clinical trial and augmented with the observations in the post-market use of the drug. Therefore, our drug repositioning approach can take the advantage of more comprehensive safety information comparing with conventional de novo approach. Method A probabilistic topic model was constructed based on the terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) that appeared in the Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions, and Adverse Reactions sections of the labels of 870 drugs. Fifty-two unique topics, each containing a set of terms, were identified by using topic modeling. The resulting probabilistic topic associations were used to measure the distance (similarity) between drugs. The success of the proposed model was evaluated by comparing a drug and its nearest neighbor (i.e., a drug pair) for common indications found in the Indications and Usage Section of the drug labels. Results Given a drug with more than three indications, the model yielded a 75% recall, meaning 75% of drug pairs shared one or more common indications. This is significantly higher than the 22% recall rate achieved by random selection. Additionally, the recall rate grows rapidly as the number of drug indications increases and reaches 84% for drugs with 11 indications. The analysis also demonstrated that 65 drugs with a Boxed Warning, which indicates significant risk of serious and possibly life-threatening adverse effects, might be replaced with safer alternatives that do not

  6. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance is not final...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the Division of...

  7. Animal Models of Social Contact and Drug Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Smith, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Social learning theories of drug abuse propose that individuals imitate drug use behaviors modeled by social peers, and that these behaviors are selectively reinforced and/or punished depending on group norms. Historically, animal models of social influence have focused on distal factors (i.e., those factors outside the drug-taking context) in drug self-administration studies. Recently, several investigators have developed novel models, or significantly modified existing models, to examine the role of proximal factors (i.e., those factors that are immediately present at the time of drug taking) on measures of drug self-administration. Studies using these newer models have revealed several important conclusions regarding the effects of social learning on drug abuse: 1) the presence of a social partner influences drug self-administration, 2) the behavior of a social partner determines whether social contact will increase or decrease drug intake, and 3) social partners can model and imitate specific patterns of drug self-administration. These findings are congruent with those obtained in the human laboratory, providing support for the cross-species generality and validity of these preclinical models. This mini-review describes in detail some of the preclinical animal models used to study social contact and drug self-administration to guide future research on social learning and drug abuse. PMID:26159089

  8. Introduction: on-label and off-label drug use in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S

    2015-03-01

    This Views and Reviews article examines FDA-approved uses of prescription drugs, as well as common off-label uses of drugs for several disorders that are frequently seen in reproductive medicine. Off-label drug use is ubiquitous in reproductive medicine, a fact that may be related to the disincentives to formally study these drugs in a potentially vulnerable population (i.e., pregnant women). It behooves clinicians to discuss with patients the risk-benefit ratio of treatment, and whether a treatment is FDA-approved for that condition. Researchers, seeking better data on effects of these drugs, may find fodder for future clinical studies in these articles. PMID:25726701

  9. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  10. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  11. Drugs on the College Campus. A Guide for College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlis, Helen H.

    This guide to drugs on the college campus provides accurate information to help administrators and other college officials understand and cope with the use of drugs by college students. The problem is defined, and facts about drugs, and the implications and issues occasioned by their use, are presented. Information is also offered in the following…

  12. Thiazide-like diuretic drug metolazone activates human pregnane X receptor to induce cytochrome 3A4 and multidrug-resistance protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and drug transporters such as multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1). PXR can be modulated by small molecules, including Federal Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs, thus altering drug metabolism and causing drug-drug interactions. To determine the role of FDA-approved drugs in PXR-mediated regulation of drug metabolism and clearance, we screened 1481 FDA-approved small-molecule drugs by using a luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells and identified the diuretic drug metolazone as an activator of PXR. Our data showed that metolazone activated hPXR-mediated expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestine cells and increased CYP3A4 promoter activity in various cell lines. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that hPXR recruits its co-activator SRC-1 upon metolazone binding in HepG2 cells, explaining the mechanism of hPXR activation. To understand the role of other commonly-used diuretics in PXR activation and the structure-activity relationship of metolazone, thiazide and non-thiazide diuretics drugs were also tested but only metolazone activates PXR. To understand the molecular mechanism, docking studies and mutational analysis were carried out and showed that metolazone binds in the ligand-binding pocket and interacts with mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues. This is the first report showing that metolazone activates PXR. Because activation of hPXR might cause drug-drug interactions, metolazone should be used with caution for drug treatment in patients undergoing combination therapy. PMID:25181459

  13. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 22599), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.''...

  14. 21 CFR 314.127 - Refusal to approve an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refusal to approve an abbreviated new drug... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.127 Refusal to approve an abbreviated new...

  15. 21 CFR 314.127 - Refusal to approve an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Refusal to approve an abbreviated new drug... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.127 Refusal to approve an abbreviated new...

  16. FDA direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs: what are consumer preferences and response tendencies?

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Nile; Loudon, David; Sircar-Ramsewak, Feroza

    2007-01-01

    The effect of direct-to-consumer (DTC) television advertising of prescription medications is a growing concern of the United States (U.S.) Congress, state legislatures, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This research study was conducted in order to examine consumers' perceived preferences of DTC television advertisement in relation to "reminder" "help-seeking," and "product-claim" FDA-approved advertisement categories. An additional objective was to examine the influence of DTC television advertising of prescription drugs on consumers' tendency to seek more information about the medication and/or the medical condition. The research indicates that DTC television drug ads appear to be insufficient for consumers to make informed decisions. Their mixed perception and acceptance of the advertisements seem to influence them to seek more information from a variety of medical sources. PMID:19042521

  17. Disinfection practices in intravenous drug administration.

    PubMed

    Helder, Onno K; Kornelisse, René F; Reiss, Irwin K M; Ista, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a feedback intervention on adherence to disinfection procedures during intravenous medication preparation and administration. We found that full adherence to the protocols significantly improved from 7.3% to 21.5% (P < .001) regarding medication preparation and from 7.9% to 15.5% (P = .012) regarding medication administration. However, disinfection practices still need improvement. PMID:26899528

  18. 78 FR 9928 - Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: To assist the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) in drafting a strategic...

  19. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  20. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  1. 21 CFR 20.3 - Certification and authentication of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification and authentication of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.3 Section 20.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... authentication of Food and Drug Administration records. (a) Upon request, the Food and Drug Administration...

  2. Drug patent expirations and the speed of generic entry.

    PubMed Central

    Bae, J P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using recent data, to analyze the generic drug entry phenomenon to determine the factors that influence the speed and likelihood of generic drug entries. DATA SOURCES: Data for 81 drugs that have lost patent between 1987 and 1994. Patent and exclusive marketing rights expiration dates: Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalent Evaluations (1986-1989). Generic entry dates: FDA Drug and Device Product Approvals (Jan. 1987-Dec. 1994). Numbers of pending generic applications: FDA Office of Generic Drugs Quantitative Report-ANDAs and AADAs (Nov. 1990-Jan. 1993). Sales revenue: Pharmaceutical Data Services, Walsh-America. STUDY DESIGN: This study appropriately recognizes generic entry as a survival problem, and uses a proportional hazard method for analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1) There is a negative relationship between an innovative drug's sales revenue and the time to generic entry. (2) Entries of generics tend to be slower for drugs that have either very few or a very large number of competing brands in the marketplace. (3) The time to generic entry increased overall between 1987 and 1994. (4) Drugs that primarily treat chronic symptoms tend to enter faster than the types of drugs that primarily treat acute illnesses. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that the generic industry is targeting large-revenue products and chronic drug markets. Entry of a generic drug is influenced by the existing branded substitutes in the marketplace. Surprisingly, the generic drug entry process has slowed despite many changes that would facilitate entry. PMID:9108806

  3. A Pressing Need for Pharmacotherapy Development to Treat Drug Addiction: An Editorial from a Legal Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andraka-Christou, B

    2016-01-01

    Only three FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for treating opiate dependence, all of which are underprescribed and underused. No FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for cocaine or methamphetamine dependence. More evidence-based, FDA-approved treatments are needed for treating drug dependence, but pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pursue such research without government incentives. Today pharmaceutical companies primarily conduct research and development (R&D) related to "blockbuster" and rare diseases; drug dependence does not fall into either category. Further compounding the problem, pharmaceutical companies have been recently slashing risky areas of research, rather than adopting new areas. Fortunately, the government has a number of options to incentivize pharmaceutical R&D relating to drug dependence treatment, including the following: market exclusivity for new medications, tax breaks, priority review vouchers, liability reduction, and an advanced market commitment. PMID:27055610

  4. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... listed in 21 CFR 1308.12 in locked compartments under proper temperature controls, permit only authorized... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system...

  5. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... listed in 21 CFR 1308.12 in locked compartments under proper temperature controls, permit only authorized... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system...

  6. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... listed in 21 CFR 1308.12 in locked compartments under proper temperature controls, permit only authorized... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system...

  7. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... listed in 21 CFR 1308.12 in locked compartments under proper temperature controls, permit only authorized... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system...

  8. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... listed in 21 CFR 1308.12 in locked compartments under proper temperature controls, permit only authorized... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system...

  9. FDA Approval Summary: Nivolumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Progression On or After Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Blumenthal, Gideon; Mushti, Sirisha; He, Kun; Libeg, Meredith; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On October 9, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the nivolumab metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indication to include patients with nonsquamous NSCLC after a 3.25-month review timeline. Approval was based on demonstration of an improvement in overall survival (OS) in an international, multicenter, open-label, randomized trial comparing nivolumab to docetaxel in patients with metastatic nonsquamous NSCLC with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. The CheckMate 057 trial enrolled 582 patients who were randomized (1:1) to receive nivolumab or docetaxel. Nivolumab demonstrated improved OS compared with docetaxel at the prespecified interim analysis with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.73 (p = .0015), and a median OS of 12.2 months (95% CI: 9.7–15.0 months) in patients treated with nivolumab compared with 9.4 months (95% CI: 8.0–10.7 months) in patients treated with docetaxel. A statistically significant improvement in objective response rate (ORR) was also observed, with an ORR of 19% (95% CI: 15%–24%) in the nivolumab arm and 12% (95% CI: 9%–17%) in the docetaxel arm. The median duration of response was 17 months in the nivolumab arm and 6 months in the docetaxel arm. Progression-free survival was not statistically different between arms. A prespecified retrospective subgroup analysis suggested that patients with programmed cell death ligand 1-negative tumors treated with nivolumab had similar OS to those treated with docetaxel. The toxicity profile of nivolumab was consistent with the known immune-mediated adverse event profile except for 1 case of grade 5 limbic encephalitis, which led to a postmarketing requirement study to better characterize immune-mediated encephalitis. Implications for Practice: Based on the results from the CheckMate 057 clinical trial, nivolumab represents a new treatment option for patients requiring second-line treatment for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. The role of nivolumab in

  10. Considerations in the Evaluation of Potential Efficacy of Medications for Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: An Editorial.

    PubMed

    Egli, M; White, D A; Acri, J B

    2016-01-01

    The societal burden created by alcohol and drug use disorders is estimated to be on the order of hundreds of billions of dollars, creating a need for effective medications to reduce use and prevent relapse. While there are FDA-approved medications to facilitate abstinence and prevent relapse for some indications including, alcohol, tobacco, and opiate use disorders, there are no approved treatments for other abused substances, including cocaine, methamphetamine, and cannabis, leaving these critical medical needs unmet. The development of such medications has fallen largely to the government with efforts spearheaded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse. Both agencies have medication development programs with preclinical components that include the standardized evaluation of compounds using animal models. This chapter describes the rationale and considerations involved in the use of such models, including reinstatement of drug self-administration. PMID:27055609

  11. Difficulties experienced during preparation and administration of oral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boztepe, Handan; Özdemir, Handan; Karababa, Çiğdem; Yıldız, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Aim: It was aimed to determine the difficulties experienced by pediatric nurses working in the wards of a university hospital during preparation and administration of drugs and to determine solution recommendations. Material and Methods: One hundred and eight nurses who accepted to participate in the study constituted the sample of the study. Open-ended questions were asked in order to obtain detailed information about the attitudes and views of the participants and face to face interview was used. The problems experienced during preparation and administration of drugs were collected using the data collection form prepared by the investigators. Institution approval, ethics committee approval (HEK12/193) and written informed consent from the nurses who wished to participate in the study were obtained to conduct the study. The data obtained were expressed as figures and percentages. Results: The most commonly reported problems in preparation of drugs included incomplete dissolution of tablets or non-homogeneous distribution in fluids (54.6%) and difficulty in breaking tablets in appropriate doses (45.3%). The most commonly reported problem experienced during administration of drugs was rejection of drugs which tasted bad by babies/children or spitting out the drug (75.9%). In our study, the nurses also mentioned the problems related with drug administration equipment. These problems included fear of injectors (25.9%), escape of the drugs into the respiratory way (15.7%) and lack of appropriate equipment for administering the drugs (7.4%). Conclusions: In our study, it was found that all nurses experienced difficulty in preparing and administering drugs. The problems experienced by the nurses and solution recommendations for these problems were reported to the hospital administration. PMID:26078668

  12. 77 FR 23485 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Input Into Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting..., Steve.Morin@fda.hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. FDA Patient Network This is the inaugural FDA Patient Network Annual Meeting hosted by the FDA Office of Special Health Issues, the Agency's liaison...

  13. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD. PMID:26268327

  14. Dosing, administration, and safety of radium-223: How I do it.

    PubMed

    Dan, Tu D; Doyle, Laura; Raval, Amar J; Pridjian, Andrew; Gomella, Leonard G; Den, Robert B

    2016-06-01

    Radium-223 dichloride is a first-in-class bone-directed radiopharmaceutical that has been shown to prolong survival in men with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Unlike other radiopharmaceuticals, radium-223 uniquely uses alpha-emission to deliver high intensity, short range cytoxic treatments resulting in minimal myelosuppression. Following the results of the ALSYMPCA trial, radium-223 (Xofigo) was FDA approved in the United States in May 2013 and approved by Health Canada in December 2013 for the treatment of mCRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral disease. This 'How I do it' article describes the background of radium 223 as well as the methods and techniques that our institution uses for safe and effective administration and notes the subtle differences when administering the drug in Canada. PMID:27347625

  15. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII--Drug Supply Chain; Standards for Admission of Imported Drugs, Registration of...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting; request for...

  16. 78 FR 48691 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Demystifying Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a meeting for patients, caregivers, patient advocates, as well as patient advocate and health professional groups, to provide a primer on drug product development and explore patient involvement in drug development. The meeting will serve as a forum for FDA's patient stakeholders and the general public, including health professionals,......

  17. 78 FR 13072 - Seventh Annual Drug Information Association/Food and Drug Administration Statistics Forum-2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with the Drug Information Association (DIA), is announcing a public conference entitled ``Seventh Annual DIA/FDA Statistics Forum--2013.'' The purpose of the conference is to discuss relevant statistical issues associated with the development and review of therapeutic drugs and biologics. This meeting is intended to be an open forum for......

  18. 77 FR 10753 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Food and Drug Administration Records Access Authority Under the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Food and Drug Administration Records Access Authority Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  19. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug...

  20. Medication Repurposing in Pediatric Patients: Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gaps in pediatric therapeutics often result in off-label use and specifically, novel uses for existing medications, termed “drug repurposing.” Drug Information (DI) queries to a Pediatric Medication Resource Center of a large metropolitan pediatric hospital in New York and inherent difficulties in retrieving evidence-based information prompted a review of current medication repurposing for pediatric patients. The objective included characterization of innovative off-label use of medications Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 1 or more indications to treat a totally different disorder or indication in pediatric patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to retrieve publications describing repurposed medications in pediatric patients. Excluded was FDA-approved indications used off-label in pediatric patients (e.g., different dose), preclinical data, adult use only, and experimental use. Evidence quality was classified using a modified American Academy of Neurology Level of Evidence. Results were analyzed using χ2 at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Over 2000 references were retrieved and reviewed. A total of 101 medications repurposed for novel off-label uses for pediatric patients were identified: 38 for neonates, 74 for children, and 52 for adolescents. Neonates and infants were least likely to receive a medication for a repurposed use. Strong or intermediate evidence existed in 80.2% of cases. The evidence was weak in 19.8%. No significant relationship was observed between the pediatric age group and strength of the literature. Most repurposed uses pertained to generic or widely used medications. Less than 5% of medications were first marketed after 2011. CONCLUSIONS: While not exhaustive, the present study represents the most comprehensive listing of novel uses exclusive to pediatric patients. Further research is needed to identify the frequency of repurposed uses. The valuable DI role of pharmacists in assessing repurposed

  1. Formulation approaches in mitigating toxicity of orally administrated drugs.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Irina; Tan, Elijah

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of current formulation approaches to mitigate toxicity of orally administrated drugs. The formulation approaches are characterized by their intended impact on a drug's pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacological properties or metabolic pathways. Regulatory opportunities and constraints with focus on U.S. regulations in optimizing a drug's safety or efficacy profile are reviewed. The following formulation approaches are described: (i) pharmacokinetic-modulating and (ii) pharmacodynamic-modulating. In the pharmacokinetic-modulating approach, the pharmacokinetic profile of drug release is modified by, for example, a reduction in peak drug plasma concentration while preserving or improving AUC, thereby potentially reducing toxic effects that may be related to C(max). In the pharmacodynamic-modulating approach, the drug is co-dosed with pharmacologically active or nonpharmacologically active agent or agents intended for mitigation of the drug's toxicity. The pharmacodynamic-modulating approach requires information on the specificity of drug interactions with other compounds and also on metabolic pathways. Examples demonstrating successful formulation work in reducing drug toxicity are provided. The in-depth knowledge of the drug's PK and PD properties combined with a greater understanding of the biology of diseases are necessary for successful drug product formulation leading to optimized in vivo exposure and minimized toxicity. PMID:23317423

  2. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse. PMID:27062912

  3. Behavioral economics of drug self-administration and drug abuse policy.

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, S R

    1991-01-01

    The concepts of behavioral economics have proven useful for understanding the environmental control of overall levels of responding for a variety of commodities, including reinforcement by drug self-administration. These general concepts are summarized for application to the analysis of drug-reinforced behavior and proposed as the basis for future applications. This behavioral agenda includes the assessment of abuse liability, the assay of drug-reinforcer interactions, the design of drug abuse interventions, and the formulation of drug abuse public policy. These separate domains of investigation are described as part of an overall strategy for designing model projects to control drug use and testing public policy initiatives. PMID:1955823

  4. Food and Drug Administration Drug Approval Process: A History and Overview.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher Ty

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the processing of investigational and new drug applications is described and the standard and expedited review processes are examined. The efforts of the US Food and Drug Administration to ensure greater agency transparency and fiscal responsibility and intensify oversight during the drug development and approval process are reviewed. Often attributed to a decrease in the number of uninsured adults, both the increase in prescription drug sales and the high costs associated with bringing a new drug to market highlight the necessity for a streamlined and cost-effective process to deliver these drugs safely and effectively. PMID:26897420

  5. Is It a Cosmetic, a Drug, or Both? (or Is It Soap?)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of product. Firms sometimes violate the law by marketing a cosmetic with a drug claim or by marketing a drug as if it were a cosmetic, ... that FDA approve a pharmaceutical for sale and marketing in the United States. FDA only approves an ...

  6. Food and Drug Administration Evaluation and Cigarette Smoking Risk Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Waters, Erika A.; Parascandola, Mark; Augustson, Erik M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between a belief about Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety evaluation of cigarettes and smoking risk perceptions. Methods: A nationally representative, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 1046 adult current cigarette smokers. Results: Smokers reporting that the FDA does not evaluate cigarettes for…

  7. 76 FR 6477 - Industry Exchange Workshop on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ..., Food and Drug Administration, 4040 North Central Expressway, suite 900, Dallas, Texas 75204, 214-253-4952, FAX: 214-253-4970, e-mail: David.Arvelo@fda.hhs.gov . Registration: You are encouraged...

  8. 75 FR 13766 - Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and Drug Administration--Partnering With Industry; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  9. 75 FR 22412 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Cincinnati District, in co-sponsorship with Xavier...

  10. 75 FR 73106 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Clostridium difficile; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  11. 76 FR 19998 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of supplemental grant funds...

  12. 76 FR 55927 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Demonstrating the Substantial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Questions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled...

  13. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan...

  14. 75 FR 74063 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration's Convener of Active Medical Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration... Supplemental Application AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent. SUMMARY: The Food... Medical Policy, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave, Bldg. 51, rm. 6360, Silver...

  15. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... predicate tobacco product. Manufacturers of tobacco products first introduced or delivered for...

  16. 21 CFR 20.29 - Prohibition on withdrawal of records from Food and Drug Administration files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibition on withdrawal of records from Food and Drug Administration files. 20.29 Section 20.29 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... withdrawal of records from Food and Drug Administration files. No person may withdraw records submitted...

  17. 21 CFR 20.2 - Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.2 Section 20.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... records by Food and Drug Administration employees. (a) Any request for records of the Food and...

  18. 21 CFR 20.30 - Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff. 20.30 Section 20.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.30 Food and Drug Administration Freedom...

  19. 21 CFR 5.1105 - Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. 5.1105 Section 5.1105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ORGANIZATION Organization § 5.1105 Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. The...

  20. 21 CFR 20.110 - Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.110 Section 20.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees. (a) The name, title, grade,...

  1. 21 CFR 20.110 - Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.110 Section 20.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Data and information about Food and Drug Administration employees. (a) The name, title, grade,...

  2. 21 CFR 20.111 - Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. 20.111 Section 20.111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Records § 20.111 Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 20.111 - Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. 20.111 Section 20.111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Records § 20.111 Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 20.111 - Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. 20.111 Section 20.111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Records § 20.111 Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 20.28 - Food and Drug Administration determinations of confidentiality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration determinations of confidentiality. 20.28 Section 20.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.28 Food and Drug Administration determinations of confidentiality. A...

  6. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  7. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner of... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7.45 Section 7.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 5.1105 - Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. 5.1105 Section 5.1105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ORGANIZATION Organization § 5.1105 Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. The...

  13. 76 FR 46303 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Investigational New Drug Applications (INDs) for Minimally Manipulated, Unrelated Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood Intended for Hematopoietic Reconstitution for Specified Indications,'' dated June 2011. The guidance document provides advice to potential......

  14. 75 FR 29561 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Drugs.Com

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and Drugs.Com. The purpose of the MOU is to extend the reach of FDA Consumer Health Information and to provide consumers with better information and timely content concerning public health and safety topics, including alerts of emerging safety issues and product...

  15. Bedaquiline, an FDA-approved antibiotic, inhibits mitochondrial function and potently blocks the proliferative expansion of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs).

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Bedaquiline (a.k.a., Sirturo) is an anti-microbial agent, which is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diaryl-quinoline compound, that mechanistically inhibits the bacterial ATP-synthase, and shows potent activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB. Interestingly, eukaryotic mitochondria originally evolved from engulfed aerobic bacteria. Thus, we hypothesized that, in mammalian cells, bedaquiline might also target the mitochondrial ATP-synthase, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion. Here, we show that bedaquiline has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that bedaquiline treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits mitochondrial oxygen-consumption, as well as glycolysis, but induces oxidative stress. Importantly, bedaquiline significantly blocks the propagation and expansion of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of approx. 1-μM, as determined using the mammosphere assay. Similarly, bedaquiline also reduces both the CD44+/CD24low/- CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, under anchorage-independent growth conditions. In striking contrast, bedaquiline significantly increases oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for TB infections. As such, future pre-clinical studies and human clinical trials in cancer patients may be warranted. Interestingly, we also highlight that bedaquiline shares certain structural similarities with trans-piceatannol and trans-resveratrol, which are known natural flavonoid inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase (complex V) and show anti-aging properties. PMID:27344270

  16. Drug repurposing for gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Weir, Scott J; Sethi, Geetika; Broward, Melinda A; Godwin, Andrew K

    2013-07-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) remains largely incurable. Rare diseases, such as GIST, individually affect small groups of patients but collectively are estimated to affect 25 to 30 million people in the United States alone. Given the costs associated with the discovery, development, and registration of new drugs, orphan diseases such as GIST are often not pursued by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. As a result, "drug repurposing" or "repositioning," has emerged as an alternative to the traditional drug development process. In this study, we screened 796 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and found that two of these compounds, auranofin (Ridaura) and fludarabine phosphate, effectively and selectively inhibited the proliferation of GISTs, including imatinib-resistant cells. One of the most notable drug hits, auranofin, an oral, gold-containing agent approved by the FDA in 1985 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was found to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to dramatic inhibition of GIST cell growth and viability. Importantly, the anticancer activity associated with auranofin was independent of imatinib-resistant status, but was closely related to the endogenous and inducible levels of ROS. Coupled with the fact that auranofin has an established safety profile in patients, these findings suggest for the first time that auranofin may have clinical benefit for patients with GIST, particularly in those suffering from imatinib-resistant and recurrent forms of this disease. PMID:23657945

  17. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... workshop regarding FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research professional... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  18. [Animal models of drug dependence using the drug self-administration method].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Yabuuchi, K; Yamaguchi, T; Nakamichi, M

    2001-01-01

    This paper will review 1) experimental models of drug-seeking behavior and 2) mechanisms underlying the behavior, focusing on cocaine self-administration. After the acquisition of self-administration, vigorous lever-pressing is generally observable after the drug was replaced by saline. This lever-pressing behavior under saline infusion can be considered "drug-seeking behavior". Drug-seeking behavior is reinstated by non-contingent injection of the drug, stress exposure and presentation of drug-associated stimuli even after extinction. This is called a relapse/reinstatement model. Electrophysiological studies showed that the majority of accumbal neurons is tonically inhibited during cocaine self-administration and exhibited phasic increases in firing time-locked to cocaine self-infusion, which might represent the craving state or drive animals to drug-seeking behavior. Voltammetry and microdialysis studies indicated that the timing of drug-seeking responses can be predicted from fluctuations in accumbal extracellular dopamine concentration. Whereas dopamine D2-like agonists reinstated extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior, D1-like agonists prevented the relapse in cocaine-seeking behavior induced by cocaine itself. Given that an AMPA receptor antagonist, but not dopamine antagonist, prevented cocaine-seeking behavior induced by cocaine, glutamate transmission in the nucleus accumbens is thought to be important for expression of craving or drug-seeking behavior. PMID:11233296

  19. Widening the path and window of opportunity for FDA approval of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant specific antidotes and reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunny; Steen, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    There remains a need for safe, immediately effective, and easy to administer antidotes for patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the settings of major bleeding, need for emergency surgery, and accidental overdose. We review considerations for the successful safety and effectiveness evaluation of potential antidotes currently under development. These compounds are in expedited regulatory approval programs aimed at accelerating the preclinical and clinical evaluation and approval processes for treatments of serious conditions. We review the features of these expedited programs as well as the FDA's efforts to broadly advance the efficiency of drug development and increase the number of new compounds brought to market. The critical path initiative and regulatory science initiative have resulted in numerous successful programs to address current challenges such as a paucity of validated biomarkers and surrogate endpoints as well as unreliable animal models of toxicity. The FDA has also advocated for increased use of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and adaptive trial design. These efforts foster collaboration between academia, industry and the public sector across interdisciplinary sciences and may continue to widen the pathway for NOAC-specific reversal agents and other novel compounds. PMID:26374107

  20. Challenges Associated with Route of Administration in Neonatal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Linakis, Matthew W; Roberts, Jessica K; Lala, Anita C; Spigarelli, Michael G; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Ward, Robert M; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2016-02-01

    The administration of drugs to neonates poses significant challenges. The aim of this review was to provide insight into some of these challenges and resolutions that may be encountered with several of the most commonly used routes of administration and dosage forms in neonatal care, including oral, parenteral, transdermal, intrapulmonary, and rectal. Important considerations include fluctuations in stomach pH hours to years after birth, the logistics of setting up an intravenous infusion, the need for reduced particle size for aerosol delivery to the developing neonatal lung, and variation in perirectal venous drainage. Additionally, some of the recently developed technologies for use in neonatal care are described. While the understanding of neonatal drug delivery has advanced over the past several decades, there is still a deficiency of technologies and formulations developed specifically for this population. PMID:26245673

  1. Food and Drug Administration Regulation of in Vitro Diagnostic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Elizabeth; O’Leary, Timothy J.; Gutman, Steven I.

    2005-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration regulates the sale and distribution of laboratory devices under a statutory and regulatory framework that is unfamiliar to most clinical laboratory scientists. In this article we briefly describe the criteria that are used to classify and review in vitro diagnostic devices. We discuss the similarities and differences between devices that are not subject to premarket review, and those that are required to undergo either a premarket application or premarket notification [510(k)] pathway. We then discuss the methods that the Food and Drug Administration uses to assess the performance of in vitro diagnostic devices in the marketplace as a component of the total life cycle approach to medical device regulation. PMID:15681468

  2. Robust model predictive control for optimal continuous drug administration.

    PubMed

    Sopasakis, Pantelis; Patrinos, Panagiotis; Sarimveis, Haralambos

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the model predictive control (MPC) technology is used for tackling the optimal drug administration problem. The important advantage of MPC compared to other control technologies is that it explicitly takes into account the constraints of the system. In particular, for drug treatments of living organisms, MPC can guarantee satisfaction of the minimum toxic concentration (MTC) constraints. A whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model serves as the dynamic prediction model of the system after it is formulated as a discrete-time state-space model. Only plasma measurements are assumed to be measured on-line. The rest of the states (drug concentrations in other organs and tissues) are estimated in real time by designing an artificial observer. The complete system (observer and MPC controller) is able to drive the drug concentration to the desired levels at the organs of interest, while satisfying the imposed constraints, even in the presence of modelling errors, disturbances and noise. A case study on a PBPK model with 7 compartments, constraints on 5 tissues and a variable drug concentration set-point illustrates the efficiency of the methodology in drug dosing control applications. The proposed methodology is also tested in an uncertain setting and proves successful in presence of modelling errors and inaccurate measurements. PMID:24986530

  3. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  4. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  5. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  6. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  7. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  8. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to......

  9. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to......

  10. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to......

  11. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to......

  12. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to......

  13. 78 FR 13348 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of January 30, 2013 (78 FR 6332... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration...

  14. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems. PMID:23415951

  15. 21 CFR 20.1 - Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.1 Section 20.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., That a written request therefor made by a health, food, or drug officer, prosecuting attorney,...

  16. 21 CFR 20.1 - Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.1 Section 20.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., That a written request therefor made by a health, food, or drug officer, prosecuting attorney,...

  17. 21 CFR 20.1 - Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.1 Section 20.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., That a written request therefor made by a health, food, or drug officer, prosecuting attorney,...

  18. 21 CFR 20.1 - Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.1 Section 20.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., That a written request therefor made by a health, food, or drug officer, prosecuting attorney,...

  19. 21 CFR 20.1 - Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testimony by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.1 Section 20.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., That a written request therefor made by a health, food, or drug officer, prosecuting attorney,...

  20. Real time computation of in vivo drug levels during drug self-administration experiments.

    PubMed

    Tsibulsky, Vladimir L; Norman, Andrew B

    2005-05-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the drug concentration in the effect compartment of the body is the major factor regulating self-administration behavior. A novel computer-based protocol was developed to facilitate studies on mechanisms of drug addiction by determining correlations between drug levels and behavior during multiple drug injections and infusions. The core of the system is a user's program written in Medstate Notation language (Med-Associates, Inc.), which runs the self-administration session (with MED-PC software and hardware, Med-Associates, Inc.) and calculates the levels of infused and/or injected drugs in real time during the session. From the comparison of classical exponential and simple linear models of first-order kinetics, it is concluded that exponential solutions for the appropriate differential equations may be replaced with linear equations if the cycle of computation is much shorter than the shortest half-life for the drug. The choice between particular computation equations depends on assumptions about the pharmacokinetics of the particular drug: (i) one-, two- or three-compartment model, (ii) zero-, first- or second-order process of elimination, (iii) the constants of distribution and elimination half-lives of the drug are known or can be reasonably assumed, (iv) dependence of the constants on the drug level, and (v) temporal stability of all parameters during the session. This method of drug level computation can be employed not only for self-administration but also for other behavioral paradigms to advance pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:15878149

  1. Drug-resin drug interactions in patients with delayed gastric emptying: What is optimal time window for drug administration?

    PubMed

    Camilleri, M

    2016-08-01

    Most drug-drug interactions involve overlap or competition in drug metabolic pathways. However, there are medications, typically resins, whose function is to bind injurious substances such as bile acids or potassium within the digestive tract. The objective of this article is to review the functions of the stomach and the kinetics of emptying of different food forms or formulations to make recommendations on timing of medication administration in order to avoid intragastric drug interactions. Based on the profiles and kinetics of emptying of liquid nutrients and homogenized solids, a window of 3 h between administration of a resin drug and another 'target' medication would be expected to allow a median of 80% of medications with particle size <1 mm to empty from the stomach and, hence, avoid potential interaction such as binding of the 'target' medication within the stomach. PMID:26987693

  2. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug-use and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR 0.49; 95%CI 0.25-0.97), had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR 2.38; 95%CI 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in non-injecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs. PMID:22116012

  3. Is tobacco a drug? Administrative agencies as common law courts.

    PubMed

    Sunstein, C R

    1998-04-01

    Professor Cass Sunstein argues that the FDA has the authority to regulate tobacco products. He considers the text of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which supports the FDA assertion, and the context of its enactment, which argues against the FDA. He resolves the tension between text and context in favor of FDA jurisdiction by turning to the emerging role of administrative agencies. In modern government, he contends, administrative agencies have become America's common law courts, with the power to adapt statutory regimes to new facts and new values when the underlying statute is ambiguous. Professor Sunstein's Article, like the other pieces in this volume, was written after the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina decided Coyne Beahm v. FDA, but before a three judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed that decision in Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. v. FDA. In Coyne Beahm, the District Court held that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act authorized the FDA to regulate tobacco products, but not tobacco advertising. The Fourth Circuit rejected the District Court's jurisdictional ruling and invalidated the FDA's regulations in their entirety. The Clinton Administration has since requested an en banc rehearing before the Fourth Circuit. PMID:10557544

  4. How the US Food and Drug Administration Can Solve the Prescription Drug Shortage Problem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug shortages are threatening care quality and cost-containment efforts. I describe the pharmaceutical marketplace changes that have caused the problem, and propose new policies to solve it, through changing incentives for producers and purchasers. I propose a grading scheme for the Food and Drug Administration when it inspects manufacturing facilities in the United States and abroad. The inspections’ focus would change from closing unsafe plants to improving production process quality, reducing the likelihood that plants will be closed—the most frequent cause of drug shortages. PMID:23488502

  5. How are drugs approved? Part 1: the evolution of the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    The discovery, development, and marketing of drugs for clinical use is a process that is complex, arduous, expensive, highly regulated, often criticized, and sometimes controversial. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the governmental agency responsible for regulating the development and marketing of drugs, medical devices, biologics, foods, cosmetics, radiation-emitting electronic devices, and veterinary products, with the objective of ensuring their safety and efficacy. As part of a broad overview of the drug development process, this article will describe the historical evolution of the FDA. This will provide background for two subsequent articles in this series, which will describe the ethical foundations of clinical research and hethe stages of drug development. PMID:18251347

  6. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  7. FDA Approves First Wire-Free Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiological Health. He said in an agency news release: "As the first leadless pacemaker, Micra offers a new option for patients considering a single chamber pacemaker device, which may help prevent problems associated with the ...

  8. Catheter Obstruction of Intrathecal Drug Administration System -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seok Myeon; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2012-01-01

    Intrathecal drug administration system (ITDAS) can reduce the side effects while increasing the effectiveness of opioids compared to systemic opioid administration. Therefore, the use of ITDAS has increased in the management of cancer pain and chronic intractable pain. Catheter obstruction is a serious complication of ITDAS. Here, we present a case of catheter obstruction by a mass formed at the side hole and in the lumen. A 37-year-old man suffering from failed back surgery syndrome received an ITDAS implantation, and the ITDAS was refilled with morphine every 3 months. When the patient visited the hospital 18 months after ITDAS implantation for a refill, the amount of delivered morphine sulfate was much less than expected. Movement of the pump rotor was examined with fluoroscopy; however, it was normal. CSF aspiration through the catheter access port was impossible. When the intrathecal catheter was removed, we observed that the side hole and lumen of the catheter was plugged. PMID:22259717

  9. Food and Drug Administration regulation and evaluation of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Valerie; Baylor, Norman W

    2011-05-01

    The vaccine-approval process in the United States is regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research of the US Food and Drug Administration. Throughout the life cycle of development, from preclinical studies to after licensure, vaccines are subject to rigorous testing and oversight. Manufacturers must adhere to good manufacturing practices and control procedures to ensure the quality of vaccines. As mandated by Title 21 of the Code of Regulations, licensed vaccines must meet stringent criteria for safety, efficacy, and potency. PMID:21502242

  10. 78 FR 20325 - 2013 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Regulatory Conference...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Global Regulatory Environment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Life Cycle in a Global Regulatory Environment.'' The conference will cover current issues affecting the... facilitate the development and continuous improvement of safe and effective medical products. The...

  11. Mining FDA drug labels using an unsupervised learning technique - topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels contain a broad array of information, ranging from adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to drug efficacy, risk-benefit consideration, and more. However, the labeling language used to describe these information is free text often containing ambiguous semantic descriptions, which poses a great challenge in retrieving useful information from the labeling text in a consistent and accurate fashion for comparative analysis across drugs. Consequently, this task has largely relied on the manual reading of the full text by experts, which is time consuming and labor intensive. Method In this study, a novel text mining method with unsupervised learning in nature, called topic modeling, was applied to the drug labeling with a goal of discovering “topics” that group drugs with similar safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses together. A total of 794 FDA-approved drug labels were used in this study. First, the three labeling sections (i.e., Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions, Adverse Reactions) of each drug label were processed by the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) to convert the free text of each label to the standard ADR terms. Next, the topic modeling approach with latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was applied to generate 100 topics, each associated with a set of drugs grouped together based on the probability analysis. Lastly, the efficacy of the topic modeling was evaluated based on known information about the therapeutic uses and safety data of drugs. Results The results demonstrate that drugs grouped by topics are associated with the same safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses with statistical significance (P<0.05). The identified topics have distinct context that can be directly linked to specific adverse events (e.g., liver injury or kidney injury) or therapeutic application (e.g., antiinfectives for systemic use). We were also able to identify potential adverse events that

  12. 75 FR 21000 - Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (formerly Docket No. 02D-0049) Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Public...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  13. 77 FR 51031 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of...

  14. 76 FR 72953 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of...

  15. 78 FR 30317 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of...

  16. 78 FR 6332 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of...

  17. 77 FR 21784 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of...

  18. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FRA Administrator's determination of random drug... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.602 FRA Administrator's determination of random...

  19. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice.... In the Federal Register of July 21, 2011 (76 FR 43689), FDA announced the availability of the...

  20. 78 FR 42381 - Administrative Detention of Drugs Intended for Human or Animal Use

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... regulations for the administrative detention of drugs (78 FR 21085). The docket was intended to ensure that... July 15, 2013 Part IV Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts... / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts...

  1. 76 FR 30727 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... reportable food that is the subject of a summary posting and that are part of a chain of establishments with... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  2. Critical Assessment of Implantable Drug Delivery Devices in Glaucoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Manickavasagam, Dharani; Oyewumi, Moses O.

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of heterogeneous disorders involving progressive optic neuropathy that can culminate into visual impairment and irreversible blindness. Effective therapeutic interventions must address underlying vulnerability of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degeneration in conjunction with correcting other associated risk factors (such as elevated intraocular pressure). However, realization of therapeutic outcomes is heavily dependent on suitable delivery system that can overcome myriads of anatomical and physiological barriers to intraocular drug delivery. Development of clinically viable sustained release systems in glaucoma is a widely recognized unmet need. In this regard, implantable delivery systems may relieve the burden of chronic drug administration while potentially ensuring high intraocular drug bioavailability. Presently there are no FDA-approved implantable drug delivery devices for glaucoma even though there are several ongoing clinical studies. The paper critically assessed the prospects of polymeric implantable delivery systems in glaucoma while identifying factors that can dictate (a) patient tolerability and acceptance, (b) drug stability and drug release profiles, (c) therapeutic efficacy, and (d) toxicity and biocompatibility. The information gathered could be useful in future research and development efforts on implantable delivery systems in glaucoma. PMID:24066234

  3. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.20 Policy on disclosure of Food and...

  4. 21 CFR 20.32 - Disclosure of Food and Drug Administration employee names.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of Food and Drug Administration employee names. 20.32 Section 20.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.32 Disclosure of Food and...

  5. 21 CFR 19.10 - Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest Review Board. 19.10 Section 19.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND CONFLICTS OF INTEREST General Provisions § 19.10...

  6. 21 CFR 20.31 - Retention schedule of requests for Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention schedule of requests for Food and Drug Administration records. 20.31 Section 20.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.31 Retention schedule of requests for...

  7. 21 CFR 20.111 - Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. 20.111 Section 20.111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.111 Data and information...

  8. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.120 Records available in Food and...

  9. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.20 Policy on disclosure of Food and...

  10. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.20 Policy on disclosure of Food and...

  11. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.20 Policy on disclosure of Food and...

  12. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.20 Policy on disclosure of Food and...

  13. 21 CFR 20.111 - Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Data and information submitted voluntarily to the Food and Drug Administration. 20.111 Section 20.111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.111 Data and information...

  14. Trends in utilization of FDA expedited drug development and approval programs, 1987-2014: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of special expedited development and review pathways at the US Food and Drug Administration over the past two decades. Design Cohort study. Setting FDA approved novel therapeutics between 1987 and 2014. Population Publicly available sources provided each drug’s year of approval, their innovativeness (first in class versus not first in class), World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Classification, and which (if any) of the FDA’s four primary expedited development and review programs or designations were associated with each drug: orphan drug, fast track, accelerated approval, and priority review. Main outcome measures Logistic regression models evaluated trends in the proportion of drugs associated with each of the four expedited development and review programs. To evaluate the number of programs associated with each approved drug over time, Poisson models were employed, with the number of programs as the dependent variable and a linear term for year of approval. The difference in trends was compared between drugs that were first in class and those that were not. Results The FDA approved 774 drugs during the study period, with one third representing first in class agents. Priority review (43%) was the most prevalent of the four programs, with accelerated approval (9%) the least common. There was a significant increase of 2.6% per year in the number of expedited review and approval programs granted to each newly approved agent (incidence rate ratio 1.026, 95% confidence interval 1.017 to 1.035, P<0.001), and a 2.4% increase in the proportion of drugs associated with at least one such program (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.006 to 1.043, P=0.009). Driving this trend was an increase in the proportion of approved, non-first in class drugs associated with at least one program for drugs (P=0.03 for interaction). Conclusions In the past two decades, drugs newly approved by the FDA have been associated with an

  15. 78 FR 21085 - Establishment of a Public Docket for Administrative Detention Under the Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Administrative Detention Under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act AGENCY: Food and Drug... Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). This document is intended to solicit input from all relevant..., and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) (21 U.S.C. 334(g)) to provide FDA administrative detention...

  16. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of.... (a) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator......

  17. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of.... (a) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator......

  18. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of.... (a) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator......

  19. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of.... (a) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator......

  20. 28 CFR 0.138 - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.138 Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of.... (a) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator......

  1. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    .99) with the observed values in the SD rat corneas. Similar pharmacokinetics models explain drug delivery to the cornea in rat and rabbit animal models. Retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration can be explained with a four-compartment (periocular space, choroid-containing transfer compartment, retina, and distribution compartment) model with elimination from the periocular space, retina, and choroid compartment. Inclusion of a dissolution–release step before the drug is available for absorption or elimination better explains retinal tmax. Good fits were obtained in both the BN (r = 0.99) and SD (r = 0.99) rats for retinal celecoxib using the same model; however, the parameter estimates differed. Conclusions Corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules after periocular administration can be described by compartment models. The modeling analysis shows that (1) leak-back from the site of administration most likely contributes to the apparent lack of an increase phase in corneal concentrations; (2) elimination via the conjunctival or periocular blood and lymphatic systems contributes significantly to drug clearance after periocular injection; (3) corneal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules can be explained by using similar models in rats and rabbits; and (4) although there are differences in some retinal pharmacokinetics parameters between the pigmented and nonpigmented rats, the physiological basis of these differences has yet to be ascertained. PMID:18172109

  2. DEWORMING DELUSIONS? MASS DRUG ADMINISTRATION IN EAST AFRICAN SCHOOLS.

    PubMed

    Allen, Tim; Parker, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    Recent debates about deworming school-aged children in East Africa have been described as the 'Worm Wars'. The stakes are high. Deworming has become one of the top priorities in the fight against infectious diseases. Staff at the World Health Organization, the Gates Foundation and the World Bank (among other institutions) have endorsed the approach, and school-based treatments are a key component of large-scale mass drug administration programmes. Drawing on field research in Uganda and Tanzania, and engaging with both biological and social evidence, this article shows that assertions about the effects of school-based deworming are over-optimistic. The results of a much-cited study on deworming Kenyan school children, which has been used to promote the intervention, are flawed, and a systematic review of randomized controlled trials demonstrates that deworming is unlikely to improve overall public health. Also, confusions arise by applying the term deworming to a variety of very different helminth infections and to different treatment regimes, while local-level research in schools reveals that drug coverage usually falls below target levels. In most places where data exist, infection levels remain disappointingly high. Without indefinite free deworming, any declines in endemicity are likely to be reversed. Moreover, there are social problems arising from mass drug administration that have generally been ignored. Notably, there are serious ethical and practical issues arising from the widespread practice of giving tablets to children without actively consulting parents. There is no doubt that curative therapy for children infected with debilitating parasitic infections is appropriate, but overly positive evaluations of indiscriminate deworming are counter-productive. PMID:27428063

  3. Suspected drug eruption in seven dogs during administration of flucytosine.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Medeiros, C; Wigney, D I; Love, D N

    1996-10-01

    7 of 8 dogs receiving combination drug therapy consisting of flucytosine together with amphotericin B and/or a triazole for cryptococcosis or aspergillosis developed cutaneous or mucocutaneous eruptions during the course of treatment. Lesions resolved in all cases following discontinuation of flucytosine despite continued administration of other antifungals, suggesting the eruption was referable primarily to the flucytosine component of therapy. Lesions developed 13 to 41 days (median 20 days) after commencing flucytosine (105 to 188 mg/kg/day divided and given every 8 h; median dose rate 150 mg/kg/day). The cumulative dose of flucytosine given prior to the first signs of the drug eruption ranged from 1.7 to 6.8 g/kg (median 2.3 g/kg). The eruptions consisted of depigmentation, followed by ulceration, exudation and crust formation. The scrotum was affected in all 4 male dogs, the nasal plane in 6 of 7 cases, while the lips, vulva, external ear canal and integument were involved in a smaller number of cases. There was considerable variation in the severity of lesions, with changes being most marked when flucytosine was continued for several days after lesions first appeared. Some dogs experienced malaise and inappetence in association with the suspected drug eruption. Healing took a variable period, typically in excess of 2 weeks after discontinuing flucytosine, with up to 2 months being required for total resolution of the lesions. All lesions resolved eventually without scarring or permanent loss of pigment. PMID:8937669

  4. Preparation of intravenous drug administration guidelines for a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia; Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia M; López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez-Gómez, Milagrosa; Echarri-Martínez, Lara; Carrillo-Álvarez, Angel; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2014-01-01

    Drug administration is one of the main sources of errors in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). An available guide for intravenous drug administration might be useful. The aim of this article is to present the methodology and results for the development of a guide for intravenous drug administration in a PICU. A total of 116 drugs were included. Standard concentrations, diluents, technique for reconstitution and dilution, stability, rate of administration, and relevant observations were defined for each drug according to a review of the most commonly used literature resources. The main unique feature of this article is that it includes standard concentrations for each drug. PMID:24384883

  5. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ..., Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg... CONTACT: Samie Allen, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and......

  6. Drug updates and approvals: 2015 in review.

    PubMed

    Klibanov, Olga M; Phan, Diep; Ferguson, Kelli

    2015-12-12

    This article highlights important prescribing information for some drugs that received FDA approval within the past year. These include: atazanavir and cobicistat (Evotaz®), ceftazidime and avibactam (Avycaz®), edoxaban (Savaysa®), ivabradine (Corlanor®), liraglutide (rDNA origin) injection (Saxenda®), perindopril arginine and amlodipine besylate (Prestalia®), and secukinumab (Cosentyx®) subcutaneous injection. PMID:26545091

  7. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic. PMID:26553791

  8. Food and Drug Administration Evaluation and Cigarette Smoking Risk Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Waters, Erika A.; Parascandola, Mark; Augustson, Erik M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between a belief about Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety evaluation of cigarettes and smoking risk perceptions. Methods A nationally representative, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 1046 adult current cigarette smokers. Results Smokers reporting that the FDA does not evaluate cigarettes for safety (46.1%), exhibited greater comprehension of the health risks of smoking and were more likely (48.5%) than other participants (33.6%) to report quit intentions. Risk perceptions partially mediated the relationship between FDA evaluation belief and quit intentions. Conclusions These findings highlight the need for proactive, effective communication to the public about the aims of new tobacco product regulations. PMID:22251767

  9. Food and Drug Administration workshop on indirect mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poirier, L A

    1996-01-01

    A workshop sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was held on March 4-5, 1996, at the Lister Hill Auditorium of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The workshop considered both the scientific aspects and the regulatory implications of indirect-acting carcinogens. A wide variety of agents and of prospective mechanisms was discussed. The organizing committee for the workshop consisted of Drs. James Farrelly and Joseph DeGeorge of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Ronald J. Lorentzen and Sidney Green of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), Martin D. Green of the Center for Biologics, Evaluation and Research (CBER), C. Darnell Jackson and Lionel A. Poirier of the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR). Rosalie K. Elespuru of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and David G. Longfellow of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Following an introduction by Dr. Poirier, who provided a description of indirect carcinogens, the major talks were grouped into three formal sessions: indirect-acting compounds and agents of FDA interest, biological and biochemical endpoints commonly seen with indirect agents, and specific problems associated with the indirect-acting compounds. A panel discussion followed and the concluding remarks were made by Dr. Bernard A. Schwetz, Associate Commissioner for Science, FDA. PMID:8923694

  10. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  11. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  12. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  13. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  14. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  15. 21 CFR 19.10 - Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest... and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest Review Board. (a) The Commissioner shall establish a permanent five-member Conflict of Interest Review Board, which shall review and make recommendations to...

  16. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections)-Guidance on Policy, Procedures, and Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner...

  17. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections)-Guidance on Policy, Procedures, and Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner...

  18. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections)-Guidance on Policy, Procedures, and Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner...

  19. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT POLICY Recalls (Including Product Corrections)-Guidance on Policy, Procedures, and Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner...

  20. 75 FR 4982 - Redelegation of Functions; Delegation of Authority to Drug Enforcement Administration Official

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    .... ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Under delegated authority, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement... Substances Act and subsequently delegated to the Administrator of DEA. DATES: Effective Dates: This Final... Attorney General has delegated his functions under the CSA to the Administrator of the Drug...

  1. 77 FR 55845 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration: Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration: Request... Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations to serve on the Science Board to FDA (Science Board). FDA seeks to... given first consideration for membership on the Science Board. Nominations received after October...

  2. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief. PMID:26220901

  3. A fuzzy logic controller for hormone administration using an implantable pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a Fuzzy Logic Controller for the physiologic administration of hormones by means of a FDA-approved surgically implantable infusion pump. Results of a LabVIEW computer simulation for the administration of insulin for diabetic adult patients as well as human growth hormone for pediatric patients are presented. A VHS video tape of the simulation in action has been prepared and is available for viewing.

  4. Steady Increase In Prices For Oral Anticancer Drugs After Market Launch Suggests A Lack Of Competitive Pressure.

    PubMed

    Bennette, Caroline S; Richards, Catherine; Sullivan, Sean D; Ramsey, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    The cost of treating cancer has risen to unprecedented heights, putting tremendous financial pressure on patients, payers, and society. Previous studies have documented the rising prices of cancer drugs at launch, but less critical attention has been paid to the cost of these drugs after launch. We used pharmacy claims for commercially insured individuals to examine trends in postlaunch prices over time for orally administered anticancer drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the period 2007-13, inflation-adjusted per patient monthly drug prices increased 5 percent each year. Certain market changes also played a role, with prices rising an additional 10 percent with each supplemental indication approved by the FDA and declining 2 percent with the FDA's approval of a competitor drug. Our findings suggest that there is currently little competitive pressure in the oral anticancer drug market. Policy makers who wish to reduce the costs of anticancer drugs should consider implementing policies that affect prices not only at launch but also later. PMID:27140986

  5. National Mass Drug Administration Costs for Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ann S.; Guisinger, Victoria H.; Aikins, Moses; Amarillo, Maria Lourdes E.; Belizario, Vicente Y.; Garshong, Bertha; Gyapong, John; Kabali, Conrad; Kamal, Hussein A.; Kanjilal, Sanjat; Kyelem, Dominique; Lizardo, Jefrey; Malecela, Mwele; Mubyazi, Godfrey; Nitièma, P. Abdoulaye; Ramzy, Reda M. R.; Streit, Thomas G.; Wallace, Aaron; Brady, Molly A.; Rheingans, Richard; Ottesen, Eric A.; Haddix, Anne C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Because lymphatic filariasis (LF) elimination efforts are hampered by a dearth of economic information about the cost of mass drug administration (MDA) programs (using either albendazole with diethylcarbamazine [DEC] or albendazole with ivermectin), a multicenter study was undertaken to determine the costs of MDA programs to interrupt transmission of infection with LF. Such results are particularly important because LF programs have the necessary diagnostic and treatment tools to eliminate the disease as a public health problem globally, and already by 2006, the Global Programme to Eliminate LF had initiated treatment programs covering over 400 million of the 1.3 billion people at risk. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain annual costs to carry out the MDA strategy, researchers from seven countries developed and followed a common cost analysis protocol designed to estimate 1) the total annual cost of the LF program, 2) the average cost per person treated, and 3) the relative contributions of the endemic countries and the external partners. Costs per person treated ranged from $0.06 to $2.23. Principal reasons for the variation were 1) the age (newness) of the MDA program, 2) the use of volunteers, and 3) the size of the population treated. Substantial contributions by governments were documented – generally 60%–90% of program operation costs, excluding costs of donated medications. Conclusions/Significance MDA for LF elimination is comparatively inexpensive in relation to most other public health programs. Governments and communities make the predominant financial contributions to actual MDA implementation, not counting the cost of the drugs themselves. The results highlight the impact of the use of volunteers on program costs and provide specific cost data for 7 different countries that can be used as a basis both for modifying current programs and for developing new ones. PMID:17989784

  6. [Consideration about data management and biostatistics analysis from a FDA's botanical drug approval case].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian-yuan; Huang, Fang-hua; Zhu, Fei-peng

    2009-11-01

    FDA approved the first botanical drug of non-simplex ingredient on 31st Oct 2006. The new drug's trade name is Veregen 15% Ointment. Veregen succeeded in coming into the market in U.S, which attracts other countries and regions' attention where traditional herbs have been always used. From the viewpoints of data management and biostatistics method, the authors will think and discuss this case well, and hope to promote domestic new drug investigation. PMID:20329620

  7. Clinical trial registration, reporting, publication and FDAAA compliance: a cross-sectional analysis and ranking of new drugs approved by the FDA in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer E; Korn, David; Ross, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical trial registration, reporting and publication rates for new drugs by: (1) legal requirements and (2) the ethical standard that all human subjects research should be publicly accessible to contribute to generalisable knowledge. Design Cross-sectional analysis of all clinical trials submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drugs approved in 2012, sponsored by large biopharmaceutical companies. Data sources Information from Drugs@FDA, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDLINE-indexed journals and drug company communications. Main outcome measures Clinical trial registration and results reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov, publication in the medical literature, and compliance with the 2007 FDA Amendments Acts (FDAAA), analysed on the drug level. Results The FDA approved 15 drugs sponsored by 10 large companies in 2012. We identified 318 relevant trials involving 99 599 research participants. Per drug, a median of 57% (IQR 32–83%) of trials were registered, 20% (IQR 12–28%) reported results in ClinicalTrials.gov, 56% (IQR 41–83%) were published, and 65% (IQR 41–83%) were either published or reported results. Almost half of all reviewed drugs had at least one undisclosed phase II or III trial. Per drug, a median of 17% (IQR 8–20%) of trials supporting FDA approvals were subject to FDAAA mandated public disclosure; of these, a median of 67% (IQR 0–100%) were FDAAA-compliant. 68% of research participants (67 629 of 99 599) participated in FDAAA-subject trials, with 51% (33 405 of 67 629) enrolled in non-compliant trials. Transparency varied widely among companies. Conclusions Trial disclosures for new drugs remain below legal and ethics standards, with wide variation in practices among drugs and their sponsors. Best practices are emerging. 2 of our 10 reviewed companies disclosed all trials and complied with legal disclosure requirements for their 2012 approved drugs. Ranking new drugs on transparency criteria may improve

  8. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Pediatric Uses of Medical Devices Under Section 515A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' FDA is... information required under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This draft guidance is...

  9. The food and drug administration agrees to classify mercury fillings.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In the United States Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit, the Appellants Mom's Against Mercury, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, Oregonians for Life, California Citizens for Health Freedom, Kevin J. Biggers, Karen Johnson, Linda Brocato, R. Andrew Landerman, and Antia Vazquez Tibaul filed a petition for review of Regulatory Inaction by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On Monday June 2, 2008, the lawsuit was settled with the FDA after it agreed to classify mercury fillings. During its negotiation session with the Appellants, the FDA indicated that it would change its website on mercury fillings. The FDA no longer claims that no science exists about the safety of mercury amalgam or that other countries have acted for environmental reasons only. On its website, the FDA now states the following: "Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetus." The FDA also states that "Pregnant women and persons who may have a health condition that makes them more sensitive to mercury exposure, including individuals with existing high levels of mercury bioburden, should not avoid seeking dental care, but should discuss options with their health practitioner." The FDA decision to classify mercury fillings is a reflection of the legislations enacted in Europe and Canada that highlight the neurotoxic effects of mercury fillings. PMID:19105536

  10. 28 CFR 0.103a - Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Notwithstanding the provisions of 28 CFR 0.104, the Administrator of DEA is authorized to redelegate the power and... ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration § 0.103a Delegations respecting... Associate Chief Counsel level....

  11. Construction of Drug Network Based on Side Effects and Its Application for Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Liu, Qi; Wei, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Drugs with similar side-effect profiles may share similar therapeutic properties through related mechanisms of action. In this study, a drug-drug network was constructed based on the similarities between their clinical side effects. The indications of a drug may be inferred by the enriched FDA-approved functions of its neighbouring drugs in the network. We systematically screened new indications for 1234 drugs with more than 2 network neighbours, 36.87% of the drugs achieved a performance score of Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain in the top 5 positions (NDCG@5)≥0.7, which means most of the known FDA-approved indications were well predicted at the top 5 positions. In particular, drugs for diabetes, obesity, laxatives and antimycobacterials had extremely high performance with more than 80% of them achieving NDCG@5≥0.7. Additionally, by manually checking the predicted 1858 drug-indication pairs with Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) score≤10−5 (EASE score is a rigorously modified Fisher exact test p value), we found that 80.73% of such pairs could be verified by preclinical/clinical studies or scientific literature. Furthermore, our method could be extended to predict drugs not covered in the network. We took 98 external drugs not covered in the network as the test sample set. Based on our similarity criteria using side effects, we identified 41 drugs with significant similarities to other drugs in the network. Among them, 36.59% of the drugs achieved NDCG@5≥0.7. In all of the 106 drug-indication pairs with an EASE score≤0.05, 50.94% of them are supported by FDA approval or preclinical/clinical studies. In summary, our method which is based on the indications enriched by network neighbors may provide new clues for drug repositioning using side effects. PMID:24505324

  12. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  13. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  14. 78 FR 51732 - The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products...

  15. 77 FR 52744 - Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development...

  16. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures...

  17. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  18. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  19. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  20. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  1. Shortage of Peritoneal Dialysis Solution and the Food and Drug Administration's Response.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Valerie; Throckmorton, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    Although the number of new drug shortages has been lower in recent years than in the past, severe shortages have occurred that have affected large numbers of patients. A new law entitled the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act was enacted in July of 2012, which requires companies to notify the Food and Drug Administration of anticipated shortages. This notification requirement has allowed the Food and Drug Administration to work closely with manufacturers earlier to mitigate and, often, prevent shortages. However, not all shortages are able to be prevented, and the shortage of peritoneal dialysis solution is one that has had a significant effect on patients. The Food and Drug Administration continues to use all available tools to address this shortage with manufacturers, including temporary availability of imported peritoneal dialysis solution from Ireland. Mitigating shortages is a top priority for the Food and Drug Administration, and communication with all stakeholders is essential. PMID:25896999

  2. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kue, Chin Siang; Tan, Kae Yi; Lam, May Lynn; Lee, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD(50)) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD(50) values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson's correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r(2)=0.42 - 0.68, P<0.005-0.05) between the ideal LD(50) values obtained using the CAM model with LD(50) values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  3. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 − 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  4. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  5. Using DrugBank for In Silico Drug Exploration and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S; Wu, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    DrugBank is a fully curated drug and drug target database that contains 8174 drug entries including 1944 FDA approved small-molecule drugs, 198 FDA-approved biotech (protein/peptide) drugs, 93 nutraceuticals, and over 6000 experimental drugs. Additionally, 4300 non-redundant protein (i.e., drug target/enzyme/transporter/carrier) sequences are linked to these drug entries. DrugBank is primarily focused on providing both the query/search tools and biophysical data needed to facilitate drug discovery and drug development. This unit provides readers with a detailed description of how to effectively use the DrugBank database and how to navigate through the DrugBank Web site. It also provides specific examples of how to find chemical homologs of potential drug leads and how to identify potential drug targets from newly sequenced tumor samples. The intent of this unit is to give readers an introduction to the field of Web-based drug discovery and to show how cheminformatics can be seamlessly integrated into the field of bioinformatics. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322405

  6. Antibody-Drug Conjugates: A Clinical Pharmacy Perspective on an Emerging Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jerjian, Taleen V; Glode, Ashley E; Thompson, Lisa A; O'Bryant, Cindy L

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) combine highly specific monoclonal antibodies with potent cytotoxic drugs. Their synergy allows for targeted delivery of toxic drugs to cancer cells while sparing systemic exposure. In this review, we focus on the history and clinical applications of ADCs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of cancer and highlight new ADCs in the drug development pipeline. Three ADCs have received FDA approval thus far. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, although withdrawn from the U.S. market, may still be an effective treatment modality in subsets of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Brentuximab vedotin and ado-trastuzumab emtansine have shown improved efficacy and safety data compared with standard chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. With a number of ADCs with promising preliminary data in the clinical trial pipeline, cancer therapy is moving forward from traditional chemotherapy to targeted treatment modalities driven by the specificity of monoclonal antibodies and advancing biotechnology. PMID:26799352

  7. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave. Bldg. 66, Rm. 1646, Silver Spring... the Internet. A search capability for all Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) guidance... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and......

  8. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...: The public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  9. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical Device... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati,...

  10. 76 FR 15986 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., ] Cincinnati, OH 45207, 513... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  11. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati, OH... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  12. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for... and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Design... study design principles relevant to the development of medical device clinical studies that can be...

  13. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  14. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the... FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards (IRBs). Individual...

  15. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  16. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among the FDA and clinical trial staff,...

  17. 75 FR 51824 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  18. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  19. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

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    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  20. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

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    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  1. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

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    2010-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task Force..., the Task Force has held two public meetings, on June 24, 2009, and November 3, 2009, and established...

  2. 77 FR 5027 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ..., (76 FR 3825, January 21, 2011), FDA recounted the actions it had already implemented, as well as those... of availability of this report on October 4, 2011 (76 FR 61366), FDA sought public comment on these... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency...

  3. FDA Approved Registration of Erythromycin for Treatment of Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) in Juvenile and Adult Chinook Salmon : Annual Report, Reporting Period March 10, 1989 to March 9, 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffitt, Christine A.

    1991-04-01

    Erythromycin is a therapeutic substance useful against bacterial kidney disease in salmon. In 1989 we began a multi year project to learn more about erythromycin applied to juvenile and adult salmon, with the goal of achieving registration of erythromycin with the US Food and Drug Administration. To begin the study, we studied the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin administered to both adult and juvenile chinook salmon. We monitored blood plasmas time curves from individual adult fish injected with two forms of injectable erythromycin using one of three routes of administration. In addition, we began experiments to evaluate hatchery applications of erythromycin to individually marked adult salmon, and we recovered blood tissues from these fish at the time of spawning. To determine how to use erythromycin in juvenile salmon, we evaluated the adsorption and elimination of erythromycin applied arterially and orally to individual juvenile fish. In feeding trials we determined the palatability to juvenile chinook salmon of feed made with one of two different carriers for erythromycin thiocyanate. 35 refs., 4 figs. , 3 tabs.

  4. Identification of 53 compounds that block Ebola virus-like particle entry via a repurposing screen of approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Sun, Wei; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Tawa, Gregory; Shinn, Paul; Chen, Catherine Z; Schimmer, Aaron; Sanderson, Philip; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    In light of the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics to treat Ebola infection, and drug repurposing screening is a potentially rapid approach for identifying such therapeutics. We developed a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) 1536-well plate assay to screen for entry inhibitors of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix VP40 protein fused to a beta-lactamase reporter protein and applied this assay for a rapid drug repurposing screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We report here the identification of 53 drugs with activity of blocking Ebola VLP entry into cells. These 53 active compounds can be divided into categories including microtubule inhibitors, estrogen receptor modulators, antihistamines, antipsychotics, pump/channel antagonists, and anticancer/antibiotics. Several of these compounds, including microtubule inhibitors and estrogen receptor modulators, had previously been reported to be active in BSL-4 infectious Ebola virus replication assays and in animal model studies. Our assay represents a robust, effective and rapid high-throughput screen for the identification of lead compounds in drug development for the treatment of Ebola virus infection. PMID:26038505

  5. Update on administration of anesthetics and psychoactive drugs for pain management in China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiping

    2015-06-01

    Anesthetics and psychoactive drugs could relieve diseases, if used properly. However, they can cause dependency, and their misuse or abuse could adversely affect people's health and social stability. For a long time, the Chinese government has been reinforcing the regulation on anesthetics and psychoactive drugs to ensure their legal and proper usage, and to prevent abuse. The state council issued 'the regulations on the administration of anesthetic drugs and psychotropic drugs' in 2005, based on which a legal system was established for administration of anesthetics and psychoactive drugs with the objectives of ensuring their legitimate medical utilization, and preventing illegal abuse. PMID:26068438

  6. Administrator's Handbook for Crime Prevention and Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Crime Prevention and Drug Education.

    Acts of three Texas Legislatures have mandated that the schools of Texas provide a program for all public school students, grades K-12, in crime prevention and drug education. To assist schools in formulating a philosophy about and in developing appropriate programs and techniques for drug education and crime prevention programs, the Texas…

  7. [Drugs administration by subcutaneous injection within palliative care].

    PubMed

    Tanguy-Goarin, Charlotte; Cogulet, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Drugs delivery by subcutaneous injection is often the last resort/appeal for a doctor anxious to limit the aggressive and invasive treatments, particularly within palliative care. A review was made to list the drugs which can be administered by this route. Concerned antibiotics are teicoplanin, netilmicin and gentamicin with a risk of skin necrosis for aminoglycosids. Midazolam is useful in various indications and can be associated with morphine in case of dyspnoea. Data about subcutaneous injection of dexamethasone, clonazepam, haloperidol and levomepromazine are published; it is the same for fentanyl, nefopam, ondansetron and metoclopramide. The subcutaneous injection of these quoted drugs is possible, but requires further studies. PMID:21176759

  8. Lead identification to clinical candidate selection: drugs for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Neitz, R Jeffrey; Chen, Steven; Supek, Frantisek; Yeh, Vince; Kellar, Danielle; Gut, Jiri; Bryant, Clifford; Gallardo-Godoy, Alejandra; Molteni, Valentina; Roach, Steven L; Khare, Shilpi; Stinson, Monique; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Robertson, Stephanie; Renslo, Adam R; Arkin, Michelle; Glynne, Richard; McKerrow, James; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease affects 8 million people worldwide and remains a main cause of death due to heart failure in Latin America. The number of cases in the United States is now estimated to be 300,000, but there are currently no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs available for patients with Chagas disease. To fill this gap, we have established a public-private partnership between the University of California, San Francisco and the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF) with the goal of delivering clinical candidates to treat Chagas disease. The discovery phase, based on the screening of more than 160,000 compounds from the GNF Academic Collaboration Library, led to the identification of new anti-Chagas scaffolds. Part of the screening campaign used and compared two screening methods, including a colorimetric-based assay using Trypanosoma cruzi expressing β-galactosidase and an image-based, high-content screening (HCS) assay using the CA-I/72 strain of T. cruzi. Comparing molecules tested in both assays, we found that ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors had greater potency in the colorimetric assay than in the HCS assay. Both assays were used to inform structure-activity relationships for antiparasitic efficacy and pharmacokinetics. A new anti-T. cruzi scaffold derived from xanthine was identified, and we describe its development as lead series. PMID:25281737

  9. Host-Directed Antimicrobial Drugs with Broad-Spectrum Efficacy against Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Daniel M.; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Riley, Sean P.; Martinez, Juan J.; Steck, Theodore L.; Crosson, Sean; Gabay, Joëlle E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sought a new approach to treating infections by intracellular bacteria, namely, by altering host cell functions that support their growth. We screened a library of 640 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for agents that render THP-1 cells resistant to infection by four intracellular pathogens. We identified numerous drugs that are not antibiotics but were highly effective in inhibiting intracellular bacterial growth with limited toxicity to host cells. These compounds are likely to target three kinds of host functions: (i) G protein-coupled receptors, (ii) intracellular calcium signals, and (iii) membrane cholesterol distribution. The compounds that targeted G protein receptor signaling and calcium fluxes broadly inhibited Coxiella burnetii, Legionella pneumophila, Brucella abortus, and Rickettsia conorii, while those directed against cholesterol traffic strongly attenuated the intracellular growth of C. burnetii and L. pneumophila. These pathways probably support intracellular pathogen growth so that drugs that perturb them may be therapeutic candidates. Combining host- and pathogen-directed treatments is a strategy to decrease the emergence of drug-resistant intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:25073644

  10. The administration of sulfonamide drugs to adult salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, D.F.; Fryer, J.L.

    1968-01-01

    Mass treatment is the most convenient way to combat fish diseases. For example, drugs can be administered per os in diets, or chemicals can be added to the water. These methods are mostly ineffective in treating systemic infections of adult salmon because mature salmon do not feed, and many fish diseases cannot be controlled by chemical baths. Thus, effective treatment would require administering drugs to each individual.

  11. Administrative Destruction of Certain Drugs Refused Admission to the United States. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is implementing its authority to destroy a drug valued at $2,500 or less (or such higher amount as the Secretary of the Treasury may set by regulation) that has been refused admission into the United States under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), by issuing a rule that provides to the owner or consignee notice and an opportunity to appear and introduce testimony to the Agency prior to destruction. This regulation is authorized by amendments made to the FD&C Act by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). Implementation of this authority will allow FDA to better protect the public health by providing an administrative process for the destruction of certain refused drugs, thus increasing the integrity of the drug supply chain. PMID:26387150

  12. Intrapulmonary drug administration in neonatal and paediatric critical care: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    De Luca, D; Cogo, P; Zecca, E; Piastra, M; Pietrini, D; Tridente, A; Conti, G; Carnielli, V P

    2011-03-01

    Administration of drugs directly into the respiratory tree first was proposed a long time ago. Surfactant is the paradigmatic example of such therapies. Many other drugs have been used in the same way and further compounds are under investigation for this aim. In the last two decades, despite the wide number of drugs available for direct lung administration in critical care patients, few controlled data exist regarding their use in neonates and infants. This review will focus on drugs clinically available in a critical care setting for neonates and infants, including bronchodilators, pulmonary vasodilators, anti-inflammatory agents, mucolytics, resuscitative anti-infective agents, surfactants and other drugs. We provide an evidence-based comprehensive review of drugs available for intratracheal administration in paediatric and neonatal critical care and we examine possible advantages and risks for each proposed indication. PMID:21357925

  13. Prescription drug abuse: what is being done to address this new drug epidemic? Testimony before the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2006-10-01

    This comprehensive health policy review of the prescription drug abuse epidemic is based on the written and oral testimony of witnesses at a July 26, 2006 Congressional Hearing, including that of Laxmaiah Manchikanti, MD, the chief executive officer of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians and additions from review of the literature. Honorable Mark E. Souder, chairman of the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy, and Human Resources, introduced the issue as follows: "Prescription drug abuse today is second only to marijuana abuse. In the most recent household survey, initiates to drug abuse started with prescription drugs (especially pain medications) more often than with marijuana. The abuse of prescription drugs is facilitated by easy access (via physicians, the Internet, and the medicine cabinet) and a perception of safety (since the drugs are FDA approved). In addition to the personal toll of drug abuse using prescription drugs, indirect costs associated with prescription drug abuse and diversion include product theft, commission of other crimes to support addiction, law enforcement costs, and encouraging the practice of defensive medicine." The Administration witnesses, Bertha Madras, Nora D. Volkow, MD, Sandra Kweder, MD, and Joe Rannazzisi reviewed the problem of drug abuse and discussed what is being done at the present time as well as future strategies to combat drug abuse, including prescription drug monitoring programs, reducing malprescriptions, public education, eliminating Internet drug pharmacies, and the development of future drugs which are not only tamper-resistant but also non-addictive. The second panel, consisting of consumers and advocates, included Misty Fetco, Linda Surks, and Barbara van Rooyan, all of whom lost their children to drugs, presented their stories and strategies to prevent drug abuse, focusing on education at all levels, development of resistant drugs, and non-opioid treatment of chronic pain. Mathea

  14. Evaluation of teratogenic effects of risperidone following simultaneous administration with antihypertensive and antiemetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tauqeer, Shaista; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Siddiqui, Afaq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Multiple drug administration is an important aspect of clinical practice particularly in specific physiological situation such as in neonates, elderly or pregnancy, since in all such situations, possibility of unwanted effects increases due to altered body physiology. In present study, the teratogenic effects of multiple drug administration risperidone, meclizine/pyridoxine and hydralazine have been compared with the teratogenic effects of individual drugs in pregnant mice. Moreover the role of folic acid and α-tocopherol if any had also been investigated in reducing the teratogenic effects of these drugs in combinations. PMID:22186339

  15. Technology assessment and the Food and Drug Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, A. H.; Becker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The statutory standards underlying the activities of the FDA, and the problems the Agency faces in decision making are discussed from a legal point of view. The premarketing clearance of new drugs and of food additives, the two most publicized and criticized areas of FDA activity, are used as illustrations. The importance of statutory standards in technology assessment in a regulatory setting is developed. The difficulties inherent in the formulation of meaningful standards are recognized. For foods, the words of the statute are inadequate, and for drugs, a statutory recognition of the various other objectives would be useful to the regulator and the regulated.

  16. Drug-Induced Pancreatitis: A Rare Manifestation of Doxycycline Administration

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Yoon, Daniel J.; Riaz, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Context: Drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) is rare, but as there are no systematic data on it, the true incidence is not known. Although numerous and varied drugs have been associated with DIP, the clinical evidence on doxycycline-induced pancreatitis is sparse. Case Report: We present the case of a 58-year-old female who presented with complaints of nausea and severe epigastric pain. Her medications included doxycycline which she had been on for only 2 days. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed mild enlargement of body of the pancreas with peripancreatic fatty infiltration, along with lipase level suggestive of acute pancreatitis. In the absence of classical risk factors for acute pancreatitis, a diagnosis of DIP secondary to doxycycline therapy was made. Immediate withdrawal of the drug was accompanied by relief of symptoms and resolution of pancreatitis. Conclusion: This report implicates doxycycline as an etiological factor for acute pancreatitis. Knowledge regarding doxycycline related pancreatitis is of paramount importance in order to diagnose cases early and institute effective treatment in patients who are undergoing therapy with this drug. PMID:27042611

  17. Nutrition and the Aging Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Administration (FDA) approved a promising new drug—ranibizumab (marketed as Lucentis) — for treatment of neovascular agerelated ... second drug is considerably cheaper for patients than ranibizumab. "The good news for patients is that there ...

  18. 76 FR 14030 - Extension of Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Servicio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... and Drug Administration and Servicio Nacional de Sanidad, Inocuidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria of the... Sanidad, Inocuidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria of the United Mexican States. The purpose of the MOU is...

  19. 76 FR 31345 - Cooperative Arrangement Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the Inter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Drug Administration and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture AGENCY: Food and... Agriculture. The purpose of the arrangement is to provide a framework between the two Agencies to...

  20. 75 FR 60767 - Office of the Commissioner; Request for Comments on the Food and Drug Administration Fiscal Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Office of the Commissioner; Request for Comments on the Food... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and...- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR...

  1. Rectal drug administration in adults: how, when, why.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael

    Administering medication per rectum can be the most appropriate route for some patients may not always be considered by health professionals. Cultural sensitivities, as well as misinformation regarding insertion methods, may be barriers to the practice. This article explains how the rectal route functions in drug absorption, clarifies when this route is appropriate to use and outlines the steps nurses should follow to prepare patients adequately and safely to carry out the procedure. PMID:27071237

  2. Drug Administration Errors in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; Robertz, R.; de Jong, A. L.; van Roon, E. N.; Leufkens, H. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Medication errors can result in harm, unless barriers to prevent them are present. Drug administration errors are less likely to be prevented, because they occur in the last stage of the drug distribution process. This is especially the case in non-alert patients, as patients often form the final barrier to prevention of errors.…

  3. 77 FR 38173 - Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Drug Administration (FDA) published in the Federal Register of March 23, 2012 (77 FR 16923), a direct... Agency received significant adverse comment. DATES: The direct final rule published at 77 FR 16923, March... and Drugs, the direct final rule published in the Federal Register on March 23, 2012 (77 FR 16923)...

  4. 21 CFR 20.30 - Food and Drug Administration Division of Freedom of Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Division of Freedom... Division of Freedom of Information. (a) The office responsible for Agency compliance with the Freedom of Information Act and this part is the Division of Freedom of Information (ELEM-1029), Food and...

  5. 21 CFR 20.30 - Food and Drug Administration Division of Freedom of Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Division of Freedom... Division of Freedom of Information. (a) The office responsible for Agency compliance with the Freedom of Information Act and this part is the Division of Freedom of Information (ELEM-1029), Food and...

  6. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20... opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases; (2) Statements of policy and...

  7. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20... opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases; (2) Statements of policy and...

  8. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20... opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases; (2) Statements of policy and...

  9. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records §...

  10. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective. 170.105 Section 170.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION...

  11. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drug Administration Web site at http://www.fda.gov once finalized. (c) Agreements and... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD...

  12. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... Specific Categories of Records § 20.108 Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and...

  13. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  14. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  15. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  16. 75 FR 17418 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Administration, United States Department of Health and Human Services and the National Alliance for Hispanic Health AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  17. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... surveillance processes, including application submission, review, compliance with good manufacturing practices... good manufacturing practices (CGMP) for PET drugs. The procedures were finalized and an implementation...://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/Manufacturing/ucm085783.htm . Recognizing that many...

  18. Overcoming obstacles to repurposing for neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Shineman, Diana W; Alam, John; Anderson, Margaret; Black, Sandra E; Carman, Aaron J; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Dacks, Penny A; Dudley, Joel T; Frail, Donald E; Green, Allan; Lane, Rachel F; Lappin, Debra; Simuni, Tanya; Stefanacci, Richard G; Sherer, Todd; Fillit, Howard M

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for a new indication may offer an accelerated pathway for new treatments to patients but is also fraught with significant commercial, regulatory, and reimbursement challenges. The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) and the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) convened an advisory panel in October 2013 to understand stakeholder perspectives related to repurposing FDA-approved drugs for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we present opportunities on how philanthropy, industry, and government can begin to address these challenges, promote policy changes, and develop targeted funding strategies to accelerate the potential of FDA-approved repurposed drugs. PMID:25356422

  19. Overcoming obstacles to repurposing for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Shineman, Diana W; Alam, John; Anderson, Margaret; Black, Sandra E; Carman, Aaron J; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Dacks, Penny A; Dudley, Joel T; Frail, Donald E; Green, Allan; Lane, Rachel F; Lappin, Debra; Simuni, Tanya; Stefanacci, Richard G; Sherer, Todd; Fillit, Howard M

    2014-07-01

    Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for a new indication may offer an accelerated pathway for new treatments to patients but is also fraught with significant commercial, regulatory, and reimbursement challenges. The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) and the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) convened an advisory panel in October 2013 to understand stakeholder perspectives related to repurposing FDA-approved drugs for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we present opportunities on how philanthropy, industry, and government can begin to address these challenges, promote policy changes, and develop targeted funding strategies to accelerate the potential of FDA-approved repurposed drugs. PMID:25356422

  20. Regulation of food intake and the development of anti-obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    As the most significant cause of death worldwide, obesity has become one of the world's most important public health problems, but approved anti-obesity drugs are extremely limited. This article summarizes the feeding control circuits and regulators involved in obesity development, highlight the hypothalamus, melanocortin system and brain-gut peptide actions in this process, and the five US FDA approved anti-obesity medications in long term use, namely phentermine/topiramate, lorcaserin, naltrexone/bupropion, liraglutide and orlistat. PMID:27063550

  1. Fixed-Dose Combination Drug Approvals, Patents and Market Exclusivities Compared to Single Active Ingredient Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jing; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fixed-dose combinations (FDC) contain two or more active ingredients. The effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC compared to single active ingredient has not been assessed. Objectives Trends in FDA approved FDC in the period 1980–2012 and time lag between approval of FDC and single active ingredients in the combination were assessed, and the effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC was compared with their single active ingredients. Materials and Methods New molecular entities (NMEs), new therapeutic biologics license applications (BLAs) and FDC data were collected from the FDA Orange Book and Drugs@FDA. Analysis included FDC containing one or more NMEs or BLAs at first FDA approval (NMEs-FDC) and only already marketed drugs (Non-NMEs-FDC). Descriptive, Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum analyses were performed. Results During the study period, the FDA approved 28 NMEs-FDC (3.5% of NMEs) and 117 non-NMEs-FDC. FDC approvals increased from 12 in the 1980s to 59 in the 2000s. Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 5.43 years (interquartile range 1.74, 10.31) after first FDA approval of single active ingredients in the combination. The Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 2.33 years (-7.55, 2.39) before approval of generic single active ingredient. Non-NME-FDC added a median of 9.70 (2.75, 16.24) years to the patent and exclusivity life of the single active ingredients in the combination. Conclusion FDC approvals significantly increased over the last twenty years. Pharmaceutical companies market FDC drugs shortly before the generic versions of the single ingredients enter the market extending the patent and exclusivity life of drugs included in the combination. PMID:26469277

  2. Influence of kidney disease on drug disposition: An assessment of industry studies submitted to the FDA for new chemical entities 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Gary R; Dowling, Thomas C; Marks, Samantha A; Murphy, John E

    2016-04-01

    In 1998, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released the first guidance for industry regarding pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in renally impaired patients. This study aimed to determine if the FDA renal PK guidance influenced the frequency and rigor of renal studies conducted for new chemical entities (NCEs). FDA-approved package inserts (APIs) and clinical pharmacology review documents were analyzed for 194 NCEs approved from 1999 to 2010. Renal studies were conducted in 71.6% of NCEs approved from 1999 to 2010, a significant increase over the 56.3% conducted from 1996 to 1997 (P = .0242). Renal studies were more likely to be completed in highly renally excreted drugs (fe ≥ 30%) compared with drugs with low renal excretion, fe < 30% (89.6% vs 65.8%, P = .0015). PK studies to assess the impact of dialysis were conducted for 31.7% of NCEs that had a renal study: a greater proportion of high fe NCEs were studied (44.2% vs 26.0%, P = .0335). No significant change in frequency or rigor of PK studies was detected over time. The majority of NCEs (76.3%) with a renal study provided specific dosing recommendations in the API. The adoption of the 1998 FDA guidance has resulted in improved availability of PK and drug-dosing recommendations, particularly for high fe drugs. PMID:26238947

  3. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Evaluation Criteria" for Difficult to Compound Drugs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    This is part 2 of a 2-part article on the topic of Nominations of Difficult to Compound Drugs to the FDA-PCAC. Part 1 provided a current list of Nominations of Difficult to Compound Drugs to the FDA-PCAC. This article discusses the evaluation procedure for determining which drugs are demonstrably difficult to compound. PMID:26891563

  5. Medical devices; laser fluorescence caries detection device. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the laser fluorescence caries detection device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are set forth below. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:11010622

  6. Factors Influencing Drug Uptake during Mass Drug Administration for Control of Lymphatic Filariasis in Rural and Urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kisoka, William J.; Simonsen, Paul E.; Malecela, Mwelecele N.; Tersbøl, Britt P.; Mushi, Declare L.; Meyrowitsch, Dan W.

    2014-01-01

    Background In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission interruption within reasonable time. The present study aimed to identify predictors and barriers to individual drug uptake during MDA implementation by the National LF Elimination Programme in Tanzania. Methods A questionnaire based cross sectional household survey was carried out in two rural and two urban districts in Lindi and Morogoro regions shortly after the 2011 MDA. 3279 adults (≥15 years) were interviewed about personal characteristics, socio-economic status, MDA drug uptake among themselves and their children, reasons for taking/not taking drugs, and participation in previous MDA activities for LF control. Findings The overall drug uptake rate was 55.1% (range of 44.5–75.6% between districts). There was no overall major difference between children (54.8%) and adults (55.2%) or between females (54.9%) and males (55.8%), but the role of these and other predictors varied to some extent between study sites. Major overall predictors of drug uptake among the interviewed adults were increasing age and history of previous drug uptake. Being absent from home during drug distribution was the main reason for not taking the drugs (50.2%) followed by clinical contraindications to treatment (10.8%), missing household visits of drug distributors (10.6%), and households not being informed about the distribution (9.0%). Conclusion Drug uptake relied more on easily modifiable provider-related factors than on individual perceptions and practices in the target population. Limited investments in appropriate timing, dissemination of accurate timing information to recipients and motivation of drug distributors to visit all households (repeatedly when residents are absent) are likely to have

  7. Safeguarding the process of drug administration with an emphasis on electronic support tools

    PubMed Central

    Seidling, Hanna M; Lampert, Anette; Lohmann, Kristina; Schiele, Julia T; Send, Alexander J F; Witticke, Diana; Haefeli, Walter E

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this work is to understand the process of drug administration and identify points in the workflow that resulted in interventions by clinical information systems in order to improve patient safety. Methods To identify a generic way to structure the drug administration process we performed peer-group discussions and supplemented these discussions with a literature search for studies reporting errors in drug administration and strategies for their prevention. Results We concluded that the drug administration process might consist of up to 11 sub-steps, which can be grouped into the four sub-processes of preparation, personalization, application and follow-up. Errors in drug handling and administration are diverse and frequent and in many cases not caused by the patient him/herself, but by family members or nurses. Accordingly, different prevention strategies have been set in place with relatively few approaches involving e-health technology. Conclusions A generic structuring of the administration process and particular error-prone sub-steps may facilitate the allocation of prevention strategies and help to identify research gaps. PMID:24007450

  8. Elimination and Eradication of Neglected Tropical Diseases with Mass Drug Administrations: A Survey of Experts

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Jeremy D.; Hotez, Peter J.; Amza, Abdou; Stoller, Nicole E.; Gaynor, Bruce D.; Porco, Travis C.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminths, and trachoma are the five most prevalent neglected tropical diseases in the world, and each is frequently treated with mass drug administrations. We performed a survey of neglected tropical diseases experts to elicit their opinions on the role of mass drug administrations for the elimination of these infections. Methodology/Principal Findings We sent an online survey to corresponding authors who had published an article about a neglected tropical disease from 2007 to 2011. Of 825 unique authors who were invited to complete the survey, 365 (44.2%) responded, including 234 (28.4%) who answered questions regarding one of the five most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. Respondents had varying opinions about the goals of programmatic activities for their chosen neglected tropical disease, with elimination or eradication identified as the most important goal by 87% of lymphatic filariasis respondents, 66% of onchocerciasis respondents, 55% of trachoma respondents, 24% of schistosomiasis respondents, and 21% of soil-transmitted helminth respondents. Mass drug administrations, other non-medication health measures, and education were generally thought to be more important for elimination than vector control, development of a new tool, or the presence of a secular trend. Drug resistance was thought to be a major limitation of mass drug administrations for all five neglected tropical diseases. Over half of respondents for lymphatic filariasis and trachoma thought that repeated mass drug administrations could eliminate infection within ten years of the initiation of mass treatments. Conclusions/Significance Respondents for lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, and trachoma were more enthusiastic about the prospects of elimination and eradication than were respondents for schistosomiasis or soil-transmitted helminths. Mass drug administrations were generally believed to be among

  9. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70kg) in buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. Since a 3:1 morphine:oxycodone dose ratio had yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in non-dependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures, i.e. a drug vs. money and a drug vs. drug procedure, were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater compared to high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3:1 dose ratio of morphine:oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent subjects. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  10. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  11. Addicted to Palatable Foods: Comparing the Neurobiology of Bulimia Nervosa to that of Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Natalie A.; Knackstedt, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is highly comorbid with substance abuse and shares common phenotypic and genetic predispositions with drug addiction. Although treatments for the two disorders are similar, controversy remains about whether BN should be classified as addiction. Objectives: Here we review the animal and human literature with the goal of assessing whether BN and drug addiction share a common neurobiology. Results: Similar neurobiological features are present following administration of drugs and bingeing on palatable food, especially sugar. Specifically, both disorders involve increases in extracellular dopamine (DA), D1 binding, D3 mRNA, and ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Animal models of BN reveal increases in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA and enzymes involved in DA synthesis that resemble changes observed after exposure to addictive drugs. Additionally, alterations in the expression of glutamate receptors and prefrontal cortex activity present in human BN or following sugar bingeing in animals are comparable to the effects of addictive drugs. The two disorders differ in regards to alterations in NAc D2 binding, VTA DAT mRNA expression, and the efficacy of drugs targeting glutamate to treat these disorders. Conclusions: Although additional empirical studies are necessary, the synthesis of the two bodies of research presented here suggests that BN shares many neurobiological features with drug addiction. While few FDA-approved options currently exist for the treatment of drug addiction, pharmacotherapies developed in the future which target the glutamate, DA, and opioid systems may be beneficial for the treatment of both BN and drug addiction. PMID:24500676

  12. Technical report: precautions regarding the use of aerosolized antibiotics. Committee on Infectious Diseases and Committee on Drugs.

    PubMed

    Prober, C G; Walson, P D; Jones, J

    2000-12-01

    In 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the licensure of tobramycin solution for inhalation (TOBI). Although a number of additional antibiotics, including other aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, antibiotics in the polymyxin class, and vancomycin, have been administered as aerosols for many years, none are approved by the FDA for administration by inhalation. TOBI was approved by the FDA for the maintenance therapy of patients 6 years or older with cystic fibrosis (CF) who have between 25% and 75% of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and are able to comply with the prescribed medical regimen. TOBI was not approved for the therapy of acute pulmonary exacerbations in patients with CF nor was it approved for use in patients without CF. Currently, no other antibiotics are approved for administration by inhalation to patients with or without CF. The purpose of this statement is to briefly summarize the data that supported approval for licensure of TOBI and to provide recommendations for its safe use. The pharmacokinetics of inhaled aminoglycosides and problems associated with aerosolized antibiotic treatment, including environmental contamination, selection of resistant microbes, and airway exposure to excipients in intravenous formulations, will be discussed. PMID:11099632

  13. Prescription Drug Promotion from 2001-2014: Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Aikin, Kathryn J.; Chung-Davies, Eunice; Wade, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The volume of prescription drug promotion over time is often measured by assessing changes in ad spending. However, this method obscures the fact that some types of advertising are more expensive than others. Another way to measure the changes in prescription drug promotion over time is to assess the number of promotional pieces submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Form FDA 2253 collects information such as the date submitted and the type of material submitted. We analyzed data from Forms FDA 2253 received from 2001–2014. We examined the frequency of submissions by audience (consumer and healthcare professional) and type of promotional material. There was a noted increase in prescription drug promotion submissions across all media in the early 2000s. Although non-Internet promotion submissions have since plateaued, Internet promotion continued to increase. These results can help public health advocates and regulators focus attention and resources. PMID:27149513

  14. Prescription Drug Promotion from 2001-2014: Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Helen W; Aikin, Kathryn J; Chung-Davies, Eunice; Wade, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The volume of prescription drug promotion over time is often measured by assessing changes in ad spending. However, this method obscures the fact that some types of advertising are more expensive than others. Another way to measure the changes in prescription drug promotion over time is to assess the number of promotional pieces submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Form FDA 2253 collects information such as the date submitted and the type of material submitted. We analyzed data from Forms FDA 2253 received from 2001-2014. We examined the frequency of submissions by audience (consumer and healthcare professional) and type of promotional material. There was a noted increase in prescription drug promotion submissions across all media in the early 2000s. Although non-Internet promotion submissions have since plateaued, Internet promotion continued to increase. These results can help public health advocates and regulators focus attention and resources. PMID:27149513

  15. Food and Drug Administration process for development and approval of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals: treatments in urologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yang-Min; Maher, V Ellen

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory advice and assessment play an important role in the successful development of new drugs and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of urologic malignancies. Cooperation between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the pharmaceutical industry has led to the approval of more than 20 new urologic oncology products in the last 2 decades. Despite these advances, more effective treatments need to be developed and approved for the treatment of urologic malignancies. This review provides general information about the FDA's role in the development of investigational new drugs, with an emphasis on the regulatory process and the requirements for marketing approval. In addition, this review summarizes the products for the treatment of urologic malignancies that were approved by the FDA in the last 30 years and the key issues concerning urologic oncology products that were discussed publicly at Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee meetings in the past 10 years. PMID:25613202

  16. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  17. Membrane-Protein Crystallography and Potentiality for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Atsuko

    Structure-based drug design for membrane proteins is far behind that for soluble proteins due to difficulty in crystallographic structure determination, despite the fact that about 60% of FDA-approved drugs target membrane proteins located at the cell surface. Stable homologs for a membrane protein of interest, such as prokaryotic neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT, might enable cooperative analyses by crystallography and functional assays, provide useful information for functional mechanisms, and thus serve as important probes for drug design based on mechanisms as well as structures.

  18. A New Approach to the Oral Administration of Insulin and Other Peptide Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffran, Murray; Sudesh Kumar, G.; Savariar, Celin; Burnham, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Frederick; Neckers, Douglas C.

    1986-09-01

    The oral administration of peptide drugs is well known to be precluded by their digestion in the stomach and small intestine. As a new approach to oral delivery, peptide drugs were coated with polymers cross-linked with azoaromatic groups to form an impervious film to protect orally administered drugs from digestion in the stomach and small intestine. When the azopolymer-coated drug reached the large intestine, the indigenous microflora reduced the azo bonds, broke the cross-links, and degraded the polymer film, thereby releasing the drug into the lumen of the colon for local action or for absorption. The ability of the azopolymer coating to protect and deliver orally administered peptide drugs was demonstrated in rats with the peptide hormones vasopressin and insulin.

  19. Oral drug self-administration: an overview of laboratory animal studies.

    PubMed

    Meisch, R A

    2001-06-01

    Many abused drugs can be established as orally delivered reinforcers for rhesus monkeys and other animals. Benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids, psychomotor stimulants, dissociative anesthetics, and ethanol can come to serve as reinforcers when taken by mouth. The principal problems in establishing drugs as reinforcers by the oral route of administration are (1) aversive taste, (2) delay in onset of central nervous system effects, and (3) consumption of low volumes of drug solution. Strategies have been devised to successfully overcome these problems, and orally delivered drugs can be established as effective reinforcers. Reinforcing actions are demonstrated by consumption of greater volumes of drug solution than volumes of the water vehicle, and supporting evidence for reinforcing effects consists of the maintenance of behavior under intermittent schedules of reinforcement and the generation of orderly dose-response functions. This article presents an overview of studies of behavior reinforced by oral drug reinforcement. Factors that control oral drug intake include dose, schedule of reinforcement, food restriction, and alternative reinforcers. Many drugs, administered by the experimenter, can alter oral drug reinforcement. Relative reinforcing effects can be assessed by choice procedures and by persistence of behavior across increases in schedule size. In general, reinforcing effects increase directly with dose. Rhesus monkeys prefer combinations of reinforcing drugs to the component drugs. The taste of drug solutions may act as a conditioned reinforcer and a discriminative stimulus. Consequences of drug intake include tolerance and physiological dependence. Findings with orally self-administered drugs are similar to many findings with other positive reinforcers, including intravenously self-administered drugs. PMID:11522433

  20. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  1. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  2. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  3. 76 FR 74791 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug..., and Food Nutrition Service AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... Food Nutrition Service. The purpose of the MOU is to provide a framework for the parties to...

  4. Nanocarriers and the delivered drug: effect interference due to intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Maria A; Rytkönen, Jussi; Riikonen, Joakim; Tarasova, Olga S; Mönkäre, Juha; Kovalainen, Miia; Närvänen, Ale; Salonen, Jarno; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2014-10-15

    Intravenously administered nanocarriers are widely studied to improve the delivery of various therapeutic agents. However, recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered nanocarriers that do not contain any drug may affect cardiovascular function. Here we provide an example where the drug and the nanocarrier both affect the same cardiovascular parameters following intravenous administration. The peptide ghrelin antagonist (GhA) increases arterial pressure, while thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (THCPSi) transiently decrease it, as assessed with radiotelemetry in conscious rats. As a result, intravenous administration of GhA-loaded THCPSi nanoparticles partially antagonized GhA activity: arterial pressure was not increased. When the cardiovascular effects of GhA were blocked with atenolol pretreatment, GhA-loaded nanoparticles reduced arterial pressure to similar extent as drug-free nanoparticles. These data indicate that the biological activity of a drug delivered within a nanocarrier may be obscured by the biological responses induced by the nanocarrier itself. PMID:24964293

  5. 78 FR 6824 - Considerations Regarding Food and Drug Administration Review and Regulation of Drugs for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    .... Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure, usually within 3 to 5 years from the onset of...- specific therapy offers hope that new medications or combinations of drugs may one day slow the...

  6. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... surveillance processes, including application submission, review, compliance with good manufacturing practices... Act directed FDA to establish appropriate approval procedures and current good manufacturing practices.../DevelopmentApprovalProcess/Manufacturing/ucm085783.htm . Recognizing that many PET drug producers...

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  8. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat). PMID:27497259

  9. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration. PMID:11028261

  10. Drug combination adds fuel to US abortion debate.

    PubMed

    Rutter, T L

    1995-09-16

    A recent study in the US showed that abortion was achieved in 171/178 women aged 18 to 47 with pregnancies of 63 days or less duration through the administration of an intramuscular injection of methotrexate (a drug used to treat cancer) followed five to seven days later with a dose of misoprostol (used to treat ulcers). The report of this study prompted the founder of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue to threaten the report's author with being "hunted down and tried for genocide" should abortion ever be made illegal. While the National Abortion Rights Action League urged that the procedure be judged on medical not political terms, a spokesperson for the National Right to Life Committee expressed concern for the reproductive and psychological health of women undergoing medical abortions. The Population Council is currently completing clinical trials of the regimen which employs RU-486 to achieve medical abortion and expects to file a new drug application with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1996. The methotrexate/misoprostol combination would be much less expensive than RU-486 (approximately $10 compared to $250 at current prices), and a pharmaceutical company is currently attempting to raise the six million dollars necessary to fund the large-scale clinical trials which must precede FDA approval. While the availability of medical abortions would make the procedure much more accessible and private for women, proper counseling must be given to the women to avoid unwanted side effects and so that the women know what to expect. PMID:7549678

  11. 'RE:fine drugs': an interactive dashboard to access drug repurposing opportunities.

    PubMed

    Moosavinasab, Soheil; Patterson, Jeremy; Strouse, Robert; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Regan, Kelly; Payne, Philip R O; Huang, Yungui; Lin, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    The process of discovering new drugs has been extremely costly and slow in the last decades despite enormous investment in pharmaceutical research. Drug repurposing enables researchers to speed up the process of discovering other conditions that existing drugs can effectively treat, with low cost and fast FDA approval. Here, we introduce 'RE:fine Drugs', a freely available interactive website for integrated search and discovery of drug repurposing candidates from GWAS and PheWAS repurposing datasets constructed using previously reported methods in Nature Biotechnology. 'RE:fine Drugs' demonstrates the possibilities to identify and prioritize novelty of candidates for drug repurposing based on the theory of transitive Drug-Gene-Disease triads. This public website provides a starting point for research, industry, clinical and regulatory communities to accelerate the investigation and validation of new therapeutic use of old drugs.Database URL: http://drug-repurposing.nationwidechildrens.org. PMID:27189611

  12. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. PMID:24698029

  13. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products... include in the bioequivalence requirement a requirement for manufacturers to submit samples of each batch... and Drug Administration and found to meet the bioequivalence requirement, unless the public...

  14. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products... include in the bioequivalence requirement a requirement for manufacturers to submit samples of each batch... and Drug Administration and found to meet the bioequivalence requirement, unless the public...

  15. Best practice strategies to safeguard drug prescribing and drug administration: an anthology of expert views and opinions.

    PubMed

    Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Allenet, Benoît; Bedouch, Pierrick; Bonnabry, Pascal; Coleman, Jamie J; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Lovis, Christian; Rei, Maria Jose; Störzinger, Dominic; Taylor, Lenka A; Pontefract, Sarah K; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; van der Sijs, Heleen; Haefeli, Walter E

    2016-04-01

    Background While evidence on implementation of medication safety strategies is increasing, reasons for selecting and relinquishing distinct strategies and details on implementation are typically not shared in published literature. Objective We aimed to collect and structure expert information resulting from implementing medication safety strategies to provide advice for decision-makers. Setting Medication safety experts with clinical expertise from thirteen hospitals throughout twelve European and North American countries shared their experience in workshop meetings, on-site-visits and remote structured interviews. Methods We performed an expert-based, in-depth assessment of implementation of best-practice strategies to improve drug prescribing and drug administration. Main outcome measures Workflow, variability and recommended medication safety strategies in drug prescribing and drug administration processes. Results According to the experts, institutions chose strategies that targeted process steps known to be particularly error-prone in the respective setting. Often, the selection was channeled by local constraints such as the e-health equipment and critically modulated by national context factors. In our study, the experts favored electronic prescribing with clinical decision support and medication reconciliation as most promising interventions. They agreed that self-assessment and introduction of medication safety boards were crucial to satisfy the setting-specific differences and foster successful implementation. Conclusion While general evidence for implementation of strategies to improve medication safety exists, successful selection and adaptation of a distinct strategy requires a thorough knowledge of the institute-specific constraints and an ongoing monitoring and adjustment of the implemented measures. PMID:26964781

  16. Compatibility of Cloxacillin Sodium with Selected Intravenous Drugs During Simulated Y-Site Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Thomas; Forest, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Data regarding Y-site compatibility of intravenous (IV) cloxacillin sodium with other drugs are scarce and incomplete. Objective: To establish the compatibility of IV cloxacillin with 89 injectable drugs during simulated Y-site administration. Methods: Cloxacillin sodium (10 mL, 100 mg/mL) was combined with 89 undiluted IV drugs (10 mL, each). Tests were duplicated and performed at room temperature. Visual evaluation and a light obscuration particle count test were performed on 1 of the 2 solutions immediately after mixing. The second mixture underwent visual evaluation after 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours, followed by a particle count test at 4 hours. Drugs were considered incompatible if the mixture precipitated or became turbid within the 4-hour period or exceeded the particle count limit allowed by Test 1.B of USP <788> initially or at 4 hours. Results: Of the 89 tested drugs, 64 were compatible for up to 4 hours. The remaining 25 drugs were incompatible. Of these incompatible drugs, 16 were identified visually, and 9 were identified by the light obscuration particle count test. Conclusions: Sixty-four IV drugs were found to be compatible with cloxacillin via simulated Y-site, whereas 25 drugs were found to be incompatible with the antibiotic. The light obscuration particle count test should be used to complement visual evaluation when samples do not precipitate immediately. PMID:26405311

  17. 21 CFR 20.106 - Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.106 Section 20.106 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.106 Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  18. Opportunities to investigate the effects of ivermectin mass drug administration on scabies.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Daniel; Martin, Diana L; Hay, Roderick J; Chosidow, Olivier; McCarthy, James S; Fuller, L Claire; Steer, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    The recent article by Mohammed et al. demonstrates an impressive effect of ivermectin mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis on the burden of scabies. Partnering scabies research within the evaluation and monitoring of Neglected Tropical Disease programmes could potentially increase our understanding of the epidemiology and control of scabies and its important bacterial complications. PMID:23594459

  19. 78 FR 15953 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Regulatory Research Related to Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cooperative Agreement To Support Regulatory Research Related...) announces its intention to accept and consider a single source application for award of a cooperative... accomplishment of these PDUFA V commitments. FDA is therefore seeking to establish a cooperative agreement...

  20. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators.'' This guidance is intended to assist clinical investigators, industry, and FDA staff in interpreting and complying with the regulations governing financial disclosure by clinical......

  1. 76 FR 72951 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... (74 FR 46433), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft guidance... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses.'' This guidance document provides industry and Agency staff...

  2. 77 FR 67379 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Highly Multiplexed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Highly Multiplexed Microbiological/Medical Countermeasure In Vitro Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostic Devices.'' This draft guidance is to provide industry and Agency staff with recommendations for studies to establish the analytical and clinical performance of highly multiplexed......

  3. 76 FR 41803 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses.'' FDA is issuing this guidance to inform industry and Agency staff of its... diagnostic devices intended for the detection or detection and differentiation of influenza viruses....

  4. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... violate a ban or restriction of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pertaining to such products. If FDA bans or restricts the use of any ingredient in such a way that further manufacture of a product in accordance with its formula would violate the ban or restriction, then the manufacturer...

  5. Program Administrator's Handbook. Strategies for Preventing Alcohol and Other Drug Problems. The College Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook is for administrators of programs in higher education settings which deal with alcohol and other drug (AOD) related problems. Chapter 1, "Defining the Problem, Issues, and Trends" examines the problem from various perspectives and presents the latest statistics on the extent of AOD use on campuses, specific problems affecting…

  6. 78 FR 57320 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules on Foreign Supplier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is announcing two public meetings to discuss two proposed rules aimed at strengthening assurances that imported food meets the same safety standards as food produced domestically. The Foreign Supplier Verification Programs (FSVP) proposal establishes requirements for importers to verify that their foreign suppliers are implementing the modern,......

  7. 77 FR 41416 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with Xavier University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference.'' This public conference for the pharmaceutical industry is in direct alignment with the ``FDA Strategic Priorities 2011-2015,'' and includes presentations from key FDA officials, global......

  8. 76 FR 56770 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with Xavier University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference.'' This 2.5-day public conference for the pharmaceutical industry is in direct alignment with the ``FDA Strategic Priorities 2011-2015,'' and includes presentations from key FDA officials, global......

  9. 77 FR 31026 - Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ..., IL, 60016. Contact: Lisa Misevicz, Food and Drug Administration, 550 West Jackson Blvd., suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60661; 312-596-4217; email: lisa.misevicz@fda.hhs.gov . Registration: Send registration... July 2, 2012. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please contact Lisa Misevicz...

  10. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE... of the selection process. (f) The railroad must randomly select a sufficient number of covered... objective, neutral criteria which ensures that every covered employee has a substantially equal...

  11. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE... of the selection process. (f) The railroad must randomly select a sufficient number of covered... objective, neutral criteria which ensures that every covered employee has a substantially equal...

  12. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance document entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Recommendations for Labeling Medical Products To Inform Users That the Product or Product Container Is Not Made With Natural Rubber Latex.'' The purpose of this draft guidance is to make recommendations on the appropriate language to include......

  13. 78 FR 12937 - Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations of Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... burdensome to institutions, IRBs, and the process of clinical investigation (66 FR 20589 at 20591). The... VIII. Federalism IX. References I. Background In the Federal Register of April 24, 2001 (66 FR 20589... interim rule (66 FR 20589), including the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997...

  14. 78 FR 5185 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Use Device (HUD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... approval of the HDE application. In the Federal Register of December 13, 2011 (76 FR 77542), FDA issued for... guidance to the Office of Orphan Products (OOPD), Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave..., MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eric Chen, Office of Orphan Products Development...

  15. 76 FR 40921 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Enforcement Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Radiology Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... ``Enforcement Policy for Premarket Notification Requirements for Certain In Vitro Diagnostic and Radiology...(k)) requirements for certain in vitro diagnostic and radiology devices under the regulations....

  16. NCL Partnerships - U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    The activities within the NCL represent a formal scientific interaction of three Federal agencies: National Cancer Institute and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the Department of Health and Human Services, and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the Department of Commerce.

  17. 75 FR 31450 - Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Food and Drug Administration and the International Anesthesia Research Society for the Safety of Key... memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS)....

  18. Fighting fire with fire: mass antimalarial drug administrations in an era of antimalarial resistance.

    PubMed

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antimalarial resistance has been a major liability for malaria control. The spread of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains had catastrophic consequences for people in malaria-endemic regions, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The recent emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains is of highest concern. Current efforts to contain artemisinin resistance have yet to show success. In the absence of more promising plans, it has been suggested to eliminate falciparum malaria from foci of artemisinin resistance using a multipronged approach, including mass drug administrations. The use of mass drug administrations is controversial as it increases drug pressure. Based on current knowledge it is difficult to conceptualize how targeted malaria elimination could contribute to artemisinin resistance, provided a full treatment course is ensured. PMID:25831482

  19. Prohibited or regulated? LSD psychotherapy and the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Oram, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Over the 1950s and early 1960s, the use of the hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to facilitate psychotherapy was a promising field of psychiatric research in the USA. However, during the 1960s, research began to decline, before coming to a complete halt in the mid-1970s. This has commonly been explained through the increase in prohibitive federal regulations during the 1960s that aimed to curb the growing recreational use of the drug. However, closely examining the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of LSD research in the 1960s will reveal that not only was LSD research never prohibited, but that the administration supported research to a greater degree than has been recognized. Instead, the decline in research reflected more complex changes in the regulation of pharmaceutical research and development. PMID:27194113

  20. Cigarette smoking, illicit drug use, and routes of administration among heroin and cocaine users

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, PT; Trenz, RC; Scherer, M; Ropelewski, LR; Latimer, WW

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is ubiquitous among illicit drug users. Some have speculated that this may be partially due to similarities in the route of administration. However, research examining the relationship between cigarette smoking and routes of administration of illicit drugs is limited. To address this gap, we investigated sociodemographic and drug use factors associated with cigarette smoking among cocaine and heroin users in the Baltimore, Maryland community (N=576). Regular and heavy cigarette smokers were more likely to be White, have a history of a prior marriage, and have a lower education level. Regular smoking of marijuana and crack was associated with cigarette smoking, but not heavy cigarette smoking. Injection use was more common among heavy cigarette smokers. In particular, regular cigarette smokers were more likely to have a lifetime history of regularly injecting heroin. Optimal prevention and treatment outcomes can only occur through a comprehensive understanding of the interrelations between different substances of abuse. PMID:22305644

  1. More New Medication Approvals.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2016-01-01

    In the past year, the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved many new drugs for treating a wide variety of patient health problems. In a previous article, examples of approvals for the early part of last year were addressed. In this article, selected new FDA approvals through January 2016 are discussed. Nurses who are knowledgeable and informed about these new drugs will be able to answer patients' questions, clarify misunderstandings, and reduce the potential for medication misadventures. PMID:27441881

  2. Cyberpharmacies and the role of the US Food And Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Henney, J E

    2001-01-01

    The sale of consumer products over the Internet has grown rapidly, including the sale of drugs. While the growth in online drug sales by reputable pharmacies is a trend that may provide benefits to consumers, online drug sales also present risks to purchasers and some unique challenges to regulators, law enforcement officials and policy makers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is concerned about the public health implications of Internet drug sales, and we are responding to these concerns as part of our overall goal of developing and implementing risk-based strategies to protect public health and safety. Although other products regulated by the Agency, such as medical devices, medical test products, foods, dietary supplements and animal drugs also are sold online, this paper focuses on online drug sales. We discuss the advantages and risks of online drug sales, outline FDA's authority and enforcement activities in this area, and describe new initiatives we are taking to better respond to the regulatory challenges we face. PMID:11720945

  3. Cyberpharmacies and the role of the US Food And Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    The sale of consumer products over the Internet has grown rapidly, including the sale of drugs. While the growth in online drug sales by reputable pharmacies is a trend that may provide benefits to consumers, online drug sales also present risks to purchasers and some unique challenges to regulators, law enforcement officials and policy makers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is concerned about the public health implications of Internet drug sales, and we are responding to these concerns as part of our overall goal of developing and implementing risk-based strategies to protect public health and safety. Although other products regulated by the Agency, such as medical devices, medical test products, foods, dietary supplements and animal drugs also are sold online, this paper focuses on online drug sales. We discuss the advantages and risks of online drug sales, outline FDA's authority and enforcement activities in this area, and describe new initiatives we are taking to better respond to the regulatory challenges we face. PMID:11720945

  4. Assessment of knowledge of pediatric nurses related with drug administration and preparation

    PubMed Central

    Bülbül, Ali; Kunt, Ayşe; Selalmaz, Melek; Sözeri, Şehrinaz; Uslu, Sinan; Nuhoğlu, Asiye

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study is to determine the levels of knowledge related with drug administration and drug administration errors of nurses who care for pediatric patients. Material and Methods: The study data were obtained from the nurses who were working in the departments of pediatrics in two education and research hospitals in the province of İstanbul and who accepted to participate in the study. The questionnaire form of the study was established by the investigators in accordance with the experiences and literature information. A total of 31 questions related with drug preparation, calculation and administration together with the general working properties of the individual were filled out by face to face interview. The data were evaluated using percent and chi-square tests. The study was initiated after ethics committee approval was obtained from Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Education and Research Hospital (365/2013). Results: The study was conducted with 98 nurses who accepted the questionnaire. The education levels of the participants were as follows: undergraduate (48%), high school (32.7%), associate degree (12.2%), master’s degree (6.1%) and postgraduate (1%). It was found that 88.8% of the participants worked in a patient-centered fashion and 11.2% worked in a work-centered fashion. The frequency of interruption/distraction during preparation of treatment was found to be 92.9%. It was found that the frequency of checking by two people during preparation or administration of high risk drugs was 64.3% and the conditions under which drugs should be kept were found to known correctly with a rate of 76.5%. It was found that undergraduate healthcare workers were more successful in converting units (p= 0.000). It was found that powder weight of drugs was considered with a rate of 85.7% in calculation. Conclusions: Conclusively, it was found that nurses who worked in pediatric wards did not receive a standard education in terms of drug administration and preparation

  5. Towards a Computable Data Corpus of Temporal Correlations between Drug Administration and Lab Value Changes

    PubMed Central

    Newe, Axel; Wimmer, Stefan; Neubert, Antje; Becker, Linda; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of electronic health records for an automated detection of adverse drug reactions is an approach to solve the problems that arise from traditional methods like spontaneous reporting or manual chart review. Algorithms addressing this task should be modeled on the criteria for a standardized case causality assessment defined by the World Health Organization. One of these criteria is the temporal relationship between drug intake and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. Appropriate data that would allow for developing or validating related algorithms is not publicly available, though. Methods In order to provide such data, retrospective routine data of drug administrations and temporally corresponding laboratory observations from a university clinic were extracted, transformed and evaluated by experts in terms of a reasonable time relationship between drug administration and lab value alteration. Result The result is a data corpus of 400 episodes of normalized laboratory parameter values in temporal context with drug administrations. Each episode has been manually classified whether it contains data that might indicate a temporal correlation between the drug administration and the change of the lab value course, whether such a change is not observable or whether a decision between those two options is not possible due to the data. In addition, each episode has been assigned a concordance value which indicates how difficult it is to assess. This is the first open data corpus of a computable ground truth of temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations. Discussion The main purpose of this data corpus is the provision of data for further research and the provision of a ground truth which allows for comparing the outcome of other assessments of this data with the outcome of assessments made by human experts. It can serve as a contribution towards systematic, computerized ADR detection in

  6. The Anthelmintic Drug Niclosamide Induces Apoptosis, Impairs Metastasis and Reduces Immunosuppressive Cells in Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yupeng; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Li, Deliang; Wang, Ningyu; Zhang, Lidan; Zhu, Yongxia; Zeng, Jun; Wei, Yuquan; Yu, Luoting

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Discovery of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of metastatic breast cancer is still needed. Here, we reported our finding with niclosamide, an FDA approved anthelmintic drug. The potency of niclosamide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that niclosamide showed a dramatic growth inhibition against breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Western blot analysis demonstrated the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of Cleaved caspases-3, down-regulation of Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Survivin. Moreover, niclosamide blocked breast cancer cells migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated STAT3Tyr705, phosphorylated FAKTyr925 and phosphorylated SrcTyr416 were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg/d niclosamide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth without detectable toxicity. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells, VEGF-positive cells and microvessel density (MVD) and an increase in Cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon niclosamide. Notably, niclosamide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in tumor tissues and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases. Taken together, these results demonstrated that niclosamide may be a promising candidate for breast cancer. PMID:24416452

  7. Identification of a mast-cell-specific receptor crucial for pseudo-allergic drug reactions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Benjamin D; Pundir, Priyanka; Meeker, Sonya; Han, Liang; Undem, Bradley J; Kulka, Marianna; Dong, Xinzhong

    2015-03-12

    Mast cells are primary effectors in allergic reactions, and may have important roles in disease by secreting histamine and various inflammatory and immunomodulatory substances. Although they are classically activated by immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies, a unique property of mast cells is their antibody-independent responsiveness to a range of cationic substances, collectively called basic secretagogues, including inflammatory peptides and drugs associated with allergic-type reactions. The pathogenic roles of these substances have prompted a decades-long search for their receptor(s). Here we report that basic secretagogues activate mouse mast cells in vitro and in vivo through a single receptor, Mrgprb2, the orthologue of the human G-protein-coupled receptor MRGPRX2. Secretagogue-induced histamine release, inflammation and airway contraction are abolished in Mrgprb2-null mutant mice. Furthermore, we show that most classes of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved peptidergic drugs associated with allergic-type injection-site reactions also activate Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2, and that injection-site inflammation is absent in mutant mice. Finally, we determine that Mrgprb2 and MRGPRX2 are targets of many small-molecule drugs associated with systemic pseudo-allergic, or anaphylactoid, reactions; we show that drug-induced symptoms of anaphylactoid responses are significantly reduced in knockout mice; and we identify a common chemical motif in several of these molecules that may help predict side effects of other compounds. These discoveries introduce a mouse model to study mast cell activation by basic secretagogues and identify MRGPRX2 as a potential therapeutic target to reduce a subset of drug-induced adverse effects. PMID:25517090

  8. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  9. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations.

    PubMed

    Newe, Axel

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  10. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5-4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5-40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1-0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects' motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice. PMID:26902717

  11. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5–4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5–40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1–0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects’ motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice. PMID:26902717

  12. Evolution of the Food and Drug Administration approach to liver safety assessment for new drugs: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Senior, John R

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by approval in 1997 of troglitazone and bromfenac, two drugs that promptly began to show serious and sometimes fatal liver toxicity, we began at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) a series of annual conferences in 1999 to consider issues of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). First inviting reviewers of new drug applications we opened the audiences in 2001 to pharmaceutical industry and academic consultants to industry and FDA, and slides shown at the meetings were posted on the internet to be available at the website of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)-go to ( http://www.aasld.org/dili/Pages/default.aspx ). Observations by Dr. Hyman J. Zimmerman that "drug-induced hepatocellular jaundice is a serious lesion" with possible mortality formed a basis for developing a computer program to plot peak serum values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total bilirubin (TBL) in an x-y log-log graph for all subjects enrolled in clinical trials. This program had the capability to show the time course of all liver tests for individuals who had both hepatocellular injury and reduced whole liver function, plus clinical narratives to diagnose the severity and most likely cause of the abnormalities. We called the program eDISH (for evaluation of Drug-Induced Serious Hepatotoxicity), and began in 2004 to use it to assess DILI in clinical trial subjects. From 2008, comments made by the presenters at the conferences about their slides and ensuing discussions have been added to the website. All this has raised awareness of the problem, and since 1997, the FDA has not had to withdraw a single drug because of post-marketing hepatotoxicity. Many issues still remain to be resolved; among the most controversial is the best method to estimate likelihood that a given liver injury was actually caused by the drug in question. On November 9, 2012, a workshop was convened to discuss the best practices for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury

  13. Tramadol hydrochloride: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse side effects, co-administration of drugs and new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, M; Andreani, T; Fangueiro, J; Faggio, C; Silva, C; Santini, A; Garcia, M L; Silva, A M; Souto, E B

    2015-03-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride (TrHC) is a synthetic analgesic drug exhibiting opioid and non-opioid properties, acting mainly on the central nervous system. It has been mostly used to treat pain, although its use to treat anxiety and depression has also been documented. These properties arise from the fact that they inhibit serotonin (5-HT) reuptake augmenting 5-HT concentration on the synaptic cleft. Despite this, TrHC has also been described to have several side effects which are mainly due to its fast metabolization and excretion which in turn requires multiple doses per day. To surpass this limitation, new pharmaceutical formulations are being developed intending the protection, target and sustained delivery as well as a reduction on daily dose aiming a reduction on the side effects. In the present work we have revised the efficacy, safety, biological and adverse effects of TrHC, and the added value of developing a novel drug delivery system for topical administration. PMID:25776506

  14. 77 FR 70166 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a public docket for information pertaining to FDA's implementation of the provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) related to medical gases. This action is intended to ensure that information submitted to FDA on the implementation of the medical gas provisions of FDASIA is available to all......

  15. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County... announcing the following conference: 14th Annual Educational Conference co-sponsored with the Orange County...: 949-608-4417; or Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group, Attention to Detail,...

  16. 75 FR 29559 - The 13th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 13th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County...-sponsored with the Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group (OCRA). The conference is intended to...-608-4417; or Orange County Regulatory Affairs Discussion Group ] (OCRA), Attention to Detail,...

  17. 77 FR 24721 - The 15th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 15th Annual Food and Drug Administration--Orange County... announcing the following conference: The 15th Annual Educational Conference cosponsored with the...

  18. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... classification information.'' In the Federal Register of April 29, 2010 (75 FR 22601), FDA announced the...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for...

  19. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...'' that appeared in the Federal Register of August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45818). In that document, FDA announced.... Background In the Federal Register of August 1, 2011 (76 FR 45818), FDA published a notice with a 78-day... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food...

  20. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  1. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  2. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  3. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  4. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  5. US Food and Drug Administration Web Site: A Primer for Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Leonard, James; Baker, Danial E

    2015-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site includes a vast amount of information, but it can be difficult to navigate. Despite frequently asked question (FAQ)-type pages within the Web site, it may not be easy for first-time users to find drug information. This article presents some examples of common questions, provides the locations of the answers on the FDA Web site, and gives a brief description of some of the many resources the FDA provides for health care professionals. Additionally, a newer project being undertaken by the FDA, Snapshot, is introduced. PMID:27621506

  6. Methods to examine molecular changes and behavioral effects of drug administration.

    PubMed

    Michna, Laura; Brenz-Verca, Maria; Dreyer, Jean-Luc; Wagner, George C

    2002-06-01

    Our laboratory has developed an integrative approach to study the molecular changes and behavioral effects of drug administration consisting of a combination of quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, RNA isolation and differential display, in situ hybridization, place preference conditioning and high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the techniques are not novel, this multi-systems approach allows for the examination of gene expression changes following the administration of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, and allows for an analysis of behavior and neurochemistry of gene knockout mice. As a result of this combination of techniques, we have been able to determine the expression, location and function of the CD81 protein. Specifically, CD81 was induced exclusively in the nucleus accumbens by cocaine treatment. Subsequent behavioral testing of CD81 knockout mice revealed these mice displayed altered sensitivity to cocaine. PMID:12113778

  7. Surveillance of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after stopping mass drug administration in Menoufiya Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, M A; Thabet, H S; Saad, G A; El-Setouhy, M; Mehrez, M; Hamdy, D M

    2014-05-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that before lymphatic filariasis elimination in an area can be confirmed, an additional survey should be performed at least 5 years after stopping mass drug administration. The current study aimed to determine the status of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after cessation ofthe mass drug administration in 3 sentinel Egyptian villages in Menoufiya Governorate. The rapid immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and a new commercial antibody detection kit (CELISA®) were used. All 1321 primary-school children aged 6-7 years old were ICT negative but 27 children were antibody positive. All households surveyed in one village with the highest antibody prevalence were ICT negative, indicating an absence of lymphatic filariasis. The CELISA antibody kit needs more standardization and development to be useful under field conditions. We conclude that lymphatic filariasis is no longer a public health problem in these villages and other villages with similar epidemiological conditions. PMID:24952286

  8. Use of closed-system drug transfer devices in the handling and administration of MABs.

    PubMed

    Meade, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of research and consensus on the long-term risks of occupational exposure to monoclonal antibodies. There is, however, some risk to health professionals who are involved in their preparation and administration. This article discusses the use of closed-system drug transfer devices to minimise exposure, and touches on the importance of aseptic techniques, personal protective equipment, and appropriate education and training for health professionals. PMID:26946648

  9. The National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition addresses the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    On July 24, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held an open forum to review proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label and to allow for public comment on these changes. Lisa Gutekunst, MSEd, RD, CSR, CDN, Chair of the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, lobbied the FDA to add phosphorus to the Nutrition Facts Label. This is her address to the FDA. PMID:25443545

  10. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Products as Used in Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance... Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance, when finalized, will discuss the meaning of the term ``harmful...

  11. 76 FR 5387 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “`Harmful and Potentially Harmful...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 10, 2010 (75 FR 32952), FDA announced... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This guidance provides written guidance...

  12. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  13. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  14. Identification of levothyroxine antichagasic activity through computer-aided drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Bellera, Carolina L; Balcazar, Darío E; Alberca, Lucas; Labriola, Carlos A; Talevi, Alan; Carrillo, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Cruzipain (Cz) is the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas disease. A conformation-independent classifier capable of identifying Cz inhibitors was derived from a 163-compound dataset and later applied in a virtual screening campaign on the DrugBank database, which compiles FDA-approved and investigational drugs. 54 approved drugs were selected as candidates, 3 of which were acquired and tested on Cz and T. cruzi epimastigotes proliferation. Among them, levothyroxine, traditionally used in hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypothyroidism, showed dose-dependent inhibition of Cz and antiproliferative activity on the parasite. PMID:24592161

  15. Identification of Levothyroxine Antichagasic Activity through Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Bellera, Carolina L.; Balcazar, Darío E.; Alberca, Lucas; Labriola, Carlos A.; Carrillo, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Cruzipain (Cz) is the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas disease. A conformation-independent classifier capable of identifying Cz inhibitors was derived from a 163-compound dataset and later applied in a virtual screening campaign on the DrugBank database, which compiles FDA-approved and investigational drugs. 54 approved drugs were selected as candidates, 3 of which were acquired and tested on Cz and T. cruzi epimastigotes proliferation. Among them, levothyroxine, traditionally used in hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypothyroidism, showed dose-dependent inhibition of Cz and antiproliferative activity on the parasite. PMID:24592161

  16. Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) as Biodegradable Controlled Drug Delivery Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Makadia, Hirenkumar K.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    In past two decades poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) has been among the most attractive polymeric candidates used to fabricate devices for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PLGA is biocompatible and biodegradable, exhibits a wide range of erosion times, has tunable mechanical properties and most importantly, is a FDA approved polymer. In particular, PLGA has been extensively studied for the development of devices for controlled delivery of small molecule drugs, proteins and other macromolecules in commercial use and in research. This manuscript describes the various fabrication techniques for these devices and the factors affecting their degradation and drug release. PMID:22577513

  17. 5 CFR 5501.104 - Prohibited financial interests applicable to employees of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prohibited financial interests applicable to employees of the Food and Drug Administration. 5501.104 Section 5501.104 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  18. Mass administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine to Guantánamo detainees: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L

    2012-10-01

    Recently, evidence has emerged from an unusual form of mass drug administration practised among detainees held at US Naval Station Guantánamo Bay, Cuba ('Guantánamo'), ostensibly as a public health measure. Mefloquine, an antimalarial drug originally developed by the US military, whose use is associated with a range of severe neuropsychiatric adverse effects, was administered at treatment doses to detainees immediately upon their arrival at Guantánamo, prior to laboratory testing for malaria and irrespective of symptoms of disease. In this analysis, the history of mefloquine's development is reviewed and the indications for its administration at treatment doses are discussed. The stated rationale for the use of mefloquine among Guantánamo detainees is then evaluated in the context of accepted forms of population-based malaria control. It is concluded that there was no plausible public health indication for the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo and that based on prevailing standards of care, the clinical indications for its use are decidedly unclear. This analysis suggests the troubling possibility that the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo may have been motivated in part by knowledge of the drug's adverse effects, and points to a critical need for further investigation to resolve unanswered questions regarding the drug's potentially inappropriate use. PMID:22882560

  19. Decomposing the Energetic Impact of Drug-Resistant Mutations: The Example of HIV-1 Protease - DRV Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yufeng; Schiffer, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 protease is a major drug target for AIDS therapy. With the appearance of drug-resistant HIV-1 protease variants, understanding the mechanism of drug resistance becomes critical. Computational methods can provide more details about inhibitor-protease binding other than crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. Darunavir is the latest FDA approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor. In this context, the free energy component analysis is performed on the DRV binding to WT protease and ACT, a drug resistant variant, to evaluate contribution of each atoms of DRV to the binding affinity. This information can contribute to the rationale design of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:22183557

  20. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY OF QT-INTERVAL PROLONGING DRUG ADMINISTRATION IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Bradley D.; Dixon, David J.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Zehnbauer, Barbara A.; Buchman, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Commonly prescribed medications produce QT-prolongation and are associated with torsades de pointes in non-acutely ill patients. We examined patterns of QT-prolonging drug use in critically ill individuals. Methods An administrative critical care database was utilized to identify patients receiving drugs associated with QT-interval prolongation or torsades de pointes for ≥24 hours. Results Data from 212,016 individuals collected over a 63-month period was examined to identify 6,125 patients (2.9%) receiving QT-interval prolonging drugs. These individuals had a mean (±SE) age of 63.0 (±0.2) years, were predominately male (55.4%) and Caucasian (84.4%), and were exposed to QT-interval prolonging agents for a mean (±SE) 53.1 (±0.4) % of their ICU length of stay. Respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses were the most common reasons for ICU admission (17.2%, 12.0%, respectively). The most frequently administered agents were Amiodarone (23.5%), Haloperidol (19.8%), and Levofloxacin (19.7%); no other single agent accounted for more than 10% of QT-interval prolonging drugs prescribed. Coadministration of QT-prolonging drugs occurred in 1,139 patients (18.6%). These patients had higher ICU mortality rate and longer ICU lengths of stay, compared to patients not receiving coadministered drugs (p<0.001 for both). For patients receiving coadministered drugs, overlap occurred for 71.4 (±0.8) % of the time that the drugs were given. Amiodarone coadministration with antibiotics, Haloperidol coadministration with antibiotics, and Haloperidol coadministration with Amiodarone, comprised 15.2%, 13.7%, and 9.4%, of all coadministered agents, respectively. Conclusions QT-prolonging drugs were used in a minority of critically ill patients. Prospective evaluation in the ICU environment is necessary to determine whether administration of these agents is associated with adverse cardiac events comparable to those reported in ambulatory patients. PMID:18693297