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Sample records for administration fda-approved drugs

  1. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  2. FDA approved drugs as potential Ebola treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Coffee, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In the search for treatments for the Ebola Virus, multiple screens of FDA drugs have led to the identification of several with promising in vitro activity. These compounds were not originally developed as antivirals and some have been further tested in mouse in vivo models. We put forward the opinion that some of these drugs could be evaluated further and move into the clinic as they are already FDA approved and in many cases readily available. This may be important if there is a further outbreak in future and no other therapeutic is available. PMID:25789163

  3. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Month Approvals, tentative approvals, and supplements Original New Drug Approvals (NDAs and BLAs) by Month All applications ... FDA. Does not include tentative approvals. Original Abbreviated New Drug Approvals (ANDAs) by Month Generic Drug Approvals. Does ...

  4. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for anti-aging therapies.

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Srinivasan, Bharath; Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    There is great interest in drugs that are capable of modulating multiple aging pathways, thereby delaying the onset and progression of aging. Effective strategies for drug development include the repurposing of existing drugs already approved by the FDA for human therapy. FDA approved drugs have known mechanisms of action and have been thoroughly screened for safety. Although there has been extensive scientific activity in repurposing drugs for disease therapy, there has been little testing of these drugs for their effects on aging. The pool of FDA approved drugs therefore represents a large reservoir of drug candidates with substantial potential for anti-aging therapy. In this paper we employ FINDSITE(comb), a powerful ligand homology modeling program, to identify binding partners for proteins produced by temperature sensing genes that have been implicated in aging. This list of drugs with potential to modulate aging rates was then tested experimentally for lifespan and healthspan extension using a small invertebrate model. Three protein targets of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas corresponding to products of the transient receptor potential gene 7, ribosomal protein S6 polypeptide 2 gene, or forkhead box C gene, were screened against a compound library consisting of DrugBank drugs including 1347 FDA approved, non-nutraceutical molecules. Twenty nine drugs ranked in the top 1 % for binding to each target were subsequently included in our experimental analysis. Continuous exposure of rotifers to 1 µM naproxen significantly extended rotifer mean lifespan by 14 %. We used three endpoints to estimate rotifer health: swimming speed (mobility proxy), reproduction (overall vitality), and mitochondria activity (cellular senescence proxy). The natural decline in swimming speed with aging was more gradual when rotifers were exposed to three drugs, so that on day 6, mean swimming speed of females was 1.19 mm/s for naproxen (P = 0.038), 1.20 for fludarabine (P = 0

  5. New Role for FDA-Approved Drugs in Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jourdan A.; Fitts, Eric C.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Peniche, Alex G.; Dann, Sara M.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Sha, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in medically relevant bacterial pathogens, coupled with a paucity of novel antimicrobial discoveries, represents a pressing global crisis. Traditional drug discovery is an inefficient and costly process; however, systematic screening of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics for other indications in humans offers a rapid alternative approach. In this study, we screened a library of 780 FDA-approved drugs to identify molecules that rendered RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resistant to cytotoxicity induced by the highly virulent Yersinia pestis CO92 strain. Of these compounds, we identified 94 not classified as antibiotics as being effective at preventing Y. pestis-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 17 prioritized drugs, based on efficacy in in vitro screens, were chosen for further evaluation in a murine model of pneumonic plague to delineate if in vitro efficacy could be translated in vivo. Three drugs, doxapram (DXP), amoxapine (AXPN), and trifluoperazine (TFP), increased animal survivability despite not exhibiting any direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect on Y. pestis and having no modulating effect on crucial Y. pestis virulence factors. These findings suggested that DXP, AXPN, and TFP may modulate host cell pathways necessary for disease pathogenesis. Finally, to further assess the broad applicability of drugs identified from in vitro screens, the therapeutic potential of TFP, the most efficacious drug in vivo, was evaluated in murine models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile infections. In both models, TFP treatment resulted in increased survivability of infected animals. Taken together, these results demonstrate the broad applicability and potential use of nonantibiotic FDA-approved drugs to combat respiratory and gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27067323

  6. Repositioning FDA-Approved Drugs in Combination with Epigenetic Drugs to Reprogram Colon Cancer Epigenome.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Da Costa, Elodie M; Lee, Justin T; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Zhang, Hanghang; Sato, Takahiro; Malouf, Gabriel G; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2017-02-01

    Epigenetic drugs, such as DNA methylation inhibitors (DNMTi) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are approved in monotherapy for cancer treatment. These drugs reprogram gene expression profiles, reactivate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) producing cancer cell differentiation and apoptosis. Epigenetic drugs have been shown to synergize with other epigenetic drugs or various anticancer drugs. To discover new molecular entities that enhance epigenetic therapy, we performed a high-throughput screening using FDA-approved libraries in combination with DNMTi or HDACi. As a screening model, we used YB5 system, a human colon cancer cell line, which contains an epigenetically silenced CMV-GFP locus, mimicking TSG silencing in cancer. CMV-GFP reactivation is triggered by DNMTi or HDACi and responds synergistically to DNMTi/HDACi combination, which phenocopies TSG reactivation upon epigenetic therapy. GFP fluorescence was used as a quantitative readout for epigenetic activity. We discovered that 45 FDA-approved drugs (4% of all drugs tested) in our FDA-approved libraries enhanced DNMTi and HDACi activity, mainly belonging to anticancer and antiarrhythmic drug classes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that combination of decitabine (DNMTi) with the antiarrhythmic proscillaridin A produced profound gene expression reprogramming, which was associated with downregulation of 153 epigenetic regulators, including two known oncogenes in colon cancer (SYMD3 and KDM8). Also, we identified about 85 FDA-approved drugs that antagonized DNMTi and HDACi activity through cytotoxic mechanisms, suggesting detrimental drug interactions for patients undergoing epigenetic therapy. Overall, our drug screening identified new combinations of epigenetic and FDA-approved drugs, which can be rapidly implemented into clinical trials. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 397-407. ©2016 AACR.

  7. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products.

  8. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products PMID:27668042

  9. Analysis of lomustine drug content in FDA-approved and compounded lomustine capsules.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, Butch; Warner, Matt; Hahn, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the lomustine content (potency) in compounded and FDA-approved lomustine capsules. DESIGN Evaluation study. SAMPLE 2 formulations of lomustine capsules (low dose [7 to 11 mg] and high dose [40 to 48 mg]; 5 capsules/dose/source) from 3 compounders and from 1 manufacturer of FDA-approved capsules. PROCEDURES Lomustine content was measured by use of a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography method. An a priori acceptable range of 90% to 110% of the stated lomustine content was selected on the basis of US Pharmacopeia guidelines. RESULTS The measured amount of lomustine in all compounded capsules was less than the stated content (range, 59% to 95%) and was frequently outside the acceptable range (failure rate, 2/5 to 5/5). Coefficients of variation for lomustine content ranged from 4.1% to 16.7% for compounded low-dose capsules and from 1.1% to 10.8% for compounded high-dose capsules. The measured amount of lomustine in all FDA-approved capsules was slightly above the stated content (range, 104% to 110%) and consistently within the acceptable range. Coefficients of variation for lomustine content were 0.5% for low-dose and 2.3% for high-dose FDA-approved capsules. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Compounded lomustine frequently did not contain the stated content of active drug and had a wider range of lomustine content variability than did the FDA-approved product. The sample size was small, and larger studies are needed to confirm these findings; however, we recommend that compounded veterinary formulations of lomustine not be used when appropriate doses can be achieved with FDA-approved capsules or combinations of FDA-approved capsules.

  10. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Merkel, Janie

    2015-08-01

    The term 'inflammation' captures a variety of disease processes linked with the immune system. An analysis of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nuclear molecular entities (NMEs) reveals notable trends in terms of acute and chronic inflammatory indications. The number of NMEs peaked during the 1990s and has since declined by more than 50%. Whereas pharmaceutical companies have dominated the field, biotechnology companies now receive half of new approvals and academia has a relatively large role in terms of pivotal first patents. Another notable trend is that the relative number of NMEs targeting allergy has been decreasing, whereas those targeting autoimmune indications is increasing. Unlike other indications, NMEs for inflammation tend towards nuclear receptors and cytokines, and a disproportionate number of biologics target cytokine pathways.

  11. 2015 in review: FDA approval of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The myriad new molecular entities (NMEs) approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 reflected both the opportunities and risks associated with the development of new medicines. On the one hand, the approval of 45 NMEs was among the highest ever recorded. Likewise, the diversity underlying the mechanistic basis of new medicines suggests continued broadening relative to the predominate trends of the past few decades. On the other hand, closer inspection indicates that business model decisions surrounding orphan indications and consolidation could be placing the industry in an ever-more precarious position, with severe implications for the sustainability of the entire enterprise.

  12. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  13. ISS-N1 makes the First FDA-approved Drug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ottesen, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the leading genetic diseases of children and infants. SMA is caused by deletions or mutations of Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7. While various regulatory elements that modulate SMN2 exon 7 splicing have been proposed, intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) has emerged as the most promising target thus far for antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing correction in SMA. Upon procuring exclusive license from the University of Massachussets Medical School in 2010, Ionis Pharmaceuticals (formerly ISIS Pharamaceuticals) began clinical development of Spinraza™ (synonyms: Nusinersen, IONIS-SMNRX, ISIS-SMNRX), an antisense drug based on ISS-N1 target. Spinraza™ showed very promising results at all steps of the clinical development and was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 23, 2016. Spinraza™ is the first FDA-approved treatment for SMA and the first antisense drug to restore expression of a fully functional protein via splicing correction. The success of Spinraza™ underscores the potential of intronic sequences as promising therapeutic targets and sets the stage for further improvement of antisense drugs based on advanced oligonucleotide chemistries and delivery protocols.

  14. Tamoxifen: an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injury recovery

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Jennifer M.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and synaptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneficial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the field. PMID:27651756

  15. Repurposing the FDA-Approved Pinworm Drug Pyrvinium as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent for Intestinal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I.; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1α. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1α agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  16. Synergy testing of FDA-approved drugs identifies potent drug combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Hulverson, Matthew A; Arif, Jennifer A; Ranade, Ranae M; Don, Robert; Buckner, Frederick S

    2014-07-01

    An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper) have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's) in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM), and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM) and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease.

  17. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients.

  18. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients. PMID:26038747

  19. Top 100 bestselling drugs represent an arena struggling for new FDA approvals: drug age as an efficiency indicator.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed a list of the top 100 bestselling drugs as a struggling market for new FDA approvals. Using the time from drug approval by the FDA as a measure of drug age, our analysis showed that the top 100 bestselling drugs are getting older. This reflects the stalled launch of new drugs into the market during recent years.

  20. Doxil®--the first FDA-approved nano-drug: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2012-06-10

    Doxil®, the first FDA-approved nano-drug (1995), is based on three unrelated principles: (i) prolonged drug circulation time and avoidance of the RES due to the use of PEGylated nano-liposomes; (ii) high and stable remote loading of doxorubicin driven by a transmembrane ammonium sulfate gradient, which also allows for drug release at the tumor; and (iii) having the liposome lipid bilayer in a "liquid ordered" phase composed of the high-T(m) (53 °C) phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol. Due to the EPR effect, Doxil is "passively targeted" to tumors and its doxorubicin is released and becomes available to tumor cells by as yet unknown means. This review summarizes historical and scientific perspectives of Doxil development and lessons learned from its development and 20 years of its use. It demonstrates the obligatory need for applying an understanding of the cross talk between physicochemical, nano-technological, and biological principles. However, in spite of the large reward, ~2 years after Doxil-related patents expired, there is still no FDA-approved generic "Doxil" available.

  1. Combining Molecular Scaffolds from FDA Approved Drugs: Application to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard D; MacCoss, Malcolm; Lawson, Alastair D G

    2017-03-09

    We have enumerated all linear combinations of ring systems from FDA approved drugs, up to three rings in length and up to four bonds linkers to give an in silico database of approximately 14 million molecules. This virtual library was compared with molecular databases of published and commercially available compounds to assess the prevalence of drug ring combinations in modern medicinal chemistry and to identify areas of under-represented, but clinically validated, chemical space. From the 10 trillion molecular comparisons, we found that less than 1% of the possible combinations of drug ring systems appear in commercially available libraries. This key observation highlights significant opportunities to design new fragment-like and lead-like libraries aimed at improving success rates and reducing risk in small molecule drug discovery, as, based on our previous analysis ( Taylor J. Med. Chem. 2014 , 57 , 5845 - 5849 ), approximately 70% of all new drugs are made up of only ring systems that have been used in existing drugs.

  2. A Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Nicholas J; Campos, Rafael K; Powell, Steven T; Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Schott-Lerner, Geraldine; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; McGrath, Erica L; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Menon, Ramkumar; Saade, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Routh, Andrew; Bradrick, Shelton S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2016-08-10

    Currently there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We interrogated a library of FDA-approved drugs for their ability to block infection of human HuH-7 cells by a newly isolated ZIKV strain (ZIKV MEX_I_7). More than 20 out of 774 tested compounds decreased ZIKV infection in our in vitro screening assay. Selected compounds were further validated for inhibition of ZIKV infection in human cervical, placental, and neural stem cell lines, as well as primary human amnion cells. Established anti-flaviviral drugs (e.g., bortezomib and mycophenolic acid) and others that had no previously known antiviral activity (e.g., daptomycin) were identified as inhibitors of ZIKV infection. Several drugs reduced ZIKV infection across multiple cell types. This study identifies drugs that could be tested in clinical studies of ZIKV infection and provides a resource of small molecules to study ZIKV pathogenesis.

  3. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch.

  4. The analysis of the market success of FDA approvals by probing top 100 bestselling drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Bogocz, Jacek; Tkocz, Aleksandra

    2016-05-01

    Target-oriented drug discovery is the main research paradigm of contemporary drug discovery. In target-oriented approaches, we attempt to maximize in vitro drug potency by finding the optimal fit to the target. This can result in a higher molecular complexity, in particular, the higher molecular weight (MW) of the drugs. However, a comparison of the successful developments of pharmaceuticals with the general trends that can be observed in medicinal chemistry resulted in the conclusion that the so-called molecular obesity is an important reason for the attrition rate of drugs. When analyzing the list of top 100 drug bestsellers versus all of the FDA approvals, we discovered that on average lower-complexity (MW, ADMET score) drugs are winners of the top 100 list in terms of numbers but that, especially, up to some optimal MW value, a higher molecular complexity can pay off with higher incomes. This indicates that slim drugs are doing better but that fat drugs are bigger fishes to catch.

  5. Inhibition of Aβ42 oligomerization in yeast by a PICALM ortholog and certain FDA approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sei-Kyoung; Ratia, Kiira; Ba, Mariam; Valencik, Maria; Liebman, Susan W.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of small Aβ42 oligomers has been implicated as a toxic species in Alzheimer disease (AD). In strong support of this hypothesis we found that overexpression of Yap1802, the yeast ortholog of the human AD risk factor, phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM), reduced oligomerization of Aβ42 fused to a reporter in yeast. Thus we used the Aβ42-reporter system to identify drugs that could be developed into therapies that prevent or arrest AD. From a screen of 1,200 FDA approved drugs and drug-like small compounds we identified 7 drugs that reduce Aβ42 oligomerization in yeast: 3 antipsychotics (bromperidol, haloperidol and azaperone), 2 anesthetics (pramoxine HCl and dyclonine HCl), tamoxifen citrate, and minocycline HCl. Also, all 7 drugs caused Aβ42 to be less toxic to PC12 cells and to relieve toxicity of another yeast AD model in which Aβ42 aggregates targeted to the secretory pathway are toxic. Our results identify drugs that inhibit Aβ42 oligomers from forming in yeast. It remains to be determined if these drugs inhibit Aβ42 oligomerization in mammals and could be developed as a therapeutic treatment for AD. PMID:28357335

  6. State-of-the-art in design rules for drug delivery platforms: lessons learned from FDA-approved nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M; Kim, Chloe; Park, Jea Ho; Russell, Luisa M; Lee, Kwan Hyi; Pomper, Martin G; Searson, Peter C

    2014-08-10

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of physiologically imposed design constraints. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery vehicles where these design constraints can be decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing targeting efficiency and efficacy. Here we review the design strategies of the two FDA-approved antibody-drug conjugates (Brentuximab vedotin and Trastuzumab emtansine) and the four FDA-approved nanoparticle-based drug delivery platforms (Doxil, DaunoXome, Marqibo, and Abraxane) in the context of the challenges associated with systemic targeted delivery of a drug to a solid tumor. The lessons learned from these nanomedicines provide an important insight into the key challenges associated with the development of new platforms for systemic delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

  7. State-of-the-Art in Design Rules for Drug Delivery Platforms: Lessons from FDA-approved Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M.; Kim, Chloe; Park, Jea Ho; Russell, Luisa M.; Lee, Kwan Hyi; Pomper, Martin G.; Searson, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of physiologically imposed design constraints. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery vehicles where these design constraints can be decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing targeting efficiency and efficacy. Here we review the design strategies of the two FDA-approved antibody-drug conjugates (Brentuximab vedotin and Trastuzumab emtansine) and the four FDA-approved nanoparticle-based drug delivery platforms (Doxil, DaunoXome, Marqibo, and Abraxane) in the context of the challenges associated with systemic targeted delivery of a drug to a solid tumor. The lessons learned from these nanomedicines provide important insight into the key challenges associated with the development of new platforms for systemic delivery of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24874289

  8. A Systematic Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Biological Threat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Peter B.; Chopra, Sidharth; Manger, Ian D.; Gilfillan, Lynne; Keepers, Tiffany R.; Shurtleff, Amy C.; Green, Carol E.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Dilks, Holli Hutcheson; Davey, Robert A.; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.; Warren, Travis K.; Wells, Jay B.; Moos, Walter H.; Burke, RaeLyn L.; Tanga, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency. Methodology/Principal Findings A large systematic effort to determine whether existing drugs can be used against high containment bacterial and viral pathogens is described. We assembled and screened 1012 FDA-approved drugs for off-label broad-spectrum efficacy against Bacillus anthracis; Francisella tularensis; Coxiella burnetii; and Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fever viruses using in vitro cell culture assays. We found a variety of hits against two or more of these biological threat pathogens, which were validated in secondary assays. As expected, antibiotic compounds were highly active against bacterial agents, but we did not identify any non-antibiotic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Lomefloxacin and erythromycin were found to be the most potent compounds in vivo protecting mice against Bacillus anthracis challenge. While multiple virus-specific inhibitors were identified, the most noteworthy antiviral compound identified was chloroquine, which disrupted entry and replication of two or more viruses in vitro and protected mice against Ebola virus challenge in vivo. Conclusions/Significance The feasibility of repurposing existing drugs to face novel threats is demonstrated and this represents the first effort to apply this approach to high containment bacteria and viruses. PMID:23577127

  9. High-throughput screening of FDA-approved drugs using oxygen biosensor plates reveals secondary mitofunctional effects

    PubMed Central

    Sahdeo, Sunil; Tomilov, Alexey; Komachi, Kelly; Iwahashi, Christine; Datta, Sandipan; Hughes, Owen; Hagerman, Paul; Cortopassi, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing of FDA-approved drugs with effects on mitochondrial function might shorten the critical path to mitochondrial disease drug development. We improved a biosensor-based assay of mitochondrial O2 consumption, and identified mitofunctional defects in cell models of LHON and FXTAS. Using this platform, we screened a 1600-compound library of clinically used drugs. The assay identified drugs known to affect mitochondrial function, such as metformin and decoquinate. We also identified several drugs not previously known to affect mitochondrial respiration including acarbose, metaraminol, gallamine triethiodide, and acamprosate. These previously unknown ‘mitoactives’ represent novel links to targets for mitochondrial regulation and potentially therapy, for mitochondrial disease. PMID:25034306

  10. Zika antiviral chemotherapy: identification of drugs and promising starting points for drug discovery from an FDA-approved library

    PubMed Central

    Pascoalino, Bruno S.; Courtemanche, Gilles; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Freitas-Junior, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV) implicated it as the cause of serious and potentially lethal congenital conditions such microcephaly and other central nervous system defects, as well as the development of the Guillain-Barré syndrome in otherwise healthy patients. Recent findings showed that anti-Dengue antibodies are capable of amplifying ZIKV infection by a mechanism similar to antibody-dependent enhancement, increasing the severity of the disease. This scenario becomes potentially catastrophic when the global burden of Dengue and the advent of the newly approved anti-Dengue vaccines in the near future are taken into account. Thus, antiviral chemotherapy should be pursued as a priority strategy to control the spread of the virus and prevent the complications associated with Zika. Methods Here we describe a fast and reliable cell-based, high-content screening assay for discovery of anti-ZIKV compounds. This methodology has been used to screen the National Institute of Health Clinical Collection compound library, a small collection of FDA-approved drugs. Results and conclusion From 725 FDA-approved compounds triaged, 29 (4%) were found to have anti-Zika virus activity, of which 22 had confirmed (76% of confirmation) by dose-response curves. Five candidates presented selective activity against ZIKV infection and replication in a human cell line. These hits have abroad spectrum of chemotypes and therapeutic uses, offering valuable opportunities for selection of leads for antiviral drug discovery. PMID:27909576

  11. FDA-approved drugs selected using virtual screening bind specifically to G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Castillo-González, Dáimel; Pérez-Machado, Gisselle; Guédin, Aurore; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Cabrera-Pérez, Miguel-Angel

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich sequences found in telomeres and oncogene promoters have the ability to form G-quadruplex structures. In this paper we describe the use of a virtual screening assay to search a database of FDA-approved compounds for compounds with the potential to bind G-quadruplex DNA. More than 750 telomerase inhibitors were identified in a literature search as acting through G-quadruplex stabilization, and from evaluation of these compounds, theoretical models capable of discriminating new compounds that bind G-quadruplex DNA were developed. Six compounds predicted to bind to the G-quadruplex structure were tested for their ability to bind to the human telomeric DNA sequence. Prochloroperazine, promazine, and chlorpromazine stabilized the G-quadruplex structure as determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. These compounds also bound to promoter sequences of oncogenes such as c-myc and K-ras. Amitriptyline, imipramine, and loxapine were less stabilizing but did bind to the G-quadruplex. The ability of prochloroperazine, promazine, and chlorpromazine to recognize G-quadruplex structures was confirmed using a fluorescent intercalator displacement assay, in which displacement of thiazole orange from G-quadruplex structures was demonstrated. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited selectivity for the G-quadruplex structure as all had poor affinity for the duplex sequence.

  12. Identification of Novel Activators of Constitutive Androstane Receptor from FDA-approved Drugs by Integrated Computational and Biological Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Xia, Menghang; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a xenobiotic sensor governing the transcription of numerous hepatic genes associated with drug metabolism and clearance. Recent evidence suggests that CAR also modulates energy homeostasis and cancer development. Thus, identification of novel human (h) CAR activators is of both clinical importance and scientific interest. Methods Docking and ligand-based structure-activity models were used for virtual screening of a database containing over 2000 FDA-approved drugs. Identified lead compounds were evaluated in cell-based reporter assays to determine hCAR activation. Potential activators were further tested in human primary hepatocytes (HPHs) for the expression of the prototypical hCAR target gene CYP2B6. Results Nineteen lead compounds with optimal modeling parameters were selected for biological evaluation. Seven of the 19 leads exhibited moderate to potent activation of hCAR. Five out of the seven compounds translocated hCAR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of HPHs in a concentration-dependent manner. These compounds also induce the expression of CYP2B6 in HPHs with rank-order of efficacies closely resembling that of hCAR activation. Conclusion These results indicate that our strategically integrated approaches are effective in the identification of novel hCAR modulators, which may function as valuable research tools or potential therapeutic molecules. PMID:23090669

  13. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  14. Is It Really FDA Approved?

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA approval of a premarket approval application before marketing. To receive FDA approval for these devices, manufacturers ... dialysis equipment and many types of catheters) for marketing once it has been demonstrated that the device ...

  15. Discovery of FDA-Approved Drugs that Promote Retinal Cell Survival or Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    or neighboring ocular tissues from cell death and edema , or that stimulate regenerative outcomes from multiple ocular stem cells, we developed an in...Here, we show that exposing transgenic lines to the prodrug CB1954 resulted in the robust edema in tissues around the eye as well as loss of NTR...10 out of 35 drugs diminished CB1954-induced edema in ~50% of the zebrafish larvae. Further, we identified one compound Panobinostat (LBH589) were

  16. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics.

  17. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics. PMID:26155740

  18. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  19. Identification of FDA-approved drugs and bioactives that protect hair cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) lateral line and mouse (Mus musculus) utricle.

    PubMed

    Ou, Henry C; Cunningham, Lisa L; Francis, Shimon P; Brandon, Carlene S; Simon, Julian A; Raible, David W; Rubel, Edwin W

    2009-06-01

    The hair cells of the larval zebrafish lateral line provide a useful preparation in which to study hair cell death and to screen for genes and small molecules that modulate hair cell toxicity. We recently reported preliminary results from screening a small-molecule library for compounds that inhibit aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. To potentially reduce the time required for development of drugs and drug combinations that can be clinically useful, we screened a library of 1,040 FDA-approved drugs and bioactive compounds (NINDS Custom Collection II). Seven compounds that protect against neomycin-induced hair cell death were identified. Four of the seven drugs inhibited aminoglycoside uptake, based on Texas-Red-conjugated gentamicin uptake. The activities of two of the remaining three drugs were evaluated using an in vitro adult mouse utricle preparation. One drug, 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine (tacrine) demonstrated conserved protective effects in the mouse utricle. These results demonstrate that the zebrafish lateral line can be used to screen successfully for drugs within a library of FDA-approved drugs and bioactives that inhibit hair cell death in the mammalian inner ear and identify tacrine as a promising protective drug for future studies.

  20. Current FDA-approved treatments for Helicobacter pylori and the FDA approval process.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, R J

    1997-12-01

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of new drugs expands treatment options and serves as a "safety net" of well-documented efficacy and safety. The information provided in the package insert facilitates physician education and provides some assurance that marketing information is accurate. As of February 1997, three Helicobacter pylori regimes have been FDA-approved for eradication of H. pylori in infected patients with active duodenal ulcers. Regimen 1, omeprazole + clarithromycin (O/C), was supported by two multicenter, controlled studies with a 6-month follow-up. Eradication rates were 74% (n = 53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 62-85) and 64% (n = 61; 95% CI, 52-76). Twenty-five of 26 patients with failed eradication therapy who were taking O/C with clarithromycin-susceptible strains before treatment and who had pretreatment and posttreatment susceptibility tests performed developed clarithromycin resistance after treatment. Regimen 2, ranitidine-bismuth-citrate + clarithromycin, was supported by two multicenter, placebo-controlled studies with a 6-month follow-up. Eradication rates were 84% (n = 19; 95% CI, 60-96) and 73% (n = 22; 95% CI, 50-88). Insufficient pretreatment and posttreatment susceptibility data were collected to assess antimicrobial resistance. Regimen 3, bismuth subsalicylate + metronidazole + tetracycline + an H2-receptor antagonist, was supported by two pivotal literature-based studies. Eradication rates in patients with duodenal ulcer were 82% (n = 51; 95% CI, 70-92) and 77% (n = 39; 95% CI, 61-89), respectively. When extrapolating the results of these three FDA-approved regimens to the clinical setting, particular aspects of the clinical trial should be kept in mind. These include the type of controls, primary end points used, population studied, and number and type of dropouts.

  1. Computational drugs repositioning identifies inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K/AKT/P70S6K-dependent pathways among FDA-approved compounds

    PubMed Central

    Carrella, Diego; Manni, Isabella; Tumaini, Barbara; Dattilo, Rosanna; Papaccio, Federica; Mutarelli, Margherita; Sirci, Francesco; Amoreo, Carla A.; Mottolese, Marcella; Iezzi, Manuela; Ciolli, Laura; Aria, Valentina; Bosotti, Roberta; Isacchi, Antonella; Loreni, Fabrizio; Bardelli, Alberto; Avvedimento, Vittorio E.; di Bernardo, Diego; Cardone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors for oncogenic signalling pathways remains a key focus in modern oncology, based on personalized and targeted therapeutics. Computational drug repurposing via the analysis of FDA-approved drug network is becoming a very effective approach to identify therapeutic opportunities in cancer and other human diseases. Given that gene expression signatures can be associated with specific oncogenic mutations, we tested whether a “reverse” oncogene-specific signature might assist in the computational repositioning of inhibitors of oncogenic pathways. As a proof of principle, we focused on oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling, a molecular pathway frequently driving cancer progression as well as raising resistance to anticancer-targeted therapies. We show that implementation of “reverse” oncogenic PI3K-dependent transcriptional signatures combined with interrogation of drug networks identified inhibitors of PI3K-dependent signalling among FDA-approved compounds. This led to repositioning of Niclosamide (Niclo) and Pyrvinium Pamoate (PP), two anthelmintic drugs, as inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling. Niclo inhibited phosphorylation of P70S6K, while PP inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and P70S6K, which are downstream targets of PI3K. Anthelmintics inhibited oncogenic PI3K-dependent gene expression and showed a cytostatic effect in vitro and in mouse mammary gland. Lastly, PP inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells harbouring PI3K mutations. Our data indicate that drug repositioning by network analysis of oncogene-specific transcriptional signatures is an efficient strategy for identifying oncogenic pathway inhibitors among FDA-approved compounds. We propose that PP and Niclo should be further investigated as potential therapeutics for the treatment of tumors or diseases carrying the constitutive activation of the PI3K/P70S6K signalling axis. PMID:27542212

  2. The Human Kinome Targeted by FDA Approved Multi-Target Drugs and Combination Products: A Comparative Study from the Drug-Target Interaction Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun Yan; Yang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Xue, Wei Wei; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human kinome is one of the most productive classes of drug target, and there is emerging necessity for treating complex diseases by means of polypharmacology (multi-target drugs and combination products). However, the advantages of the multi-target drugs and the combination products are still under debate. A comparative analysis between FDA approved multi-target drugs and combination products, targeting the human kinome, was conducted by mapping targets onto the phylogenetic tree of the human kinome. The approach of network medicine illustrating the drug-target interactions was applied to identify popular targets of multi-target drugs and combination products. As identified, the multi-target drugs tended to inhibit target pairs in the human kinome, especially the receptor tyrosine kinase family, while the combination products were able to against targets of distant homology relationship. This finding asked for choosing the combination products as a better solution for designing drugs aiming at targets of distant homology relationship. Moreover, sub-networks of drug-target interactions in specific disease were generated, and mechanisms shared by multi-target drugs and combination products were identified. In conclusion, this study performed an analysis between approved multi-target drugs and combination products against the human kinome, which could assist the discovery of next generation polypharmacology. PMID:27828998

  3. FDA Approval for Imiquimod

    Cancer.gov

    On July 15, 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of a new indication for Aldara® (imiquimod) topical cream for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), a type of skin cancer.

  4. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment FDA-Approved HIV Medicines (Last updated 2/27/2017; last reviewed 2/27/2017) Treatment with ... 2007 Pharmacokinetic Enhancers Pharmacokinetic enhancers are used in HIV treatment to increase the effectiveness of an HIV medicine ...

  5. Prescribing of FDA-approved and compounded hormone therapy differs by specialty

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Ginger D.; Archer, David F.; Graham, Shelli; Bernick, Brian A.; Mirkin, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of general practitioners (GPs), obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), and wellness physicians (WPs) of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for both compounded (CHT) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products, using a survey of US physicians. Methods: Nine thousand one US physicians were invited to participate in a survey to report on their HT-prescribing patterns. Physicians were eligible if they prescribed HT for at least six patients per month. Results: The survey was completed by 440 eligible physicians (893 responded of 9,001 invited) including 171 GPs, 170 OB/GYNs, and 84 WPs. Physicians prescribed HT for 15% to 30% of their female patients, with WPs numerically most likely to prescribe HT. Menopausal symptoms were the leading reason for HT prescriptions among all specialties. WPs seemed more likely to prescribe HT for general/cardiovascular health (28%), and for shorter durations, than other specialties. WPs prescribed proportionally more compounded (vs FDA-approved) estrogens/progestogens than GPs or OB/GYNs, but OB/GYNs seemed to prescribe more compounded dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone (prescribed alone) than did others. OB/GYNs seemed least likely to consider CHT being more safe or effective than FDA-approved HT. Symptom relief was the main determinant of efficacy for all specialties; WPs also used blood (61%) or saliva testing (25%) for dose adjustment. Conclusions: Although all physician specialties surveyed prescribed HT, differences in prescribing CHT versus FDA-approved formulations by medical specialty/practice seemed to exist. Of those surveyed, OB/GYNs and GPs prescribed proportionally more FDA-approved HT, whereas WPs, similarly, prescribed more CHT. More discussion is needed concerning physicians’ decisions to prescribe CHT versus FDA-approved formulations. PMID:27648594

  6. Off-label or out of bounds? Prescriber and marketer liability for unapproved uses of FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, James; Dalal, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Professor O'Reilly's study of recent drug review legislation applies a historical and holistic view of promotion practices for unapproved uses of prescription drugs. He faults Congress for moving public health protections away from a strictly protective mode and toward assistance to drug marketers. He argues that the adverse health consequences of "off-label" promotion of drugs are not well understood, and that the 1997 amendments deserved the public health interest while expanding pharmaceutical company profits.

  7. Irbesartan, an FDA approved drug for hypertension and diabetic nephropathy, is a potent inhibitor for hepatitis B virus entry by disturbing Na(+)-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jun; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-yu; Mao, Ying-ying; Liu, Nan-nan; Wang, Sheng-qi

    2015-08-01

    The liver-specific Na(+)-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) was recently identified as an entry receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) hepatotropic infection. In this study, an NTCP-overexpressing HepG2 cell line named HepG2.N9 susceptible to HBV infection was established using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology. Using this cell line, irbesartan, the new NTCP-interfering molecule reported recently, was demonstrated here to effectively inhibit HBV infection with an IC50 of 3.3μM for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression and exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity up to 1000μM. Irbesartan suppressed HBV uptake weakly but inhibited HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) formation efficiently at physiological temperature. These results suggested that irbesartan targeted HBV infection at a post-uptake prior to cccDNA formation step such as the cell membrane fusion. Based on these findings, irbesartan, an FDA approved drug for hypertension and diabetic nephropathy, could be a potential candidate for treatment of HBV infection although further in vivo experiments are required.

  8. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C

    PubMed Central

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S. Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J.; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  9. Integration of new technology into clinical practice after FDA approval.

    PubMed

    Govil, Ashul; Hao, Steven C

    2016-10-01

    Development of new medical technology is a crucial part of the advancement of medicine and our ability to better treat patients and their diseases. This process of development is long and arduous and requires a significant investment of human, financial and material capital. However, technology development can be rewarded richly by its impact on patient outcomes and successful sale of the product. One of the major regulatory hurdles to technology development is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, which is necessary before a technology can be marketed and sold in the USA. Many businesses, medical providers and consumers believe that the FDA approval process is the only hurdle prior to use of the technology in day-to-day care. In order for the technology to be adopted into clinical use, reimbursement for both the device as well as the associated work performed by physicians and medical staff must be in place. Work and coverage decisions require Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code development and Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) valuation determination. Understanding these processes is crucial to the timely availability of new technology to patients and providers. Continued and better partnerships between physicians, industry, regulatory bodies and payers will facilitate bringing technology to market sooner and ensure appropriate utilization.

  10. Structure-based optimization of FDA-approved drug methylene blue as a c-myc G-quadruplex DNA stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Yang, Hui; Kwan, Maria Hiu-Tung; Cheng, Zhen; Lee, Paul; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Fong, Wang-Fun; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2011-06-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA secondary structures putatively present in the promoter regions of oncogenes in the human genome. The targeting of promoter G-quadruplex structures to repress oncogene transcription represents a potential anticancer strategy. Here, we have used high-throughput virtual screening to identify FDA-approved drug methylene blue (MB) as a promising scaffold for binding the c-myc oncogene G-quadruplex DNA. Based on molecular docking analysis of MB to the c-myc G-quadruplex, we designed and screened 50 MB derivatives containing side chains that could interact with the G-quadruplex grooves. As a proof-of-concept, the highest-scoring compounds were synthesized and the interactions with the c-myc G-quadruplex were investigated using the FID assay. The results showed that the methylene blue derivatives 6a-c were able to bind to the c-myc G-quadruplex with greater binding affinity compared to the known G-quadruplex binding ligand, crystal violet. The activity of the most potent compound identified from the FID assay, 6b, as an inhibitor for polymerase-drive DNA extension was examined using a PCR-stop assay and compared against that of the parent compound methylene blue. The results of the PCR-stop assay showed that the addition of the side chain improved the activity of the derivatives as an inhibitor compared to the parent compound. The MB derivative 6b was shown to be highly selective towards c-myc G-quadruplex over double-stranded DNA and other biologically relevant G-quadruplexes using UV-visible spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, respectively. The MB derivative 6b could induce or stabilize c-myc G-quadruplex formation in both cell-free and cellular biological models, and displayed higher cytoxicity against human hepatocarcinoma cells compared to the parent compound, MB.

  11. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models for predicting drug-induced liver injury based on FDA-approved drug labeling annotation and using a large collection of drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjun; Hong, Huixiao; Fang, Hong; Kelly, Reagan; Zhou, Guangxu; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2013-11-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the leading causes of the termination of drug development programs. Consequently, identifying the risk of DILI in humans for drug candidates during the early stages of the development process would greatly reduce the drug attrition rate in the pharmaceutical industry but would require the implementation of new research and development strategies. In this regard, several in silico models have been proposed as alternative means in prioritizing drug candidates. Because the accuracy and utility of a predictive model rests largely on how to annotate the potential of a drug to cause DILI in a reliable and consistent way, the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug labeling was given prominence. Out of 387 drugs annotated, 197 drugs were used to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model and the model was subsequently challenged by the left of drugs serving as an external validation set with an overall prediction accuracy of 68.9%. The performance of the model was further assessed by the use of 2 additional independent validation sets, and the 3 validation data sets have a total of 483 unique drugs. We observed that the QSAR model's performance varied for drugs with different therapeutic uses; however, it achieved a better estimated accuracy (73.6%) as well as negative predictive value (77.0%) when focusing only on these therapeutic categories with high prediction confidence. Thus, the model's applicability domain was defined. Taken collectively, the developed QSAR model has the potential utility to prioritize compound's risk for DILI in humans, particularly for the high-confidence therapeutic subgroups like analgesics, antibacterial agents, and antihistamines.

  12. Assessment of foetal risk associated with 93 non-US-FDA approved medications during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-jedai, Ahmed H.; Balhareth, Sakra S.; Algain, Roaa A.

    2012-01-01

    Health care practitioners utilize the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) pregnancy categorization (A, B, C, D, X) for making decision on the appropriateness of certain medications during pregnancy. Many non US-FDA approved medications are registered and marketed in Saudi Arabia. However, these medications do not have an assigned pregnancy risk categorization like those approved in the US. The objective of this review is to evaluate, report, and categorize the foetal risk associated with non-US-FDA approved medications registered by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (S-FDA) according to the US-FDA pregnancy risk categorization system. We identified 109 non-US-FDA approved medications in the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) as of October 2007. We searched for data on functional or anatomical birth defects or embryocidal-associated risk using different databases and references. An algorithm for risk assessment was used to determine a pregnancy risk category for each medication. Out of 93 eligible medications, 73% were assigned category risk C, 10 medications (11%) were assigned category risk D, and 12 medications (13%) were assigned category risk B. Only three medications were judged to be safe during pregnancy based on the available evidence and were assigned category risk A. Inconsistencies in defining and reporting the foetal risk category among different drug regulatory authorities could create confusion and affect prescribing. We believe that standardization and inclusion of this information in the medication package insert is extremely important to all health care practitioners. PMID:23960803

  13. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets.

  14. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets. PMID:26556207

  15. AMCP Partnership Forum: Enabling the Exchange of Clinical and Economic Information Pre-FDA Approval.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Current federal laws and FDA regulations have significantly restricted the sharing of clinical and health economic information on biopharmaceuticals that have yet to receive FDA approval. Over the past several years, organizations that make health care coverage decisions, including those that set copayments, premiums, and formulary placement, have expressed a need for receiving this information before approval, as long as appropriate safeguards exist to prevent this information from reaching unintended entities. Population health decision makers have indicated that waiting until FDA approval is often too late for the critical planning, budgeting, and forecasting associated with health benefit design, especially given the recent influx of high-cost medications and scrutiny for better evaluation and preparation. Recognizing that securities laws restrict the disclosure of nonpublic information and may need to be amended, permissible early dissemination would allow population health decision makers to incorporate clinical and economic information for pipeline drugs or expanded indications into financial forecasting for the following year's plan. Access to this information is needed 12-18 months before FDA approval when organizations are deciding on terms of coverage and budgetary assumptions for state health insurance rate filings, Medicare and Medicaid bids, contracts with health care purchasers, and other financial arrangements. The need for exchange of clinical economic information before FDA approval was first introduced at a previous Academy of Managed Care (AMCP) forum in March 2016, which addressed section 114 of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act and the communication of such information after FDA approval. To address preapproval information specifically, AMCP convened a Partnership Forum on September 13-14, 2016. This forum included a diverse group of stakeholders representing managed care, the biopharmaceutical industry, providers, patients

  16. Comparison of FDA Approved Kinase Targets to Clinical Trial Ones: Insights from Their System Profiles and Drug-Target Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyu; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Hong; Li, Yinghong; Yu, Chunyan; Tian, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Kinase is one of the most productive classes of established targets, but the majority of approved drugs against kinase were developed only for cancer. Intensive efforts were therefore exerted for releasing its therapeutic potential by discovering new therapeutic area. Kinases in clinical trial could provide great opportunities for treating various diseases. However, no systematic comparison between system profiles of established targets and those of clinical trial ones was conducted. The reveal of probable difference or shift of trend would help to identify key factors defining druggability of established targets. In this study, a comparative analysis of system profiles of both types of targets was conducted. Consequently, the systems profiles of the majority of clinical trial kinases were identified to be very similar to those of established ones, but percentages of established targets obeying the system profiles appeared to be slightly but consistently higher than those of clinical trial targets. Moreover, a shift of trend in the system profiles from the clinical trial to the established targets was identified, and popular kinase targets were discovered. In sum, this comparative study may help to facilitate the identification of the druggability of established drug targets by their system profiles and drug-target interaction networks. PMID:27547755

  17. Obinutuzumab breaks through to FDA approval.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab for use with chlorambucil in patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The drug is the first to receive approval under the agency's breakthrough therapy designation, created in July 2012.

  18. In vitro screening of an FDA-Approved Library against ESKAPE pathogens.

    PubMed

    Younis, Waleed; AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2017-02-09

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is an increasingly serious threat to public health worldwide that requires immediate exploration and the development of novel antimicrobial compounds. Drug repurposing is an inexpensive and untapped source of new antimicrobial leads, and it holds many attractive features warranting further attention for antimicrobial drug discovery. In an effort to repurpose drugs and explore new leads in the field of antimicrobial drug discovery, we performed a whole-cell screening assay of 1,600 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs against Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae (ESKAPE) pathogens. The in vitro screening identified 49 non-antimicrobial drugs that were active against at least one species of ESKAPE pathogen. Although some of these drugs were known to have antibacterial activity, many have never been reported before. In particular, sulfonamide-containing structures represent a novel drug scaffold that should be investigated further. The characteristics of these drugs as antimicrobial agents may offer a safe, effective, and quick supplement to current approaches to treating bacterial infections.

  19. Ultraviolet light-an FDA approved technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet Light (254 nm) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nonthermal intervention technology that can be used for decontamination of food and food contact surfaces. Ultraviolet light is a green technology that leaves no chemical residues. Results from our laboratory indicate that ex...

  20. FDA Approves New Treatment for Dust Mite Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163882.html FDA Approves New Treatment for Dust Mite Allergies Odactra is a year-round treatment for ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new treatment for dust mite allergies has won approval from the U.S. Food ...

  1. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of FDA-Approved Products of Oral Solutions Containing Dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-transtetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] in Schedule II. Interim final rule, with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2017-03-23

    On July 1, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug application for Syndros, a drug product consisting of dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] oral solution. Thereafter, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provided the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) with a scheduling recommendation that would result in Syndros (and other oral solutions containing dronabinol) being placed in schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). In accordance with the CSA, as revised by the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act, DEA is hereby issuing an interim final rule placing FDA-approved products of oral solutions containing dronabinol in schedule II of the CSA.

  2. FDA approval summary: vemurafenib for treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma with the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geoffrey; McKee, Amy E; Ning, Yang-Min; Hazarika, Maitreyee; Theoret, Marc; Johnson, John R; Xu, Qiang Casey; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Roscoe, Donna; McGuinn, W David; Helms, Whitney S; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Zirkelbach, Jeanne Fourie; Earp, Justin; Liu, Qi; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-10-01

    On August 17, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved vemurafenib tablets (Zelboraf, Hoffmann-LaRoche Inc.) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with the BRAF(V600E) mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test. The cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Inc.) was approved concurrently. An international, multicenter, randomized, open-label trial in 675 previously untreated patients with BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive unresectable or metastatic melanoma allocated 337 patients to receive vemurafenib, 960 mg orally twice daily, and 338 patients to receive dacarbazine, 1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks. Overall survival was significantly improved in patients receiving vemurafenib [HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.59; P < 0.0001]. Progression-free survival was also significantly improved in patients receiving vemurafenib (HR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.20-0.33; P < 0.0001). Overall response rates were 48.4% and 5.5% in the vemurafenib and dacarbazine arms, respectively. The most common adverse reactions (≥30%) in patients treated with vemurafenib were arthralgia, rash, alopecia, fatigue, photosensitivity reaction, and nausea. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas or keratoacanthomas were detected in approximately 24% of patients treated with vemurafenib. Other adverse reactions included hypersensitivity, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, uveitis, QT prolongation, and liver enzyme laboratory abnormalities.

  3. Evaluation of genotoxicity testing of FDA approved large molecule therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Satin G; Fielden, Mark R; Black, Kurt A

    2014-10-01

    Large molecule therapeutics (MW>1000daltons) are not expected to enter the cell and thus have reduced potential to interact directly with DNA or related physiological processes. Genotoxicity studies are therefore not relevant and typically not required for large molecule therapeutic candidates. Regulatory guidance supports this approach; however there are examples of marketed large molecule therapeutics where sponsors have conducted genotoxicity studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on genotoxicity studies of United States FDA approved large molecule therapeutics since 1998 identified through the Drugs@FDA website. This information was used to provide a data-driven rationale for genotoxicity evaluations of large molecule therapeutics. Fifty-three of the 99 therapeutics identified were tested for genotoxic potential. None of the therapeutics tested showed a positive outcome in any study except the peptide glucagon (GlucaGen®) showing equivocal in vitro results, as stated in the product labeling. Scientific rationale and data from this review indicate that testing of a majority of large molecule modalities do not add value to risk assessment and support current regulatory guidance. Similarly, the data do not support testing of peptides containing only natural amino acids. Peptides containing non-natural amino acids and small molecules in conjugated products may need to be tested.

  4. Generation of recombinant arenavirus for vaccine development in FDA-approved Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Benson Y H; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-08-01

    The development and implementation of arenavirus reverse genetics represents a significant breakthrough in the arenavirus field. The use of cell-based arenavirus minigenome systems together with the ability to generate recombinant infectious arenaviruses with predetermined mutations in their genomes has facilitated the investigation of the contribution of viral determinants to the different steps of the arenavirus life cycle, as well as virus-host interactions and mechanisms of arenavirus pathogenesis. In addition, the development of trisegmented arenaviruses has permitted the use of the arenavirus genome to express additional foreign genes of interest, thus opening the possibility of arenavirus-based vaccine vector applications. Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious arenaviruses capable of expressing reporter genes provides a new experimental tool to improve the safety of research involving highly pathogenic human arenaviruses. The generation of recombinant arenaviruses using plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques has so far relied on the use of rodent cell lines, which poses some barriers for the development of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccine or vaccine vectors. To overcome this obstacle, we describe here the efficient generation of recombinant arenaviruses in FDA-approved Vero cells.

  5. Racial/Ethnic composition of study participants in FDA-approved oncology new molecular entities, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Merenda, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has an ongoing interest in identifying the race/ethnicity of clinical trial participants to ensure they are representative of the people who will use the products once they are approved, and differences in response to medical products have already been observed in racial/ethnic subgroups of the US population. As a result, we reviewed the racial/ethnic composition of study participants in clinical trials of FDA-approved oncology products. Oncology products were chosen because of the disparate incidence and impact of cancer in racial/ethnic communities. New Drug and Biologics Licensing Application databases were searched for new molecular entity (NME) approvals for oncologic treatment from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008. We then reviewed NME applications for the pivotal Phase II and III trials used for approval decisions. We then compared the racial/ethnic composition results from the recent trials with those conducted earlier. We also assessed FDA-approved labeling to determine the extent to which race-based findings were included. US participants averaged 20.3% (range, 11%-97%) of the total participants in the studies reviewed. A comparison of the racial/ ethnic composition showed the participation of whites and blacks or African Americans have decreased, while that of Latinos, Asians, and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders has increased. The results suggest better attention to compliance with collection and reporting, as the percentage of US study participants whose race and/or ethnicity could not be determined decreased from 31% to < 1%. With respect to product labeling, the current study found 6 (60%) included race-based findings.

  6. Annual update: drugs, diagnostics and devices.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, Candace; Kupecz, Deborah

    2003-03-01

    As NPs continue to play an important role in health care as administers of prescriptions, the value of reviewing the latest Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for new drugs and devices is immeasurable. In 2002, the FDA approved several new drugs and devices, as well as monitored previously approved drugs for adverse reactions and untoward events. This article provides a brief review of relevant primary care topics.

  7. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses.

    PubMed

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV), a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, "loop docking" - an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach - followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =-9.2 kcal/mol) when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 μM). Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =-9.0, -8.6, and -8.5 kcal/mol, respectively). Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602) played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding mechanism of the FDA-approved HIV PIs binding to human Hsp90. Information gained from this study should also provide a route map toward the design, optimization, and further experimental investigation of potential

  8. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud ES

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV), a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, “loop docking” – an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach – followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =−9.2 kcal/mol) when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 μM). Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =−9.0, −8.6, and −8.5 kcal/mol, respectively). Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602) played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding mechanism of the FDA-approved HIV PIs binding to human Hsp90. Information gained from this study should also provide a route map toward the design, optimization, and further experimental investigation of

  9. FDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164507.html FDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk Tests They screen for gene variants linked ... on Thursday approved the first direct-to-consumer genetic health risk tests. Known as the 23andMe Personal ...

  10. Rare cancer trial design: lessons from FDA approvals.

    PubMed

    Gaddipati, Himabindu; Liu, Ke; Pariser, Anne; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-10-01

    A systematic analysis of clinical trials supporting rare cancer drug approvals may identify concepts and terms that can inform the effective design of prospective clinical trials for rare cancers. In this article, using annual incidence ≤6 of 100,000 individuals to define "rare cancer," we identified clinical trials for rare cancers, supporting U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug approvals for rare cancer indications between December 1987 and May 2011. We characterized each selected trial for study design, sample size, primary efficacy endpoints, and statistical comparisons. We also profiled trials with regard to type of submission, review designation, and approval type. Our results indicated that, of 99 trials that supported the approvals of 45 drugs for 68 rare cancer indications, one third of these trials were randomized; 69% of approvals relied on objective response rate as the primary efficacy endpoint; and 63% were based on a single trial. Drugs granted accelerated approval appeared more likely to be associated with postmarketing safety findings, relative to drugs approved under the regular approval. Data collected across clinical trials were robust: Use of different lower incidence rates in analyzing these trials did not have effects on trial characteristics. The absolute number of drug approvals for rare cancer indications increased markedly over time. We concluded that one third of clinical trials supporting drug approvals for rare cancer indications were randomized, affirming the feasibility and value of randomized trial design to evaluate drugs for rare cancers. Postmarketing safety data may relate to trial design and approval type. An operational definition of "rare cancer" can be useful for the analysis of trial data and for the path toward harmonizing the terminology in the area of clinical research on rare cancers.

  11. Development of a FDA-Approved Pharmaceutical to Treat Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    CONTRACT NUMBER: N62645-12-C-403 7 TITLE: Development of a FDA-Approved Pharmaceutical to Treat Noise-Induced Hearing Loss PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Development of a FDA-Approved Pharmaceutical to Treat Noise-Induced N62645-12-C-4037 Hearing Loss (NIHL) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...TERMS Noise-induced hearing loss, pharmaceutical , pre-clinical, animal studies 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER a. REPORT

  12. Activity Profile of an FDA-Approved Compound Library against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan; Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background As plans to expand mass drug treatment campaigns to fight schistosomiasis form, worries about reliance on praziquantel as the sole available treatment motivate the investigation for novel antischistosomal compounds. Drug repurposing might be an inexpensive and effective source of novel antischistosomal leads. Methodology 1600 FDA approved compounds were first assayed against Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula at a concentration of 10 µM. Active compounds identified from this screen were advanced to the adult worm screen at 33.33 µM, followed by hit characterization. Leads with complementary pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles were then selected for in vivo studies. Principal Findings The in vitro screen identified 121 and 36 compounds active against the schistosomula and adult stage, respectively. Further, in vitro characterization and comparison with already available pharmacokinetic and toxicity data identified 11 in vivo candidates. Doramectin (10 mg/kg) and clofazimine (400 mg/kg) were found to be active in vivo with worm burden reductions of 60.1% and 82.7%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here expands the knowledge of antischistosomal properties of already approved compounds and underscores variations observed between target-based and phenotypic approaches and among laboratories. The two in vivo-active drugs identified in this study, doramectin and clofazimine are widely available and present as novel drug classes as starting points for further investigation. PMID:26230921

  13. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  14. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  15. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New drug product exclusivity. 314.108 Section 314.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications...

  16. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  17. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New drug product exclusivity. 314.108 Section 314.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications...

  18. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false New drug product exclusivity. 314.108 Section 314.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications...

  19. 21 CFR 314.108 - New drug product exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New drug product exclusivity. 314.108 Section 314.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications...

  20. 21 CFR 314.420 - Drug master files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug master files. 314.420 Section 314.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Miscellaneous Provisions § 314.420...

  1. Evaluation of hepatic impairment dosing recommendations in FDA-approved product labels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang; Burckart, Gilbert J; Lesko, Lawrence J; Dowling, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in patients with liver disease are an important clinical pharmacology component of drug development. In 2003, FDA released the guidance for industry on "Pharmacokinetics in Patients with Impaired Hepatic Function," which provides recommendations to sponsors on study design, data analysis, and impact on dosing and labeling. We evaluated the quality and consistency of hepatic dosing recommendations, and compared contemporary clinical practice of dosing in patients with impaired hepatic function with product labels. All new molecular entities (NME) and labels approved by the FDA during the period of January 2004 to December 2011 were reviewed. The fraction of the dose hepatically eliminated, quality of hepatic impairment PK studies reported, and any dose recommendations provided in the label and in a tertiary clinical reference (Micromedex) were reviewed. Out of 157 NMEs, 67 met the criteria for evaluation of dosing in hepatic disease. Problem areas were identified related to the lack of specific hepatic metabolism information in 90% of FDA-approved labels, inconsistent terminology, and "use with caution in liver disease" in 27% of NME. Updating the FDA guidance on PK studies in patients with impaired hepatic function could provide a standardized approach to improve the clinical usefulness of this dosing information for practitioners.

  2. 21 CFR 314.153 - Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application. 314.153 Section 314.153 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG...

  3. Using Chemoinformatics, Bioinformatics, and Bioassay to Predict and Explain the Antibacterial Activity of Nonantibiotic Food and Drug Administration Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kahlous, Nour Aldin; Bawarish, Muhammad Al Mohdi; Sarhan, Muhammad Arabi; Küpper, Manfred; Hasaba, Ali; Rajab, Mazen

    2017-03-27

    Discovering of new and effective antibiotics is a major issue facing scientists today. Luckily, the development of computer science offers new methods to overcome this issue. In this study, a set of computer software was used to predict the antibacterial activity of nonantibiotic Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, and to explain their action by possible binding to well-known bacterial protein targets, along with testing their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A three-dimensional virtual screening method that relies on chemical and shape similarity was applied using rapid overlay of chemical structures (ROCS) software to select candidate compounds from the FDA-approved drugs database that share similarity with 17 known antibiotics. Then, to check their antibacterial activity, disk diffusion test was applied on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Finally, a protein docking method was applied using HYBRID software to predict the binding of the active candidate to the target receptor of its similar antibiotic. Of the 1,991 drugs that were screened, 34 had been selected and among them 10 drugs showed antibacterial activity, whereby drotaverine and metoclopramide activities were without precedent reports. Furthermore, the docking process predicted that diclofenac, drotaverine, (S)-flurbiprofen, (S)-ibuprofen, and indomethacin could bind to the protein target of their similar antibiotics. Nevertheless, their antibacterial activities are weak compared with those of their similar antibiotics, which can be potentiated further by performing chemical modifications on their structure.

  4. Use of FDA approved methamphetamine to allow adjunctive use of methylnaltrexone to mediate core anti-growth factor signaling effects in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kast, R E

    2009-09-01

    Methylnaltrexone (MNTX) was recently FDA approved to treat opiate induced constipation. It happens to also indirectly reduce Src activity. Src is a 54 kDa tyrosine kinase, crucial in signaling of, and link between, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Glioblastomas use both EGF and VEGF signaling to enhance growth and neo-angiogenesis. Stem cell sub-fractions of glioblastomas are enriched for high VEGF synthesizing cells so this is a particularly valuable adjunctive target during cytotoxic treatment with drugs like temozolomide. MNTX does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Methamphetamine (MA) temporarily opens the BBB and therefore may allow methylnaltrexone entry into glioblastoma tissue. MA is FDA approved, marketed to treat attention problems in children. MA-MNTX combination should be tested as glioblastoma treatment adjunct. Temozolomide CSF levels are 10-20% of blood levels. Thus MA may also allow greater brain tissue temozolomide levels yet with lower systemic exposure.

  5. Analysis of the structural diversity, substitution patterns, and frequency of nitrogen heterocycles among U.S. FDA approved pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vitaku, Edon; Smith, David T; Njardarson, Jon T

    2014-12-26

    Nitrogen heterocycles are among the most significant structural components of pharmaceuticals. Analysis of our database of U.S. FDA approved drugs reveals that 59% of unique small-molecule drugs contain a nitrogen heterocycle. In this review we report on the top 25 most commonly utilized nitrogen heterocycles found in pharmaceuticals. The main part of our analysis is divided into seven sections: (1) three- and four-membered heterocycles, (2) five-, (3) six-, and (4) seven- and eight-membered heterocycles, as well as (5) fused, (6) bridged bicyclic, and (7) macrocyclic nitrogen heterocycles. Each section reveals the top nitrogen heterocyclic structures and their relative impact for that ring type. For the most commonly used nitrogen heterocycles, we report detailed substitution patterns, highlight common architectural cores, and discuss unusual or rare structures.

  6. 77 FR 69630 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; New Animal Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Collection; Comment Request; New Animal Drug Applications and Supporting Regulations, and Form FDA 356V AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... approval. To comply with this requirement, FDA is publishing notice of the proposed collection...

  7. FDA-Approved Devices That Keep the Heart Beating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... notifications. Email Address More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  8. The Facts on Bipolar Disorder and FDA-Approved Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Medications May Help More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  9. Embracing 21st Century Information Sharing: Defining a New Paradigm for the Food and Drug Administration's Regulation of Biopharmaceutical Company Communications with Healthcare Professionals.

    PubMed

    Spears, James M; Francer, Jeffrey K; Turner, Natale A

    2015-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays a unique role in protecting the public health and minimizing the risk of the distribution of unsafe or ineffective medicines in the United States. Perhaps equally as important for public health, however, is the need for healthcare professionals to be well informed about the benefits and risks of the medicines they prescribe. In this way, information sharing is critical to healthcare delivery. FDA's current interpretation of laws and regulations governing healthcare communications prohibits biopharmaceutical companies from sharing certain accurate, data-driven information about FDA-approved uses and medically accepted alternative uses of FDA-approved drugs with healthcare professionals. Often, these uses are the standard of care for good medical practice and are, accordingly, reimbursed under the federal healthcare programs. FDA has failed to describe adequately how manufacturers can share truthful and non-misleading information about such uses with healthcare professionals and formulary decision makers. This failure could impede medical innovation, negatively impact patient care, and increase healthcare costs. To improve public health, FDA should reform its current approach and provide manufacturers with a clear safe harbor on how to share data and information on both approved uses and medically accepted alternative uses of FDA-approved drugs with healthcare professionals. This Article describes key principles for a new regulatory paradigm.

  10. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Romaine, Patricia L P; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA.

  11. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA. PMID:25905522

  12. FDA Drug Approval: Review Time Has Decreased in Recent Years.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    New drugs marketed in the United States must be approved first by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Approval comes after FDA has determined...reform argue that shortening the time it takes to get new drugs approved will contribute both to public health, by making effective therapies

  13. 21 CFR 314.152 - Notice of withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.152 Notice of... Administration withdraws approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug, FDA will publish...

  14. Retinal Neuroprotective Effects of Flibanserin, an FDA-Approved Dual Serotonin Receptor Agonist-Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, Renee C.; Ku, Cristy A.; Fischer, Cody M.; Patel, Rachel C.; Datta, Shreya; Yang, Paul; Wen, Yuquan; Hen, René; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the neuroprotective effects of flibanserin (formerly BIMT-17), a dual 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT2A antagonist, in a light-induced retinopathy model. Methods Albino BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or increasing doses of flibanserin ranging from 0.75 to 15 mg/kg flibanserin. To assess 5-HT1A-mediated effects, BALB/c mice were injected with 10 mg/kg WAY 100635, a 5-HT1A antagonist, prior to 6 mg/kg flibanserin and 5-HT1A knockout mice were injected with 6 mg/kg flibanserin. Injections were administered once immediately prior to light exposure or over the course of five days. Light exposure lasted for one hour at an intensity of 10,000 lux. Retinal structure was assessed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and retinal function was assessed using electroretinography. To investigate the mechanisms of flibanserin-mediated neuroprotection, gene expression, measured by RT-qPCR, was assessed following five days of daily 15 mg/kg flibanserin injections. Results A five-day treatment regimen of 3 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin significantly preserved outer retinal structure and function in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a single-day treatment regimen of 6 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin still provided significant protection. The action of flibanserin was hindered by the 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635, and was not effective in 5-HT1A knockout mice. Creb, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bcl-2, Cast1, Nqo1, Sod1, and Cat were significantly increased in flibanserin-injected mice versus vehicle-injected mice. Conclusions Intraperitoneal delivery of flibanserin in a light-induced retinopathy mouse model provides retinal neuroprotection. Mechanistic data suggests that this effect is mediated through 5-HT1A receptors and that flibanserin augments the expression of genes capable of reducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Since flibanserin is already FDA-approved for other indications, the potential to repurpose this drug for

  15. Unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy drug products: recent US Food and Drug Administration regulatory action on unapproved cough, cold, and allergy medications.

    PubMed

    Ostroff, Craig; Lee, Charles E; McMeekin, Judith

    2011-08-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug approval and over-the-counter drug monograph processes play an essential role in ensuring that all drugs are both safe and effective for their intended uses. Manufacturers of drugs that lack required approval have not provided the FDA with evidence demonstrating that their products are safe and effective. Some of these prescription drugs have been marketed for many years and have remained on the market despite changes to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which requires approval for safety and efficacy purposes. Many health-care providers may be unaware that unapproved drugs exist because the product labels of these drugs do not disclose that they lack FDA approval. The FDA recently took action against unapproved prescription oral cough, cold, and allergy drug products because of concerns about the potential risks of these products, particularly some extended-release formulations that have not been reviewed for quality. There is a potential for medication errors because product names and labeling have not been reviewed for potential confusion, with some products inappropriately labeled for use in children aged ≤ 2 years. FDA-approved prescription drugs or drugs appropriately marketed as over the counter remain available for treatment of cough, cold, and allergy symptoms. Such products are of known efficacy, safety, identity, quality, and purity. Removing unapproved drugs from the marketplace and encouraging manufacturers of unapproved products to seek FDA review and approval is a top priority for the FDA. Since the initiation of the Unapproved Drugs Initiative in 2006, the FDA has removed ~1,500 unapproved products from the market and has worked with firms to bring other unapproved drugs into the approval process. The FDA remains committed to its mission of ensuring that safe and effective drugs are available to American consumers.

  16. Drug Education for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Peter; McKeon, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    The formulation of a drug policy and the implementation of that policy in a firm but fair manner are the responsibility of the school administrator. Authors give serious consideration to this responsibility. (Editor/RK)

  17. Food and Drug Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... blog post. April 11, 2017 ‘Organs-on-Chips’ Technology: FDA Testing Groundbreaking Science More FDA Voice Blog ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  18. Application of next generation sequencing to CEPH cell lines to discover variants associated with FDA approved chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to perform candidate gene association with cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics in cell line models through resequencing and discovery of rare and low frequency variants along with common variations. Here, an association study of cytotoxicity response to 30 FDA approved drugs was conducted and we applied next generation targeted sequencing technology to discover variants from 103 candidate genes in 95 lymphoblastoid cell lines from 14 CEPH pedigrees. In this article, we called variants across 95 cell lines and performed association analysis for cytotoxic response using the Family Based Association Testing method and software. Results We called 2281 variable SNP genotypes across the 103 genes for these cell lines and identified three genes of significant association within this marker set. Specifically, ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 5 (ABCC5), metallothionein 1A (MT1A) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone1 (NQO1) were significantly associated with oxaliplatin drug response. The significant SNP on NQO1 (rs1800566) has been linked with poor survival rates in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with cisplatin (which belongs to the same class of drugs as oxaliplatin). A SNP (rs1846692) near the 5′ region of MT1A was associated with arsenic trioxide. Conclusions The results from this study are promising and this serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration of the use of sequencing data in the cytotoxicity models of human cell lines. With increased sample sizes, such studies will be a fast and powerful way to associate common and rare variants with drug response; while overcoming the cost and time limitations to recruit cohorts for association study. PMID:24924344

  19. Real-Time Imaging of Electrical Signals with an Infrared FDA-Approved Dye

    PubMed Central

    Treger, Jeremy S.; Priest, Michael F.; Iezzi, Raymond; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Clinical methods used to assess the electrical activity of excitable cells are often limited by their poor spatial resolution or their invasiveness. One promising solution to this problem is to optically measure membrane potential using a voltage-sensitive dye, but thus far, none of these dyes have been available for human use. Here we report that indocyanine green (ICG), an infrared fluorescent dye with FDA approval as an intravenously administered contrast agent, is voltage-sensitive. The fluorescence of ICG can follow action potentials in artificial neurons and cultured rat neurons and cardiomyocytes. ICG also visualized electrical activity induced in living explants of rat brain. In humans, ICG labels excitable cells and is routinely visualized transdermally with high spatial resolution. As an infrared voltage-sensitive dye with a low toxicity profile that can be readily imaged in deep tissues, ICG may have significant utility for clinical and basic research applications previously intractable for potentiometric dyes. PMID:25229155

  20. Clinical Evidence Supporting US Food and Drug Administration Premarket Approval of High-Risk Otolaryngologic Devices, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Vinay K; Wang, Bo; Ross, Joseph S; Downing, Nicholas S; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Gray, Stacey T

    2017-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves high-risk medical devices based on premarket pivotal clinical studies demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness and may require postapproval studies (PAS) to further inform benefit-risk assessment. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using publicly available FDA documents to characterize industry-sponsored pivotal studies and PAS of high-risk devices used in the treatment of otolaryngologic diseases. Between 2000 and 2014, the FDA approved 23 high-risk otolaryngologic devices based on 28 pivotal studies. Median enrollment was 118 patients (interquartile range, 67-181), and median duration of longest primary effectiveness end point follow-up was 26 weeks (interquartile range, 16-96). Fewer than half were randomized (n = 13, 46%), blinded (n = 12, 43%), or controlled (n = 10, 36%). The FDA required 23 PASs for 16 devices (70%): almost two-thirds (n = 15, 65%) monitored long-term performance, and roughly one-third (n = 8, 35%) focused on subgroups. Otolaryngologists should be aware of limitations in the strength of premarket evidence when considering the use of newly approved devices.

  1. Radium Ra 223 dichloride injection: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Kluetz, Paul G; Pierce, William; Maher, V Ellen; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Shenghui; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Haber, Martin T; Leutzinger, Eldon E; Al-Hakim, Ali; Chen, Wei; Palmby, Todd; Alebachew, Elleni; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-01-01

    On May 15, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved radium Ra 223 dichloride (Ra-223; Xofigo injection; Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.) for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), symptomatic bone metastases, and no known visceral metastatic disease. The FDA review was based on clinical trial BC1-06, which randomly allocated patients (2:1) to either Ra-223 plus best standard of care (BSoC) or placebo plus BSoC. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) with a key secondary endpoint of time to first symptomatic skeletal event (SSE). A statistically significant improvement in OS was demonstrated [HR, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.88, P = 0.0019]. At the prespecified interim analysis, the median OS durations were 14.0 and 11.2 months in the Ra-223 and placebo arms, respectively. The improvement in OS was supported by a delay in time to first SSE favoring the Ra-223 arm. The most common (>10%) adverse reactions in patients receiving Ra-223 were nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and peripheral edema. The most common (>10%) hematologic laboratory abnormalities were anemia, lymphocytopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia. Ra-223 is the first α-emitting radiotherapeutic and the first radiopharmaceutical to demonstrate an OS advantage in metastatic prostate cancer.

  2. Can We Repurpose FDA-Approved Alefacept to Diminish the HIV Reservoir?

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Asifa; Meng, Qinglai; Popkin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Current anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV is effective in maintaining HIV at undetectable levels. However, cessation of ART results in immediate and brisk rebound of viremia to high levels. This rebound is driven by an HIV reservoir mainly enriched in memory CD4+ T cells. In order to provide any form of functional HIV Cure, elimination of this viral reservoir has become the focus of current HIV cure strategies. Alefacept was initially developed for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. Alefacept is a chimeric fusion protein consisting of the CD2-binding portion of human leukocyte function antigen-3 (LFA3) linked to the Fc region of human IgG1 (LFA3-Fc). Alefacept was designed to inhibit memory T cell activation that contributes to the chronic autoimmune disease psoriasis by blocking the CD2 coreceptor. However, it was found to deplete memory T cells that express high levels of CD2 via NK cell-mediated antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. Phase II and phase III clinical trials of alefacept with psoriasis patients demonstrated promising results and an excellent safety profile. Subsequently, alefacept has been successfully repurposed for other memory T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases including skin diseases other than psoriasis, organ transplantation and type I diabetes (T1D). Herein, we review our specific strategy to repurpose the FDA approved biologic alefacept to decrease and hopefully someday eliminate the HIV reservoir, for which CD2hi memory CD4+ T cells are a significant contributor. PMID:27110598

  3. Too fast or not too fast: the FDA's approval of Merck's HPV vaccine Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic, Lucija; Shaw, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    There are not many public health issues where views are as extremely polarized as those concerning vaccines, and Merck's HPV vaccine Gardasil is a case in point. Ever since gaining the FDA's approval in 2006, Merck has been heavily criticized for their overly aggressive marketing strategies and lobbying campaigns aimed at promoting Gardasil as a mandatory vaccine. Subsequently, questions have been raised as to whether it was appropriate for vaccine manufacturers to partake in public health policies when their conflicts of interests are so obvious. Some of their advertising campaign slogans, such as "cervical cancer kills x women per year" and "your daughter could become one less life affected by cervical cancer," seemed more designed to promote fear rather than evidence-based decision making about the potential benefits of the vaccine. Although, conflicts of interests do not necessarily mean that the product itself is faulty, marketing claims should be carefully examined against factual science data. Currently Gardasil vaccination is strongly recommended by the U.S. and other health authorities while public concerns about safety and efficacy of the vaccine appear to be increasing. This discrepancy leads to some important questions that need to be resolved. The current review examines key issues of this debate in light of currently available research evidence.

  4. Zohydro approval by food and drug administration: controversial or frightening?

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Atluri, Sairam; Candido, Kenneth D; Boswell, Mark V; Simopoulos, Thomas T; Grider, Jay S; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    The actions and regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are crucial to the entire population of the U.S., specifically the public who take a multitude of drugs and providers who prescribe drugs and devices. Further, the FDA is relevant to investors, specifically in regards to biotech and pharmaceutical companies involved in developing new drugs. The FDA has been criticized for a lack of independence on the one hand and excessive regulatory and expanding authority without evidence and consistency of the actions on the other hand. The FDA approved a single-entity, long-acting, hydrocodone product (Zohydro, Zogenix, San Diego, CA) on October 25, 2013, against the recommendation of the FDA's own appointed scientific advisory panel, which voted 11 to 2 against the approval of Zohydro. Subsequent to the approval, multiple consumer safety organizations, health care agencies, addiction treatment providers, professional organizations, and other groups on the frontline of the opioid addiction epidemic have expressed concern. In addition, the US Congress and various state attorneys general raised serious concerns about the approval of Zohydro, which is highly addictive and may enhance the opioid addiction epidemic. Supporters of Zohydro contend that it is necessary and essential to manage chronic pain and improve functional status with no additional risk. Over the past 15 years, prescriptions for opioids have skyrocketed with the United States consuming more than 84% of the global oxycodone and more than 99% of the hydrocodone supply. The sharp increase in opioid prescribing has led to parallel increases in opioid addiction and overdose deaths, surpassing motor vehicle injuries in the U.S. Recent studies assessing the trends of medical use and misuse of opioid analgesics from 2000 to 2011 have concluded that the present trend of the continued increase in the medical use of opioid analgesics appears to contribute to increasing misuse, resulting in multiple health

  5. U.S. Food and drug administration approval: obinutuzumab in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyon-Zu; Miller, Barry W; Kwitkowski, Virginia E; Ricci, Stacey; DelValle, Pedro; Saber, Haleh; Grillo, Joseph; Bullock, Julie; Florian, Jeffry; Mehrotra, Nitin; Ko, Chia-Wen; Nie, Lei; Shapiro, Marjorie; Tolnay, Mate; Kane, Robert C; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Justice, Robert; Farrell, Ann T; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-08-01

    On November 1, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved obinutuzumab (GAZYVA; Genentech, Inc.), a CD20-directed cytolytic antibody, for use in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In stage 1 of the trial supporting approval, patients with previously untreated CD20-positive CLL were randomly allocated (2:2:1) to obinutuzumab + chlorambucil (GClb, n = 238), rituximab + chlorambucil (RClb, n = 233), or chlorambucil alone (Clb, n = 118). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints included overall response rate (ORR). Only the comparison of GClb to Clb was relevant to this approval and is described herein. A clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement in PFS with medians of 23.0 and 11.1 months was observed in the GClb and Clb arms, respectively (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.11-0.24; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). The ORRs were 75.9% and 32.1% in the GClb and Clb arms, respectively, and the complete response rates were 27.8% and 0.9% in the GClb and Clb arms, respectively. The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) reported in the GClb arm were infusion reactions, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, pyrexia, cough, and musculoskeletal disorders. Obinutuzumab was the first Breakthrough Therapy-designated drug to receive FDA approval.

  6. FDA Approval Summary: Lenvatinib for Progressive, Radio-iodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nair, Abhilasha; Lemery, Steven J; Yang, Jun; Marathe, Anshu; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Ladouceur, Gaetan; Mitra, Amit K; Zhou, Liang; Fox, Emily; Aungst, Stephanie; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The FDA approved lenvatinib (Lenvima, Eisai Inc.) for the treatment of patients with locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory (RAI-refractory) differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). In an international, multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (E7080-G000-303), 392 patients with locally recurrent or metastatic RAI-refractory DTC and radiographic evidence of disease progression within 12 months prior to randomization were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive either lenvatinib 24 mg orally per day (n = 261) or matching placebo (n = 131) with the option for patients on the placebo arm to receive lenvatinib following independent radiologic confirmation of disease progression. A statistically significant prolongation of progression-free survival (PFS) as determined by independent radiology review was demonstrated [HR, 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.28; P < 0.001, stratified log-rank test], with an estimated median PFS of 18.3 months (95% CI, 15.1, NR) in the lenvatinib arm and 3.6 months (95% CI, 2.2-3.7) in the placebo arm. The most common adverse reactions, in order of decreasing frequency, observed in the lenvatinib-treated patients were hypertension, fatigue, diarrhea, arthralgia/myalgia, decreased appetite, decreased weight, nausea, stomatitis, headache, vomiting, proteinuria, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome, abdominal pain, and dysphonia. Adverse reactions led to dose reductions in 68% of patients receiving lenvatinib at the 24 mg dose and 18% of patients discontinued lenvatinib for adverse reactions leading to residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of lenvatinib.

  7. Structure-based repurposing of FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) by an integrated virtual screening approach. Piperacillin 1 inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based systems with high selectivity. Furthermore, piperacillin 1 was able to inhibit the degradation of the NAE downstream protein substrate p27(kip1). Our molecular modeling and kinetic studies suggested that this compound may act as a non-covalent ATP-competitive inhibitor of NAE.

  8. Nanoparticle therapeutics: FDA approval, clinical trials, regulatory pathways, and case study.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Aaron C; Thaxton, C Shad

    2011-01-01

    The approval of drugs for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) is a time-consuming and expensive process, and approval rates are low (DiMasi et al., J Health Econ 22:151-185, 2003; Marchetti and Schellens, Br J Cancer 97:577-581, 2007). In general, the FDA drug approval process can be separated into preclinical, clinical, and postmarketing phases. At each step from the point of discovery through demonstration of safety and efficacy in humans, drug candidates are closely scrutinized. Advances in nanotechnology are being applied in the development of novel therapeutics that may address a number of shortcomings of conventional small molecule drugs and may facilitate the realization of personalized medicine (Ferrari, Curr Opin Chem Biol 9:343-346, 2005; Ferrari, Nat Rev Cancer 5:161-171, 2005; Ferrari and Downing, BioDrugs 19:203-210, 2005). Appealingly, nanoparticle drug candidates often represent multiplexed formulations (e.g., drug, targeting moiety, and nanoparticle scaffold material). By tailoring the chemistry and identity of variable nanoparticle constituents, it is possible to achieve targeted delivery, reduce side effects, and prepare formulations of unstable (e.g., siRNA) and/or highly toxic drugs (Ferrari, Curr Opin Chem Biol 9:343-346, 2005; Ferrari, Nat Rev Cancer 5:161-171, 2005; Ferrari and Downing, BioDrugs 19:203-210, 2005). With these benefits arise new challenges in all aspects of regulated drug development and testing.This chapter distils the drug development and approval process with an emphasis on special considerations for nanotherapeutics. The chapter concludes with a case study focused on a nanoparticle therapeutic, CALAA-01, currently in human clinical trials, that embodies many of the potential benefits of nanoparticle therapeutics (Davis, Mol Pharm 6:659-668, 2009). By choosing CALAA-01, reference is made to the infancy of the therapeutic nanoparticle field; in 2008

  9. FDA Approves Test to Aid Post-PSA Biopsy Decisions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a test to help men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test scores decide whether to have a biopsy to test for prostate cancer. The Access Hybritech p2PSA test is approved for use in men aged 50 or older who have a PSA test score between 4 and 10 ng/ml but who show no signs of cancer during a digital rectal exam. |

  10. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles.

  11. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  12. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: crizotinib for treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shakun M; Maher, Virginia Ellen; Bijwaard, Karen E; Becker, Robert L; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui W; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Marathe, Anshu; Gehrke, Brenda; Helms, Whitney; Hanner, Diane; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-04-15

    On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (XALKORI Capsules, Pfizer Inc.) for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. The Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc.) was approved concurrently. In two multicenter, single-arm trials, patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one or more systemic therapies received crizotinib orally at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. In 119 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by local trial assay, the objective response rate (ORR) was 61% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 52%-70%] with a median response duration of 48 weeks. In 136 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by the to-be-marketed test, the ORR was 50% (95% CI, 42%-59%) with a median response duration of 42 weeks. The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) were vision disorder, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, edema, and constipation. Accelerated approval was granted on the basis of the high ORRs and durable responses. On November 20, 2013, crizotinib received full approval based on an improvement in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen.

  13. Comparison of Outcomes before and after Ohio's Law Mandating Use of the FDA-Approved Protocol for Medication Abortion: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Combellick, Sarah L.; Kohn, Julia E.; Roberts, Sarah C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In February 2011, an Ohio law took effect mandating use of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved protocol for mifepristone, which is used with misoprostol for medication abortion. Other state legislatures have passed or enacted similar laws requiring use of the FDA-approved protocol for medication abortion. The objective of this study is to examine the association of this legal change with medication abortion outcomes and utilization. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort design, comparing outcomes of medication abortion patients in the prelaw period to those in the postlaw period. Sociodemographic and clinical chart data were abstracted from all medication abortion patients from 1 y prior to the law’s implementation (January 2010–January 2011) to 3 y post implementation (February 2011–October 2014) at four abortion-providing health care facilities in Ohio. Outcome data were analyzed for all women undergoing abortion at ≤49 d gestation during the study period. The main outcomes were as follows: need for additional intervention following medication abortion (such as aspiration, repeat misoprostol, and blood transfusion), frequency of continuing pregnancy, reports of side effects, and the proportion of abortions that were medication abortions (versus other abortion procedures). Among the 2,783 medication abortions ≤49 d gestation, 4.9% (95% CI: 3.7%–6.2%) in the prelaw and 14.3% (95% CI: 12.6%–16.0%) in the postlaw period required one or more additional interventions. Women obtaining a medication abortion in the postlaw period had three times the odds of requiring an additional intervention as women in the prelaw period (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.11, 95% CI: 2.27–4.27). In a mixed effects multivariable model that uses facility-months as the unit of analysis to account for lack of independence by site, we found that the law change was associated with a 9.4% (95% CI: 4.0%–18.4%) absolute increase in

  14. FDA-Approved Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Inhibit Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Lisa M.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Delos, Sue E.; Shoemaker, Charles J.; Stossel, Andrea; Lear, Calli; Hoffstrom, Benjamin G.; DeWald, Lisa Evans; Schornberg, Kathryn L.; Scully, Corinne; Lehár, Joseph; Hensley, Lisa E.; White, Judith M.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses remain a substantial threat to both civilian and military populations as bioweapons, during sporadic outbreaks, and from the possibility of accidental importation from endemic regions by infected individuals. Currently, no approved therapeutics exist to treat or prevent infection by Ebola viruses. Therefore, we performed an in vitro screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)– and ex–US-approved drugs and selected molecular probes to identify drugs with antiviral activity against the type species Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV). From this screen, we identified a set of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), including clomiphene and toremifene, which act as potent inhibitors of EBOV infection. Anti-EBOV activity was confirmed for both of these SERMs in an in vivo mouse infection model. This anti-EBOV activity occurred even in the absence of detectable estrogen receptor expression, and both SERMs inhibited virus entry after internalization, suggesting that clomiphene and toremifene are not working through classical pathways associated with the estrogen receptor. Instead, the response appeared to be an off-target effect where the compounds interfere with a step late in viral entry and likely affect the triggering of fusion. These data support the screening of readily available approved drugs to identify therapeutics for the Ebola viruses and other infectious diseases. The SERM compounds described in this report are an immediately actionable class of approved drugs that can be repurposed for treatment of filovirus infections. PMID:23785035

  15. Food and Drug Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reportable Food Registry Report an Emergency Report Suspected Criminal Activity For Industry: Drugs and Therapeutic Biologics News & ... FDA Organization FDA Basics Advisory Committees International Programs Criminal Investigations Emergency Preparedness & Response Working at FDA Training/ ...

  16. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  17. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles. PMID:25492359

  18. Bromocriptine mesylate: Food and Drug Administration approved new approach in therapy of non-insulin dependant diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Keche, Yogendra

    2010-04-01

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved bromocriptine mesylate, a quick release formulation, 0.8 mg tablets, as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bromocriptine products were previously approved by the FDA for the treatment of pituitary tumors and Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine is thought to act on circadian neuronal activities within the hypothalamus to reset abnormally elevated hypothalamic drive for increased plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels in fasting and postprandial states in insulin-resistant patients. Adverse events most commonly reported in clinical trials of bromocriptine included nausea, fatigue, vomiting, headache, and dizziness. These events lasted a median of 14 days and were more likely to occur during initial titration of the drug. Due to novel mechanism of action, single daily dose, and lower incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular events, bromocriptine may act as landmark in treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Beyond hydroxyurea: new and old drugs in the pipeline for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of hydroxyurea to reduce the frequency of vaso-occlusive episodes, sickle cell disease (SCD) has continued to be treated primarily with analgesics for pain relief. However, elucidation of the multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to vaso-occlusion and tissue injury in SCD has now resulted in a burgeoning effort to identify new treatment modalities to prevent or ameliorate the consequences of the disease. Development of new drugs as well as investigation of drugs previously used in other settings have targeted cell adhesion, inflammatory pathways, upregulation of hemoglobin F, hemoglobin polymerization and sickling, coagulation, and platelet activation. Although these efforts have not yet yielded drugs ready for FDA approval, several early studies have been extremely encouraging. Moreover, the marked increase in clinical pharmaceutical research addressing SCD and the new and old drugs in the pipeline make it reasonable to expect that we will soon have new treatments for SCD. PMID:26758919

  20. Prescription Patterns for Tigecycline in Severely Ill Patients for Non-FDA Approved Indications in a Developing Country: A Compromised Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Moghnieh, Rima A.; Abdallah, Dania I.; Fawaz, Ismail A.; Hamandi, Tarek; Kassem, Mohammad; El-Rajab, Nabila; Jisr, Tamima; Mugharbil, Anas; Droubi, Nabila; Al Tabah, Samaa; Sinno, Loubna; Ziade, Fouad; Daoud, Ziad; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: With the rise in antibiotic resistance, tigecycline has been used frequently in off-label indications, based on its in-vitro activity against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this study, our aim was to assess its use in approved and unapproved indications. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective chart review evaluating a 2-year experience of tigecycline use for > 72 h in 153 adult patients inside and outside critical care unit from January 2012 to December 2013 in a Lebanese tertiary-care hospital. Results: Tigecycline was mostly used in off-label indications (81%) and prescribed inside the critical care area, where the number of tigecycline cycles was 16/1,000 patient days. Clinical success was achieved in 43.4% of the patients. In the critically ill group, it was significantly higher in patients with a SOFA score <7 using multivariate analysis (Odds Ratio (OR) = 12.51 [4.29–36.51], P < 0.0001). Microbiological success was achieved in 43.3% of patients. Yet, the univariate and adjusted multivariate models failed to show a significant difference in this outcome between patients inside vs. outside critical care area, those with SOFA score <7 vs. ≥ 7, and in FDA-approved vs. off-label indications. Total mortality reached ~45%. It was significantly higher in critically ill patients with SOFA score ≥7 (OR = 5.17 [2.43–11.01], P < 0.0001) and in off-label indications (OR = 4.00 [1.30–12.31], P = 0.01) using an adjusted multivariate model. Gram-negative bacteria represented the majority of the clinical isolates (81%) and Acinetobacter baumannii predominated (28%). Carbapenem resistance was present in 85% of the recovered Acinetobacter, yet, more than two third of the carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter species were still susceptible to tigecycline. Conclusion: In our series, tigecycline has been mostly used in off-label indications, specifically in severely ill patients. The outcome of such infections was not inferior to that of FDA-approved

  1. Precision Medicine, Diabetes, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has long sought to achieve the broader use of personalized medicine, which is better targeting of FDA-approved therapies through incorporating precise knowledge of a patient's underlying condition to therapies optimally chosen to match those needs. While some strides have been made in precision medicine-particularly in oncology and rare genetic diseases-most of the standard general medicine indications have yet to realize the benefits of precision-guided therapies. This includes those for diabetes mellitus (DM), both type 1 and type 2. Although the scientific and regulatory considerations needed to move to a more "precise" future of DM prevention and treatment differ between the two disease subsets, scientific advances in both must occur before the FDA can incorporate precision medicine into its oversight of DM drug development and approval. This article provides an overview of the regulatory expectations and challenges in realizing a future where the therapeutics for DM are informed by precise knowledge of a patient's genetics and specific phenotype.

  2. PROVENGE (Sipuleucel-T) in prostate cancer: the first FDA-approved therapeutic cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Martin A; Higano, Celestia S

    2011-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T (PROVENGE; Dendreon) is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In men who have metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with no or minimal symptoms, sipuleucel-T prolongs median survival by 4.1 months compared with results in those treated with placebo. At 3 years, the proportion of patients in the vaccine group who were alive was 50% higher than that in the control group (31.7% versus 21.7%, respectively). Sipuleucel-T, which is designed to elicit an immune response to prostatic acid phosphatase, uses the patient's own immune system to recognize and combat his cancer. Currently, no other agents are available that offer a survival benefit for this population of asymptomatic patients who have not been treated with chemotherapy, except for docetaxel (whose inherent toxicities often lead patients and physicians to delay administration until symptoms develop). Straightforward strategies to increase the efficacy of sipuleucel-T are likely to provide even greater benefit. The preclinical and clinical development of sipuleucel-T is reviewed, and approaches to enhance efficacy are considered herein.

  3. Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the Determination of Two Recently FDA Approved TKIs in Human Plasma Using Diode Array Detection

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Marwa; Blankert, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Generally, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have narrow therapeutic window and large interpatient variability compared to intrapatient variability. In order to support its therapeutic drug monitoring, two fast and accurate methods were developed for the determination of recently FDA approved anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors, afatinib and ibrutinib, in human plasma using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to PDA detection. Diclofenac sodium was used as internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 analytical column using a mobile phase combining ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile at a constant flow rate of 0.4 mL/min using gradient elution mode. A µSPE (solid phase extraction) procedure, using Oasis MCX µElution plates, was processed and it gave satisfying and reproducible results in terms of extraction yields. Additionally, the methods were successfully validated using the accuracy profiles approach (β = 95% and acceptance limits = ±15%) over the ranges 5–250 ng/mL for afatinib and from 5 to 400 ng/mL for ibrutinib in human plasma. PMID:26101692

  4. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... access to investigational drugs being developed by pharmaceutical companies? Are there specific criteria used to determine whether ... laboratory. If the results are promising, the drug company or sponsor must apply for FDA approval to ...

  5. Long-term drug administration in the adult zebrafish using oral gavage for cancer preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Michelle; Henderson, Rachel E.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zebrafish are a major model for chemical genetics, and most studies use embryos when investigating small molecules that cause interesting phenotypes or that can rescue disease models. Limited studies have dosed adults with small molecules by means of water-borne exposure or injection techniques. Challenges in the form of drug delivery-related trauma and anesthesia-related toxicity have excluded the adult zebrafish from long-term drug efficacy studies. Here, we introduce a novel anesthetic combination of MS-222 and isoflurane to an oral gavage technique for a non-toxic, non-invasive and long-term drug administration platform. As a proof of principle, we established drug efficacy of the FDA-approved BRAFV600E inhibitor, Vemurafenib, in adult zebrafish harboring BRAFV600E melanoma tumors. In the model, adult casper zebrafish intraperitoneally transplanted with a zebrafish melanoma cell line (ZMEL1) and exposed to daily sub-lethal dosing at 100 mg/kg of Vemurafenib for 2 weeks via oral gavage resulted in an average 65% decrease in tumor burden and a 15% mortality rate. In contrast, Vemurafenib-resistant ZMEL1 cell lines, generated in culture from low-dose drug exposure for 4 months, did not respond to the oral gavage treatment regimen. Similarly, this drug treatment regimen can be applied for treatment of primary melanoma tumors in the zebrafish. Taken together, we developed an effective long-term drug treatment system that will allow the adult zebrafish to be used to identify more effective anti-melanoma combination therapies and opens up possibilities for treating adult models of other diseases. PMID:27482819

  6. US Food and Drug Administration approval of generic versions of complex biologics: implications for the practicing physician using low molecular weight heparins.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc; Jeske, Walter P; Nicolau, Jose C; Montalescot, Gilles; Fareed, Jawed

    2012-04-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) have shown equivalent or superior efficacy and safety to unfractionated heparin as antithrombotic therapy for patients with acute coronary syndromes. Each approved LMWH is a pleotropic biological agent with a unique chemical, biochemical, biophysical and biological profile and displays different pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. As a result, LMWHs are neither equipotent in preclinical assays nor equivalent in terms of their clinical efficacy and safety. Previously, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cautioned against using various LMWHs interchangeably, however recently, the FDA approved generic versions of LMWH that have not been tested in large clinical trials. This paper highlights the bio-chemical and pharmacological differences between the LMWH preparations that may result in different clinical outcomes, and also reviews the implications and challenges physicians face when generic versions of the original/innovator agents are approved for clinical use.

  7. Chromium picolinate intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based review by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R; Ellwood, Kathleen C

    2006-08-01

    The labeling of both health claims that meet significant scientific agreement (SSA) and qualified health claims on conventional foods and dietary supplements requires pre-market approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Approval by the FDA involves, in part, a thorough review of the scientific evidence to support an SSA or a qualified health claim. This article discusses FDA's evidence-based review of the scientific evidence on the role of chromium picolinate supplements in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Based on this evidence-based review, FDA issued a letter of enforcement discretion for one qualified health claim on chromium picolinate and risk of insulin resistance, a surrogate endpoint for type 2 diabetes. The agency concluded that the relationship between chromium picolinate intake and insulin resistance is highly uncertain.

  8. FDA-approved neurologic devices intended for use in infants, children, and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peña, Carlos; Bowsher, Kristen; Samuels-Reid, Joy

    2004-10-12

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several applications for the marketing of neurologic devices. Nineteen high risk Class III medical devices were approved for the central and peripheral nervous system for marketing between 1994 and 2003, and almost half (n = 8) include indications for use in children as well as adults. On July 24, 2003, the FDA Center for Devices and Radiologic Health released for public comment a draft guidance document entitled "Premarket Assessment of Pediatric Medical Devices," which included in its objectives, the types of information needed to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of medical devices intended for use in children. The draft guidance document is also relevant to the types of information needed to promote the safe and effective development of neurologic devices. We review risk assessment and ways to reduce risk for neurologic devices intended for use in children. We also discuss the deep brain stimulator, the cochlear implant, and the CSF shunt, and considerations for minimizing risks associated with brain development, physical growth, surgery, and human factors.

  9. Drugs and drug administration in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Thomas E A H; Schraut, Bettina; Rieke, Burkhard; Hemmerling, Arnica-Verena; Schöffl, Volker; Steffgen, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Emergency medicine must often cope with harsh climates far below freezing point or high temperatures, and sometimes, an alternative to the normal route of drug administration is necessary. Most of this information is not yet published. Therefore, we summarized the information about these topics for most drugs used in medical emergencies by combining literature research with extensive personal communications with the heads of the drug safety departments of the companies producing these drugs. Most drugs can be used after temperature stress of limited duration. Nevertheless, we recommend replacing them at least once per year or after extreme heat. Knowledge about drugs used in extreme environments will be of increasing importance for medical personnel because in an increasingly mobile society, more and more people, and especially elderly -often with individual medical risks-travel to extreme regions such as tropical or arctic regions or to high altitude, and some of them need medical care during these activities. Because of this increasing need to use drugs in harsh climates (tourism, expeditions, peace corps, military, etc) the actual International Congress of Harmonization recommendations should be added with stability tests at +50 degrees C, freezing and oscillating temperatures, and UV exposure to simulate the storage of the drugs at "outdoor conditions."

  10. FDA Approval Summary: Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Barone, Amy; Hazarika, Maitreyee; Theoret, Marc R; Mishra-Kalyani, Pallavi; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Subramaniam, Sriram; Pfuma, Elimika; Wang, Yaning; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Hong; Fourie Zirkelbach, Jeanne; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-02-08

    On December 18, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted regular approval to pembrolizumab (KEYTRUDA®; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.) for treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma, based on results of two randomized, open-label, active-controlled clinical trials. In Trial PN006, 834 patients with ipilimumab-naïve metastatic melanoma were randomized (1:1:1) to pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg intravenously (IV) every 2 (q2w) or 3 (q3w) weeks until disease progression or ipilimumab 3 mg/kg q3w for up to four doses. In Trial PN002, 540 patients with ipilimumab-refractory metastatic melanoma were randomized (1:1:1) to pembrolizumab 2 or 10 mg/kg IV q3w or to investigator's choice of chemotherapy. In Trial PN006, patients randomized to pembrolizumab demonstrated statistically significant improvement in overall survival compared to ipilimumab (q2w arm, HR= 0.63 [95%CI: 0.47, 0.83; p<0.001]; q3w arm, HR=0.67 [95%CI: 0.52, 0.90; p=0.004]). In both trials, patients receiving pembrolizumab demonstrated statistically significant improvements in progression-free survival. The most common (≥2%) immune-mediated adverse reactions in a pooled safety analysis were hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, and hyperthyroidism. Key considerations for approval were determination of pembrolizumab dose and interpretation of tumor response-based endpoints using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) or immune-related RECIST (irRC).

  11. Screening of an FDA-approved compound library identifies four small-molecule inhibitors of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Jochmans, Dirk; Posthuma, Clara C; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Bestebroer, Theo M; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G; Neyts, Johan; Snijder, Eric J

    2014-08-01

    Coronaviruses can cause respiratory and enteric disease in a wide variety of human and animal hosts. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first demonstrated the potentially lethal consequences of zoonotic coronavirus infections in humans. In 2012, a similar previously unknown coronavirus emerged, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), thus far causing over 650 laboratory-confirmed infections, with an unexplained steep rise in the number of cases being recorded over recent months. The human MERS fatality rate of ∼ 30% is alarmingly high, even though many deaths were associated with underlying medical conditions. Registered therapeutics for the treatment of coronavirus infections are not available. Moreover, the pace of drug development and registration for human use is generally incompatible with strategies to combat emerging infectious diseases. Therefore, we have screened a library of 348 FDA-approved drugs for anti-MERS-CoV activity in cell culture. If such compounds proved sufficiently potent, their efficacy might be directly assessed in MERS patients. We identified four compounds (chloroquine, chlorpromazine, loperamide, and lopinavir) inhibiting MERS-CoV replication in the low-micromolar range (50% effective concentrations [EC(50)s], 3 to 8 μM). Moreover, these compounds also inhibit the replication of SARS coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E. Although their protective activity (alone or in combination) remains to be assessed in animal models, our findings may offer a starting point for treatment of patients infected with zoonotic coronaviruses like MERS-CoV. Although they may not necessarily reduce viral replication to very low levels, a moderate viral load reduction may create a window during which to mount a protective immune response.

  12. Obinutuzumab: A FDA approved monoclonal antibody in the treatment of untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Mamta; Dhingra, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an adult lymphoid malignancy with a variable clinical course. There is considerable interest in the identification of new treatments, as most current approaches are not curative. While most patients respond to initial chemotherapy, relapsed disease is often resistant to the drugs commonly used in CLL and patients are left with limited therapeutic options. Obinutuzumab is recently approved in combination with chlorambucil for people with previously untreated CLL and is additionally being investigated in a large clinical program, including multiple head-to-head phase III studies compared with Rituxan in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In this article, author has made an attempt to review the therapeutic profile of this newly approved monoclonal antibody in the treatment of CLL.

  13. Systematic Review: FDA-Approved Prescription Medications for Adults With Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.

    2006-01-01

    Constipation is a common, often chronic, gastrointestinal disorder that can negatively impact the lives of those it affects and can be difficult to treat satisfactorily. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and analyze the available published literature on US Food and Drug Administration–approved prescription therapies for adults with constipation (episodic and chronic) and to assess their place in therapy, based on the methodologic strength and results of identified clinical trials. Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were used to search the published literature. Studies were included if they were randomized and prospective, conducted in adults (age ≥18), published as full-length manuscripts in English, and compared the test agent with placebo or a comparator(s). Studies were excluded if they involved patients with constipation attributed to secondary causes. Because fully published manuscripts from phase III efficacy trials involving the recently approved medication lubiprostone were not available, a manual search was performed of abstracts from the two annual major gastroenterology meetings (American College of Gastroenterology and Digestive Disease Week) from the past 4 years. Data on study design; number, age, and sex of patients; duration of treatment period; primary efficacy variable; secondary efficacy variables; adverse events; and discontinuations because of adverse events were abstracted from eligible articles. Eligible studies were assessed using well-established recommendations and a preformatted standardized form. A scoring system, with scores ranging from 1 to 15, was used to individually and separately assess the methodologic quality of the studies. Results of this analysis indicate a general lack of methodologically high-quality clinical trials supporting the use of lactulose and PEG 3350 to treat patients with chronic constipation, but data support their use in acute, episodic constipation. Conversely, high

  14. Mass drug administration for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Eugenie; Skarbinski, Jacek; Sinclair, David; Kachur, S Patrick; Slutsker, Laurence; Hwang, Jimee

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA), defined as the empiric administration of a therapeutic antimalarial regimen to an entire population at the same time, has been a historic component of many malaria control and elimination programmes, but is not currently recommended. With renewed interest in MDA and its role in malaria elimination, this review aims to summarize the findings from existing research studies and program experiences of MDA strategies for reducing malaria burden and transmission. Objectives To assess the impact of antimalarial MDA on population asexual parasitaemia prevalence, parasitaemia incidence, gametocytaemia prevalence, anaemia prevalence, mortality and MDA-associated adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE+, EMBASE, to February 2013. We also searched CABS Abstracts, LILACS, reference lists, and recent conference proceedings. Selection criteria Cluster-randomized trials and non-randomized controlled studies comparing therapeutic MDA versus placebo or no MDA, and uncontrolled before-and-after studies comparing post-MDA to baseline data were selected. Studies administering intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) to sub-populations (for example, pregnant women, children or infants) were excluded. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently reviewed studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were stratified by study design and then subgrouped by endemicity, by co-administration of 8-aminoquinoline plus schizonticide drugs and by plasmodium species. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Two cluster-randomized trials, eight non-randomized controlled studies and 22 uncontrolled before-and-after studies are included in this review. Twenty-two studies (29 comparisons) compared MDA to placebo or no intervention of which two comparisons were

  15. WE-G-BRE-06: New Potential for Enhancing External Beam Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Using FDA-Approved Concentrations of Cisplatin Or Carboplatin Nanoparticles Administered Via Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Altundal, Y; Sajo, E; Detappe, A; Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates, for the first time, the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs) and carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs) administered via inhalation route (IR) during external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using Monte Carlo generated 6 MV energy fluence spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumor due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from CNPs administered via IR in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung tumor via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5–14.6 times higher concentrations of CNPs can reach the lung tumors by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the dose with and without CNPs was calculated for field size of 10 cm × 10 cm (sweeping gap), for a range of tumor depths and tumor sizes. Similar calculations were done for CBNPs. Results: For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of 1.19–1.30 were obtained for CNPs at 3–10 cm depth, respectively, in comparison to 1.06–1.09 for IV. For CBNPs, DEF values of 1.26–1.41 were obtained in comparison to 1.07–1.12 for IV. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81–2.27 for CNPs. DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor size. Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that major dose enhancement to lung tumors can be achieved using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR, in contrast to IV administration during external beam radiotherapy. These findings highlight a potential new approach for radiation boosting to lung tumors using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR. This would, especially, be applicable during concomitant chemoradiotherapy, potentially allowing for dose enhancement while

  16. Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies in Aggressive Biology Sarcoma Patients after progression from US FDA approved Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Hess, Kenneth R.; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Wagner, Michael J.; Tang, Chad; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Ravi, Vinod; Benjamin, Robert S.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with advanced sarcoma after progression from FDA approved therapies remains grim. In this study, clinical outcomes of 100 patients with advanced sarcoma who received treatment on novel targeted therapy trials were evaluated. Outcomes of interest included best response, clinical benefit rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median patient age was 48 years (range 14–80). Patients had received a median of 2 prior lines of systemic treatment. Phase I treatments were anti-VEGF–based (n = 45), mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 15), and anti-VEGF + mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 17) or involved other targets (n = 23). Best responses included partial response (n = 4) and stable disease (n = 57). Clinical benefit rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 27–46%). Median OS was 9.6 months (95% Confidence Interval 8.1–14.2); median PFS was 3.5 months (95% Confidence Interval 2.4–4.7). RMH prognostic score of 2 or 3 was associated with lower median OS (log-rank p-value < 0.0001) and PFS (log-rank p-value 0.0081). Receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of phase I trial was also associated with shorter median OS (log-rank p-value 0.039). Patients with advanced sarcoma treated on phase I clinical trials had a clinical benefit rate of 36% and RMH score predicted survival. PMID:27748430

  17. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  18. The First 18 Months Following Food and Drug Administration Approval of Lumbar Total Disc Replacement in the United States: Reported Adverse Events Outside an Investigational Device Exemption Study Environment

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Richard D.; Geisler, Fred H.; McAfee, Paul C.; Regan, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Introduction of a new surgical technology may result in higher rates of adverse events compared with rates reported in the study performed to gain regulatory approval. The purpose of our study was to describe the incidence of reported adverse events during the first 18 months following US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the first lumbar arthroplasty device available in the United States and to discern data trends. Methods Reports of adverse events submitted to the FDA in patients receiving the Charité artificial disc were reviewed and pooled by similarity. We analyzed 135 medical device reports filed with the FDA regarding the Charité artificial disc between October 26, 2004, and April 26, 2006. Sixteen reports were excluded for lack of information regarding cause or because described events were vague or unrelated to the procedure. Results Rate of adverse events reported to the FDA as a percentage of devices of which the device manufacturer was aware had been dispensed at 6, 12, and 18 months following approval was 0.58%, 2.34%, and 2.13%, respectively. The adverse event reported most frequently through 18 months was anterior migration with reoperation (0.65%); other reported adverse events were, in decreasing order, sizing and malposition errors resulting in reoperation (0.36%), posterior element fracture resulting in reoperation (0.30%), major vascular injury requiring a blood transfusion (0.23%), and subsidence requiring reoperation (0.20%). Three non–device-related patient deaths were reported following FDA approval. The reported rate of sizing/malposition errors leading to reoperation of 0.36% was the same rate as that seen in the investigational device exemption (IDE) study of the Charité artificial disc. All other reported rates were lower than rates of the same events reported in the study. Conclusions Medical device reporting is an important yet highly anecdotal and incomplete event-tracking process. However, it is the

  19. 76 FR 82311 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Food and Drug Administration Report on Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... and Drug Administration Report on Good Guidance Practices: Improving Efficiency and Transparency... announcing the availability of a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Report on Good Guidance... Office of the Commissioner prepared a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Report on...

  20. 78 FR 69133 - Drug Enforcement Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug... renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I...

  1. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Wagh, Dhananjay; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Solow-Cordero, David; Kim, Kwang-Min; Samineni, Aneesh V; Parekh, Mansi B; Tayebi, Lobat; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%–20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved) that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150 unique compounds, which inhibited >90% of B. burgdorferi growth at a concentration of <25 µM. These 150 unique compounds comprise many safe antibiotics, chemical compounds, and also small molecules from plant sources. Of the 150 unique compounds, 101 compounds are FDA approved. We selected the top 20 FDA-approved molecules based on safety and potency and studied their minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The promising safe FDA-approved candidates that show low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values can be chosen as

  2. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Wagh, Dhananjay; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Solow-Cordero, David; Kim, Kwang-Min; Samineni, Aneesh V; Parekh, Mansi B; Tayebi, Lobat; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%-20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved) that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150 unique compounds, which inhibited >90% of B. burgdorferi growth at a concentration of <25 µM. These 150 unique compounds comprise many safe antibiotics, chemical compounds, and also small molecules from plant sources. Of the 150 unique compounds, 101 compounds are FDA approved. We selected the top 20 FDA-approved molecules based on safety and potency and studied their minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The promising safe FDA-approved candidates that show low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values can be chosen as lead

  3. The FDA-approved natural product dihydroergocristine reduces the production of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiling; Yu, Jing; Niu, Qi; Liu, Jianhua; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Known γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators display an undesirable pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity and have therefore not been successful in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). So far, no compounds from natural products have been identified as direct inhibitors of γ-secretase. To search for bioactive molecules that can reduce the amount of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and that have better pharmacokinetics and an improved safety profile, we completed a screen of ~400 natural products by using cell-based and cell-free γ-secretase activity assays. We identified dihydroergocristine (DHEC), a component of an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug, to be a direct inhibitor of γ-secretase. Micromolar concentrations of DHEC substantially reduced Aβ levels in different cell types, including a cell line derived from an AD patient. Structure-activity relationship studies implied that the key moiety for inhibiting γ-secretase is the cyclized tripeptide moiety of DHEC. A Surface Plasmon Resonance assay showed that DHEC binds directly to γ-secretase and Nicastrin, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 25.7 nM and 9.8 μM, respectively. This study offers DHEC not only as a new chemical moiety for selectively modulating the activity of γ-secretase but also a candidate for drug repositioning in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26567970

  4. The FDA should eliminate the ambiguities in the current BCS biowaiver guidance and make public the drugs for which BCS biowaivers have been granted.

    PubMed

    Benet, L Z; Larregieu, C A

    2010-09-01

    Although US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class 1 drugs are designated as high-permeability drugs, in fact, the criterion utilized is high extent of absorption. This ambiguity should be eliminated, and the FDA criterion should explicitly be stated as > or =90% absorption based on absolute bioavailability or mass balance. Maintaining confidentiality regarding the drugs for which the FDA has approved BCS waivers of in vivo bioequivalence studies is not good public policy and should be reversed.

  5. Thiazide-like diuretic drug metolazone activates human pregnane X receptor to induce cytochrome 3A4 and multidrug-resistance protein 1.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-11-15

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and drug transporters such as multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1). PXR can be modulated by small molecules, including Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, thus altering drug metabolism and causing drug-drug interactions. To determine the role of FDA-approved drugs in PXR-mediated regulation of drug metabolism and clearance, we screened 1481 FDA-approved small-molecule drugs by using a luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells and identified the diuretic drug metolazone as an activator of hPXR. Our data showed that metolazone activated hPXR-mediated expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestine cells and increased CYP3A4 promoter activity in various cell lines. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that hPXR recruits its co-activator SRC-1 upon metolazone binding in HepG2 cells, explaining the mechanism of hPXR activation. To understand the role of other commonly-used diuretics in hPXR activation and the structure-activity relationship of metolazone, thiazide and non-thiazide diuretics drugs were also tested but only metolazone activates hPXR. To understand the molecular mechanism, docking studies and mutational analysis were carried out and showed that metolazone binds in the ligand-binding pocket and interacts with mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues. This is the first report showing that metolazone activates hPXR. Because activation of hPXR might cause drug-drug interactions, metolazone should be used with caution for drug treatment in patients undergoing combination therapy.

  6. Regulatory approval of pharmaceuticals without a randomised controlled study: analysis of EMA and FDA approvals 1999–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hatswell, Anthony J; Baio, Gianluca; Berlin, Jesse A; Irs, Alar; Freemantle, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of pharmaceuticals is most often demonstrated by randomised controlled trials (RCTs); however, in some cases, regulatory applications lack RCT evidence. Objective To investigate the number and type of these approvals over the past 15 years by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods Drug approval data were downloaded from the EMA website and the ‘Drugs@FDA’ database for all decisions on pharmaceuticals published from 1 January 1999 to 8 May 2014. The details of eligible applications were extracted, including the therapeutic area, type of approval and review period. Results Over the period of the study, 76 unique indications were granted without RCT results (44 by the EMA and 60 by the FDA), demonstrating that a substantial number of treatments reach the market without undergoing an RCT. The majority was for haematological malignancies (34), with the next most common areas being oncology (15) and metabolic conditions (15). Of the applications made to both agencies with a comparable data package, the FDA granted more approvals (43/44 vs 35/44) and took less time to review products (8.7 vs 15.5 months). Products reached the market first in the USA in 30 of 34 cases (mean 13.1 months) due to companies making FDA submission before EMA submissions and faster FDA review time. Discussion Despite the frequency with which approvals are granted without RCT results, there is no systematic monitoring of such treatments to confirm their effectiveness or consistency regarding when this form of evidence is appropriate. We recommend a more open debate on the role of marketing authorisations granted without RCT results, and the development of guidelines on what constitutes an acceptable data package for regulators. PMID:27363818

  7. Manipulating In-House Designed Drug Databases For The Prediction of pH-Dependent Aqueous Drug Solubility

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; AlAbed, Ghada J.; Earley, Melissa; Roberts, Natalia; Gerges, Fady J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics properties are available in the package inserts of every Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved prescription drug, including all available chemotherapy drugs. These inserts follow a specific format imposed by the FDA. Whether chemotherapy drugs are administered via the parenteral route or alimentary tract, a significant factor affecting their bioavailability, elimination and consequently the drug’s effectiveness and potency, is its state of aqueous solubility. Water solubility has always lent itself poorly to the different predictive and experimental measures employed in the determination of a useful quantitative assessment. In this project, we first built a chemical structure based searchable database for 85 FDA approved chemotherapy drugs and then used Bio-Rad’s KnowItAll® Informatics suite to focus on the drugs pH-dependent water solubility prediction. We compared the predicted values for water solubility to the available values reported in the drug inserts, testing the practical utility and the predictive ability of our model in reporting such a clinically relevant, underreported pharmacokinetic parameter. A relational cancer drug database (MySQL) was created to further facilitate analysis and/or prediction of a chemotherapy compound’s missing pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:24478935

  8. Antifungal Drugs for Onychomycosis: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    In 1996, oral terbinafine joined itraconazole and fluconazole on the short list of systemic medications that could be used to treat onychomycosis (although fluconazole was not approved for this indication by the US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], it was commonly used for this purpose). In 1999, ciclopirox was the first topical treatment to be FDA approved. The addition of the topical antifungal agents efinaconazole and tavaborole in 2014 expanded the roster of medications available to more effectively manage onychomycosis in a wide range of patients, including those for whom comorbid conditions, concomitant medications, or patient preference limited the use of systemic antifungals.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Properties and Human Use Characteristics of an FDA-Approved Intranasal Naloxone Product for the Treatment of Opioid Overdose.

    PubMed

    Krieter, Philip; Chiang, Nora; Gyaw, Shwe; Skolnick, Phil; Crystal, Roger; Keegan, Fintan; Aker, Julie; Beck, Melissa; Harris, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral naloxone has been approved to treat opiate overdose for over 4 decades. Intranasal naloxone, administered "off label" using improvised devices, has been widely used by both first responders and the lay public to treat overdose. However, these improvised devices require training for effective use, and the recommended volumes (2 to 4 mL) exceed those considered optimum for intranasal administration. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of intranasal naloxone (2 to 8 mg) delivered in low volumes (0.1 to 0.2 mL) using an Aptar Unit-Dose device to an approved (0.4 mg) intramuscular dose. A parallel study assessed the ease of use of this device in a simulated overdose situation. All doses of intranasal naloxone resulted in plasma concentrations and areas under the curve greater than those observed following the intramuscular dose; the time to reach maximum plasma concentrations was not different following intranasal and intramuscular administration. Plasma concentrations of naloxone were dose proportional between 2 and 8 mg and independent of whether drug was administered to 1 or both nostrils. In a study using individuals representative of the general population, >90% were able to perform both critical tasks (inserting nozzle into a nostril and pressing plunger) needed to deliver a simulated dose of naloxone without prior training. Based on both pharmacokinetic and human use studies, a 4-mg dose delivered in a single device (0.1 mL) was selected as the final product. This product can be used by first responders and the lay public, providing an important and potentially life-saving intervention for victims of an opioid overdose.

  10. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov. Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs. PMID:27631620

  11. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  12. U.S. FDA Approval Summary: Nivolumab for Treatment of Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma Following Progression on Ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Maitreyee; Chuk, Meredith K; Theoret, Marc R; Mushti, Sirisha; He, Kun; Weis, Shawna L; Putman, Alexander H; Helms, Whitney S; Cao, Xianhua; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Liang; Welch, Joel; Graham, Laurie; Libeg, Meredith; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-01-13

    On December 22, 2014, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval to nivolumab (OPDIVO®, Bristol-Myers Squibb) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma and disease progression following ipilimumab and, if BRAF V600 mutation-positive, a BRAF inhibitor. Approval was based on a clinically meaningful, durable objective response rate (ORR) in a non-comparative analysis of 120 patients who received nivolumab 3 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks with at least 6 months follow-up in an ongoing, randomized, open-label, active-controlled clinical trial. The ORR as assessed by a blinded independent review committee per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 was 31.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 23.5, 40.8]. Ongoing responses were observed in 87% of responding patients, ranging from 2.6+ to 10+ months. In 13 patients the response duration was 6 months or longer. The risks of nivolumab, including clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions (imARs), were assessed in 268 patients who received at least one dose of nivolumab. FDA review considered whether the ORR and durations of responses were reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit, the adequacy of the safety database, and systematic approaches to the identification, description and patient management for imARs in product labeling.

  13. FDA Approval Summary: Nivolumab in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma After Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Exploratory Predictive Biomarker Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Xunhai; Maher, V Ellen; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Ibrahim, Amna; Kim, Geoffrey; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-03-01

    On November 23, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nivolumab (OPDIVO, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company) for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who have received prior anti-angiogenic therapy. The approval was based on efficacy and safety data demonstrated in an open-label, randomized study of 821 patients with advanced RCC who progressed after at least one anti-angiogenic therapy. Patients were randomized to nivolumab or everolimus and followed for disease progression. The primary end point was overall survival. Subsequent therapies, including everolimus for patients who developed progressive disease on the nivolumab arm, were allowed, but no cross-over was permitted. The median overall survival was 25.0 months on the nivolumab arm and 19.6 months on everolimus arm (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.89). The confirmed response rates were 21.5% versus 3.9%; median durations of response were 23.0 versus 13.7 months, and median times to response were 3.0 versus 3.7 months in the nivolumab and everolimus arms, respectively. A statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival was not observed in this trial. The safety profile of nivolumab in renal cell cancer was similar to that in other disease settings. However, the incidence of immune-mediated nephritis appeared to be higher in patients with RCC. The Oncologist 2017;22:311-317 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The overall benefit/risk profile demonstrated in trial CA209025 supported the approval of nivolumab as an additional treatment option for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma after anti-angiogenic therapy. The use of nivolumab in patients who had received vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy resulted in a 5.4 month improvement in median overall survival compared with the everolimus arm. This difference is statistically significant and clinically meaningful.

  14. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  15. 76 FR 79194 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug Product Labeling: Medication Guide Requirements AGENCY: Food... labeling, called Medications Guides, for certain products that pose a serious and significant public health concern requiring distribution of FDA-approved patient medication. DATES: Submit either electronic...

  16. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications.

  17. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107... Administration manuals. (a) Food and Drug Administration administrative staff manuals and instructions that affect a member of the public are available for public disclosure. An index of all such manuals...

  18. Evaluation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in vitro inhibition by chloroquine and chlorpromazine, two FDA approved molecules.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, O; Moroso, M; Pernet, O; Emonet, S; Ferrier Rembert, A; Paranhos-Baccalà, G; Peyrefitte, C N

    2015-06-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic virus (CCHFV) causes hemorrhagic fever with high case mortality rates and is endemic in south-eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia. The limited catalog of specific treatment, highlight the necessity to look for additional therapeutic solutions. Previous experiments suggested that CCHFV enters the cells via a clathrin dependent pathway. Therefore, we have evaluated the potential anti-CCHFV activity of several molecules targeting this entry possibility. We identified two molecules chloroquine and chlorpromazine. Neutralization and virus yield reduction assays were tested in Vero E6 and Huh7 cells on two different CCHFV strains. Several combinations, including ribavirin, were assayed to test a potential synergistic effect. The two molecules inhibited CCHFV, and depending on the virus and the cell lines, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for chloroquine and chlorpromazine ranged from 28 to 43 and 10.8-15.7 μM, respectively. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that these molecules had a direct effect on CCHFV infectivity and spread. The antiviral activity of the two molecules was still effective even when added up to 6h post-infection and up to 24h. The selectivity index ranging from 3 to 35 lead us to evaluate combinations with ribavirin. Combinations of ribavirin and chloroquine or chlorpromazine were synergistic against CCHFV. Though the low chlorpromazine selectivity index suggests the need for a chemical improvement, our present study highlights chloroquine as the main drug having the potential for drug repurposing.

  19. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products--Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  20. FDA Approval of Palbociclib in Combination with Fulvestrant for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amanda J; Wedam, Suparna; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Bloomquist, Erik; Tang, Shengui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Chen, Wei; Palmby, Todd R; Fourie Zirkelbach, Jeanne; Fu, Wentao; Liu, Qi; Tilley, Amy; Kim, Geoffrey; Kluetz, Paul G; McKee, Amy E; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-10-15

    On February 19, 2016, the FDA approved palbociclib (Ibrance, Pfizer) for use in combination with fulvestrant (Faslodex, AstraZeneca) for the treatment of women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) with disease progression following endocrine therapy. The approval was based on the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 521 pre- and postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced or MBC. Patients were randomized (2:1) to receive palbociclib plus fulvestrant (n = 347) or placebo plus fulvestrant (n = 174). The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS). A statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS (9.5 months vs. 4.6 months) was observed in patients receiving palbociclib plus fulvestrant [HR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.36-0.59; P < 0.0001]. Safety data confirmed the known adverse reaction profile of palbociclib. The most common adverse reactions (>20%) in patients treated with palbociclib were neutropenia, leukopenia, infections, fatigue, nausea, anemia, stomatitis, headache, diarrhea, and thrombocytopenia. This approval was granted in the context of a prior accelerated approval for palbociclib in combination with letrozole in patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer as initial endocrine-based therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 22(20); 4968-72. ©2016 AACR.

  1. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  2. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  3. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107 Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.107 Food and...

  4. Comparison of the FDA-Approved CDC DENV-1-4 Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR with a Laboratory-Developed Assay for Dengue Virus Detection and Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.; Abeynayake, Janaki; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Gresh, Lionel; Tellez, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Karla; Ballesteros, Gabriela; Guo, Frances P.; Balmaseda, Angel; Karunaratne, Kumudu; Harris, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the agent of the most common vector-borne disease worldwide. Using 199 clinical samples collected from Nicaragua and Sri Lanka, a laboratory-developed DENV multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rRT-PCR) proved more clinically sensitive than the FDA-approved CDC assay for DENV serotypes 1 to 4 when measured against a composite reference standard, with sensitivities of 97.4% versus 87.1%, respectively. PMID:23903549

  5. Progress in the Fight Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria? A Review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Approved Antibiotics, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Deak, Dalia; Outterson, Kevin; Powers, John H; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-09-06

    A weak antibiotic pipeline and the increase in drug-resistant pathogens have led to calls for more new antibiotics. Eight new antibiotics were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) between January 2010 and December 2015: ceftaroline, fidaxomicin, bedaquiline, dalbavancin, tedizolid, oritavancin, ceftolozane-tazobactam, and ceftazidime-avibactam. This study evaluates the development course and pivotal trials of these antibiotics for their innovativeness, development process, documented patient outcomes, and cost. Data sources were FDA approval packages and databases (January 2010 to December 2015); the Red Book (Truven Health Analytics); Orange Book: Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations (FDA); and supplementary information from company filings, press releases, and media reports. Four antibiotics were approved for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection. Seven had similar mechanisms of action to those of previously approved drugs. Six were initially developed by small to midsized companies, and 7 are currently marketed by 1 of 3 large companies. The drugs spent a median of 6.2 years in clinical trials (interquartile range [IQR], 5.4 to 8.8 years) and 8 months in FDA review (IQR, 7.5 to 8 months). The median number of patients enrolled in the pivotal trials was 666 (IQR, 553 to 739 patients; full range, 44 to 1005 patients), and median trial duration was 18 months (IQR, 15 to 22 months). Seven drugs were approved on the basis of pivotal trials evaluating noninferiority. One drug demonstrated superiority on an exploratory secondary end point, 2 showed decreased efficacy in patients with renal insufficiency, and 1 showed increased mortality compared with older drugs. Seven of the drugs are substantially more expensive than their trial comparators. Limitations are that future research may show benefit to patients, new drugs from older classes may show superior effectiveness in specific patient populations, and

  6. Exploring network theory for mass drug administration.

    PubMed

    Chami, Goylette F; Molyneux, David H; Kontoleon, Andreas A; Dunne, David W

    2013-08-01

    Network theory is a well-established discipline that uses mathematical graphs to describe biological, physical, and social systems. The topologies across empirical networks display strikingly similar organizational properties. In particular, the characteristics of these networks allow computational analysis to contribute data unattainable from examining individual components in isolation. However, the interdisciplinary and quantitative nature of network analysis has yet to be exploited by public health initiatives to distribute preventive chemotherapies. One notable application is the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) Roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) where there is a need to upscale distribution capacity and to target systematic noncompliers. An understanding of local networks for analysing the distributional properties of community-directed treatment may facilitate sustainable expansion of mass drug-administration (MDA) programs.

  7. Successful Shortening of Tuberculosis Treatment Using Adjuvant Host-Directed Therapy with FDA-Approved Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ammerman, Nicole C.; Gupta, Radhika; Guo, Haidan; Maiga, Marama C.; Lun, Shichun; Bishai, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Global control of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease that claims nearly 2 million lives annually, is hindered by the long duration of chemotherapy required for curative treatment. Lack of adherence to this intense treatment regimen leads to poor patient outcomes, development of new or additional drug resistance, and continued spread of M.tb. within communities. Hence, shortening the duration of TB therapy could increase drug adherence and cure in TB patients. Here, we report that addition of the United Stated Food and Drug Administration-approved phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) cilostazol and sildenafil to the standard TB treatment regimen reduces tissue pathology, leads to faster bacterial clearance and shortens the time to lung sterilization by one month, compared to standard treatment alone, in a murine model of TB. Our data suggest that these PDE-Is could be repurposed for use as adjunctive drugs to shorten TB treatment in humans. PMID:22319585

  8. FDA designations for therapeutics and their impact on drug development and regulatory review outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, A S; Darrow, J J

    2015-01-01

    New prescription drugs receive approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based on tests establishing safety and adequate and well-controlled trials demonstrating "substantial evidence" of efficacy. However, a number of legislative and regulatory initiatives, the most recent being the breakthrough therapy designation created in 2012, give the FDA flexibility to approve drugs on the basis of less rigorous data in situations of greater clinical need. These expedited development and review pathways now contribute to a majority of all new drug approvals and have important benefits in encouraging efficient availability of transformative drugs. They also have a number of risks, including a heightened possibility that the drugs will be discovered to be ineffective or unsafe after widespread use, and confusion by patients and physicians over what it means for a product to be "FDA approved."

  9. DrugE-Rank: improving drug–target interaction prediction of new candidate drugs or targets by ensemble learning to rank

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingjun; Gao, Junning; Wu, Dongliang; Zhang, Shihua; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying drug–target interactions is an important task in drug discovery. To reduce heavy time and financial cost in experimental way, many computational approaches have been proposed. Although these approaches have used many different principles, their performance is far from satisfactory, especially in predicting drug–target interactions of new candidate drugs or targets. Methods: Approaches based on machine learning for this problem can be divided into two types: feature-based and similarity-based methods. Learning to rank is the most powerful technique in the feature-based methods. Similarity-based methods are well accepted, due to their idea of connecting the chemical and genomic spaces, represented by drug and target similarities, respectively. We propose a new method, DrugE-Rank, to improve the prediction performance by nicely combining the advantages of the two different types of methods. That is, DrugE-Rank uses LTR, for which multiple well-known similarity-based methods can be used as components of ensemble learning. Results: The performance of DrugE-Rank is thoroughly examined by three main experiments using data from DrugBank: (i) cross-validation on FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) approved drugs before March 2014; (ii) independent test on FDA approved drugs after March 2014; and (iii) independent test on FDA experimental drugs. Experimental results show that DrugE-Rank outperforms competing methods significantly, especially achieving more than 30% improvement in Area under Prediction Recall curve for FDA approved new drugs and FDA experimental drugs. Availability: http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/DrugE-Rank Contact: zhusf@fudan.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307615

  10. Approval of Raxibacumab for the Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax Under the US Food and Drug Administration “Animal Rule”

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    On December 14, 2012, the FDA approved Raxibacumab, the first monoclonal antibody product developed under Project BioShield to achieve this milestone, and the first biologic product to be approved through the FDA animal efficacy rule (or “Animal Rule”). Raxibacumab is approved for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with inhalational anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis in combination with appropriate antibiotic drugs and for prophylaxis of inhalational anthrax when alternative therapies are not available or not appropriate. The developmental process required for approval of Raxibacumab illustrates many of the challenges that product developers may encounter when pursuing approval under the Animal Rule and highlights a number of important regulatory and policy issues. PMID:26648915

  11. Accelerated Approval of Cancer Drugs: Improved Access to Therapeutic Breakthroughs or Early Release of Unsafe and Ineffective Drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Richey, Elizabeth A.; Lyons, E. Alison; Nebeker, Jonathan R.; Shankaran, Veena; McKoy, June M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Trifilio, Steven; Sartor, Oliver; Benson, Al B.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Tallman, Martin S.; West, Dennis P.; Hirschfeld, Steven; Grillo-Lopez, Antonio J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated approval (AA) was initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to shorten development times of drugs for serious medical illnesses. Sponsors must confirm efficacy in postapproval trials. Confronted with several drugs that received AA on the basis of phase II trials and for which confirmatory trials were incomplete, FDA officials have encouraged sponsors to design AA applications on the basis of interim analyses of phase III trials. Methods We reviewed data on orphan drug status, development time, safety, and status of confirmatory trials of AAs and regular FDA approvals of new molecular entities (NMEs) for oncology indications since 1995. Results Median development times for AA NMEs (n = 19 drugs) and regular-approval oncology NMEs (n = 32 drugs) were 7.3 and 7.2 years, respectively. Phase III trials supported efficacy for 75% of regular-approval versus 26% of AA NMEs and for 73% of non–orphan versus 45% of orphan drug approvals. AA accounted for 78% of approvals for oncology NMEs between 2001 and 2003 but accounted for 32% in more recent years. Among AA NMEs, confirmatory trials were nine-fold less likely to be completed for orphan drug versus non–orphan drug indications. Postapproval, black box warnings were added to labels for four oncology NMEs (17%) that had received AA and for two oncology NMEs (9%) that had received regular approval. Conclusion AA oncology NMEs are safe and effective, although development times are not accelerated. A return to endorsing phase II trial designs for AA for oncology NMEs, particularly for orphan drug indications, may facilitate timely FDA approval of novel cancer drugs. PMID:19636013

  12. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  13. Exploring the pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB) for repositioning breast cancer drugs by leveraging Web ontology language (OWL) and cheminformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qian; Tao, Cui; Shen, Feichen; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Computational drug repositioning leverages computational technology and high volume of biomedical data to identify new indications for existing drugs. Since it does not require costly experiments that have a high risk of failure, it has attracted increasing interest from diverse fields such as biomedical, pharmaceutical, and informatics areas. In this study, we used pharmacogenomics data generated from pharmacogenomics studies, applied informatics and Semantic Web technologies to address the drug repositioning problem. Specifically, we explored PharmGKB to identify pharmacogenomics related associations as pharmacogenomics profiles for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved breast cancer drugs. We then converted and represented these profiles in Semantic Web notations, which support automated semantic inference. We successfully evaluated the performance and efficacy of the breast cancer drug pharmacogenomics profiles by case studies. Our results demonstrate that combination of pharmacogenomics data and Semantic Web technology/Cheminformatics approaches yields better performance of new indication and possible adverse effects prediction for breast cancer drugs.

  14. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practices; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Los...

  15. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Baltimore District Office,...

  16. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with...

  17. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This... Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the...

  18. [Anatomophysiological bases of drug administration. Dosage forms and routes of administration].

    PubMed

    Carillo Norte, Juan Antonio; Gañán Presmanes, Yolanda

    2010-12-01

    The administration of the right dose to the right patient is of paramount importance to obtain an optimal drug response within the scope of clinical pharmacology and tailored medicine. The marketing of safer and more efficient drug entities, along with the development of new drug administration devices provide a major boost for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, beyond our imagination. However dose adjustment is not enough to produced the desired effect, and drug therapy should include an appropriate route of drug administration. Currently, there are many different and sophisticated methods to incorporate drugs into the patients that nurses should be familiar with. When there is no contraindication, oral route of drug administration is of choice and most frequently used as a physiological pathway of drug intake.

  19. A review of human drug self-administration procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Comer, Sandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Drug self-administration procedures in laboratory settings allow us to closely model drug-taking behavior in real-world settings. This review provides an overview of many of the common self-administration methods used in human laboratory research. Typically, self-administration studies provide a quantifiable measure of the reinforcing effect of a drug, which is believed to be predictive of its potential for abuse. Several adaptations of the self-administration paradigm exist, the simplest of which allows participants free access to the drug under investigation. Free-access procedures allow investigators to observe patterns of drug self-administration and drug effects in a controlled setting. Allowing participants to choose between two simultaneously available reinforcers (choice procedures) is another well-established method of assessing the reinforcing effects of a drug. Offering a choice between two reinforcers (e.g. two different doses of the same drug, two different drugs, or drug and nondrug reinforcers) provides researchers with a point of comparison (e.g. between a drug of known abuse potential and a novel drug). When combined with other endpoints, such as subjective effects ratings, physiological responses, and cognitive performance, human self-administration paradigms have contributed significantly to our understanding of the factors that contribute to, maintain, and alter drug-taking behavior including: craving, positive subjective effects, toxicity, drug interactions and abstinence. This area of research has also begun to incorporate other techniques such as imaging and genetics to further understand the multifaceted nature of substance abuse. The present paper summarizes the different self-administration techniques that are commonly used today and the application of other procedures that may complement interpretation of the drug PMID:23839027

  20. Animal models of social contact and drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Justin C; Smith, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Social learning theories of drug abuse propose that individuals imitate drug use behaviors modeled by social peers, and that these behaviors are selectively reinforced and/or punished depending on group norms. Historically, animal models of social influence have focused on distal factors (i.e., those factors outside the drug-taking context) in drug self-administration studies. Recently, several investigators have developed novel models, or significantly modified existing models, to examine the role of proximal factors (i.e., those factors that are immediately present at the time of drug taking) on measures of drug self-administration. Studies using these newer models have revealed several important conclusions regarding the effects of social learning on drug abuse: 1) the presence of a social partner influences drug self-administration, 2) the behavior of a social partner determines whether social contact will increase or decrease drug intake, and 3) social partners can model and imitate specific patterns of drug self-administration. These findings are congruent with those obtained in the human laboratory, providing support for the cross-species generality and validity of these preclinical models. This mini-review describes in detail some of the preclinical animal models used to study social contact and drug self-administration to guide future research on social learning and drug abuse.

  1. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... good manufacturing practices (CGMP) for PET drugs. The procedures were finalized and an implementation... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products--Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  2. 78 FR 48691 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Demystifying Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ...; Demystifying Food and Drug Administration: An Exploration of Drug Development Hosted by the Food and Drug... registration fee for this conference. Early registration is suggested because space is limited. The...

  3. Detecting ordered small molecule drug aggregates in live macrophages: a multi-parameter microscope image data acquisition and analysis strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rzeczycki, Phillip; Yoon, Gi Sang; Keswani, Rahul K.; Sud, Sudha; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2017-01-01

    Following prolonged administration, certain orally bioavailable but poorly soluble small molecule drugs are prone to precipitate out and form crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) within the cells of living organisms. In this research, we present a quantitative multi-parameter imaging platform for measuring the fluorescence and polarization diattenuation signals of cells harboring intracellular CLDIs. To validate the imaging system, the FDA-approved drug clofazimine (CFZ) was used as a model compound. Our results demonstrated that a quantitative multi-parameter microscopy image analysis platform can be used to study drug sequestering macrophages, and to detect the formation of ordered molecular aggregates formed by poorly soluble small molecule drugs in animals. PMID:28270989

  4. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  5. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:28367259

  6. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug.

  7. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug.

  8. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program...

  9. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program...

  10. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program...

  11. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program...

  12. 38 CFR 52.180 - Administration of drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration of drugs... of drugs. The program management must assist with the management of medication and have a system for disseminating drug information to participants and program staff. (a) Procedures. (1) The program...

  13. Drugs on the College Campus. A Guide for College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlis, Helen H.

    This guide to drugs on the college campus provides accurate information to help administrators and other college officials understand and cope with the use of drugs by college students. The problem is defined, and facts about drugs, and the implications and issues occasioned by their use, are presented. Information is also offered in the following…

  14. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds). A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs to all patients during the three drug rounds on each of six days per ward. Main outcomes were number, type and clinical importance of errors and associated risk factors. Drug administration error rate was calculated with and without wrong time errors. Relationship between the occurrence of errors and potential risk factors were investigated using logistic regression models with random effects. Results Twenty-eight nurses caring for 108 patients were observed. Among 1501 opportunities for error, 415 administrations (430 errors) with one or more errors were detected (27.6%). There were 312 wrong time errors, ten simultaneously with another type of error, resulting in an error rate without wrong time error of 7.5% (113/1501). The most frequently administered drugs were the cardiovascular drugs (425/1501, 28.3%). The highest risks of error in a drug administration were for dermatological drugs. No potentially life-threatening errors were witnessed and 6% of errors were classified as having a serious or significant impact on patients (mainly omission). In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of errors was associated with drug administration route, drug classification (ATC) and the number of patient under the nurse's care. Conclusion Medication administration errors are frequent. The identification of its determinants helps to undertake designed interventions. PMID:22409837

  15. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... drugs, devices, and biologics; as well as inspections of clinical investigators, IRBs, and research... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  16. Data-mining for sulfur and fluorine: an evaluation of pharmaceuticals to reveal opportunities for drug design and discovery.

    PubMed

    Ilardi, Elizabeth A; Vitaku, Edon; Njardarson, Jon T

    2014-04-10

    Among carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen, sulfur and fluorine are both leading constituents of the pharmaceuticals that comprise our medicinal history. In efforts to stimulate the minds of both the general public and expert scientist, statistics were collected from the trends associated with therapeutics spanning 12 disease categories (a total of 1969 drugs) from our new graphical montage compilation: disease focused pharmaceuticals posters. Each poster is a vibrant display of a collection of pharmaceuticals (including structural image, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval date, international nonproprietary name (INN), initial market name, and a color-coded subclass of function) organized chronologically and classified according to an association with a particular clinical indication. Specifically, the evolution and structural diversity of sulfur and the popular integration of fluorine into drugs introduced over the past 50 years are evaluated. The presented qualitative conclusions in this article aim to promote innovative insights into drug development.

  17. FDA direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs: what are consumer preferences and response tendencies?

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Nile; Loudon, David; Sircar-Ramsewak, Feroza

    2007-01-01

    The effect of direct-to-consumer (DTC) television advertising of prescription medications is a growing concern of the United States (U.S.) Congress, state legislatures, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This research study was conducted in order to examine consumers' perceived preferences of DTC television advertisement in relation to "reminder" "help-seeking," and "product-claim" FDA-approved advertisement categories. An additional objective was to examine the influence of DTC television advertising of prescription drugs on consumers' tendency to seek more information about the medication and/or the medical condition. The research indicates that DTC television drug ads appear to be insufficient for consumers to make informed decisions. Their mixed perception and acceptance of the advertisements seem to influence them to seek more information from a variety of medical sources.

  18. Retention of drug administration skills after intensive teaching.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D W; Degnan, B A; Murray, L J; Dunling, C P; Whittlestone, K D; Wood, D F; Smith, H L; Gupta, A K

    2008-04-01

    We have identified deficiencies in medical students' drug administration skills, and we attempted to address them with interactive online teaching modules and simulated critical incident scenarios. Short-term improvements have been evident with this intensive effort, but medium-term retention of skills has not been measured. A drug administration lecture, an online module and a simulated emergency scenario were offered to final year clinical students. None of the teaching was compulsory but participation was recorded, along with students' simulator performances and marks in an objective structured practical examination 9 months later. A poor simulator score predicted a poor performance in the later examination. Participation in the simulated scenario only significantly improved examination scores when supplemented by online teaching (p = 0.002). Intensive drug administration teaching using an online module and high fidelity simulation improves drug administration skills in the medium term. Students found simulation much more engaging than online teaching.

  19. Empowering Malaria Vaccination by Drug Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    response with drugs that neutralize suppressive functions and potentiate protective responses. Chloroquine may be a first attractive candidate...However, sterile immunity is never observed in natura lly exposed popu- lations; adults living in e ndemic areas often harbor para- si tes albeit ar low ...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  20. 78 FR 9928 - Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: To assist the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) in drafting a strategic...

  1. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  2. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 20.107 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... affect a member of the public are available for public disclosure. An index of all such manuals is... Information Public Reading Room, located in rm. 1050, at the same address. The index and all manuals...

  3. A Pressing Need for Pharmacotherapy Development to Treat Drug Addiction: An Editorial from a Legal Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andraka-Christou, B

    2016-01-01

    Only three FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for treating opiate dependence, all of which are underprescribed and underused. No FDA-approved pharmacological treatments exist for cocaine or methamphetamine dependence. More evidence-based, FDA-approved treatments are needed for treating drug dependence, but pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pursue such research without government incentives. Today pharmaceutical companies primarily conduct research and development (R&D) related to "blockbuster" and rare diseases; drug dependence does not fall into either category. Further compounding the problem, pharmaceutical companies have been recently slashing risky areas of research, rather than adopting new areas. Fortunately, the government has a number of options to incentivize pharmaceutical R&D relating to drug dependence treatment, including the following: market exclusivity for new medications, tax breaks, priority review vouchers, liability reduction, and an advanced market commitment.

  4. FDA reform signed into law. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1997-12-05

    The laws under which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) operates have been changed by bipartisan Congressional efforts. The FDA Modernization Act of 1997, signed into law on November 21, 1997 modifies the mission of the FDA to include a goal of speeding research, innovation and access to care. The legislation allows fast track review for the most important drugs. It also allows drug companies to promote off label use of already-approved pharmaceuticals for other purposes. The controversial issue allows drug companies to provide physicians with documentation on the effectiveness of their drugs in treating other conditions. The industry supports the change since the revenue growth for off label use of drugs is especially important for smaller biotechnical companies, while consumer groups fear that it is a loophole for selling unproven drugs. The bill also renews the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), regulating the current practice of compounding, and monitoring medical devices and health care claims for foods.

  5. FDA Approval of Nivolumab for the First-Line Treatment of Patients with BRAFV600 Wild-Type Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Julia A; Theoret, Marc R; Mushti, Sirisha; He, Kun; Libeg, Meredith; Goldberg, Kirsten; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; McKee, Amy E; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-01-10

    On November 23, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved nivolumab (OPDIVO®, Bristol Myers Squibb, Co.) as a single agent for the first-line treatment of patients with BRAFV600 wild-type, unresectable or metastatic melanoma. An international, double-blind, randomized (1:1) trial conducted outside of the U.S. allocated 418 patients to receive nivolumab 3mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks (n=210) or dacarbazine 1000mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks (n=208). Patients with disease progression who met protocol-specified criteria (~25% of each trial arm) were permitted to continue with the assigned treatment in a blinded fashion until further disease progression is documented. Overall survival (OS) was statistically significantly improved in the nivolumab arm compared to the dacarbazine arm [HR 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.30-0.60; p < 0.0001]. Progression-free survival was also statistically significantly improved in the nivolumab arm (HR 0.43: 95% CI, 0.34-0.56; P < 0.0001). The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) of nivolumab were fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, musculoskeletal pain, rash, and pruritus. Nivolumab demonstrated a favorable benefit-risk profile compared to dacarbazine supporting regular approval; however, it remains unclear whether treatment beyond disease progression contributes to the overall clinical benefit of nivolumab.

  6. Difficulties experienced during preparation and administration of oral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boztepe, Handan; Özdemir, Handan; Karababa, Çiğdem; Yıldız, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Aim: It was aimed to determine the difficulties experienced by pediatric nurses working in the wards of a university hospital during preparation and administration of drugs and to determine solution recommendations. Material and Methods: One hundred and eight nurses who accepted to participate in the study constituted the sample of the study. Open-ended questions were asked in order to obtain detailed information about the attitudes and views of the participants and face to face interview was used. The problems experienced during preparation and administration of drugs were collected using the data collection form prepared by the investigators. Institution approval, ethics committee approval (HEK12/193) and written informed consent from the nurses who wished to participate in the study were obtained to conduct the study. The data obtained were expressed as figures and percentages. Results: The most commonly reported problems in preparation of drugs included incomplete dissolution of tablets or non-homogeneous distribution in fluids (54.6%) and difficulty in breaking tablets in appropriate doses (45.3%). The most commonly reported problem experienced during administration of drugs was rejection of drugs which tasted bad by babies/children or spitting out the drug (75.9%). In our study, the nurses also mentioned the problems related with drug administration equipment. These problems included fear of injectors (25.9%), escape of the drugs into the respiratory way (15.7%) and lack of appropriate equipment for administering the drugs (7.4%). Conclusions: In our study, it was found that all nurses experienced difficulty in preparing and administering drugs. The problems experienced by the nurses and solution recommendations for these problems were reported to the hospital administration. PMID:26078668

  7. The formulation of drug for ocular administration.

    PubMed

    Aiache, J M; el Meski, S; Beyssac, E; Serpin, G

    1997-01-01

    The different barriers that slow the penetration of active ingredients administered by the ocular route are described, and some novel dosage forms designed for this route are discussed. Both precorneal and corneal factors considerably restrict ocular penetration. The low bioavailability of classical ophthalmic dosage forms can be improved by several approaches, particularly by increasing the time the active ingredients remain in contact with the eye tissues. The new dosage forms are reviewed according to their type and their drug release mechanisms. The characteristics, advantages, and limitations of each are outlined. The potential of these dosage forms can be expected to enhance development. They offer prolonged effectiveness, reproducibility, fewer unwanted side effects, and improved tolerance.

  8. Drug patent expirations and the speed of generic entry.

    PubMed Central

    Bae, J P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using recent data, to analyze the generic drug entry phenomenon to determine the factors that influence the speed and likelihood of generic drug entries. DATA SOURCES: Data for 81 drugs that have lost patent between 1987 and 1994. Patent and exclusive marketing rights expiration dates: Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalent Evaluations (1986-1989). Generic entry dates: FDA Drug and Device Product Approvals (Jan. 1987-Dec. 1994). Numbers of pending generic applications: FDA Office of Generic Drugs Quantitative Report-ANDAs and AADAs (Nov. 1990-Jan. 1993). Sales revenue: Pharmaceutical Data Services, Walsh-America. STUDY DESIGN: This study appropriately recognizes generic entry as a survival problem, and uses a proportional hazard method for analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1) There is a negative relationship between an innovative drug's sales revenue and the time to generic entry. (2) Entries of generics tend to be slower for drugs that have either very few or a very large number of competing brands in the marketplace. (3) The time to generic entry increased overall between 1987 and 1994. (4) Drugs that primarily treat chronic symptoms tend to enter faster than the types of drugs that primarily treat acute illnesses. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that the generic industry is targeting large-revenue products and chronic drug markets. Entry of a generic drug is influenced by the existing branded substitutes in the marketplace. Surprisingly, the generic drug entry process has slowed despite many changes that would facilitate entry. PMID:9108806

  9. 21 CFR 314.162 - Removal of a drug product from the list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.162 Removal of a drug product from the list. (a) FDA will remove a... that the withdrawal from the market has ceased or is not for safety or effectiveness reasons. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 314.101 - Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.101 Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application. (a)(1) Within 60 days after FDA receives...

  11. 21 CFR 314.161 - Determination of reasons for voluntary withdrawal of a listed drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.161 Determination of reasons for... act, FDA will initiate a proceeding in accordance with § 314.153(b). (e) A drug that the...

  12. 21 CFR 314.93 - Petition to request a change from a listed drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Abbreviated... listed combination drug, must first obtain permission from FDA to submit such an abbreviated application... petition that is permitted under paragraph (a) of this section is submitted, FDA will approve or...

  13. 21 CFR 314.92 - Drug products for which abbreviated applications may be submitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW... an abbreviated new drug application submission by FDA through the petition procedures set forth under § 10.30 of this chapter and § 314.93. (b) FDA will publish in the list listed drugs for...

  14. 76 FR 56770 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with Xavier University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Outsourcing...

  15. 76 FR 72951 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses.'' This guidance document provides industry and Agency staff...

  16. 77 FR 5027 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... announcing the availability of a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... Transparency Initiative. This report includes eight initiatives adopted by the Commissioner of Food and...

  17. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD.

  18. 77 FR 23485 - Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting; Input Into Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... perspective is discussed outside of a specific product's marketing application review. The medical product... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Patient Network Annual Meeting... regulatory process related to the medical product life cycle, analyze where in the process patient input...

  19. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice..., and other entities about how the FDA intends to apply its regulatory authorities to select...

  20. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...: Demonstrating Substantial Equivalence for Tobacco Products.'' In general, the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  1. 77 FR 26768 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Cosponsorship...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/International Society for..., and Sustaining a Culture of Compliance AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ] ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research,...

  2. 75 FR 17143 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... six of them from the premarket notification requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  3. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), procedural information on how to fulfill section...

  4. 76 FR 61103 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), also known as the de novo classification process. FDA...

  5. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft...

  6. The runway model of drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral scientists have employed operant runways as a means of investigating the motivational impact of incentive stimuli for the better part of the past 100 years. In this task, the speed with which a trained animal traverses a long straight alley for positive incentive stimuli, like food or water, provides a reliable index of the subject’s motivation to seek those stimuli. The runway is therefore a particularly appropriate tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of animals working for drugs of abuse. The current review describes our laboratory’s work over the past twenty years developing and implementing an operant runway model of drug self-administration. Procedures are described that methodologically dissociate the antecedent motivational processes that induce an animal to seek a drug, from the positive reinforcing consequences of actually earning the drug. Additional work is reviewed on the use of the runway method as a means of modeling the factors that often result in a “relapse” of drug self-administration after a period of abstinence (i.e., a response reinstatement test), as are runway studies that revealed the presence of opposing positive and negative consequences of self-administered cocaine. This body of work suggests that the runway method has served as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological basis of drug self-administration. PMID:19032964

  7. Medication Repurposing in Pediatric Patients: Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gaps in pediatric therapeutics often result in off-label use and specifically, novel uses for existing medications, termed “drug repurposing.” Drug Information (DI) queries to a Pediatric Medication Resource Center of a large metropolitan pediatric hospital in New York and inherent difficulties in retrieving evidence-based information prompted a review of current medication repurposing for pediatric patients. The objective included characterization of innovative off-label use of medications Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 1 or more indications to treat a totally different disorder or indication in pediatric patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to retrieve publications describing repurposed medications in pediatric patients. Excluded was FDA-approved indications used off-label in pediatric patients (e.g., different dose), preclinical data, adult use only, and experimental use. Evidence quality was classified using a modified American Academy of Neurology Level of Evidence. Results were analyzed using χ2 at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Over 2000 references were retrieved and reviewed. A total of 101 medications repurposed for novel off-label uses for pediatric patients were identified: 38 for neonates, 74 for children, and 52 for adolescents. Neonates and infants were least likely to receive a medication for a repurposed use. Strong or intermediate evidence existed in 80.2% of cases. The evidence was weak in 19.8%. No significant relationship was observed between the pediatric age group and strength of the literature. Most repurposed uses pertained to generic or widely used medications. Less than 5% of medications were first marketed after 2011. CONCLUSIONS: While not exhaustive, the present study represents the most comprehensive listing of novel uses exclusive to pediatric patients. Further research is needed to identify the frequency of repurposed uses. The valuable DI role of pharmacists in assessing repurposed

  8. Formulation approaches in mitigating toxicity of orally administrated drugs.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Irina; Tan, Elijah

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of current formulation approaches to mitigate toxicity of orally administrated drugs. The formulation approaches are characterized by their intended impact on a drug's pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacological properties or metabolic pathways. Regulatory opportunities and constraints with focus on U.S. regulations in optimizing a drug's safety or efficacy profile are reviewed. The following formulation approaches are described: (i) pharmacokinetic-modulating and (ii) pharmacodynamic-modulating. In the pharmacokinetic-modulating approach, the pharmacokinetic profile of drug release is modified by, for example, a reduction in peak drug plasma concentration while preserving or improving AUC, thereby potentially reducing toxic effects that may be related to C(max). In the pharmacodynamic-modulating approach, the drug is co-dosed with pharmacologically active or nonpharmacologically active agent or agents intended for mitigation of the drug's toxicity. The pharmacodynamic-modulating approach requires information on the specificity of drug interactions with other compounds and also on metabolic pathways. Examples demonstrating successful formulation work in reducing drug toxicity are provided. The in-depth knowledge of the drug's PK and PD properties combined with a greater understanding of the biology of diseases are necessary for successful drug product formulation leading to optimized in vivo exposure and minimized toxicity.

  9. [Behavioral correlations of gradual forced administration of psychoactive drugs].

    PubMed

    Shabanov, P D; Lebedev, A A

    2011-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the behavioral correlations of the forced administration of psychoactive drugs. Wistar rats received the following drugs in elevated doses (over 4 days, i. p.): (i) physiological saline (control; 0.1-0.2-0.4-0.8 ml/rat), (ii) psychostimulant amphetamine (0.5-1.0--2.0-4.0 mg/kg); (iii) opioid analgetic fentanyl (0.00625-0.0125--0.025-0.05 mg/kg), (iv) ethanol 40% solution (0.5-1.0--2.0-4.0 g/kg), (v) barbiturate sodium ethaminal (2.5-5--10-20 mg/kg); and(vi) synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (0.5-1.0--2.0-4.0 mg/kg). The forced regime of drug administration led to gradual load of the organism and prevented drug tolerance. The dynamics of self-stimulation reaction of the lateral hypothalamus was registered every day over drug administration period and revealed the following regularities: (I) dose-dependent effect of psychostimulant amphetamine and opioid analgetic fentanyl; (II) dexamethasone modulated self-stimulation, increasing (2 day, 1 mg/kg) or decreasing it (3 day, 2 mg/kg); (III) ethanol (1-2 g/kg) activated self-stimulation slightly; (IV) sodium ethaminal slightly inhibited self-stimulation and increased the thresholds of self-stimulation. In 24 h and 72 h after the last administration of drugs, the rat behavior was assessed in open field, elevated plus maze, resident-intruder paradigm, and Porsolt's test. In the open field, significant signs of post-intoxication exposure of psychoactive drugs were revealed, which were registered for 24-72 h after drug withdrawal. The withdrawal of drugs was accompanied with reduction (in 24 h) and subsequent recovery (in 72 h) of the vertical motor activity, exploration behavior, and emotionality. The anxiety indexes were increased up to the 3rd day after withdrawal. The antidepressant effect was also increased. The system of aggression-defense was restored only in rats treated with ethanol. The indexes of individual behavior and communicability in the post-intoxication period were

  10. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse.

  11. Improving Drugs Administration Safety in Pediatric Resuscitation Using Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Hamdi; Siebert, Johan; Gervaix, Alain; Daehne, Peter; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio; Ehrler, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The fast preparation of drugs during pediatric resuscitation is of utmost importance. The influence of the patient's weight on the drug doses requires to perform complex calculations and is a source of errors. A technological solution could be a real help in avoiding these kinds of mistakes. Relying on a user centered approach we have developed an application supporting drug preparation. It has been tested in simulations with predefined scenario. The developed tool consists of a screen displaying a list of drug that can be administered. When the user select a drug, the instructions regarding its preparation are displayed with all dosage precisely calculated. The tool has demonstrated a significant reduction of errors associated to administration, a speeding up the overall process and has been well received by the nurses.

  12. Behavioral economics of drug self-administration and drug abuse policy.

    PubMed

    Hursh, S R

    1991-09-01

    The concepts of behavioral economics have proven useful for understanding the environmental control of overall levels of responding for a variety of commodities, including reinforcement by drug self-administration. These general concepts are summarized for application to the analysis of drug-reinforced behavior and proposed as the basis for future applications. This behavioral agenda includes the assessment of abuse liability, the assay of drug-reinforcer interactions, the design of drug abuse interventions, and the formulation of drug abuse public policy. These separate domains of investigation are described as part of an overall strategy for designing model projects to control drug use and testing public policy initiatives.

  13. Food and Drug Administration Drug Approval Process: A History and Overview.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher Ty

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the processing of investigational and new drug applications is described and the standard and expedited review processes are examined. The efforts of the US Food and Drug Administration to ensure greater agency transparency and fiscal responsibility and intensify oversight during the drug development and approval process are reviewed. Often attributed to a decrease in the number of uninsured adults, both the increase in prescription drug sales and the high costs associated with bringing a new drug to market highlight the necessity for a streamlined and cost-effective process to deliver these drugs safely and effectively.

  14. Food and Drug Administration Evaluation and Cigarette Smoking Risk Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Waters, Erika A.; Parascandola, Mark; Augustson, Erik M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between a belief about Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety evaluation of cigarettes and smoking risk perceptions. Methods: A nationally representative, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 1046 adult current cigarette smokers. Results: Smokers reporting that the FDA does not evaluate cigarettes for…

  15. Is It a Cosmetic, a Drug, or Both? (or Is It Soap?)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of product. Firms sometimes violate the law by marketing a cosmetic with a drug claim or by marketing a drug as if it were a cosmetic, ... that FDA approve a pharmaceutical for sale and marketing in the United States. FDA only approves an ...

  16. 75 FR 25271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Enforcement Policy Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Smokeless Tobacco; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled...

  17. 75 FR 13766 - Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and Drug Administration--Partnering With Industry; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and...

  18. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island Sea Lab Collaboration (U19) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of...

  19. 75 FR 73951 - Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 14, and 17 RIN 0910-AG55 Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain of its...

  20. 75 FR 73984 - Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 14, and 17 RIN 0910-AG55 Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend certain of its...

  1. 76 FR 570 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Antibodies to Borrelia Burgdorferi; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft...

  2. 76 FR 27331 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Trachomatis and/or Neisseria Gonorrhoeae: Screening and Diagnostic Testing; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  3. 75 FR 73107 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance...

  4. 75 FR 47603 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... zonisamide assays. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES: Although you...

  5. 76 FR 36542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Glucose Suspend Device Systems; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft...

  6. 77 FR 67379 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Highly Multiplexed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled...

  7. 75 FR 57963 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Helicobacter pylori; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  8. 76 FR 43689 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the...

  9. 75 FR 73106 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Clostridium difficile; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  10. 76 FR 40921 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Enforcement Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Radiology Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  11. 76 FR 569 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Staphylococcus aureus; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  12. 78 FR 4417 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Submissions for Postapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Marketing Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry...

  13. 77 FR 14403 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Norovirus Serological Reagents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  14. 77 FR 18828 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors To Consider When Making...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Novo Classifications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance document... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...

  15. 21 CFR 20.20 - Policy on disclosure of Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Administration records. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will make the fullest possible disclosure of records... Administration records. 20.20 Section 20.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Administration records shall be made available for public disclosure. (c) Except as provided in paragraph (d)...

  16. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner of... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. 7.45 Section 7.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  17. 21 CFR 20.30 - Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff. 20.30 Section 20.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.30 Food and Drug Administration Freedom...

  18. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  19. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  20. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  1. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  2. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and...

  3. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 10.90 - Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. 10.90 Section 10.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Procedures § 10.90 Food and Drug Administration regulations, recommendations, and agreements. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 5.1105 - Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. 5.1105 Section 5.1105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ORGANIZATION Organization § 5.1105 Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration. The...

  6. Potential of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems by intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Javed; Ali, Mushir; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahani, Jasjeet Kaur; Ramassamy, Charles; Dao, Lé; Bhavna

    2010-05-01

    Due to number of problems related with oral, parenteral, rectal and other routes of drug administration, the interest of pharmaceutical scientists has increased towards exploring the possibilities of intranasal delivery of various drugs. Nasal drug delivery system is commonly known for the treatment of local ailments like cold, cough, rhinitis, etc. Efforts have been made to deliver various drugs, especially peptides and proteins, through nasal route for systemic use; utilizing the principles and concepts of various nanoparticulate drug delivery systems using various polymers and absorption promoters. The incorporation of drugs into nanoparticles might be a promising approach, since colloidal formulations have been shown to protect them from the degrading milieu in the nasal cavity and facilitate their transport across the mucosal barriers. The use of nanoparticles for vaccine delivery provides beneficial effect, by achieving good immune responses. This could be due to the fact that small particles can be transported preferentially by the lymphoid tissue of the nasal cavity (NALT). The brain gets benefited through the intranasal delivery as direct olfactory transport bypasses the blood brain barrier and nanoparticles are taken up and conveyed along cell processes of olfactory neurons through the cribriform plate to synaptic junctions with neurons of the olfactory bulb. The intranasal delivery is aimed at optimizing drug bioavailability for systemic drugs, as absorption decreases with increasing molecular weight, and for drugs, which are susceptible to enzymatic degradation such as proteins and polypeptides. This review discusses the potential benefits of using nanoparticles for nasal delivery of drugs and vaccines for brain, systemic and topical delivery. The article aims at giving an insight into nasal cavity, consideration of factors affecting and strategies to improve drug absorption through nasal route, pharmaceutical dosage forms and delivery systems with

  7. Orbitofrontal response to drug-related stimuli after heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Scheffler, Klaus; Seifritz, Erich; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    The compulsion to seek and use heroin is frequently driven by stress and craving during drug-cue exposure. Although previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that craving is mediated by increased prefrontal cortex activity, it remains unknown how heroin administration modulates the prefrontal cortex response. This study examines the acute effects of heroin on brain function in heroin-maintained patients. Using a crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 27 heroin-maintained patients performed functional magnetic resonance imaging 20 minutes after the administration of heroin or placebo (saline) while drug-related and neutral stimuli were presented. Images were processed and analysed with statistical parametric mapping. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Region of interest analyses showed a drug-related cue-associated blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in heroin-dependent patients during both treatment conditions (heroin and placebo). This activation of the OFC was significantly higher after heroin than after placebo administration. These findings may indicate the importance of OFC activity for impulse control and decision-making after regular heroin administration and may emphasize the benefit of the heroin-assisted treatment in heroin dependence.

  8. Bedaquiline, an FDA-approved antibiotic, inhibits mitochondrial function and potently blocks the proliferative expansion of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs).

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Bedaquiline (a.k.a., Sirturo) is an anti-microbial agent, which is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diaryl-quinoline compound, that mechanistically inhibits the bacterial ATP-synthase, and shows potent activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB. Interestingly, eukaryotic mitochondria originally evolved from engulfed aerobic bacteria. Thus, we hypothesized that, in mammalian cells, bedaquiline might also target the mitochondrial ATP-synthase, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion. Here, we show that bedaquiline has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that bedaquiline treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits mitochondrial oxygen-consumption, as well as glycolysis, but induces oxidative stress. Importantly, bedaquiline significantly blocks the propagation and expansion of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of approx. 1-μM, as determined using the mammosphere assay. Similarly, bedaquiline also reduces both the CD44+/CD24low/- CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, under anchorage-independent growth conditions. In striking contrast, bedaquiline significantly increases oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for TB infections. As such, future pre-clinical studies and human clinical trials in cancer patients may be warranted. Interestingly, we also highlight that bedaquiline shares certain structural similarities with trans-piceatannol and trans-resveratrol, which are known natural flavonoid inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase (complex V) and show anti-aging properties.

  9. Bedaquiline, an FDA-approved antibiotic, inhibits mitochondrial function and potently blocks the proliferative expansion of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Bedaquiline (a.k.a., Sirturo) is an anti-microbial agent, which is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diaryl-quinoline compound, that mechanistically inhibits the bacterial ATP-synthase, and shows potent activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB. Interestingly, eukaryotic mitochondria originally evolved from engulfed aerobic bacteria. Thus, we hypothesized that, in mammalian cells, bedaquiline might also target the mitochondrial ATP-synthase, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion. Here, we show that bedaquiline has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that bedaquiline treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits mitochondrial oxygen-consumption, as well as glycolysis, but induces oxidative stress. Importantly, bedaquiline significantly blocks the propagation and expansion of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of approx. 1-μM, as determined using the mammosphere assay. Similarly, bedaquiline also reduces both the CD44+/CD24low/− CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, under anchorage-independent growth conditions. In striking contrast, bedaquiline significantly increases oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for TB infections. As such, future pre-clinical studies and human clinical trials in cancer patients may be warranted. Interestingly, we also highlight that bedaquiline shares certain structural similarities with trans-piceatannol and trans-resveratrol, which are known natural flavonoid inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase (complex V) and show anti-aging properties. PMID:27344270

  10. Intravenous drug administration: a skill for student nurses?

    PubMed

    Morris, Ruth

    2006-04-01

    This article explores issues related to children's nursing students learning about preparation and administration of IV drugs, considering professional and organisational issues. The competencies required for safe practice are discussed, and the question of who is in the best position to teach and assess students in this skill is considered. Organisations need to ensure that clear guidelines exist for student nurses' involvement in IV therapy.

  11. Food and Drug Administration regulation and evaluation of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Valerie; Baylor, Norman W

    2011-05-01

    The vaccine-approval process in the United States is regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research of the US Food and Drug Administration. Throughout the life cycle of development, from preclinical studies to after licensure, vaccines are subject to rigorous testing and oversight. Manufacturers must adhere to good manufacturing practices and control procedures to ensure the quality of vaccines. As mandated by Title 21 of the Code of Regulations, licensed vaccines must meet stringent criteria for safety, efficacy, and potency.

  12. 75 FR 4982 - Redelegation of Functions; Delegation of Authority to Drug Enforcement Administration Official

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Enforcement Administration Official AGENCY: Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Department of Justice... Administration (DEA), Department of Justice, is amending the appendix to the Justice Department regulations to... Substances Act and subsequently delegated to the Administrator of DEA. DATES: Effective Dates: This...

  13. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  14. Oral Administration of Peptide-Based Drugs: Beyond Lipinski's Rule.

    PubMed

    Santos, Gabriela B; Ganesan, A; Emery, Flavio S

    2016-10-19

    The use of peptides in therapy presents several limitations, from physicochemical characteristics to inadequate pharmacokinetic profiles for oral absorption. As peptides are gaining importance in the therapeutic arsenal, there is an increasing need to rationalize the main characteristics of this compound class in the market. Therefore, we performed an extensive analysis of all known peptide drugs and clinical candidates based on their peptide features, physicochemical and structural properties, and correlated these with their administration route and therapeutic classes. Peptide drugs are widely distributed across drug and pharmacological space, covering several therapeutic areas with structural diversity and complexity, distributed between groups of cyclic and linear compounds. Although structural and physicochemical properties are clear within these groups, we counter the consensus that cyclic peptides have better oral availability than linear peptides, as most of the orally administrated peptides have linear structures. This study and review furnishes information that could support peptide drug design, with a new cutoff of known descriptors that go beyond the Rule of Five.

  15. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to...

  16. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to...

  17. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug... Administrative Matters § 0.157 Federal Bureau of Investigation—Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to...

  18. 78 FR 13348 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration Advisory... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Science Board to the Food and... that a meeting of the Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration would be held on February...

  19. 78 FR 35937 - Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... revised and is being reissued for comment because the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Investigations; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  20. 75 FR 17418 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Health AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Food and...

  1. 75 FR 3238 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Heart Valves...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... for heart valves. This draft guidance document is not final, nor is it in effect at this time....

  2. 76 FR 6685 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommended Warning for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... about the potential adverse health effects from the use of powder on medical gloves and is...

  3. A Multicenter Evaluation of Off-Label Medication Use and Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Adult Medical Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Smithburger, Pamela L.; Buckley, Mitchell S.; Culver, Mark A.; Sokol, Sarah; Lat, Ishaq; Handler, Steven M.; Kirisci, Levent; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior research indicates off-label use is common in the intensive care unit (ICU); however the safety of off-label use has not been assessed. The study objective was to determine the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with off-label use and evaluate off-label use as a risk factor for the development of ADRs in an adult ICU population. Setting Medical ICUs at three academic medical centers Patients Adult patients (age ≥ 18 years old) receiving medication therapy Interventions All administered medications were evaluated for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved or off-label use. Patients were assessed daily for the development of an ADR through active surveillance. Three ADR assessment instruments were used to determine the probability of an ADR resulting from drug therapy. Severity and harm of the ADR were also assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify a set of covariates that influenced the rate of ADRs. Measurements and Main Results Overall, 1654 patient days (327 patients) and 16,391 medications were evaluated, with 43% of medications being used off-label. One hundred and sixteen ADRs were categorized dichotomously (FDA or off-label), with 56% and 44% being associated with FDA approved and off-label use, respectively. The number of ADRs for medications administered and number of harmful and severe ADRs did not differ for medications used for FDA approved or off-label use (0.74% vs 0.67%, p = 0.336; 33 vs. 31 events, p=0.567; 24 vs. 24 events, p = 0.276). Age, sex, number of high-risk medications, number of off-label medications, and severity of illness score were included in the Cox proportional hazard regression. It was found that the rate of ADRs increases by 8% for every one additional off-label medication (HR = 1.08; 95 % CI: 1.018–1.154). Conclusion While ADRs do not occur more frequently with off-label use, ADR risk increases with each additional off-label medication used. PMID:25855897

  4. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems.

  5. Widening the path and window of opportunity for FDA approval of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant specific antidotes and reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunny; Steen, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    There remains a need for safe, immediately effective, and easy to administer antidotes for patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the settings of major bleeding, need for emergency surgery, and accidental overdose. We review considerations for the successful safety and effectiveness evaluation of potential antidotes currently under development. These compounds are in expedited regulatory approval programs aimed at accelerating the preclinical and clinical evaluation and approval processes for treatments of serious conditions. We review the features of these expedited programs as well as the FDA's efforts to broadly advance the efficiency of drug development and increase the number of new compounds brought to market. The critical path initiative and regulatory science initiative have resulted in numerous successful programs to address current challenges such as a paucity of validated biomarkers and surrogate endpoints as well as unreliable animal models of toxicity. The FDA has also advocated for increased use of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and adaptive trial design. These efforts foster collaboration between academia, industry and the public sector across interdisciplinary sciences and may continue to widen the pathway for NOAC-specific reversal agents and other novel compounds.

  6. Sequential drug verification errors resulting in wrong drug administration during caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Calderbank, S; Uncles, D R; Burns, N; Kariyawasam, H K C D; Allan, G D L

    2011-01-01

    An intravenous bolus of phentolamine was inadvertently given to a parturient during an emergency caesarean section following delivery of her infant when the intention had been to give an intravenous bolus of 5 IU Syntocinon. Root cause analysis identified a series of errors originating in the hospital pharmacy when one drug package was mistakenly issued in place of another. Subsequent checks failed to detect the original mistake. The final and most important check immediately before intravenous administration was also at fault. This case highlights a systems failure that permitted issue, transportation and administration of the wrong drug to a parturient. Robust measures to ensure avoidance of drug administration errors should be evaluated and introduced where possible.

  7. Is tobacco a drug? Administrative agencies as common law courts.

    PubMed

    Sunstein, C R

    1998-04-01

    Professor Cass Sunstein argues that the FDA has the authority to regulate tobacco products. He considers the text of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which supports the FDA assertion, and the context of its enactment, which argues against the FDA. He resolves the tension between text and context in favor of FDA jurisdiction by turning to the emerging role of administrative agencies. In modern government, he contends, administrative agencies have become America's common law courts, with the power to adapt statutory regimes to new facts and new values when the underlying statute is ambiguous. Professor Sunstein's Article, like the other pieces in this volume, was written after the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina decided Coyne Beahm v. FDA, but before a three judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed that decision in Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. v. FDA. In Coyne Beahm, the District Court held that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act authorized the FDA to regulate tobacco products, but not tobacco advertising. The Fourth Circuit rejected the District Court's jurisdictional ruling and invalidated the FDA's regulations in their entirety. The Clinton Administration has since requested an en banc rehearing before the Fourth Circuit.

  8. [Intravesical therapy with mitomycin through electromotive drug administration].

    PubMed

    Verri, Cristian; Liberati, Emanuele; Celestino, Francesco; De Carlo, Francesco; Torelli, Fiammetta; Di Stasi, Savino M

    2013-01-01

    In the management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), high-level evidence supports the widespread practice of intravesical therapy with mitomycin-C (MMC). Randomized trials showed a significant reduction in short-term recurrence compared with transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) alone, but little effect on long-term and no impact at all in preventing progression. Electromotive drug administration (EMDA®) offers a means of controlling and enhancing the tissue transport of certain drugs, in order to increase their efficacy. In both laboratory and clinical studies, intravesical electromotive drug administration (EMDA) increases MMC bladder uptake, resulting in an improved clinical efficacy in NMIBC without systemic side effects. New frameworks for treatment of NMIBC - e.g., sequential intravesical BCG and EMDA/MMC, as well as intravesical EMDA/MMC immediately before TURBT - have provided promising preliminary results with higher remission rates and longer remission times, and they are a priority to minimise the costs of disease management. These findings suggest EMDA-enhanced MMC efficacy against urothelial cancer could be a major therapeutic breakthrough in the treatment of NMIBC.

  9. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2012-06-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug use, and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior, and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25-0.97) and had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in noninjecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs.

  10. [Internet and nursing: development of a site on drug administration].

    PubMed

    da Silva, F B; Cassiani, S H; Zem-Mascarenhas, S H

    2001-01-01

    This study identified existent sites in the internet about Administration of Medications and developed and evaluated a specific site of this thematic. Of the 158 existent and available sites in the database of the Alta Vista search, 17 of these presented some relationship with pharmacology, marketing and information about drugs, technologies and rules of the medication. After that a site was developed and named The process of Administration of Medications in focus which goal was to present investigations conducted by a group about the following topics: errors, technology, complications, study group and the team. The evaluation of this site was made by 2 analyst of systems, 2 computer science technicians and 4 nursing professors and it showed that the quality of the pages, the time of answer, the link, images and content were considered between excellent and satisfactory.

  11. How the US Food and Drug Administration Can Solve the Prescription Drug Shortage Problem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug shortages are threatening care quality and cost-containment efforts. I describe the pharmaceutical marketplace changes that have caused the problem, and propose new policies to solve it, through changing incentives for producers and purchasers. I propose a grading scheme for the Food and Drug Administration when it inspects manufacturing facilities in the United States and abroad. The inspections’ focus would change from closing unsafe plants to improving production process quality, reducing the likelihood that plants will be closed—the most frequent cause of drug shortages. PMID:23488502

  12. Update on emerging drugs for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shannon

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, there has been no evidence that the problem of chronic insomnia has faded in the least in US adults; on the contrary, a recent estimate of annual lost productivity due to insomnia was $63.2 billion dollars. However, the proportion of insomniacs who are treated continues to be low, indicating the need for continued development and dissemination of effective therapies. Hypnotic drug development has arguably become more focused in recent years, particularly upon the highly anticipated novel target, the orexin (hypocretin) system. Merck's suvorexant (MK-4305) is the first compound of the so-called dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) class expected to be submitted for FDA approval, with a new drug application anticipated in 2012. While there has also been some new activity in the modulation of well-characterized targets with well-characterized agents, such as CNS histamine receptors with low-dose doxepin, a decades-old antidepressant and GABA(A) with sublingual zolpidem, experience with melatonin and serotonin modulators suggests that other targets also exist. Diversifying insomnia drug targets may expand possibilities for customizing hypnotic administration to individualized patient presentation and mechanistic underpinnings. In addition, it may offer improved avenues for combining medications with non-drug treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I).

  13. Food and drug administration regulation of drugs that raise blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Blankfield, Robert P; Iftikhar, Imran H

    2015-01-01

    Although it is recognized that a systolic blood pressure (SBP) increase ≥ 2 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increase ≥ 1 mm Hg increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes in middle-aged adults, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks an adequate policy for regulating medications that increase blood pressure (BP). Some FDA reviewers consider a clinically significant increase in BP to occur only if a drug raises SBP ≥ 20 mm Hg or if a drug raises DBP ≥ 10 to 15 mm Hg. In recent years, numerous drugs have been regulated or taken off the market due to cardiovascular safety concerns. The list includes rofecoxib (Vioxx), valdecoxib (Bextra), nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sibutramine (Meridia), and phenylpropanolamine. It is probable that the hypertensive effect of these drugs explains why they increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Other drugs, notably serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, were approved without cardiovascular safety data despite the fact that they raise BP comparable to valdecoxib and sibutramine. It is the responsibility of the FDA to ensure that drugs are properly labeled regarding risk. Even if a drug raises BP only modestly, FDA guidelines for new drug approvals should include a requirement for cardiovascular safety data. However, such guidelines will not address the problem of how to obtain cardiovascular safety data for the many already approved drugs that increase BP. The FDA should play a role in obtaining cardiovascular safety data for such drugs.

  14. Drug Administration Errors in Hospital Inpatients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Berdot, Sarah; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Context Drug administration in the hospital setting is the last barrier before a possible error reaches the patient. Objectives We aimed to analyze the prevalence and nature of administration error rate detected by the observation method. Data Sources Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2011 and reference lists of included studies. Study Selection Observational studies, cross-sectional studies, before-and-after studies, and randomized controlled trials that measured the rate of administration errors in inpatients were included. Data Extraction Two reviewers (senior pharmacists) independently identified studies for inclusion. One reviewer extracted the data; the second reviewer checked the data. The main outcome was the error rate calculated as being the number of errors without wrong time errors divided by the Total Opportunity for Errors (TOE, sum of the total number of doses ordered plus the unordered doses given), and multiplied by 100. For studies that reported it, clinical impact was reclassified into four categories from fatal to minor or no impact. Due to a large heterogeneity, results were expressed as median values (interquartile range, IQR), according to their study design. Results Among 2088 studies, a total of 52 reported TOE. Most of the studies were cross-sectional studies (N=46). The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was 10.5% [IQR: 7.3%-21.7%]. No fatal error was observed and most errors were classified as minor in the 18 studies in which clinical impact was analyzed. We did not find any evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Administration errors are frequent among inpatients. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was about 10%. A standardization of administration error rate using the same denominator (TOE), numerator and types of errors is essential for further publications. PMID:23818992

  15. 78 FR 42381 - Administrative Detention of Drugs Intended for Human or Animal Use

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... July 15, 2013 Part IV Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts... / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1 and 16 Administrative Detention of Drugs Intended for Human or Animal Use AGENCY: Food and...

  16. 76 FR 37820 - Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... cooperative agreement for the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. The goal of the Food and...

  17. 75 FR 36425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (formerly Docket No. 2007D-0387) Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; In Vitro Diagnostic Studies--Frequently Asked Questions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  18. 75 FR 22412 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Outsourcing Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Cincinnati District, in co-sponsorship with Xavier University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Outsourcing...

  19. 78 FR 76842 - Food and Drug Administration/American Academy of Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/American Academy of Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel Endpoints for Premium Intraocular Lenses; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  20. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28766] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0689] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De...

  1. 76 FR 36543 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to...

  2. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    .99) with the observed values in the SD rat corneas. Similar pharmacokinetics models explain drug delivery to the cornea in rat and rabbit animal models. Retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular drug administration can be explained with a four-compartment (periocular space, choroid-containing transfer compartment, retina, and distribution compartment) model with elimination from the periocular space, retina, and choroid compartment. Inclusion of a dissolution–release step before the drug is available for absorption or elimination better explains retinal tmax. Good fits were obtained in both the BN (r = 0.99) and SD (r = 0.99) rats for retinal celecoxib using the same model; however, the parameter estimates differed. Conclusions Corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules after periocular administration can be described by compartment models. The modeling analysis shows that (1) leak-back from the site of administration most likely contributes to the apparent lack of an increase phase in corneal concentrations; (2) elimination via the conjunctival or periocular blood and lymphatic systems contributes significantly to drug clearance after periocular injection; (3) corneal pharmacokinetics of small lipophilic molecules can be explained by using similar models in rats and rabbits; and (4) although there are differences in some retinal pharmacokinetics parameters between the pigmented and nonpigmented rats, the physiological basis of these differences has yet to be ascertained. PMID:18172109

  3. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  4. 28 CFR 0.103a - Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration. 0.103a Section 0.103a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration § 0.103a Delegations...

  5. 21 CFR 20.31 - Retention schedule of requests for Food and Drug Administration records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention schedule of requests for Food and Drug Administration records. 20.31 Section 20.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.31 Retention schedule of requests for...

  6. 21 CFR 20.32 - Disclosure of Food and Drug Administration employee names.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of Food and Drug Administration employee names. 20.32 Section 20.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.32 Disclosure of Food and...

  7. 21 CFR 20.29 - Prohibition on withdrawal of records from Food and Drug Administration files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibition on withdrawal of records from Food and Drug Administration files. 20.29 Section 20.29 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.29 Prohibition...

  8. 77 FR 41415 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... such products in interstate commerce. The document was published with an incorrect Web link....

  9. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat drug... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration...

  10. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat drug... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration...

  11. Reform at FDA: faster access to promising drugs? Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1995-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the government agency responsible for ensuring that drugs, vaccines, and medical devices are safe and effective, is under hot debate by Congress, the Clinton administration, and the AIDS community. The Clinton/Gore proposal favors excluding drug and biologic manufacturers from requirements for more environmental assessments and only indirectly addresses drug development. Oregon Democratic Congressman Ron Wyden introduced an FDA reform bill which calls for the FDA to use expert panels, independent testing organizations, and institutional review boards (IRB) to help speed new drugs and devices through the approval process. The bill calls for the use of the IRB for the approval (or denial) of applications for Phase I review of new drugs. Not surprisingly, the AIDS community has differing views on the reform at the FDA. The Treatment Action Group (TAG), whose members hold key positions in well-known AIDS groups, supports the status quo at FDA and is lobbying AIDS organizations across the country to sign on to its FDA Reform Principles. Other AIDS treatment activists, such as members of ACT UP, favor local IRB jurisdiction over Phase I research.

  12. Bioequivalence of generic drugs: a simple explanation for a US Food and Drug Administration requirement.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-06-01

    There is a widespread misconception that for a generic drug to be deemed bioequivalent to a branded drug, it must contain 80%-125% of the active ingredient that is present in the branded version. More correctly, bioequivalence is studied in randomized crossover trials that compare the generic drug with the reference agent, and the relevant outcome measures are pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters such as peak drug concentration and area under the curve, which describe the rate and extent of absorption of the drug. The ratio of each PK characteristic of the generic drug to the reference drug is computed; the ideal value of this ratio is 1:1, or just 1.00 (indicating a perfect match, or perfect bioequivalence). Because this ideal is probably unattainable, the US Food and Drug Administration requires that the 90% confidence interval of the PK ratio should lie between 0.80 and 1.25. For the entire 90% confidence interval to meet this requirement, the mean PK value of the generic product should actually lie quite close to that of the reference standard. Therefore, the variation between the generic and the reference is actually small. These concepts are explained in this article with the help of simple, easy-to-understand examples.

  13. Neurostimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M.; Krahl, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the neurostimulation options available for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in the United States and in European countries. Recent Findings: The field of neurostimulation for epilepsy has grown dramatically since 1997, when vagus nerve stimulation became the first device to be approved for epilepsy by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New data from recently completed randomized controlled trials are available for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus, responsive neurostimulation, and trigeminal nerve stimulation. Although vagus nerve stimulation is the only device currently approved in the United States, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation devices are awaiting FDA approval. Deep brain stimulation, trigeminal nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation are now approved for epilepsy in the European Union. In this article, the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new neurostimulation devices are reviewed, and the key advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Summary: The exponential growth of the field of neuromodulation for epilepsy is an exciting development; these new devices provide physicians with new options for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:23739108

  14. The corporate assault on the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R

    1996-01-01

    Current "regulatory reform" in the U.S. Congress is seeking to eliminate the Food and Drug Administration. The author discusses the forces behind this reform and traces the impact of campaign contributions from various industries opposed to FDA regulations, stock held by members of Congress in companies regulated by the FDA, and a variety of organizations with ties to House Speaker Newt Gingrich that have received donations from industries that Gingrich has helped in their efforts to loosen FDA regulations. The article also examines the myth that the FDA is an overzealous watchdog imposing unnecessary burdens on the companies that it regulates. The controversy over the cow hormone rBGH is given as an example.

  15. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic.

  16. A fuzzy logic controller for hormone administration using an implantable pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a Fuzzy Logic Controller for the physiologic administration of hormones by means of a FDA-approved surgically implantable infusion pump. Results of a LabVIEW computer simulation for the administration of insulin for diabetic adult patients as well as human growth hormone for pediatric patients are presented. A VHS video tape of the simulation in action has been prepared and is available for viewing.

  17. Administrative detention of drugs intended for human or animal use. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-05-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is implementing administrative detention authority with respect to drugs intended for human or animal use as authorized by amendments made to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). FDA's administrative detention authority with respect to drugs allows FDA to better protect the integrity of the drug supply chain. Specifically, FDA is able to administratively detain drugs encountered during an inspection that an authorized FDA representative conducting an inspection has reason to believe are adulterated or misbranded. This authority is intended to protect the public by preventing distribution or subsequent use of drugs encountered during inspections that are believed to be adulterated or misbranded, until FDA has had time to consider what action it should take concerning the drugs, and to initiate legal action, if appropriate.

  18. 76 FR 78530 - Applications for Food and Drug Administration Approval To Market a New Drug; Revision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing an interim final rule amending its postmarketing reporting regulations implementing certain provisions of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The provisions of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act require manufacturers who are the sole manufacturers of certain drug products to notify FDA at least 6 months before......

  19. A multifunctional pipette for localized drug administration to brain slices.

    PubMed

    Ahemaiti, Aikeremu; Ainla, Alar; Jeffries, Gavin D M; Wigström, Holger; Orwar, Owe; Jesorka, Aldo; Jardemark, Kent

    2013-10-15

    We have developed a superfusion method utilizing an open-volume microfluidic device for administration of pharmacologically active substances to selected areas in brain slices with high spatio-temporal resolution. The method consists of a hydrodynamically confined flow of the active chemical compound, which locally stimulates neurons in brain slices, applied in conjunction with electrophysiological recording techniques to analyze the response. The microfluidic device, which is a novel free-standing multifunctional pipette, allows diverse superfusion experiments, such as testing the effects of different concentrations of drugs or drug candidates on neurons in different cell layers with high positional accuracy, affecting only a small number of cells. We demonstrate herein the use of the method with electrophysiological recordings of pyramidal cells in hippocampal and prefrontal cortex brain slices from rats, determine the dependence of electric responses on the distance of the superfusion device from the recording site, document a multifold gain in solution exchange time as compared to whole slice perfusion, and show that the device is able to store and deliver up to four solutions in a series. Localized solution delivery by means of open-volume microfluidic technology also reduces reagent consumption and tissue culture expenses significantly, while allowing more data to be collected from a single tissue slice, thus reducing the number of laboratory animals to be sacrificed for a study.

  20. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  1. 76 FR 22903 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing That a Tobacco...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Request AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... February 15, 2007'' to the Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, 9200 Corporate...

  2. 78 FR 9701 - Draft Joint Food and Drug Administration/Health Canada Quantitative Assessment of the Risk of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Joint Food and Drug Administration/Health Canada... and Canada AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is announcing the availability of a draft ``Joint Food and Drug...

  3. 96-hour methamphetamine self-administration in male and female rats: a novel model of human methamphetamine addiction.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Elyse M; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2013-10-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse for which no FDA-approved treatment exists. While high on MA, both male and female MA users report engaging in risky behaviors and are more likely to be involved in violent criminal activities and to engage in domestic and sexual violence. A unique aspect of MA is that it is typically used in binges. However, there is no animal model of MA self-administration that appears to represent a human MA self-administration binge. We recently developed a 96-hour MA self-administration paradigm in rats that more closely resembles how human MA users take the drug. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer MA for 96 consecutive hours for 5 weeks. Responding by female and male rats tended to escalate to binge-like behavior, as the animals responded continuously during their normal periods of activity as well as during their inactive periods for up to 72 h, followed by a crash of 6 or more hours. Thus, this 96-hour model of MA self-administration is a novel way to study MA addition in rats that may contribute to the development of improved treatments for recovering human MA users.

  4. A staged screening of registered drugs highlights remyelinating drug candidates for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Eleuteri, C.; Olla, S.; Veroni, C.; Umeton, R.; Mechelli, R.; Romano, S.; Buscarinu, MC.; Ferrari, F.; Calò, G.; Ristori, G.; Salvetti, M.; Agresti, C.

    2017-01-01

    There is no treatment for the myelin loss in multiple sclerosis, ultimately resulting in the axonal degeneration that leads to the progressive phase of the disease. We established a multi-tiered platform for the sequential screening of drugs that could be repurposed as remyelinating agents. We screened a library of 2,000 compounds (mainly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds and natural products) for cellular metabolic activity on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPC), identifying 42 molecules with significant stimulating effects. We then characterized the effects of these compounds on OPC proliferation and differentiation in mouse glial cultures, and on myelination and remyelination in organotypic cultures. Three molecules, edaravone, 5-methyl-7-methoxyisoflavone and lovastatin, gave positive results in all screening tiers. We validated the results by retesting independent stocks of the compounds, analyzing their purity, and performing dose-response curves. To identify the chemical features that may be modified to enhance the compounds’ activity, we tested chemical analogs and identified, for edaravone, the functional groups that may be essential for its activity. Among the selected remyelinating candidates, edaravone appears to be of strong interest, also considering that this drug has been approved as a neuroprotective agent for acute ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Japan. PMID:28387380

  5. 28 CFR 16.102 - Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint System of Records. 16.102 Section 16.102 Judicial... Systems Under the Privacy Act § 16.102 Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and..., the Immigration and Naturalization Service or the Drug Enforcement Administration will...

  6. 28 CFR 16.102 - Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint System of Records. 16.102 Section 16.102 Judicial... Systems Under the Privacy Act § 16.102 Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and..., the Immigration and Naturalization Service or the Drug Enforcement Administration will...

  7. 28 CFR 16.102 - Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration and Immigration and Naturalization Service Joint System of Records. 16.102 Section 16.102 Judicial... Systems Under the Privacy Act § 16.102 Exemption of Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and..., the Immigration and Naturalization Service or the Drug Enforcement Administration will...

  8. 77 FR 43846 - Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop; Notice of Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices... Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following workshop: FDA Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop. This meeting is intended to focus on challenges in pediatric device...

  9. 75 FR 17423 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Profession Schools, Inc. AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... opportunities for socio-economically disadvantaged students. DATES: The agreement became effective January...

  10. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  11. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  12. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  13. Approved drug mimics of short peptide ligands from protein interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Laavanya; Casey, Fergal; Stein, Amelie; Aloy, Patrick; Shields, Denis C

    2008-10-01

    Most biological functions are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions, and, thus, finding effective ways to modulate them would represent an important step towards defining the next generation of drugs. In this study, we set out to determine if existing approved drugs may represent a good source of compounds from which initial lead inhibitors of protein-protein interactions mediated by short peptide regions may be drawn. Peptide structures were defined in terms of pharmacophores and searched against U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs to identify similar compounds. The top ranking matches (using a score that corrects root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) for the number of matched pharmacophores and for the number of drug rotatable bonds) included a number of nuclear receptor ligands that matched allosterically to the corepressor binding site of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). The top ranking drug matches were docked to the peptide-binding site using AUTODOCK. The majority of the top-ranking matches showed a negative estimated free energy change upon binding that is comparable to, or greater than, that of the original peptide. We conclude that the usage of certain approved drugs may represent a useful strategy in inhibiting specific protein-protein interactions. Such a strategy may benefit from the increased likelihood that developed compounds might have favorable bioactivity and safety profiles in clinical use.

  14. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.

  15. Caregivers' perception of drug administration safety for pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nariman; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Saab, Raya; Khalidi, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors (MEs) are reported to be between 1.5% and 90% depending on many factors, such as type of the institution where data were collected and the method to identify the errors. More significantly, the risk for errors with potential for harm is 3 times higher for children, especially those receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been published on averting such errors with children and none on how caregivers perceive their role in preventing such errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology patient's caregivers' perception of drug administration safety and their willingness to be involved in averting such errors. A cross-sectional design was used to study a nonrandomized sample of 100 caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. Ninety-six of the caregivers surveyed were well informed about the medications their children receive and were ready to participate in error prevention strategies. However, an underestimation of potential errors uncovered a high level of "trust" for the staff. Caregivers echoed their apprehension for being responsible for potential errors. Caregivers are a valuable resource to intercept medication errors. However, caregivers may be hesitant to actively communicate their fears with health professionals. Interventions that aim at encouraging caregivers to engage in the safety of their children are recommended.

  16. Vaccines, Pharmaceutical Products, and Bioterrorism: Challenges for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    plague (Yersinia pestis), tularemia (Francisella tularensis), brucellosis ( Brucella abortus, B. melitensis , B. suis, B. canis), Q fever (Coxiella...Special Issue 20011029 090 Vaccines, Pharmaceutical Products, and Bioterrorism: Challenges for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Kathryn C...Zoon U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland, USA In regards to bioterrorism, the goal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA

  17. Drug Enforcement Administration Western Lab wins EPA Federal Green Challenge award for electronics recycling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld presented the Federal Green Challenge award to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Western Laboratory for increasing its electronics recycling mor

  18. Approved drugs and their problems in patient care: routes of administration and dosing.

    PubMed

    Cook, Stuart D

    2007-08-15

    Problems in patient care with regard to route of administration and dosing of currently approved drugs are reviewed. Dose, frequency and route of administration can make a difference in efficacy, side effects, quality of life, antigenicity, cost, and compliance.

  19. Dosage Form Developments of Nanosuspension Drug Delivery System for Oral Administration Route.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Shi, Ye; Yan, Zhiqiang; Hao, Hongxun; Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Jian; Hou, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of new drug candidates are practically insoluble in aqueous solvents and are even simultaneously poorly soluble in organic solvents. Nanosuspension drug delivery system (DDS) was firstly developed in 1994 and has attracted more and more attention as a formation solution for the poorly soluble drugs. By nansizing the poorly soluble drugs, nanosuspensions have several outstanding advantages for drug delivery. Among many administration routes of drug delivery, oral administration is the most preferred route due to its advantages such as ease of ingestion, versatility to accommodate various types of drug candidates, low production cost, high safety, good patient compliance, and pain avoidance. Current marketed pharmaceutical nanosuspension DDS products are mostly for oral administration. This review is to systematically summarize the nanosuspension DDS dosage form developments of poorly soluble drugs for oral administration use.

  20. Clinical trial registration, reporting, publication and FDAAA compliance: a cross-sectional analysis and ranking of new drugs approved by the FDA in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer E; Korn, David; Ross, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical trial registration, reporting and publication rates for new drugs by: (1) legal requirements and (2) the ethical standard that all human subjects research should be publicly accessible to contribute to generalisable knowledge. Design Cross-sectional analysis of all clinical trials submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drugs approved in 2012, sponsored by large biopharmaceutical companies. Data sources Information from Drugs@FDA, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDLINE-indexed journals and drug company communications. Main outcome measures Clinical trial registration and results reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov, publication in the medical literature, and compliance with the 2007 FDA Amendments Acts (FDAAA), analysed on the drug level. Results The FDA approved 15 drugs sponsored by 10 large companies in 2012. We identified 318 relevant trials involving 99 599 research participants. Per drug, a median of 57% (IQR 32–83%) of trials were registered, 20% (IQR 12–28%) reported results in ClinicalTrials.gov, 56% (IQR 41–83%) were published, and 65% (IQR 41–83%) were either published or reported results. Almost half of all reviewed drugs had at least one undisclosed phase II or III trial. Per drug, a median of 17% (IQR 8–20%) of trials supporting FDA approvals were subject to FDAAA mandated public disclosure; of these, a median of 67% (IQR 0–100%) were FDAAA-compliant. 68% of research participants (67 629 of 99 599) participated in FDAAA-subject trials, with 51% (33 405 of 67 629) enrolled in non-compliant trials. Transparency varied widely among companies. Conclusions Trial disclosures for new drugs remain below legal and ethics standards, with wide variation in practices among drugs and their sponsors. Best practices are emerging. 2 of our 10 reviewed companies disclosed all trials and complied with legal disclosure requirements for their 2012 approved drugs. Ranking new drugs on transparency criteria may improve

  1. 75 FR 69089 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... for the Topical Approximation of Skin; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the...

  2. 76 FR 20992 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... subject to comment in accordance with the Agency's good guidance practices. DATES: Submit...

  3. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of...

  4. 78 FR 101 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for Premarket Approval Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  5. 76 FR 19373 - The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The 14th Annual Food and Drug Administration-Orange County Regulatory Affairs Educational Conference in Irvine, California: New Regulatory Challenges AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  6. 77 FR 52744 - Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. The Food and Drug Administration's...

  7. 76 FR 64228 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: External Pacemaker Pulse Generator; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  8. 76 FR 44935 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-18923] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0453] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  9. 76 FR 20688 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 30-Day Notices, 135-Day Premarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Supplements for Manufacturing Method or Process Changes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  10. 77 FR 37058 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-15025] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA 2012-D-0304] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  11. 75 FR 21632 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Total Product Life Cycle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... safety and effectiveness of these devices. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at...

  12. 77 FR 41413 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices: The Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES: Although you can comment on...

  13. 76 FR 78670 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Evaluation of Sex Differences...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing... adequately addressed in clinical trials. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this...

  14. 75 FR 59726 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Assays; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Class...

  15. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  16. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  17. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  18. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  19. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  20. Advertising for AIDS drugs: it's everywhere lately, but is it helpful?

    PubMed

    Mirken, B

    1998-07-01

    The recent proliferation of direct to consumer (DTC) advertisements for prescription drugs, including HIV/AIDS drugs, can present a confusing and unrealistic picture of treatment options and outcomes; however, supporters claim that it stimulates awareness of treatment options and encourages dialogue between doctors and patients. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates DTC advertising, requires that manufacturers disclose a complete description of benefits and adverse effects, similar to the information on the product's label. This balance of information applies to the written portion of the ad, but not to the visual message, which is arguably the most powerful part of the advertisement. Many of the visuals in the AIDS drugs advertisements misconstrue the effect of the virus on the patients. However, the FDA has not yet developed restrictions to more accurately control the visual component of advertisements, in order to depict the downside of disease. Additionally, manufacturers whose advertisements match the wording on their labels have an easier time getting acceptance from the FDA, but use more technical language than the typical lay person can understand. Reliance on the FDA- approved label description, restricts the drug companies from promoting off-label uses of their products, and also does not allow for the constantly changing information of a drug's effectiveness.

  1. 76 FR 44594 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...'s good guidance practices. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on this guidance...

  2. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... manufacturer or distributor of a human drug or biologic, or from FDA--intended to alert physicians and...

  3. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... regulations issued under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) relating to tobacco products...

  4. Shortage of Peritoneal Dialysis Solution and the Food and Drug Administration's Response.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Valerie; Throckmorton, Douglas C

    2015-08-07

    Although the number of new drug shortages has been lower in recent years than in the past, severe shortages have occurred that have affected large numbers of patients. A new law entitled the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act was enacted in July of 2012, which requires companies to notify the Food and Drug Administration of anticipated shortages. This notification requirement has allowed the Food and Drug Administration to work closely with manufacturers earlier to mitigate and, often, prevent shortages. However, not all shortages are able to be prevented, and the shortage of peritoneal dialysis solution is one that has had a significant effect on patients. The Food and Drug Administration continues to use all available tools to address this shortage with manufacturers, including temporary availability of imported peritoneal dialysis solution from Ireland. Mitigating shortages is a top priority for the Food and Drug Administration, and communication with all stakeholders is essential.

  5. Construction of Drug Network Based on Side Effects and Its Application for Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Liu, Qi; Wei, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Drugs with similar side-effect profiles may share similar therapeutic properties through related mechanisms of action. In this study, a drug-drug network was constructed based on the similarities between their clinical side effects. The indications of a drug may be inferred by the enriched FDA-approved functions of its neighbouring drugs in the network. We systematically screened new indications for 1234 drugs with more than 2 network neighbours, 36.87% of the drugs achieved a performance score of Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain in the top 5 positions (NDCG@5)≥0.7, which means most of the known FDA-approved indications were well predicted at the top 5 positions. In particular, drugs for diabetes, obesity, laxatives and antimycobacterials had extremely high performance with more than 80% of them achieving NDCG@5≥0.7. Additionally, by manually checking the predicted 1858 drug-indication pairs with Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) score≤10−5 (EASE score is a rigorously modified Fisher exact test p value), we found that 80.73% of such pairs could be verified by preclinical/clinical studies or scientific literature. Furthermore, our method could be extended to predict drugs not covered in the network. We took 98 external drugs not covered in the network as the test sample set. Based on our similarity criteria using side effects, we identified 41 drugs with significant similarities to other drugs in the network. Among them, 36.59% of the drugs achieved NDCG@5≥0.7. In all of the 106 drug-indication pairs with an EASE score≤0.05, 50.94% of them are supported by FDA approval or preclinical/clinical studies. In summary, our method which is based on the indications enriched by network neighbors may provide new clues for drug repositioning using side effects. PMID:24505324

  6. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 − 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  7. Revocation of Office of Generic Drug's interim policy statement on inactive ingredients. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revoking an interim policy statement on inactive ingredients in parenteral, ophthalmic, otic, and topical generic drug products (Interim Inactive Ingredient Policy). These generic drug products are the subjects of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDA's). The Interim Inactive Ingredient Policy was issued as a memorandum from the Acting Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's (CDER's) Office of Generic Drugs, FDA, to CDER's Associate Director for Science and Medical Affairs, FDA. FDA is taking this action because the Interim Inactive Ingredient Policy no longer represents current agency policy.

  8. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug approval end points for chronic cutaneous ulcer studies.

    PubMed

    Eaglstein, William H; Kirsner, Robert S; Robson, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    The rising costs of caring for chronic cutaneous ulcers (CCUs) and recent appreciation of the mortality of CCUs have led to consideration of the reasons for the failure to have new drug therapies. No new chemical entities to heal CCUs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in over a decade, in part due to an inability to reach the FDA accepted end point of "complete wound closure." The frequent failure to reach the complete closure end point brings forward the question of the relevance of other healing end points such as improved quality of life, or partial healing. Because CCUs carry a prognosis and mortality rate worse than many cancers, it is reasonable to compare the FDA trial end points for cancer drug approval with those for CCUs. And the difference is quite striking. While there is only one end point for CCUs, there are five surrogate and three direct end points for cancers. In contrast to cancer, surrogate end points and partial healing are not acceptable for therapies aimed at CCUs. For example, making tumors smaller is an acceptable end point, but making CCUs smaller is not and improvement in the signs and symptoms of cancer is an acceptable end point for cancers but not CCUs. As CCUs carry a prognosis and mortality rate worse than many cancers, we believe a reconsideration of end points for CCUs is highly warranted.

  9. 78 FR 6762 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110, 112, 114, 117, 120, 123, 129, 179, and 211 Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish... Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human...

  10. 78 FR 10107 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110, 112, 114, 117, 120, 123, 129, 179, and 211 Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish... Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human...

  11. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task Force..., the Task Force has held two public meetings, on June 24, 2009, and November 3, 2009, and established...

  12. 77 FR 31026 - Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... respect to importing pharmaceutical products, medical devices, food products, as well as technology which... No: 2012-12592] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the...

  13. 77 FR 38173 - Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published in the Federal Register of March 23, 2012 (77 FR 16923), a direct final rule making technical changes to update a requirement that many of its written agreements...

  14. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical Device... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati,...

  15. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical Device... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati,...

  16. 77 FR 21784 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration; Notice of... provides advice to the Agency on keeping pace with technical and scientific evolutions in the fields...

  17. 76 FR 61366 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to Increase Transparency By Promoting Greater Access to the Agency's Compliance... availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: As part of the Transparency Initiative, the Food and...

  18. 76 FR 55927 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Demonstrating the Substantial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Demonstrating the Substantial Equivalence of a New Tobacco Product: Responses to Frequently Asked... the Substantial Equivalence of a New Tobacco Product: Responses to Frequently Asked Questions.''...

  19. 78 FR 5185 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Use Device (HUD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... the industry and FDA staff entitled ``Humanitarian Use Device (HUD) Designations.'' Devices are... HUD designations may be eligible for marketing approval under the Humanitarian Device Exemption...

  20. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Disorders, and the Genetic Alliance. FDA encourages all attendees to also plan on attending the NIH Rare... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient...

  1. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  2. Back to first principles: a new model for the regulation of drug promotion.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alan; Jiménez, Freddy; Fields, Larry Eugene; Oyster, Joshua

    2015-07-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's ('FDA' or the 'Agency') current regulatory framework for drug promotion, by significantly restricting the ability of drug manufacturers to communicate important, accurate, up-to-date scientific information about their products that is truthful and non-misleading, runs afoul of the First Amendment and actually runs counter to the Agency's public health mission. Our article proposes a New Model that represents an initial proposal for a modern, sustainable regulatory framework that comprehensively addresses drug promotion while protecting the public health, protecting manufacturers' First Amendment rights, establishing clear and understandable rules, and maintaining the integrity of the FDA approval process. The New Model would create three categories of manufacturer communications-(1) Scientific Exchange and Other Exempt Communications, (2) Non-Core Communications, and (3) Core Communications-that would be regulated consistent with the First Amendment and according to the strength of the government's interest in regulating the specific communications included within each category. The New Model should address the FDA's concerns related to off-label speech while protecting drug manufacturers' freedom to engage in truthful and non-misleading communications about their products.

  3. Back to first principles: a new model for the regulation of drug promotion

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alan; Jiménez, Freddy; Fields, Larry Eugene; Oyster, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's (‘FDA’ or the ‘Agency’) current regulatory framework for drug promotion, by significantly restricting the ability of drug manufacturers to communicate important, accurate, up-to-date scientific information about their products that is truthful and non-misleading, runs afoul of the First Amendment and actually runs counter to the Agency's public health mission. Our article proposes a New Model that represents an initial proposal for a modern, sustainable regulatory framework that comprehensively addresses drug promotion while protecting the public health, protecting manufacturers’ First Amendment rights, establishing clear and understandable rules, and maintaining the integrity of the FDA approval process. The New Model would create three categories of manufacturer communications—(1) Scientific Exchange and Other Exempt Communications, (2) Non-Core Communications, and (3) Core Communications—that would be regulated consistent with the First Amendment and according to the strength of the government's interest in regulating the specific communications included within each category. The New Model should address the FDA's concerns related to off-label speech while protecting drug manufacturers’ freedom to engage in truthful and non-misleading communications about their products. PMID:27774195

  4. A review and update on orphan drugs for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    You, Caiyun; Sahawneh, Haitham F; Ma, Lina; Kubaisi, Buraa; Schmidt, Alexander; Foster, C Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Uveitis, a leading cause of preventable blindness around the world, is a critically underserved disease in regard to the medications approved for use. Multiple immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) drugs are appropriate for uveitis therapy but are still off-label. These IMT agents, including antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, alkylating agents, and biologic agents, have been designated as “orphan drugs” and are widely used for systemic autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation. Area covered The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review and summarize the approved orphan drugs and biologics that are being used to treat systemic diseases and to discuss drugs that have not yet received approval as an “orphan drug for treating uveitis” by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our perspective IMT, as a steroid-sparing agent for uveitis patients, has shown promising clinical results. Refractory and recurrent uveitis requires combination IMT agents. IMT is continued for a period of 2 years while the patient is in remission before considering tapering medication. Our current goals include developing further assessments regarding the efficacy, optimal dose, and safety in efforts to achieve FDA approval for “on-label” use of current IMT agents and biologics more quickly and to facilitate insurance coverage and expand access to the products for this orphan disease. PMID:28203051

  5. Novel drugs targeting sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bhabak, Krishna P; Arenz, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    While the evidence for an involvement of sphingolipids (SLs) in a variety of diseases is rapidly increasing, the development of sphingolipid-related drugs is still in its infancy. In fact, the recently FDA-approved fingolimod or FTY-720 (see chapter by J. Pfeilschifter for more information) is the first drug on the market to interfere with sphingolipid signaling. The reasons for this lagging are manifold and within this chapter we try to name some of them. Ceramide is in the center of sphingolipid metabolism. We describe the most important and most recent inhibitors for enzymes controlling cellular ceramide levels.

  6. 28 CFR 0.103a - Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration. (a) The Administrator of DEA is authorized to... lawful activities of DEA personnel in an amount not to exceed $50,000.00 in any one case. (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of 28 CFR 0.104, the Administrator of DEA is authorized to redelegate the power...

  7. 28 CFR 0.103a - Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration. (a) The Administrator of DEA is authorized to... lawful activities of DEA personnel in an amount not to exceed $50,000.00 in any one case. (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of 28 CFR 0.104, the Administrator of DEA is authorized to redelegate the power...

  8. 28 CFR 0.103a - Delegations respecting claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... claims against the Drug Enforcement Administration. (a) The Administrator of DEA is authorized to... lawful activities of DEA personnel in an amount not to exceed $50,000.00 in any one case. (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of 28 CFR 0.104, the Administrator of DEA is authorized to redelegate the power...

  9. 76 FR 43332 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... subject to comment in accordance with the Agency's good guidance practices. DATES: Submit...

  10. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business; Request for...

  11. 76 FR 16425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... document is immediately in effect as the special control for the ovarian adnexal mass assessment score...

  12. FDA Approved Registration of Erythromycin for Treatment of Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) in Juvenile and Adult Chinook Salmon : Annual Report, Reporting Period March 10, 1989 to March 9, 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffitt, Christine A.

    1991-04-01

    Erythromycin is a therapeutic substance useful against bacterial kidney disease in salmon. In 1989 we began a multi year project to learn more about erythromycin applied to juvenile and adult salmon, with the goal of achieving registration of erythromycin with the US Food and Drug Administration. To begin the study, we studied the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin administered to both adult and juvenile chinook salmon. We monitored blood plasmas time curves from individual adult fish injected with two forms of injectable erythromycin using one of three routes of administration. In addition, we began experiments to evaluate hatchery applications of erythromycin to individually marked adult salmon, and we recovered blood tissues from these fish at the time of spawning. To determine how to use erythromycin in juvenile salmon, we evaluated the adsorption and elimination of erythromycin applied arterially and orally to individual juvenile fish. In feeding trials we determined the palatability to juvenile chinook salmon of feed made with one of two different carriers for erythromycin thiocyanate. 35 refs., 4 figs. , 3 tabs.

  13. Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lynn W; Vaughn, David W; Skillman, Donald R

    2006-07-01

    US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

  14. The administration of sulfonamide drugs to adult salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, D.F.; Fryer, J.L.

    1968-01-01

    Mass treatment is the most convenient way to combat fish diseases. For example, drugs can be administered per os in diets, or chemicals can be added to the water. These methods are mostly ineffective in treating systemic infections of adult salmon because mature salmon do not feed, and many fish diseases cannot be controlled by chemical baths. Thus, effective treatment would require administering drugs to each individual.

  15. Host-Directed Antimicrobial Drugs with Broad-Spectrum Efficacy against Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Daniel M.; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Riley, Sean P.; Martinez, Juan J.; Steck, Theodore L.; Crosson, Sean; Gabay, Joëlle E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sought a new approach to treating infections by intracellular bacteria, namely, by altering host cell functions that support their growth. We screened a library of 640 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for agents that render THP-1 cells resistant to infection by four intracellular pathogens. We identified numerous drugs that are not antibiotics but were highly effective in inhibiting intracellular bacterial growth with limited toxicity to host cells. These compounds are likely to target three kinds of host functions: (i) G protein-coupled receptors, (ii) intracellular calcium signals, and (iii) membrane cholesterol distribution. The compounds that targeted G protein receptor signaling and calcium fluxes broadly inhibited Coxiella burnetii, Legionella pneumophila, Brucella abortus, and Rickettsia conorii, while those directed against cholesterol traffic strongly attenuated the intracellular growth of C. burnetii and L. pneumophila. These pathways probably support intracellular pathogen growth so that drugs that perturb them may be therapeutic candidates. Combining host- and pathogen-directed treatments is a strategy to decrease the emergence of drug-resistant intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:25073644

  16. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 61 - Drug Enforcement Administration Procedures Relating to the Implementation of the National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL.... This part applies to all organizational elements of the Drug Enforcement Administration . 2....

  17. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug...

  18. Technology assessment and the Food and Drug Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, A. H.; Becker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The statutory standards underlying the activities of the FDA, and the problems the Agency faces in decision making are discussed from a legal point of view. The premarketing clearance of new drugs and of food additives, the two most publicized and criticized areas of FDA activity, are used as illustrations. The importance of statutory standards in technology assessment in a regulatory setting is developed. The difficulties inherent in the formulation of meaningful standards are recognized. For foods, the words of the statute are inadequate, and for drugs, a statutory recognition of the various other objectives would be useful to the regulator and the regulated.

  19. Drug-induced Pneumonitis Following the Administration of TAS-102

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Ota, Takayo; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Suzumura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman, diagnosed with advanced rectal cancer, presented with a low-grade fever and dyspnea on exertion after the 2nd cycle of TAS-102. TAS-102 has promising efficacy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A CT scan revealed mosaic patterns with bilateral ground-glass opacities. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test for TAS-102 was strongly positive and serum β-D glucan level was elevated. The clinical course was compatible with TAS-102-induced pneumonitis combined with pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We herein report a rare case of drug-induced pneumonitis in a patient receiving TAS-102 in combination with PCP. PMID:27725548

  20. Teen Involvement for Drug Abuse Prevention. Administrator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Gladys E.; Brayer, Herbert O.

    The Teen Involvement program is implemented primarily by youth, with guidance and direction from qualified, concerned adults. It aims at preventing substance abuse by utilizing positive youth-to-youth communications. Junior and senior high school students are trained to discusses causes of drug abuse and ways of preventing it with students in…

  1. 78 FR 32390 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA): Request for Comments on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA... Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of the National Coordinator for Health...

  2. 76 FR 19998 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Service (HFA-500), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm.1079, Rockville, MD 20857, 301-827... Acquisition & Grant Services, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1079, Rockville, MD 20857, 301-827-7177. Dated: April...

  3. 21 CFR 7.45 - Food and Drug Administration-requested recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Industry Responsibilities § 7.45 Food and Drug Administration-requested recall. (a) The Commissioner of... agency action is necessary to protect the public health and welfare. (b) The Commissioner or his...

  4. 21 CFR 20.28 - Food and Drug Administration determinations of confidentiality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.28 Food and Drug Administration determinations of... held in confidence and will not be available for public disclosure shall be made only in the form of...

  5. 77 FR 125 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... Staff; Medical Device Classification Product Codes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... of the draft guidance entitled ``Medical Device Classification Product Codes.'' The purpose of the... classification product codes for medical devices regulated by the Center for Devices and Radiological...

  6. 76 FR 31345 - Cooperative Arrangement Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the Inter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Drug Administration and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture AGENCY: Food and... notice of a cooperative arrangement between FDA and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation...

  7. 77 FR 39498 - Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ...--Premarket Notification (510(k)) Submissions; and Clinical Performance Assessment: Considerations for... Approval and Premarket Notification (510(k)) Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... Applied to Radiology Images and Radiology Device Data--Premarket Notification (510(k)) Submissions''...

  8. 76 FR 14030 - Extension of Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Servicio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... and Drug Administration and Servicio Nacional de Sanidad, Inocuidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria of the... Sanidad, Inocuidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria of the United Mexican States. The purpose of the MOU is...

  9. Novel strategies in the oral delivery of antidiabetic peptide drugs- insulin, GLP 1 and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ruba; Csóka, Ildikó

    2017-03-21

    As diabetes is a complex disorder being a major cause of mortality and morbidity in epidemic rates, continuous research has been done on new drug types and administration routes. Up to now, a large number of therapeutic peptides have been produced to treat diabetes including insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs. The most common route of administration of these antidiabetic peptides is parenteral. Due to several drawbacks associated with this invasive route, delivery of these antidiabetic peptides by the oral route has been a goal of pharmaceutical technology for many decades. Dosage form development should focus on overcoming the limitations facing oral peptides delivery as degradation by proteolytic enzymes and poor absorption in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This review focuses on currently developed strategies to improve oral bioavailability of these peptide based drugs; evaluating their advantages and limitations in addition to discussing future perspectives on oral peptides delivery. Depending on the previous reports and papers, the area of nanocarriers systems including polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes and micelles seem to be the most promising strategy that could be applied for successful oral peptides delivery; but still further potential attempts are required to be able to achieve the FDA approved oral antidiabetic peptide delivery system.

  10. Rectal drug administration in adults: how, when, why.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael

    Administering medication per rectum can be the most appropriate route for some patients may not always be considered by health professionals. Cultural sensitivities, as well as misinformation regarding insertion methods, may be barriers to the practice. This article explains how the rectal route functions in drug absorption, clarifies when this route is appropriate to use and outlines the steps nurses should follow to prepare patients adequately and safely to carry out the procedure.

  11. The Food and Drug Administration and pragmatic clinical trials of marketed medical products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique L; Griffin, Joseph; Goldkind, Sara F; Zeitler, Emily P; Wing, Liz; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sherman, Rachel E

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials can help answer questions of comparative effectiveness for interventions routinely used in medical practice. Pragmatic clinical trials may examine outcomes of one or more marketed medical products, and they are heterogeneous in design and risk. The Food and Drug Administration is charged with protecting the rights, safety, and welfare of individuals enrolled in clinical investigations, as well as assuring the integrity of the data upon which approval of medical products is made. The Food and Drug Administration has broad jurisdiction over drugs and medical devices (whether or not they are approved for marketing), and as such, clinical investigations of these products are subject to applicable Food and Drug Administration regulations. While many pragmatic clinical trials will meet the criteria for an exemption from the requirements for an investigational new drug application or investigational device exemption, in general, all clinical investigations of medical products that fall under Food and Drug Administration jurisdiction must adhere to regulations for informed consent and review by an institutional review board. We are concerned that current Food and Drug Administration requirements for obtaining individual informed consent may deter or delay the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials intended to develop reliable evidence of comparative safety and effectiveness of approved medical products that are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Under current regulations, there are no described mechanisms to alter or waive informed consent to make it less burdensome or more practicable for low-risk pragmatic clinical trials. We recommend that the Food and Drug Administration establish a risk-based approach to obtaining informed consent in pragmatic clinical trials that would facilitate the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials without compromising the protection of enrolled individuals or the integrity of the resulting data.

  12. 78 FR 51732 - The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and...

  13. 76 FR 28688 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus Species Detection AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  14. 76 FR 50483 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors to Consider When...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors to Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Review; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  15. 77 FR 14404 - Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members' Financial.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  16. A Prodrug of Two Approved Drugs, Cisplatin and Chlorambucil, for Chemo War Against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Wen, Ru; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Dhar, Shanta

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells maintain normal mitochondrial glutathione as one of the defense mechanisms to inhibit mitochondrial membrane polarization and hence apoptosis. A combinational therapeutic modality Platin-Cbl, a prodrug of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and chlorambucil (Cbl), was synthesized and characterized to explore the potential of this compound to initiate chemo war on cancer cells using the active drugs, cisplatin and Cbl, when delivered to the cellular power house mitochondrion using a targeted nanoparticle (NP) designed to get associated with this organelle. Platin-Cbl demonstrated significantly high cytotoxic activity across a number of tumor cell lines as well as in a cisplatin resistant cancer cell line compared to cisplatin or its mixture with Cbl suggesting its unique potency in cisplatin resistant tumors. A mitochondria targeted NP formulation of Platin-Cbl allowed for its efficacious mitochondrial delivery. In vitro studies documented high potency of Platin-Cbl NP formulations. Cisplatin resistant cells cells upon treatment with Platin-Cbl were still able to manage energy production to a certain extent via fatty acid pathway; the advantage of using T-Platin-Cbl-NP is that this NP treatment causes impairment of all metabolic pathways in cisplatin resistant cells forcing the cells to undergo efficient apoptosis. This study highlights a combination of several beneficial effects for a cascade of events to overcome resistance associated with single drug therapy.

  17. 21 CFR 19.10 - Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Management and Operations on any matter arising under the conflict of interest laws, except a determination... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Conflict of Interest... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND CONFLICTS OF INTEREST General Provisions § 19.10...

  18. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The... Professional Organizations. Dr. Margaret Hamburg, Commissioner of the Food and Drugs, and Dr. Janet Woodcock... organization, address, and telephone number. There is no registration fee for this conference....

  19. 77 FR 19425 - Prescription Drugs Not Administered During Treatment; Update to Administrative Cost for Calendar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... AFFAIRS Prescription Drugs Not Administered During Treatment; Update to Administrative Cost for Calendar... purposes of calculating VA's charges for prescription drugs that were not administered during treatment but... administered during treatment for: (1) A nonservice-connected disability for which the veteran is entitled...

  20. Drug Administration Errors in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; Robertz, R.; de Jong, A. L.; van Roon, E. N.; Leufkens, H. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Medication errors can result in harm, unless barriers to prevent them are present. Drug administration errors are less likely to be prevented, because they occur in the last stage of the drug distribution process. This is especially the case in non-alert patients, as patients often form the final barrier to prevention of errors.…

  1. Effects of chronic administration of drugs of abuse on impulsive choice (delay discounting) in animal models.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Barry; Mendez, Ian A; Mitchell, Marci R; Simon, Nicholas W

    2009-09-01

    Drug-addicted individuals show high levels of impulsive choice, characterized by preference for small immediate over larger but delayed rewards. Although the causal relationship between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice in humans has been unclear, a small but growing body of literature over the past decade has shown that chronic drug administration in animal models can cause increases in impulsive choice, suggesting that a similar causal relationship may exist in human drug users. This article reviews this literature, with a particular focus on the effects of chronic cocaine administration, which have been most thoroughly characterized. The potential mechanisms of these effects are described in terms of drug-induced neural alterations in ventral striatal and prefrontal cortical brain systems. Some implications of this research for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced increases in impulsive choice are discussed, along with suggestions for future research in this area.

  2. Drug specificity in extended access cocaine and heroin self-administration.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Guillem, Karyn; Koob, George F; Ahmed, Serge H

    2012-11-01

    Increased drug availability can precipitate a rapid escalation of drug consumption in both vulnerable humans and laboratory animals. Drug intake escalation is observed across a broad spectrum of drugs of abuse, including stimulants, opiates, ethanol and phencyclidine. Whether and to what extent the processes underlying escalated levels of drug intake vary across different substances is poorly understood. The present study sought to address this question in rats self-administering both cocaine and heroin-two addictive drugs with both common and different neurobiological effects. In experiment 1, we determined how cocaine intake is initially related to heroin intake in non-escalated rats with a limited access to both drugs. In experiment 2, two groups of rats were initially allowed to self-administer either cocaine or heroin for 1 hour per day and then after behavioral stabilization, for 6 hours per day to precipitate drug intake escalation. In each group, dose-injection functions for cocaine and heroin self-administration were generated. In experiment 1, regardless of the dose, rats with a high intake of one drug did not necessarily have a high intake of the alternate drug. In experiment 2, escalated levels of heroin or cocaine self-administration did not generalize to the other drug. This outcome was confirmed in a third drug substitution experiment following different access lengths to cocaine self-administration (i.e. 1, 4 and 8 hours). The processes underlying spontaneous and escalated drug overconsumption appear thus to vary across different drugs of abuse. More research should be devoted in the future to these differences.

  3. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drug Administration Web site at http://www.fda.gov once finalized. (c) Agreements and... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD...

  4. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... Specific Categories of Records § 20.108 Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and...

  5. 21 CFR 20.108 - Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drug Administration Web site at http://www.fda.gov once finalized. (c) Agreements and... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agreements between the Food and Drug Administration and other departments, agencies, and organizations. 20.108 Section 20.108 Food and Drugs FOOD...

  6. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  7. Fixed-Dose Combination Drug Approvals, Patents and Market Exclusivities Compared to Single Active Ingredient Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jing; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fixed-dose combinations (FDC) contain two or more active ingredients. The effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC compared to single active ingredient has not been assessed. Objectives Trends in FDA approved FDC in the period 1980–2012 and time lag between approval of FDC and single active ingredients in the combination were assessed, and the effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC was compared with their single active ingredients. Materials and Methods New molecular entities (NMEs), new therapeutic biologics license applications (BLAs) and FDC data were collected from the FDA Orange Book and Drugs@FDA. Analysis included FDC containing one or more NMEs or BLAs at first FDA approval (NMEs-FDC) and only already marketed drugs (Non-NMEs-FDC). Descriptive, Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum analyses were performed. Results During the study period, the FDA approved 28 NMEs-FDC (3.5% of NMEs) and 117 non-NMEs-FDC. FDC approvals increased from 12 in the 1980s to 59 in the 2000s. Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 5.43 years (interquartile range 1.74, 10.31) after first FDA approval of single active ingredients in the combination. The Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 2.33 years (-7.55, 2.39) before approval of generic single active ingredient. Non-NME-FDC added a median of 9.70 (2.75, 16.24) years to the patent and exclusivity life of the single active ingredients in the combination. Conclusion FDC approvals significantly increased over the last twenty years. Pharmaceutical companies market FDC drugs shortly before the generic versions of the single ingredients enter the market extending the patent and exclusivity life of drugs included in the combination. PMID:26469277

  8. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration.

  9. Influence of kidney disease on drug disposition: An assessment of industry studies submitted to the FDA for new chemical entities 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Gary R; Dowling, Thomas C; Marks, Samantha A; Murphy, John E

    2016-04-01

    In 1998, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released the first guidance for industry regarding pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in renally impaired patients. This study aimed to determine if the FDA renal PK guidance influenced the frequency and rigor of renal studies conducted for new chemical entities (NCEs). FDA-approved package inserts (APIs) and clinical pharmacology review documents were analyzed for 194 NCEs approved from 1999 to 2010. Renal studies were conducted in 71.6% of NCEs approved from 1999 to 2010, a significant increase over the 56.3% conducted from 1996 to 1997 (P = .0242). Renal studies were more likely to be completed in highly renally excreted drugs (fe ≥ 30%) compared with drugs with low renal excretion, fe < 30% (89.6% vs 65.8%, P = .0015). PK studies to assess the impact of dialysis were conducted for 31.7% of NCEs that had a renal study: a greater proportion of high fe NCEs were studied (44.2% vs 26.0%, P = .0335). No significant change in frequency or rigor of PK studies was detected over time. The majority of NCEs (76.3%) with a renal study provided specific dosing recommendations in the API. The adoption of the 1998 FDA guidance has resulted in improved availability of PK and drug-dosing recommendations, particularly for high fe drugs.

  10. Development of a standardized knowledge base to generate individualized medication plans automatically with drug administration recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Send, Alexander F J; Al-Ayyash, Adel; Schecher, Sabrina; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Klein, Ulrike; Schaier, Matthias; Pruszydlo, Markus G; Witticke, Diana; Lohmann, Kristina; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E; Seidling, Hanna M

    2013-01-01

    Aims We aimed to develop a generic knowledge base with drug administration recommendations which allows the generation of a dynamic and comprehensive medication plan and to evaluate its comprehensibility and potential benefit in a qualitative pilot study with patients and physicians. Methods Based on a literature search and previously published medication plans, a prototype was developed and iteratively refined through qualitative evaluation (interviews with patients and focus group discussions with physicians). To develop the recommendations for safe administration of specific drugs we screened the summary of product characteristics (SmPC) of different exemplary brands, allocated the generated advice to groups with brands potentially requiring the same advice, and reviewed these allocations regarding applicability and appropriateness of the recommendations. Results For the recommendations, 411 SmPCs of 140 different active ingredients including all available galenic formulations, routes of administrations except infusions, and administration devices were screened. Finally, 515 distinct administration recommendations were included in the database. In 926 different generic groups, 29 879 allocations of brands to general advice, food advice, indications, step-by-step instructions, or combinations thereof were made. Thereby, 27 216 of the preselected allocations (91.1%) were confirmed as appropriate. In total, one third of the German drug market was labelled with information. Conclusions Generic grouping of brands according to their active ingredient and other drug characteristics and allocation of standardized administration recommendations is feasible for a large drug market and can be integrated in a medication plan. PMID:24007451

  11. Safeguarding the process of drug administration with an emphasis on electronic support tools

    PubMed Central

    Seidling, Hanna M; Lampert, Anette; Lohmann, Kristina; Schiele, Julia T; Send, Alexander J F; Witticke, Diana; Haefeli, Walter E

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this work is to understand the process of drug administration and identify points in the workflow that resulted in interventions by clinical information systems in order to improve patient safety. Methods To identify a generic way to structure the drug administration process we performed peer-group discussions and supplemented these discussions with a literature search for studies reporting errors in drug administration and strategies for their prevention. Results We concluded that the drug administration process might consist of up to 11 sub-steps, which can be grouped into the four sub-processes of preparation, personalization, application and follow-up. Errors in drug handling and administration are diverse and frequent and in many cases not caused by the patient him/herself, but by family members or nurses. Accordingly, different prevention strategies have been set in place with relatively few approaches involving e-health technology. Conclusions A generic structuring of the administration process and particular error-prone sub-steps may facilitate the allocation of prevention strategies and help to identify research gaps. PMID:24007450

  12. Factors Influencing Drug Uptake during Mass Drug Administration for Control of Lymphatic Filariasis in Rural and Urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kisoka, William J.; Simonsen, Paul E.; Malecela, Mwelecele N.; Tersbøl, Britt P.; Mushi, Declare L.; Meyrowitsch, Dan W.

    2014-01-01

    Background In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission interruption within reasonable time. The present study aimed to identify predictors and barriers to individual drug uptake during MDA implementation by the National LF Elimination Programme in Tanzania. Methods A questionnaire based cross sectional household survey was carried out in two rural and two urban districts in Lindi and Morogoro regions shortly after the 2011 MDA. 3279 adults (≥15 years) were interviewed about personal characteristics, socio-economic status, MDA drug uptake among themselves and their children, reasons for taking/not taking drugs, and participation in previous MDA activities for LF control. Findings The overall drug uptake rate was 55.1% (range of 44.5–75.6% between districts). There was no overall major difference between children (54.8%) and adults (55.2%) or between females (54.9%) and males (55.8%), but the role of these and other predictors varied to some extent between study sites. Major overall predictors of drug uptake among the interviewed adults were increasing age and history of previous drug uptake. Being absent from home during drug distribution was the main reason for not taking the drugs (50.2%) followed by clinical contraindications to treatment (10.8%), missing household visits of drug distributors (10.6%), and households not being informed about the distribution (9.0%). Conclusion Drug uptake relied more on easily modifiable provider-related factors than on individual perceptions and practices in the target population. Limited investments in appropriate timing, dissemination of accurate timing information to recipients and motivation of drug distributors to visit all households (repeatedly when residents are absent) are likely to have

  13. The role of human drug self-administration procedures in the development of medications.

    PubMed

    Comer, S D; Ashworth, J B; Foltin, R W; Johanson, C E; Zacny, J P; Walsh, S L

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the utility and value of employing human self-administration procedures in medication development, including abuse liability assessments of novel medications and evaluation of potential pharmacotherapies for substance use disorders. Traditionally, human abuse liability testing has relied primarily on subjective reports describing drug action by use of questionnaires; similarly, drug interactions between putative treatment agents and the drugs of abuse have relied on these measures. Subjective reports are highly valued because they provide qualitative and quantitative information about the characteristics of central and peripheral pharmacodynamic effects as well as safety and tolerability. However, self-administration procedures directly examine the behavior of interest-that is, drug taking. The present paper (1) reviews the most commonly used human self-administration procedures, (2) discusses the concordance of subjective reports and self-administration within the context of medications development for substance use disorders, focusing primarily on illustrative examples from development efforts with opioid and cocaine dependence, and (3) explores the utility of applying self-administration procedures to assess the abuse liability of novel compounds, including "abuse-deterrent" formulations (ADFs). The review will focus on opioid and cocaine dependence because a rich database from both clinical laboratory and clinical trial research exists for these two drug classes. The data reviewed suggest that drug-induced changes in self-administration and subjective effects are not always concordant. Therefore, assessment of self-administration in combination with subjective effects provides a more comprehensive picture that may have improved predictive validity for translating to the clinical setting.

  14. The role of human drug self-administration procedures in the development of medications

    PubMed Central

    Comer, SD; Ashworth, JB; Foltin, RW; Johanson, CE; Zacny, JP; Walsh, SL

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the utility and value of employing human self-administration procedures in medication development, including abuse liability assessments of novel medications and evaluation of potential pharmacotherapies for substance use disorders. Traditionally, human abuse liability testing has relied primarily on subjective reports describing drug action by use of questionnaires; similarly, drug interactions between putative treatment agents and the drugs of abuse have relied on these measures. Subjective reports are highly valued because they provide qualitative and quantitative information about the characteristics of central and peripheral pharmacodynamic effects as well as safety and tolerability. However, self-administration procedures directly examine the behavior of interest – that is, drug taking. The present paper 1) reviews the most commonly used human self-administration procedures, 2) discusses the concordance of subjective reports and self-administration within the context of medications development for substance use disorders, focusing primarily on illustrative examples from development efforts with opioid and cocaine dependence, and 3) explores the utility of applying self-administration procedures to assess the abuse liability of novel compounds, including “abuse deterrent” formulations (ADFs). The review will focus on opioid and cocaine dependence because a rich database from both clinical laboratory and clinical trial research exists for these two drug classes. The data reviewed suggest that drug-induced changes in self-administration and subjective effects are not always concordant. Therefore, assessment of self-administration in combination with subjective effects provides a more comprehensive picture that may have improved predictive validity for translating to the clinical setting. PMID:18436394

  15. Improving the effect of FDA-mandated drug safety alerts with Internet-based continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N; Baldwin, Alan T; McAllister, R G

    2013-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires risk communication as an element of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) to alert and educate healthcare providers about severe toxicities associated with approved drugs. The educational effectiveness of this approach has not been evaluated. To support the communication plan element of the ipilimumab REMS, a Medscape Safe Use Alert (SUA) letter was distributed by Medscape via email and mobile device distribution to clinicians specified in the REMS. This alert contained the FDA-approved Dear Healthcare Provider (DHCP) letter mandated for distribution. A continuing medical education (CME) activity describing ipilimumab toxicities and the appropriate management was simultaneously posted on the website and distributed to Medscape members. Data were collected over a 6-month period regarding the handling of the letter and the responses to pre- and post-test questions for those who participated in the CME activity. Analysis of the answers to the pre- and posttest questions showed that participation in the CME activity resulted in an improvement in correct answer responses of 47%. Our experience shows that there are likely distinct information sources that are utilized by different HCP groups. The ready availability of a brief CME activity was utilized by 24,063 individuals, the majority of whom showed enhanced understanding of ipilimumab toxicity by improvement in post-test scores, educational data that are not available via implementation of standard safety alert communications. These results demonstrate that improvement in understanding of specific drug toxicities is enhanced by a CME intervention.

  16. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest.

  17. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70kg) in buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. Since a 3:1 morphine:oxycodone dose ratio had yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in non-dependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures, i.e. a drug vs. money and a drug vs. drug procedure, were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater compared to high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3:1 dose ratio of morphine:oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent subjects. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  18. A New Approach to the Oral Administration of Insulin and Other Peptide Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffran, Murray; Sudesh Kumar, G.; Savariar, Celin; Burnham, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Frederick; Neckers, Douglas C.

    1986-09-01

    The oral administration of peptide drugs is well known to be precluded by their digestion in the stomach and small intestine. As a new approach to oral delivery, peptide drugs were coated with polymers cross-linked with azoaromatic groups to form an impervious film to protect orally administered drugs from digestion in the stomach and small intestine. When the azopolymer-coated drug reached the large intestine, the indigenous microflora reduced the azo bonds, broke the cross-links, and degraded the polymer film, thereby releasing the drug into the lumen of the colon for local action or for absorption. The ability of the azopolymer coating to protect and deliver orally administered peptide drugs was demonstrated in rats with the peptide hormones vasopressin and insulin.

  19. The use of sonophoresis in the administration of drugs throughout the skin.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Bonilla-Martínez, Dalia; Villegas-González, Martha Angélica; Rodríguez-Cruz, Isabel Marlen; Domínguez-Delgado, Clara Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers an attractive alternative to the conventional drug delivery methods of oral administration and injection. However, the stratum corneum acts as a barrier that limits the penetration of substances through the skin. Application of ultrasound to the skin increases its permeability (sonophoresis) and enables the delivery of various substances into and through the skin. Ultrasound has been used extensively for medical diagnostics and to a certain extent in medical therapy (physiotherapy, ultrasonic surgery, hyperthermia). Nevertheless, it has only recently become popular as a technique to enhance drug release from drug delivery systems. A number of studies suggest the use of ultrasound as an external mean of delivering drugs at increased rates and at desired times. This review presents the main findings in the field of sonophoresis, namely transdermal drug delivery and transdermal monitoring. Particular attention is paid to proposed enhancement mechanisms and trends in the field of topical and transdermal delivery.

  20. Pivotal clinical trials of novel ophthalmic drugs and medical devices: retrospective observational study, 2002–2012

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jenny; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Novel therapeutics are an important part of ophthalmologists’ armamentarium, and the risks and benefits of these therapies must be carefully evaluated. We sought to quantify the characteristics of the pivotal clinical trials supporting the regulatory approval of new ophthalmic drugs and medical devices. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting and data source Medical review dossiers for new ophthalmic drug and high-risk device approvals released publicly by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Main outcome measures Proportion of pivotal trials with randomisation, masking, active or placebo controls and subgroup analyses; total and median number of trial enrollees; and the number of drugs and devices approved with required postapproval studies. Results From 2002 to 2012, the FDA approved 11 ophthalmic drugs and 25 devices. The pivotal trials underlying the approvals of ophthalmic drugs in our study cohort enrolled a median of 809 patients. Virtually all drug trials were randomised and masked (91%), of which 7 (70%) used a placebo control. Pivotal trials for ophthalmic devices enrolled 324 patients on average, and significantly fewer trials for ophthalmic devices versus drugs were randomised (16% vs 91%; p<0.001) or masked (12% vs 91%; p<0.001). 8 (32%) ophthalmic devices and 6 (55%) ophthalmic drugs were approved with required postapproval studies. Conclusions Ophthalmic therapeutics were approved based on varying levels of evidence. Postapproval studies could be used to confirm or refute early indications of safety and effectiveness of these therapeutics, with the study results accessible to patients and clinicians who need to make informed treatment decisions. PMID:26044760

  1. Prescription Drug Promotion from 2001-2014: Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Helen W.; Aikin, Kathryn J.; Chung-Davies, Eunice; Wade, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The volume of prescription drug promotion over time is often measured by assessing changes in ad spending. However, this method obscures the fact that some types of advertising are more expensive than others. Another way to measure the changes in prescription drug promotion over time is to assess the number of promotional pieces submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Form FDA 2253 collects information such as the date submitted and the type of material submitted. We analyzed data from Forms FDA 2253 received from 2001–2014. We examined the frequency of submissions by audience (consumer and healthcare professional) and type of promotional material. There was a noted increase in prescription drug promotion submissions across all media in the early 2000s. Although non-Internet promotion submissions have since plateaued, Internet promotion continued to increase. These results can help public health advocates and regulators focus attention and resources. PMID:27149513

  2. Food and Drug Administration process for development and approval of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals: treatments in urologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yang-Min; Maher, V Ellen

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory advice and assessment play an important role in the successful development of new drugs and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of urologic malignancies. Cooperation between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the pharmaceutical industry has led to the approval of more than 20 new urologic oncology products in the last 2 decades. Despite these advances, more effective treatments need to be developed and approved for the treatment of urologic malignancies. This review provides general information about the FDA's role in the development of investigational new drugs, with an emphasis on the regulatory process and the requirements for marketing approval. In addition, this review summarizes the products for the treatment of urologic malignancies that were approved by the FDA in the last 30 years and the key issues concerning urologic oncology products that were discussed publicly at Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee meetings in the past 10 years.

  3. Nanocarriers and the delivered drug: effect interference due to intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Maria A; Rytkönen, Jussi; Riikonen, Joakim; Tarasova, Olga S; Mönkäre, Juha; Kovalainen, Miia; Närvänen, Ale; Salonen, Jarno; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2014-10-15

    Intravenously administered nanocarriers are widely studied to improve the delivery of various therapeutic agents. However, recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that intravenously administered nanocarriers that do not contain any drug may affect cardiovascular function. Here we provide an example where the drug and the nanocarrier both affect the same cardiovascular parameters following intravenous administration. The peptide ghrelin antagonist (GhA) increases arterial pressure, while thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (THCPSi) transiently decrease it, as assessed with radiotelemetry in conscious rats. As a result, intravenous administration of GhA-loaded THCPSi nanoparticles partially antagonized GhA activity: arterial pressure was not increased. When the cardiovascular effects of GhA were blocked with atenolol pretreatment, GhA-loaded nanoparticles reduced arterial pressure to similar extent as drug-free nanoparticles. These data indicate that the biological activity of a drug delivered within a nanocarrier may be obscured by the biological responses induced by the nanocarrier itself.

  4. Local drug delivery - the early Berlin experience: single drug administration versus sustained release.

    PubMed

    Speck, Ulrich; Scheller, Bruno; Rutsch, Wolfgang; Laule, Michael; Stangl, Verena

    2011-05-01

    Our initial investigations into restenosis inhibition by local drug delivery were prompted by reports on an improved outcome of coronary interventions, including a lower rate of target lesion revascularisation, when the intervention was performed with an ionic instead of non-ionic contrast medium. Although this was not confirmed in an animal study, the short exposure of the vessel wall to paclitaxel dissolved in contrast agent or coated on balloons proved to be efficacious. A study comparing three methods of local drug delivery to the coronary artery in pigs indicated the following order of efficacy in inhibiting neointimal proliferation: paclitaxel-coated balloons > sirolimus-eluting stents, sustained drug release > paclitaxel in contrast medium. Cell culture experiments confirmed that cell proliferation can be inhibited by very short exposure to the drug. Shorter exposure times require higher drug concentrations. Effective paclitaxel concentrations in porcine arteries are achieved when the drug is dissolved in contrast medium or coated on balloons. Paclitaxel is an exceptional drug in that it stays in the treated tissue for a long time. This may explain the long-lasting efficacy of paclitaxel-coated balloons, but does not disprove the hypothesis that the agent blocks a process initiating long-lasting excessive neointimal proliferation, which occurs early after vessel injury.

  5. 78 FR 17611 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... On July 9, 2012, President Obama signed the Food and Drug Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) (Pub. L... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part Chapter 1 Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases; Request for Comments Regarding...

  6. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  7. A Novel Method of Drug Administration to Multiple Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the Quantification of Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Adam; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor James

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety testing in zebrafish is often studied in combination with the application of pharmacological substances. In these studies, fish are routinely netted and transported between home aquaria and dosing tanks. In order to enhance the ease of compound administration, a novel method for transferring fish between tanks for drug administration was developed. Inserts that are designed for spawning were used to transfer groups of fish into the drug solution, allowing accurate dosing of all fish in the group. This increases the precision and efficiency of dosing, which becomes very important in long schedules of repeated drug administration. We implemented this procedure for use in a study examining the behavior of zebrafish in the light/dark test after administering ethanol with differing 21 day schedules. In fish exposed to daily-moderate amounts of alcohol there was a significant difference in location preference after 2 days of withdrawal when compared to the control group. However, a significant difference in location preference in a group exposed to weekly-binge administration was not observed. This protocol can be generalized for use with all types of compounds that are water-soluble and may be used in any situation when the behavior of fish during or after long schedules of drug administration is being examined. The light/dark test is also a valuable method of assessing withdrawal-induced changes in anxiety. PMID:25407925

  8. Biomarker qualification pilot process at the US Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Goodsaid, Federico; Frueh, Felix

    2007-03-23

    New biomarkers of safety and efficacy are becoming powerful tools in drug development. Their application can be accelerated if a consensus can be reached about their qualification for regulatory applications. This consensus requires a review structure within the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that can evaluate qualification data for these biomarkers and determine whether these biomarkers can be qualified. A pilot process and corresponding Biomarker Qualification Review Team have been developed to test how the FDA can work on biomarker qualification.

  9. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  10. Membrane-Protein Crystallography and Potentiality for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Atsuko

    Structure-based drug design for membrane proteins is far behind that for soluble proteins due to difficulty in crystallographic structure determination, despite the fact that about 60% of FDA-approved drugs target membrane proteins located at the cell surface. Stable homologs for a membrane protein of interest, such as prokaryotic neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT, might enable cooperative analyses by crystallography and functional assays, provide useful information for functional mechanisms, and thus serve as important probes for drug design based on mechanisms as well as structures.

  11. DrugCentral: online drug compendium

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Oleg; Holmes, Jayme; Knockel, Jeffrey; Bologa, Cristian G.; Yang, Jeremy J.; Mathias, Stephen L.; Nelson, Stuart J.; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2017-01-01

    DrugCentral (http://drugcentral.org) is an open-access online drug compendium. DrugCentral integrates structure, bioactivity, regulatory, pharmacologic actions and indications for active pharmaceutical ingredients approved by FDA and other regulatory agencies. Monitoring of regulatory agencies for new drugs approvals ensures the resource is up-to-date. DrugCentral integrates content for active ingredients with pharmaceutical formulations, indexing drugs and drug label annotations, complementing similar resources available online. Its complementarity with other online resources is facilitated by cross referencing to external resources. At the molecular level, DrugCentral bridges drug-target interactions with pharmacological action and indications. The integration with FDA drug labels enables text mining applications for drug adverse events and clinical trial information. Chemical structure overlap between DrugCentral and five online drug resources, and the overlap between DrugCentral FDA-approved drugs and their presence in four different chemical collections, are discussed. DrugCentral can be accessed via the web application or downloaded in relational database format. PMID:27789690

  12. Key Findings from Preclinical and Clinical Drug Interaction Studies Presented in New Drug and Biological License Applications Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Zhou, Zhu; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory approval documents contain valuable information, often not published, to assess the drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of newly marketed drugs. This analysis aimed to systematically review all drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the new drug applications and biologic license applications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight the significant findings. Among the 30 new drug applications and 11 biologic license applications reviewed, 35 new molecular entities (NMEs) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, and/or organ impairment and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. In vivo, when NMEs were considered as victim drugs, 16 NMEs had at least one in vivo DDI study with a clinically significant change in exposure (area under the time-plasma concentration curve or Cmax ratio ≥2 or ≤0.5), with 6 NMEs shown to be sensitive substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes (area under the time-plasma concentration curve ratio ≥5 when coadministered with potent inhibitors): paritaprevir and naloxegol (CYP3A), eliglustat (CYP2D6), dasabuvir (CYP2C8), and tasimelteon and pirfenidone (CYP1A2). As perpetrators, seven NMEs showed clinically significant inhibition involving both enzymes and transporters, although no clinically significant induction was observed. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacogenetics studies were used for six and four NMEs, respectively, to optimize dosing recommendations in special populations and/or multiple impairment situations. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluations in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful quantitative information to support drug administration in these fragile populations.

  13. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat).

  14. Co-administration of a Tumor-Penetrating Peptide Enhances the Efficacy of Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Teesalu, Tambet; Karmali, Priya Prakash; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Agemy, Lilach; Greenwald, Daniel R.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    Poor penetration of anti-cancer drugs into tumors can be an important factor limiting their efficacy. Studying mouse tumor models, we show that a previously characterized tumor-penetrating peptide, iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC), increased vascular and tissue permeability in a tumor-specific and neuropilin-1-dependent manner, allowing co-administered drugs to penetrate into extravascular tumor tissue. Importantly, this effect did not require the drugs to be chemically conjugated to the peptide. Systemic injection with iRGD improved the therapeutic index of drugs of various compositions including a small molecule (doxorubicin), nanoparticles (nab-paclitaxel and doxorubicin liposomes), and a monoclonal antibody (trastuzumab). Thus, co-administration of iRGD may be a valuable way to enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs while reducing their side effects, a primary goal of cancer therapy research. PMID:20378772

  15. 76 FR 43690 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Electrocardiograph Electrodes.'' The special controls identify the following risks to health... Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Electrocardiograph...

  16. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... goals: (1) Total abstinence from tobacco use, (2) reductions in consumption of tobacco, and (3... Tobacco Dependence; Public Hearing; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... innovative products and treatments for tobacco dependence. The Agency is taking this action to...

  17. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... products manufactured solely for export or for uses other than internal human consumption (e.g. tobacco... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. 17.136 Section 17.136 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms...

  18. 28 CFR 0.157 - Federal Bureau of Investigation-Drug Enforcement Administration Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be known as the FBI-DEA Senior Executive Service (FBI-DEA SES). (b) Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 3151(b)(2)(B), a... the position of Deputy Director of the FBI (which remains subject to the exclusive authority of...

  19. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Detroit District Office, in co... District Office, 300 River Pl., Suite 5900, Detroit, MI 48207, 313-393-8143, Fax: 313- 393-8139, email... 13.3 Continuing Education Credits for SoCRA CE and Nurse CNE. SoCRA designates this live activity...

  20. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    .... ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Los Angeles District Office... continuing nurse education (CNE). SOCRA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 13.3 American.... SoCRA is an approved provider of CNE by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association (PSNA),...

  1. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    .... ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Philadelphia District Office..., Philadelphia District, 900 U.S. Customhouse, Second & Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19106, 215-597-4390... Continuing Education Credits for SoCRA CE and Nurse CNE. SOCRA designates this live activity for a maximum...

  2. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    .... ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Denver District Office, in co... activity for a maximum of 13.3 Continuing Education (CE) Credits for SoCRA CE and Nurse CNE. SoCRA... nursing education by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association (PSNA), an accredited approver by...

  3. Program Administrator's Handbook. Strategies for Preventing Alcohol and Other Drug Problems. The College Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook is for administrators of programs in higher education settings which deal with alcohol and other drug (AOD) related problems. Chapter 1, "Defining the Problem, Issues, and Trends" examines the problem from various perspectives and presents the latest statistics on the extent of AOD use on campuses, specific problems affecting…

  4. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (formerly 1999D-4396) Guidance for Clinical Investigators... recommendations made by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Department of Health and Human Services, in... represents FDA's current thinking on this topic. It does not create or confer any rights for or on any...

  5. 77 FR 16923 - Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...-ROM submissions): Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers... document, into the ``Search'' box and follow the prompts and/or go to the Division of Dockets Management... Register of March 22, 1977 (42 FR 15616 at 15625). Consumers, industry, professional groups,...

  6. 77 FR 16971 - Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852... and/or go to the Division of Dockets Management, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR... 20.108) in the Federal Register of March 22, 1977 (42 FR 15616 at 15625). Consumers,...

  7. 76 FR 41803 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses.'' FDA is issuing this guidance to inform industry and Agency staff of its... diagnostic devices intended for the detection or detection and differentiation of influenza viruses....

  8. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... Container Is Not Made With Natural Rubber Latex; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... to include in the labeling of a medical product to convey that natural rubber latex was not used as a... for inclusion in medical product labeling such as ``latex-free,'' ``does not contain natural...

  9. 76 FR 12563 - Amendments to General Regulations of the Food and Drug Administration; Confirmation of Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 14, and 17 RIN 0910-AG55 Amendments to... certain general regulations of FDA to include tobacco products, where appropriate, in light of FDA's authority to regulate these products under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act,...

  10. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for... Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices.'' This document is intended to provide... to fulfill premarket clinical data requirements. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in...

  11. More New Medication Approvals.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2016-01-01

    In the past year, the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved many new drugs for treating a wide variety of patient health problems. In a previous article, examples of approvals for the early part of last year were addressed. In this article, selected new FDA approvals through January 2016 are discussed. Nurses who are knowledgeable and informed about these new drugs will be able to answer patients' questions, clarify misunderstandings, and reduce the potential for medication misadventures.

  12. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving.

  13. Finding, evaluating, and managing drug-related risks: approaches taken by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    PubMed

    Weaver, Joyce; Grenade, Lois La; Kwon, Hyon; Avigan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Marketed pharmaceuticals are evaluated for safety by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) throughout the life cycle of the products. The FDA uses data from controlled clinical trials, from postmarketing case reports reported to the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System, from epidemiological studies, and from registries to evaluate the safety of approved products. For some products, including some products used in dermatologic medicine, risks become apparent during the postmarketing period that require additional measures beyond product labeling and routine pharmacovigilance. The FDA continues to seek additional tools to assess risk, including pharmacogenomic biomarkers for adverse drug reactions and the use of large medical record and epidemiological databases for the systematic detection and characterization of drug-associated safety outcomes.

  14. 76 FR 46303 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    .... We acknowledge that there will be cord blood banks that are not able to achieve licensure by October... Blood Intended for Hematopoietic Reconstitution for Specified Indications; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Drug Applications (INDs) for Minimally Manipulated, Unrelated Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord...

  15. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... authority of FDA and to facilitate interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the... provide those engaged in FDA-regulated (human) clinical trials with information on a number of topics... community a high priority to help ensure the quality of FDA-regulated drugs and devices. The workshop...

  16. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  17. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  18. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  19. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  20. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  1. 76 FR 5387 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “`Harmful and Potentially Harmful...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This guidance provides written guidance to... Tobacco Products as Used in Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' The...

  2. Prohibited or regulated? LSD psychotherapy and the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Oram, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Over the 1950s and early 1960s, the use of the hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to facilitate psychotherapy was a promising field of psychiatric research in the USA. However, during the 1960s, research began to decline, before coming to a complete halt in the mid-1970s. This has commonly been explained through the increase in prohibitive federal regulations during the 1960s that aimed to curb the growing recreational use of the drug. However, closely examining the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of LSD research in the 1960s will reveal that not only was LSD research never prohibited, but that the administration supported research to a greater degree than has been recognized. Instead, the decline in research reflected more complex changes in the regulation of pharmaceutical research and development.

  3. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... related to the production and marketing of drugs and/or devices. Topics for discussion include the following: Regulating Medical Products in the Global Environment FDA Revitalization Efforts--Top 10 Drug... Case Studies--Supplier Controls Supplier Quality in a Global Economy--Consensus Standards...

  4. 75 FR 32953 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Use of “Light,” “Mild,” “Low,” or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Tobacco Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Use...

  5. Cyberpharmacies and the role of the US Food And Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    The sale of consumer products over the Internet has grown rapidly, including the sale of drugs. While the growth in online drug sales by reputable pharmacies is a trend that may provide benefits to consumers, online drug sales also present risks to purchasers and some unique challenges to regulators, law enforcement officials and policy makers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is concerned about the public health implications of Internet drug sales, and we are responding to these concerns as part of our overall goal of developing and implementing risk-based strategies to protect public health and safety. Although other products regulated by the Agency, such as medical devices, medical test products, foods, dietary supplements and animal drugs also are sold online, this paper focuses on online drug sales. We discuss the advantages and risks of online drug sales, outline FDA's authority and enforcement activities in this area, and describe new initiatives we are taking to better respond to the regulatory challenges we face. PMID:11720945

  6. New drug development for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Berlant, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    US FDA approval of two serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) agents for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has created new opportunities for drug development. This follows many years of exploring the potential utility of several classes of psychotropic agents for this very common, yet under-recognized and under-treated disorder. This review examines some of the basic neurobiological abnormalities observed in PTSD and summarizes open and controlled drug trials for major classes of medications, including SSRIs, other antidepressants, atypical neuroleptics, noradrenergic modulators and anticonvulsants, while critically evaluating the extent of effectiveness of these agents and reviewing unmet gaps in therapeutic need.

  7. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  8. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5–4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5–40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1–0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects’ motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice. PMID:26902717

  9. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-02-23

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5-4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5-40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1-0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects' motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice.

  10. A drug-paired taste cue elicits withdrawal and predicts cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Nyland, Jennifer E; Grigson, Patricia S

    2013-03-01

    Addiction is a chronic disease where periods of abstinence are riddled with instances of craving, withdrawal, and eventual relapse to escalated drug use. Cues previously associated with drug use can have a deleterious effect on this cycle by precipitating withdrawal symptoms. Here we focus specifically on the relationship between avoidance of a drug-paired taste cue and the ability of the drug-paired cue to elicit withdrawal and, ultimately, drug seeking and taking. We used a rat model of drug addiction and naloxone-induced loss of body weight to test whether a taste cue elicits withdrawal in anticipation of drug availability. Experiment 1 investigated the ability of a taste cue to elicit signs of withdrawal when it predicted experimenter-administered morphine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). In Experiment 2, a saccharin taste cue was paired with the opportunity to actively self-administer cocaine (0.167 mg/infusion, i.v.). The results show that presentation of a morphine- or cocaine-paired taste cue is sufficient to elicit naloxone-induced withdrawal symptoms, and greater withdrawal predicts greater cocaine self-administration in rats.

  11. Gender-based differences in the toxicity of pharmaceuticals--the Food and Drug Administration's perspective.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A

    2001-01-01

    Women experience more adverse reactions to treatment with therapeutic drugs than men. Theories proposed to explain this include overdosing, different pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, women are more likely to report adverse events than men, or women take more medications than men. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Office of Women's Health (OWH) funds research to promote including women in clinical trials and understanding the biology of sex-related differences in the safety of FDA-regulated products. Including women in clinical trials advances the understanding of drug efficacy and safety in women by providing information on drug dosing, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. A Baysian statistical analysis of sex differences in adverse events showed that although about the same number of adverse events were reported for men and women, those reported for women were more serious. One example of a sex difference in the toxicity of pharmaceuticals is the drug-induced cardiac arrhythmia, torsades de point. OWH funded studies in animals and humans to investigate the mechanism behind this sex difference. These studies demonstrated that shortening the QT interval increases the risk of developing torsades and that androgens protect against torsades by slowing cardiac repolarization and prolonging the QT interval. Understanding the mechanisms behind other reported sex-related differences in adverse drug effects requires additional research. The preliminary studies conducted to date suggest that this sex-related difference is likely to be a multifactorial problem requiring information from several fields of study. Ideally, individuals at risk for developing an adverse event should be identified prior to therapeutic intervention. The OWH plans to fund more studies to investigate the role of hormonal variations on drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions. Animal and in vitro model systems are needed to fully understand the mechanism of how gender influences drug

  12. US Food and Drug Administration Web Site: A Primer for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Danial E.

    2015-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site includes a vast amount of information, but it can be difficult to navigate. Despite frequently asked question (FAQ)–type pages within the Web site, it may not be easy for first-time users to find drug information. This article presents some examples of common questions, provides the locations of the answers on the FDA Web site, and gives a brief description of some of the many resources the FDA provides for health care professionals. Additionally, a newer project being undertaken by the FDA, Snapshot, is introduced. PMID:27621506

  13. US Food and Drug Administration Web Site: A Primer for Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Leonard, James; Baker, Danial E

    2015-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site includes a vast amount of information, but it can be difficult to navigate. Despite frequently asked question (FAQ)-type pages within the Web site, it may not be easy for first-time users to find drug information. This article presents some examples of common questions, provides the locations of the answers on the FDA Web site, and gives a brief description of some of the many resources the FDA provides for health care professionals. Additionally, a newer project being undertaken by the FDA, Snapshot, is introduced.

  14. 75 FR 60767 - Office of the Commissioner; Request for Comments on the Food and Drug Administration Fiscal Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Office of the Commissioner; Request for Comments on the Food... Global Supply Chain, (3) Strengthen Compliance and Enforcement Activities to Support Public Health, and... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food...

  15. 77 FR 45357 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... and Research. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES: Although you... Development (HFM-40), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 1401..., Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-17), Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville...

  16. 76 FR 22905 - Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco... regulation (21 CFR 10.115). The guidance represents the Agency's current thinking on ``Civil Money...

  17. 77 FR 11550 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Notification to Food and Drug Administration of Issues That May...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Notification to Food and Drug..., directing FDA to use all available administrative tools to expand the Agency's efforts to combat the problem... required nutrition, or to address other serious medical conditions. Other shortages force providers...

  18. 77 FR 41418 - Statement of Cooperation Between the Food and Drug Administration and the Secretaria of Health of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Statement of Cooperation Between the Food and Drug Administration and the Secretaria of Health of the United Mexican States: Safety and Sanitary Quality of Fresh and Frozen Molluscan Shellfish Exported From Mexico to the United States AGENCY: Food and...

  19. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information.'' This guidance document describes the user fees associated with 513(g)...

  20. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...