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Sample records for administration nasa initiated

  1. 78 FR 51750 - NASA Asteroid Initiative Idea Synthesis Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Asteroid Initiative Idea Synthesis Workshop AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... for the agency's Asteroid Initiative. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a public conference to provide a status on the Agency's Asteroid Initiative planning and to...

  2. Internal NASA Study: NASAs Protoflight Research Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Mary R.; Hirshorn, Steven R.; Moreland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Protoflight Research Initiative is an internal NASA study conducted within the Office of the Chief Engineer to better understand the use of Protoflight within NASA. Extensive literature reviews and interviews with key NASA members with experience in both robotic and human spaceflight missions has resulted in three main conclusions and two observations. The first conclusion is that NASA's Protoflight method is not considered to be "prescriptive." The current policies and guidance allows each Program/Project to tailor the Protoflight approach to better meet their needs, goals and objectives. Second, Risk Management plays a key role in implementation of the Protoflight approach. Any deviations from full qualification will be based on the level of acceptable risk with guidance found in NPR 8705.4. Finally, over the past decade (2004 - 2014) only 6% of NASA's Protoflight missions and 6% of NASA's Full qualification missions experienced a publicly disclosed mission failure. In other words, the data indicates that the Protoflight approach, in and of it itself, does not increase the mission risk of in-flight failure. The first observation is that it would be beneficial to document the decision making process on the implementation and use of Protoflight. The second observation is that If a Project/Program chooses to use the Protoflight approach with relevant heritage, it is extremely important that the Program/Project Manager ensures that the current project's requirements falls within the heritage design, component, instrument and/or subsystem's requirements for both the planned and operational use, and that the documentation of the relevant heritage is comprehensive, sufficient and the decision well documented. To further benefit/inform this study, a recommendation to perform a deep dive into 30 missions with accessible data on their testing/verification methodology and decision process to research the differences between Protoflight and Full Qualification

  3. 78 FR 31977 - NASA Asteroid Initiative Call for Ideas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Asteroid Initiative Call for Ideas AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Public Forum. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration... p.m. EDT. Location: James E. Webb Auditorium. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street...

  4. NASA's Climate Data Services Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, M.; Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; Webster, W. P.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the Earth's processes is based on a combination of observational data records and mathematical models. The size of NASA's space-based observational data sets is growing dramatically as new missions come online. However a potentially bigger data challenge is posed by the work of climate scientists, whose models are regularly producing data sets of hundreds of terabytes or more. It is important to understand that the 'Big Data' challenge of climate science cannot be solved with a single technological approach or an ad hoc assemblage of technologies. It will require a multi-faceted, well-integrated suite of capabilities that include cloud computing, large-scale compute-storage systems, high-performance analytics, scalable data management, and advanced deployment mechanisms in addition to the existing, well-established array of mature information technologies. It will also require a coherent organizational effort that is able to focus on the specific and sometimes unique requirements of climate science. Given that it is the knowledge that is gained from data that is of ultimate benefit to society, data publication and data analytics will play a particularly important role. In an effort to accelerate scientific discovery and innovation through broader use of climate data, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Office of Computational and Information Sciences and Technology has embarked on a determined effort to build a comprehensive, integrated data publication and analysis capability for climate science. The Climate Data Services (CDS) Initiative integrates people, expertise, and technology into a highly-focused, next-generation, one-stop climate science information service. The CDS Initiative is providing the organizational framework, processes, and protocols needed to deploy existing information technologies quickly using a combination of enterprise-level services and an expanding array of cloud services. Crucial to its effectiveness, the CDS

  5. Nasa-wide Standard Administrative Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneck, P.

    1984-01-01

    Factors to be considered in developing agency-wide standard administrative systems for NASA include uniformity of hardware and software; centralization vs. decentralization; risk exposure; and models for software development.

  6. NASA Administrator Flies Dream Chaser Simulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden had the opportunity to fly a simulated landing of the Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Dream Chaser while touring the agency's Dryden Flight Research Center in Cali...

  7. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    This technical report presents the summary of the 2nd NASA Aerospace Pyrotechnic Systems Workshop's discussion on Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO). Laser initiated ordnance benefits, applications, advantage of laser ordnance, and disadvantage of laser diode initiated ordnance are discussed. In addition, the three LIO programs: NASA standard laser diode safe and arm, NASA standard laser detonators, and laser diode safe/arm performance are reviewed. Steps for the LIO implementation are also presented.

  8. NASA Initiatives with Historically Black Colleges & Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This publication outlines the involvement of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) programs in aeronautics and space research. NASA aims to assist HBCUs in science, engineering, and technology programs and also to encourage greater participation of minorities in its…

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) education 1993--2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivie, Christine M.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993 -- 2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that time period. Constant changes in education leadership at NASA resulted in changes in direction in the education program and the documents produced by each administration reflected both small and some significant changes in program direction. The result of the analysis of documents and interview data was the identification of several trends in the NASA education program. This study identified three significant trends in NASA education. First, the approach that NASA took in both its EPO efforts and in the efforts directed by the Office of Education is disjointed and seems to reflect individual preferences in education approaches designed to reach populations that are of interest to the individuals in decision-making positions rather than reflect a systematic approach designed to meet identified goals and outcomes. Second, this disjointed and person-driven approach led to a lack of consistent evaluation data available for review and planning purposes. Third, there was an ongoing assumption made by the education community that NASA education efforts were tied to larger education reports, concerns, needs, initiatives and evidence collected and presented in Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education-related studies over the past twenty years. In fact, there is no evidence that the programs and projects initiated were a response to these identified needs or initiatives. That does not mean that NASA's efforts did not contribute to STEM education initiatives in the United States. This study, however, indicates that contributions to those initiatives occurred as a byproduct of the effort and not because of specific

  10. Propellant for the NASA Standard Initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl; Tipton, Bill, Jr.; Dutton, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses processes employed in manufacturing zirconium-potassium perchlorate propellant for the NASA standard initiator. It provides both a historical background on the NSI device-detailing problem areas and their resolution--and on propellant blending techniques. Emphasis is placed on the precipitation blending method. The findings on mixing equipment, processing, and raw materials are described. Also detailed are findings on the bridgewire slurry operation, one of the critical steps in the production of the NASA standard initiator.

  11. A systems engineering initiative for NASA's space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda S.; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Kelly, Angelita C.; Lightfoot, Patricia C.; Bell, Holland T.; Cureton-Snead, Izeller E.; Hurd, William J.; Scales, Charles H.

    1993-01-01

    In addition to but separate from the Red and Blue Teams commissioned by the NASA Administrator, NASA's Associate Administrator for Space Communications commissioned a Blue Team to review the Office of Space Communications (Code O) Core Program and determine how the program could be conducted faster, better, and cheaper, without compromising safety. Since there was no corresponding Red Team for the Code O Blue Team, the Blue Team assumed a Red Team independent attitude and challenged the status quo. The Blue Team process and results are summarized. The Associate Administrator for Space Communications subsequently convened a special management session to discuss the significance and implications of the Blue Team's report and to lay the groundwork and teamwork for the next steps, including the transition from engineering systems to systems engineering. The methodology and progress toward realizing the Code O Family vision and accomplishing the systems engineering initiative for NASA's space communications are presented.

  12. NASA RECON: Course Development, Administration, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, W. D.; Roquemore, L.

    1984-01-01

    The R and D activities addressing the development, administration, and evaluation of a set of transportable, college-level courses to educate science and engineering students in the effective use of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems, and, in particular, in the use of the NASA RECON system, are discussed. The long-range scope and objectives of these contracted activities are overviewed and the progress which has been made toward these objectives during FY 1983-1984 is highlighted. In addition, the results of a survey of 237 colleges and universities addressing course needs are presented.

  13. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  14. NASA's Productivity Improvement and Quality Enhancement Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration celebrated its 25th Anniversary in 1983 at the Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, with President Reagan in attendance. We look back on the accomplishments of these twenty-five years with pride in our missions and our people. NASA captured the world's imagination during the days of the Apollo mission. So much so, that we now talk about the Apollo era. In the l970s, we moved into the Space Transportation business and in the 199Os, we look forward to having a manned Space Station. Each succeeding mission has presented its own challenge in terms of technology and resources. This is especially true today, when we are being asked to do more with less. To ensure that NASA continues to be a productive and quality conscious agency, one of our highest Agency goals is leadership in the development and application of practices which contribute to high productivity and quality. greatest competitive strength, and this country has a solid scientific and engineering foundation. Traditionally we have spent more money on research and development than Japan and Europe combined, and we are the source of most of this century significant innovations. We should build on this solid base and use it more effectively.

  15. NASA Administrative Data Base Management Systems, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radosevich, J. D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Strategies for converting to a data base management system (DBMS) and the implementation of the software packages necessary are discussed. Experiences with DBMS at various NASA centers are related including Langley's ADABAS/NATURAL and the NEMS subsystem of the NASA metrology informaton system. The value of the integrated workstation with a personal computer is explored.

  16. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Laser initiated ordnance appears to offer the advantages of greater reliability, enhanced safety, lighter, less costly products, and improvements in spacecraft system designs which can lead to higher operational efficiency. But the lack of flight demonstrations has prevented the application of this new technology into new programs. Hence, a three-phase technology program was initiated by NASA to provide flight proof of their technical and programmatic feasibility: flight demonstration aboard an unmanned commercial vehicle (Pegasus), use as a Space Shuttle payload, and the most demanding of applications, namely, solid rocket motor vehicle ignition and flight termination. The programs investigate, via flight demonstrations the use of fully solid state laser diode systems to reduce potential hazards imposed by stray electrical signals. Inadvertent ignition has proven to cause serious problems. While the current electromechanical have been made safe, the result has been complex systems. Now is the time to take advantage of this new technology to further enhance safety and reliability of spacecraft systems. Two of the three phases are underway; an announcement of opportunity for the third, a sounding rocket flight demonstration, was made at the workshop.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  18. NASA aerospace battery system program initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight and flight battery system problems in flight programs at NASA created high-level concern and interest in the current battery technology status. As a result, NASA conducted an in-house review of problems experienced both internally and by other government users. The derived issues which encompassed the programmatic scope from cell manufacturing to in-flight operations of the system are discussed. From the identified deficiencies, a modestly scaled battery program was established to alleviate or minimize the risks of future occurrences.

  19. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  20. The NASA SARP Software Research Infusion Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrence; Feather, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the NASA Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) research infusion projects is shown. The topics include: 1) Background/Motivation; 2) Proposal Solicitation Process; 3) Proposal Evaluation Process; 4) Overview of Some Projects to Date; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  1. NASA NDATC Global Climate Change Education Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, B.; Wood, E.; Meyer, D.; Maynard, N.; Pandya, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    This project aligns with NASA’s Strategic Goal 3A - “Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs and focuses on funding from the GCCE Funding Category 2: Strengthen the Teaching and Learning About Global Climate Change Within Formal Education Systems. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report (2007) those communities with the least amount of resources will be most vulnerable, and least likely to adapt to the impacts brought on by a changing climate. Further, the level of vulnerability of these communities is directly correlated with their ability to implement short, medium and long range mitigation measures. The North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges (NDATC) has established a climate change education initiative among its six member Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). The goal of this project is to enhance the TCUs capacity to educate their constituents on the science of climate change and mitigation strategies specifically as they apply to Indian Country. NDATC is comprised of six American Indian tribally chartered colleges (TCUs) which include: Cankdeska Cikana Community College, serving the Spirit Lake Dakota Nation; Fort Berthold Community College, serving the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation; Sitting Bull College, serving the Hunkpapa Lakota and Dakota Nation; Turtle Mountain Community College, serving the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa; Sisseton Wahpeton College serving the Sisseton and Wahpeton Dakota Nation, and United Tribes Technical College, serving over 70 Tribal groups from across the United States. The purpose of this project is to (1) increase awareness of climate change and its potential impacts in Indian Country through education for students, faculty and presidents of the TCUs as well as Tribal leadership; (2) increase the capacity of TCUs to respond to this global threat on behalf of tribal people; (3) develop climate change mitigation strategies relevant to Indian

  2. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Pictured from the left, in the Saturn I mockup, are: William Brooksbank, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Dr. Wernher von Braun, MSFC director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, executive officer of the Office of the Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, newly appointed deputy associate administrator for Manned Space Flight, technical. The party examined an ordinary man's shoe (held by Paine) outfitted for use in the Saturn I Workshop. The shoe had a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desired. Dr. Paine and his party indulged in a two-day tour at the Marshall Space Flight Center getting acquainted with Marshall personnel and programs. It was Paine's first visit to the center since assuming the NASA post on February 1, 1968.

  3. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  4. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left) watches as 10-year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA, shakes hands with astronaut Dog Wheelock. Behind Jonathan is his mother, Penny. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS-99.

  5. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left) shares a laugh with VIP 10- year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. Behind Goldin is astronaut Doug Wheelock; behind Jonathan is his mother, Penny. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS- 99.

  6. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left) shares a light moment during his meeting with 10-year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. Behind Goldin is astronaut Doug Wheelock; behind Jonathan is his mother, Penny. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS-99.

  7. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Ten-year-old Jonathan Pierce (second from right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit, without the helmet, which was designed by NASA, poses with (left to right) NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, Mrs. Goldin, and astronaut Doug Wheelock. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS- 99.

  8. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left) listens intently to 10-year- old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. Behind Goldin is astronaut Doug Wheelock; behind Jonathan is his mother, Penny. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS- 99.

  9. NASA's Space Launch Initiative Targets Toxic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric; McNeal, Curtis; Davis, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When manned and unmanned space flight first began, the clear and overriding design consideration was performance. Consequently, propellant combinations of all kinds were considered, tested, and, when they lifted the payload a kilometer higher, or an extra kilogram to the same altitude, they became part of our operational inventory. Cost was not considered. And with virtually all of the early work being performed by the military, safety was hardly a consideration. After all, fighting wars has always been dangerous. Those days are past now. With space flight, and the products of space flight, a regular part of our lives today, safety and cost are being reexamined. NASA's focus turns naturally to its Shuttle Space Transportation System. Designed, built, and flown for the first time in the 1970s, this system remains today America's workhorse for manned space flight. Without its tremendous lift capability and mission flexibility, the International Space Station would not exist. And the Hubble telescope would be a monument to shortsighted management, rather than the clear penetrating eye on the stars it is today. But the Shuttle system fully represents the design philosophy of its period: it is too costly to operate, and not safe enough for regular long term access to space. And one of the key reasons is the utilization of toxic propellants. This paper will present an overview of the utilization of toxic propellants on the current Shuttle system.

  10. The administration of the NASA space tracking system and the NASA space tracking system in Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollander, N.

    1973-01-01

    The international activities of the NASA space program were studied with emphasis on the development and maintenance of tracking stations in Australia. The history and administration of the tracking organization and the manning policies for the stations are discussed, and factors affecting station operation are appraised. A field study of the Australian tracking network is included.

  11. The Science Goals of NASA's Exploration Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Grunsfeld, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    The recently released policy directive, "A Renewed Spirit of Discovery: The President's Vision for U. S. Space Exploration," seeks to advance the U. S. scientific, security and economic interest through a program of space exploration which will robotically explore the solar system and extend human presence to the Moon, Mars and beyond. NASA's implementation of this vision will be guided by compelling questions of scientific and societal importance, including the origin of our Solar System and the search for life beyond Earth. The Exploration Roadmap identifies four key targets: the Moon, Mars, the outer Solar System, and extra-solar planets. First, a lunar investigation will set up exploration test beds, search for resources, and study the geological record of the early Solar System. Human missions to the Moon will serve as precursors for human missions to Mars and other destinations, but will also be driven by their support for furthering science. The second key target is the search for past and present water and life on Mars. Following on from discoveries by Spirit and Opportunity, by the end of the decade there will have been an additional rover, lander and orbiter studying Mars. These will set the stage for a sample return mission and increasingly complex robotic investigations in the next decade, and an eventual human landing. The third key target is the study of underground oceans, biological chemistry, and their potential for life in the outer Solar System. Beginning with the arrival of Cassini at Saturn in July 2004 and a landing on Titan in 2005, the next decade will see an extended investigation of the Jupiter icy moons by a mission making use of Project Prometheus, a program to develop space nuclear power and nuclear-electric propulsion. Finally, the search for Earth-like planets and life includes a series of telescopic missions designed to find and characterize extra-solar planets and search them for evidence of life. These missions include HST and

  12. The Science Goals of NASA's Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; Grunsfeld, John

    2004-01-01

    The recently released policy directive, "A Renewed Spirit of Discovery: The President's Vision for U. S. Space Exploration," seeks to advance the U. S. scientific, security and economic interest through a program of space exploration which will robotically explore the solar system and extend human presence to the Moon, Mars and beyond. NASA's implementation of this vision will be guided by compelling questions of scientific and societal importance, including the origin of our Solar System and the search for life beyond Earth. The Exploration Roadmap identifies four key targets: the Moon, Mars, the outer Solar System, and extra-solar planets. First, a lunar investigation will set up exploration test beds, search for resources, and study the geological record of the early Solar System. Human missions to the Moon will serve as precursors for human missions to Mars and other destinations, but will also be driven by their support for furthering science. The second key target is the search for past and present water and life on Mars. Following on from discoveries by Spirit and Opportunity, by the end of the decade there will have been an additional rover, a lander and two orbiters studying Mars. These will set the stage for a sample return mission in 2013, increasingly complex robotic investigations, and an eventual human landing. The third key target is the study of underground oceans, biological chemistry, and their potential for life in the outer Solar System. Beginning with the arrival of Cassini at Saturn in July 2004 and a landing on Titan in 2006, the next decade will see an extended investigation of the Jupiter icy moons by a mission making use of Project Prometheus, a program to develop space nuclear power and nuclear-electric propulsion. Finally, the search for Earth-like planets and life includes a series of telescopic missions designed to find and characterize extra-solar planets and search them for evidence of life. These missions include HST and Spitzer

  13. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin talks with STS-78 crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left) chats with STS-78 Mission Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks (center) and KSC Director Jay Honeycutt underneath the orbiter Columbia. Columbia and her seven-member crew touched down on Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 8:36 a.m. EDT, July 7, bringing to a close the longest Shuttle flight to date. STS-78, which also was the 78th Shuttle flight, lasted 16 days, 21 minutes and 47 seconds.

  14. Status of NASA's commercial cargo and crew transportation initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmoyer, Alan; Stone, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    To stimulate the commercial space transportation industry, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is facilitating the demonstration of Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by private-sector companies. In 2006, NASA entered into funded agreements with two such companies to share NASA's 500 million investment, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) and Rocketplane Kistler (RpK), each of which proposed to obtain the additional private financing needed to complete its flight demonstrations. In 2007, NASA terminated the agreement with RpK because it failed to meet a series of technical and financial milestones which were necessary to receive the incremental NASA payments. In 2008, NASA conducted another competition for the remaining 170 million of NASA funding and entered into a funded agreement with Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). This paper provides an overview of the COTS approach of SpaceX and OSC and the status of their efforts to develop reliable and cost-effective commercial transportation to serve the LEO marketplace.

  15. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (center) greets 10-year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. In the background, between them, are Jonathan's mother, Penny; his grandfather, John Janocka; and his sister, Jaimie.. At left is Mrs. Goldin. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS-99.

  16. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (center) presents a bag of special gifts to 10-year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. In the background, between them, are Jonathan's mother, Penny; his grandfather, John Janocka; and his sister, Jaimie.. At left is Mrs. Goldin. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS-99.

  17. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 10-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (center) talks to 10-year-old Jonathan Pierce (right), who is garbed in a protective cooling suit designed by NASA. In the background, between them, are Jonathan's mother, Penny; his grandfather, John Janocka; and his sister, Jaimie. At left is Mrs. Goldin. Jonathan suffers from erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare condition that makes his body unable to withstand ultraviolet rays. The suit allows him to be outside during the day, which would otherwise be impossible. Jonathan's trip was funded by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and included a visit to Disney World. He and his family were among a dozen VIPs at KSC to view the launch of STS-99.

  18. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 100-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Among the VIPs attending the launch of STS-99 is Captain Ralph Charles (left), standing next to NASA Administrator Dan Goldin. Charles hopes to have his wish fulfilled of watching a Shuttle launch in person. The 100-year-old aviator has experienced nearly a century of flight history, from the Wright Brothers to the Space Program. He took flying lessons from one of the first fliers trained by Orville Wright, first repaired then built airplanes, went barnstorming, operated a charter service in the Caribbean, and worked as a test pilot for the Curtiss Wright Airplane Co. Charles is the oldest licensed pilot in the United States, and is still flying.

  19. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration activities associated with NASA?s goals to return to the Moon, travel to Mars, or explore Near Earth Objects (NEOs) will involve the need for human-supported space and surface extravehicular activities (EVAs). The technology development and human element associated with these exploration missions provide fantastic content to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). As NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden remarked on December 9, 2009, "We....need to provide the educational and experiential stepping-stones to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and leaders in STEM fields." The EVA Systems Project actively supports this initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for these missions. This paper summarizes these education and public efforts.

  20. NASA's commercial space program - Initiatives for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, James T.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's commercial development of the space program aimed at the stimulation and assistance of expanded private sector involvement and investment in civil space activities is discussed, focusing on major new program initiatives and their implementation. NASA's Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) program, composed of competitively selected consortia of universities, industries, and government involved in early research and testing phases of potentially commercially viable technologies is described. The 16 centers concentrate on seven different technical areas such as automation and robotics; remote sensing; life sciences; and space power, propulsion, and structures. Private sector participation, CCDS technology development, government and commercially supplied access to space in support of CCDS programs, CCDS hardware development, and CCDS spinoffs are discussed together with various cooperative and reimbursable agreements between NASA and the private sector.

  1. NASA scientific and technical information program multimedia initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Kaye, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This paper relates the experiences of the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program in introducing multimedia within the STI Program framework. A discussion of multimedia technology is included to provide context for the STI Program effort. The STI Program's Multimedia Initiative is discussed in detail. Parallels and differences between multimedia and traditional information systems project development are highlighted. Challenges faced by the program in initiating its multimedia project are summarized along with lessons learned. The paper concludes with a synopsis of the benefits the program hopes to provide its users through the introduction of multimedia illustrated by examples of successful multimedia projects.

  2. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin watches the STS-99 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (right) joins other spectators at the Banana Creek viewing site in cheering the successful launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-99. The perfect liftoff occurred at 12:43:40 p.m. EST. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the SRTM could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

  3. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets 100-year-old VIP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut Andy Thomas (left) greets 100-year-old Captain Ralph Charles, one of the VIPs attending the launch of STS-99. Charles also met NASA Administrator Dan Goldin. An aviator who has the distinction of being the oldest licensed pilot in the United States, Charles is still flying. He has experienced nearly a century of flight history, from the Wright Brothers to the Space Program. He took flying lessons from one of the first fliers trained by Orville Wright, first repaired then built airplanes, went barnstorming, operated a charter service in the Caribbean, and worked as a test pilot for the Curtiss Wright Airplane Co. Charles watches all the Shuttle launches from his home in Ohio and his greatest wish is to be able to watch one in person from KSC.

  4. First Lady Hillary Clinton is greeted by NASA Administrator Goldin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five- day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes.

  5. First Lady Hillary Clinton is greeted by NASA Administrator Goldin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Next to Gold are (from left) Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five- day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes.

  6. STS-79 NASA administrator Goldin greets crew after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (center, with box) greets STS-79 Commander William F. Readdy following the successful conclusion of Mission STS-79 with an end of mission landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Also climbing down from the Crew Transport Vehicle (CTV) are (from left) STS-79 Mission Specialists Carl E. Walz and Jay Apt, and Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt. To the right of Goldin are KSC Director Jay Honeycutt and Acting Associate Administrator for the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications Dr. Arnauld Nicogossian. Goldin is holding a box of m&m candy to give to U.S. astronaut Shannon W. Lucid, who returns to Earth after a record setting six month stay aboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The candy is a gift from President Bill Clinton for Lucid. M&M Mars has been supplying m&m candy to the U.S. space program for more than a decade; the gift candies for Lucid are red, white and blue to commemorate her historic flight.

  7. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  8. Swearing in of George M. Low as Deputy Administrator of NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Swearing in of George M. Low as Deputy Administrator of NASA. The 43-year-old veteran of NASAs Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo manned flight programs was administered the oath of Office by Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA's Administrator. President Nixon nominated Low for the post November 13, 1969, and the Senate confirmed him on November 26, 1969. Low, who joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NASAs predecessor agency) in 1949, was the fourth person to hold the Deputy Administrator post at NASA.

  9. Viton's Impact on NASA Standard Initiator Propellant Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl; Tipton, Bill, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the properties of Viton that are relevant to its use as a pyrotechnic binder in a NASA standard initiator (NSI) propellant. Nearly every aspect of NSI propellant manufacture and use is impacted by the binder system. The effect of Viton's molecular weight on solubility, solution viscosity, glass transition temperature, and strength characteristics as applied to NSI production and performance are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the Viton fractionation that occurs during the precipitation cycle and its impact on bridgewire functions. Special consideration is given to the production of bridgewire slurry mixtures.

  10. NASA industry education initiative. Education programs report, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Findings from the initial inventory of education programs show that support for the NASA-Industry Education Initiative (NIEI) appears to be strong among the organizations surveyed. In addition, the range, depth and historical baselines of NIEI education programs are encouraging. It is also apparent that there is a significant level of cooperation between NIEI members and other organizations. Heavily focused towards science, engineering, mathematics and technology achievement, NIEI activities appear to be aligned with national education goals. Three criticisms are revealed: (1) the majority of programs are targeted fairly late in the education cycle; (2) the number of initiatives geared towards adult literacy and adult skills-enhancement appears to be relatively low; (3) the majority of NIEI activities involve traditional education-assistance programs, but the number of critical assessment and systematic reform initiatives is low. Four Working Group recommendations resulted from this activity: (1) NIEI Working Group operations should continue for an indefinite period, with participation open to other like-minded private-sector organization; (2) the report should be periodically updated; (3) an analysis of ongoing education programs should be conducted; (4) American corporations should continue to support education and evaluate in-house programs periodically.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Automated Information Security Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Automated Information Security Handbook provides NASA's overall approach to automated information systems security including discussions of such aspects as: program goals and objectives, assignment of responsibilities, risk assessment, foreign national access, contingency planning and disaster recovery, awareness training, procurement, certification, planning, and special considerations for microcomputers.

  12. NASA's initiative to develop education through astronomy (IDEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Jeffrey O.; Morrow, Cherilynn A.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a progressive program in science education called the Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy (IDEA). IDEA represents a commitment by the Astrophysics Division of NASA Headquarters to pre-collegiate and public learning. The program enlists the full participation of research astronomers in taking advantage of the natural appeal of astronomy and the unique features of space astrophysics missions to generate valuable learning experiences and scientifically accurate and educationally effective products for students, teachers and citizens. One of the premier projects is called Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment (FOSTER) - a program to fly teachers aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory during actual research missions. IDEA is managed by a visiting scientist with extensive educational background (each of the authors have served in this role), and the program is unique within NASA science divisions for having a full time scientist devoted to education. IDEA recognizes that the rapidly shifting social and political landscape has caused a fundamental change in how science is expected to contribute to society. It is in the enlightened self-interest of all research scientists to respond to the challenge of connecting forefront research to basic educational needs. IDEA is exploring the avenues needed to facilitate these connections, including supplementing research grants for educational purposes.

  13. NASA initiatives with historically black colleges and universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA programs involving students and teachers at historically Black colleges and universities are discussed. The programs at each of the NASA research centers are described. Guidance is given on proposal submission for NASA grants. The Cooperative Education program, the Graduate Student Researchers program, and summer faculty fellowships are discussed.

  14. Project ELaNa and NASA's CubeSat Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrobot, Garrett Lee

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA program to use expendable lift vehicles (ELVs) to launch nanosatellites for the purpose of enhancing educational research. The Education Launch of Nanosatellite (ELaNa) project, run out of the Launch Services Program is requesting proposals for CubeSat type payload to provide information that will aid or verify NASA Projects designs while providing higher educational research

  15. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel report to the NASA acting administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The level of activity of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel was increased smewhat during 1985 in concert with the increased mission rate of the National Space Transportation System, the evolutionary changes in management and operation of that program, and the preparation of the Vandenberg Launch Site; the implementation of the Program Definition Phase of the Space Station Program; and the actual flight testing of the X-29 research aircraft. Impending payload STS missions and NASA's overall aircraft operations are reviewed. The safety aspects of the LEASAT salvage mission were assessed. The findings and recommendation of the committee are summerized.

  16. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  17. Reaching for the Stars: A New NASA-National Federation of the Blind Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.; Riccobono, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) recently launched a unique new partnership which will inspire and empower blind youth to consider opportunities in science, technologies, engineering, and math related careers from which they have typically been excluded. This partnership presents a framework for successful cultivation of the next generation of scientists. By partnering with the NFB Jernigan Institute, a one of a kind research and training facility developed and directed by blind people, NASA has engaged the most powerful tool for tapping the potential of blind youth. By teaming NASA scientists and engineers with successful blind adults within a national organization, the NFB, this partnership has established an unparalleled pipeline of talent and imagination. The NASA/NFB partnership seeks to facilitate the means that will lead to increased science and technology employment opportunities for the blind, and particularly within NASA. The initiative is facilitating the development of education programs and products which will stimulate better educational opportunities and supports for blind youth in the STEM areas and better preparing them to enter the NASA employment path. In addition, the partnership brings the unique perspective of the blind to the continuing effort to develop improved space technologies, which may be applied for navigation and wayfinding, technologies for education and outreach, and technologies for improving access to information using nonvisual techniques. This presentation describes some of the activities accomplished in the first year of the partnership. Examples include the establishment of the first NFB Science Academy for Blind Youth which included two summer science camps supported by NASA. During the first camp session, twelve middle school age blind youth explored earth science concepts such as identification and characterization of soils, weather parameters, plants

  18. NASA today, and a vision for tomorrow. [The NASA Administrator's Speech to the American Geophysical Union on 26 May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldin, Daniel S.

    1994-01-01

    Under the administration of Dan Goldin's leadership, NASA is reinventing itself. In the process, the agency is also searching for a vision to define its role, both as a US Government agency and as a leading force in humanity's exploration of space. An adaption of Goldin's speech to the American Geophysical Union on 26 May 1994 in which he proposes one possible unifying vision is presented.

  19. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  20. 14 CFR § 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  1. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  2. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  3. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  4. NASA's Needs for Biomaterials within the HEDS Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    The part to be played by materials scientists to further NASA's exploration missions cannot be underestimated. To quote Jerome Groopman (New Yorker, February 14, 2000), "The rocket science will be the easy part". The four main risks on the Critical Path Road Map during a three-year sojourn to Mars are osteoporosis, psychological problems, radiation induced cancer and acute medical trauma. NASA's microgravity materials science program has investigations in membrane fabrication, bone growth and materials for radiation protection. These programs will be reviewed in the context of the four main risks, as will other potential uses of biomaterials and applications of biomimetic processing.

  5. 77 FR 5027 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Exploratory Program To Increase Access to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... announcing the availability of a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative... Transparency Initiative. This report includes eight initiatives adopted by the Commissioner of Food and...

  6. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes JASON kids to NASA while handing out patches and pins. Tom Clausen and Donald James, Ames Education Office in background.

  7. 14 CFR § 1240.105 - Special initial awards-NASA and NASA contractor employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... subject of a software release award is not eligible to receive a Tech Brief award based upon the publication of an announcement of availability in “NASA Tech Briefs.” (3) Software release awards for...) Tech Briefs Awards. When the Board receives written notice, in the manner and format prescribed by...

  8. 14 CFR 1240.105 - Special initial awards-NASA and NASA contractor employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... subject of a software release award is not eligible to receive a Tech Brief award based upon the publication of an announcement of availability in “NASA Tech Briefs.” (3) Software release awards for...) Tech Briefs Awards. When the Board receives written notice, in the manner and format prescribed by...

  9. 15 CFR 785.3 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Assessment (NOVA). Prior to the initiation of an administrative proceeding through issuance of a NOVA, the... enforcement proceeding under this § 785.3 by issuing a NOVA. (b) Content of a NOVA. The NOVA shall constitute... state the maximum amount of the civil penalty that could be assessed. The NOVA also will inform...

  10. 15 CFR 719.5 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Assessment (NOVA). The letter of intent to charge will be accompanied by a draft NOVA and proposed... the allegations set forth in the draft NOVA. An administrative enforcement proceeding is not initiated... for Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office of Export...

  11. 15 CFR 719.5 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Assessment (NOVA). The letter of intent to charge will be accompanied by a draft NOVA and proposed... the allegations set forth in the draft NOVA. An administrative enforcement proceeding is not initiated... for Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office of Export...

  12. 15 CFR 719.5 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Assessment (NOVA). The letter of intent to charge will be accompanied by a draft NOVA and proposed... the allegations set forth in the draft NOVA. An administrative enforcement proceeding is not initiated... for Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office of Export...

  13. 15 CFR 719.5 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Assessment (NOVA). The letter of intent to charge will be accompanied by a draft NOVA and proposed... the allegations set forth in the draft NOVA. An administrative enforcement proceeding is not initiated... for Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office of Export...

  14. 15 CFR 785.3 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Assessment (NOVA). Prior to the initiation of an administrative proceeding through issuance of a NOVA, the... enforcement proceeding under this § 785.3 by issuing a NOVA. (b) Content of a NOVA. The NOVA shall constitute... state the maximum amount of the civil penalty that could be assessed. The NOVA also will inform...

  15. 15 CFR 785.3 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Assessment (NOVA). Prior to the initiation of an administrative proceeding through issuance of a NOVA, the... enforcement proceeding under this § 785.3 by issuing a NOVA. (b) Content of a NOVA. The NOVA shall constitute... state the maximum amount of the civil penalty that could be assessed. The NOVA also will inform...

  16. 15 CFR 719.5 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Assessment (NOVA). The letter of intent to charge will be accompanied by a draft NOVA and proposed... the allegations set forth in the draft NOVA. An administrative enforcement proceeding is not initiated... for Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office of Export...

  17. 15 CFR 785.3 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Assessment (NOVA). Prior to the initiation of an administrative proceeding through issuance of a NOVA, the... enforcement proceeding under this § 785.3 by issuing a NOVA. (b) Content of a NOVA. The NOVA shall constitute... state the maximum amount of the civil penalty that could be assessed. The NOVA also will inform...

  18. 15 CFR 785.3 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Assessment (NOVA). Prior to the initiation of an administrative proceeding through issuance of a NOVA, the... enforcement proceeding under this § 785.3 by issuing a NOVA. (b) Content of a NOVA. The NOVA shall constitute... state the maximum amount of the civil penalty that could be assessed. The NOVA also will inform...

  19. The Perceptions of Administrators Concerning the One Florida Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Adriel A.; Green-Powell, Patricia A.; Joseph, Crystal L.; Knight, Linda G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover the perceptions of Florida law school administrators on the impact of the OFI (one Florida initiative) and the addition of two MSI (minority serving institution) law schools on diversity in Florida's legal profession. This research explored the impact of Governor Bush's EO (executive order) on diversity…

  20. Support of NASA quality requirements by defense contract administration services regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, Hiram D.

    1966-01-01

    Defense Contract Administration Services Regions (DCASR) quality assurance personnel performing under NASA Letters of Delegation must work closely with the assigned technical representative of the NASA centers. It is realized that technical personnel from the NASA Centers cannot make on-site visits as frequently as they would like to. However, DCASR quality assurance personnel would know the assigned NASA technical representative and should contact him when problems arise. The technical representative is the expert on the hardware and should be consulted on any problem area. It is important that the DCASR quality assurance personnel recommend to the delegating NASA Center any new or improved methods of which they may be aware which would assist in achieving the desired quality and reliability in NASA hardware. NASA expects assignment of competent personnel in the Quality Assurance functional area and is not only buying the individual's technical skill, but also his experience. Suggestions by field personnel can many times up-grade the quality or the hardware.

  1. Earth to space power beaming: A new NASA technology initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1992-02-01

    Laser power beaming from the Earth's surface is an innovative and potentially cost-effective option for reliably providing electrical power for applications such as space transportation, Earth-orbiting satellites, and lunar development. The maturation of laser power beaming technology can support low power applications such as upgraded conventional communications satellites in the present decade. Power beaming systems to support extensive lunar base operations that may consume extremely large amounts of power can be implemented early in the 21st century. The synergistic advantages of high-thrust, high specific-impulse electric propulsion may make enhanced, low cost space logistics an area of unique significance for laser power beaming. Economic forces will continue as a driving factor in the selection of major system elements for both commercial applications as well as the avant-garde national space missions envisioned for the 21st century. As a result, the implementation of laser power beaming systems will only take place if they can demonstrate clear economic benefits without sacrificing performance, personnel safety, or the environment. Similarly, the development activities that are a necessary precursor to any operational system will take place only if key industry and government leaders perceive laser power beaming systems as an achievable goal with realistic payoffs in comparison to competing energy options. This paper summarizes NASA's current research to evaluate laser power beaming systems as they apply to applications of greatest interest, and it includes a summary of the current laser power beaming program within the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. This research effort will quantify some key technical certainties and uncertainties pertaining to laser power beaming systems appropriate for space applications as well as establish a path of development that includes maturation of key technology components for reliable laser and

  2. Initial results from the NASA-Lewis wave rotor experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Fronek, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Wave rotors may play a role as topping cycles for jet engines, since by their use, the combustion temperature can be raised without increasing the turbine inlet temperature. In order to design a wave rotor for this, or any other application, knowledge of the loss mechanisms is required, and also how the design parameters affect those losses. At NASA LeRC, a 3-port wave rotor experiment operating on the flow-divider cycle, has been started with the objective of determining the losses. The experimental scheme is a three factor Box-Behnken design, with passage opening time, friction factor, and leakage gap as the factors. Variation of these factors is provided by using two rotors, of different length, two different passage widths for each rotor, and adjustable leakage gap. In the experiment, pressure transducers are mounted on the rotor, and give pressure traces as a function of rotational angle at the entrance and exit of a rotor passage. In addition, pitot rakes monitor the stagnation pressures for each port, and orifice meters measure the mass flows. The results show that leakage losses are very significant in the present experiment, but can be reduced considerably by decreasing the rotor to wall clearance spacing.

  3. Auxiliary Propulsion Activities in Support of NASA's Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Philip J.; Unger, Ronald J.; Waits, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Launch Initiative (SLI) procurement mechanism NRA8-30 initiated the Auxiliary Propulsion System/Main Propulsion System (APS/MPS) Project in 2001 to address technology gaps and development risks for non-toxic and cryogenic propellants for auxiliary propulsion applications. These applications include reaction control and orbital maneuvering engines, and storage, pressure control, and transfer technologies associated with on-orbit maintenance of cryogens. The project has successfully evolved over several years in response to changing requirements for re-usable launch vehicle technologies, general launch technology improvements, and, most recently, exploration technologies. Lessons learned based on actual hardware performance have also played a part in the project evolution to focus now on those technologies deemed specifically relevant to the Exploration Initiative. Formal relevance reviews held in the spring of 2004 resulted in authority for continuation of the Auxiliary Propulsion Project through Fiscal Year 2005 (FY05), and provided for a direct reporting path to the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The tasks determined to be relevant under the project were: continuation of the development, fabrication, and delivery of three 870 lbf thrust prototype LOX/ethanol reaction control engines; the fabrication, assembly, engine integration and testing of the Auxiliary Propulsion Test Bed at White Sands Test Facility; and the completion of FY04 cryogenic fluid management component and subsystem development tasks (mass gauging, pressure control, and liquid acquisition elements). This paper presents an overview of those tasks, their scope, expectations, and results to-date as carried forward into the Exploration Initiative.

  4. Crew and Thermal Systems Strategic Communications Initiatives in Support of NASA's Strategic Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has defined strategic goals to invest in next-generation technologies and innovations, to inspire students to become the future leaders of space exploration, and to expand partnerships with industry and academia around the world. The Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports these NASA initiatives. In July 2011, CTSD created a strategic communications team to communicate CTSD capabilities, technologies, and personnel to internal NASA and external technical audiences for business development and collaborative initiatives, and to students, educators, and the general public for education and public outreach efforts. This paper summarizes the CTSD Strategic Communications efforts and metrics through the first nine months of fiscal year 2012.

  5. 40 CFR 179.112 - Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision. (a) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator shall have the same powers as did the presiding officer in making the initial decision. On the Administrator's own initiative or on motion, the Administrator may remand...

  6. 40 CFR 179.112 - Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision. (a) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator shall have the same powers as did the presiding officer in making the initial decision. On the Administrator's own initiative or on motion, the Administrator may remand...

  7. 40 CFR 179.112 - Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision. (a) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator shall have the same powers as did the presiding officer in making the initial decision. On the Administrator's own initiative or on motion, the Administrator may remand...

  8. 40 CFR 179.112 - Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision. (a) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator shall have the same powers as did the presiding officer in making the initial decision. On the Administrator's own initiative or on motion, the Administrator may remand...

  9. 40 CFR 179.112 - Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Decision by Administrator on appeal or review of initial decision. (a) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator shall have the same powers as did the presiding officer in making the initial decision. On the Administrator's own initiative or on motion, the Administrator may remand...

  10. NASA GRC Fatigue Crack Initiation Life Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Metal fatigue has plagued structural components for centuries, and it remains a critical durability issue in today's aerospace hardware. This is true despite vastly improved and advanced materials, increased mechanistic understanding, and development of accurate structural analysis and advanced fatigue life prediction tools. Each advance is quickly taken advantage of to produce safer, more reliable, more cost effective, and better performing products. In other words, as the envelope is expanded, components are then designed to operate just as close to the newly expanded envelope as they were to the initial one. The problem is perennial. The economic importance of addressing structural durability issues early in the design process is emphasized. Tradeoffs with performance, cost, and legislated restrictions are pointed out. Several aspects of structural durability of advanced systems, advanced materials and advanced fatigue life prediction methods are presented. Specific items include the basic elements of durability analysis, conventional designs, barriers to be overcome for advanced systems, high-temperature life prediction for both creep-fatigue and thermomechanical fatigue, mean stress effects, multiaxial stress-strain states, and cumulative fatigue damage accumulation assessment.

  11. NASA GRC Fatigue Crack Initiation Life Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    2002-10-01

    Metal fatigue has plagued structural components for centuries, and it remains a critical durability issue in today's aerospace hardware. This is true despite vastly improved and advanced materials, increased mechanistic understanding, and development of accurate structural analysis and advanced fatigue life prediction tools. Each advance is quickly taken advantage of to produce safer, more reliable, more cost effective, and better performing products. In other words, as the envelope is expanded, components are then designed to operate just as close to the newly expanded envelope as they were to the initial one. The problem is perennial. The economic importance of addressing structural durability issues early in the design process is emphasized. Tradeoffs with performance, cost, and legislated restrictions are pointed out. Several aspects of structural durability of advanced systems, advanced materials and advanced fatigue life prediction methods are presented. Specific items include the basic elements of durability analysis, conventional designs, barriers to be overcome for advanced systems, high-temperature life prediction for both creep-fatigue and thermomechanical fatigue, mean stress effects, multiaxial stress-strain states, and cumulative fatigue damage accumulation assessment.

  12. 77 FR 65103 - Rules of Practice in Proceedings Relative to Administrative Offsets Initiated Against Former...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... 966 Rules of Practice in Proceedings Relative to Administrative Offsets Initiated Against Former... the rules of practice of the Judicial Officer in proceedings relative to administrative offsets... Summary The rules of practice in proceedings relative to administrative offsets initiated against...

  13. NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Rothenberg addresses guests at ribbon cutting for the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Joseph Rothenberg addresses attendees at a ribbon cutting for the new Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS) at the Hypergolic Maintenance Facility (HMF). The CLCS was declared operational in a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier. The new control room will be used to process the Orbital Maneuvering System pods and Forward Reaction Control System modules at the HMF. This hardware is removed from Space Shuttle orbiters and routinely taken to the HMF for checkout and servicing.

  14. Profile of software engineering within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Craig C.; Jeletic, Kellyann F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents findings of baselining activities being performed to characterize software practices within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It describes how such baseline findings might be used to focus software process improvement activities. Finally, based on the findings to date, it presents specific recommendations in focusing future NASA software process improvement efforts. The findings presented in this paper are based on data gathered and analyzed to date. As such, the quantitative data presented in this paper are preliminary in nature.

  15. NASA Earth Sciences Data Support System and Services for the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The presentation describes the recently awarded ACCESS project to provide data management of NASA remote sensing data for the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI). The project targets integration of remote sensing data from MODIS, and other NASA instruments on board US-satellites (with potential expansion to data from non-US satellites), customized data products from climatology data sets (e.g., ISCCP, ISLSCP) and model data (e.g., NCEP/NCAR) into a single, well-architected data management system. It will utilize two existing components developed by the Goddard Earth Sciences Data & Information Services Center (GES DISC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: (1) online archiving and distribution system, that allows collection, processing and ingest of data from various sources into the online archive, and (2) user-friendly intelligent web-based online visualization and analysis system, also known as Giovanni. The former includes various kinds of data preparation for seamless interoperability between measurements by different instruments. The latter provides convenient access to various geophysical parameters measured in the Northern Eurasia region without any need to learn complicated remote sensing data formats, or retrieve and process large volumes of NASA data. Initial implementation of this data management system will concentrate on atmospheric data and surface data aggregated to coarse resolution to support collaborative environment and climate change studies and modeling, while at later stages, data from NASA and non-NASA satellites at higher resolution will be integrated into the system.

  16. NASA safety program activities in support of the Space Exploration Initiatives Nuclear Propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Panels have been used as the basis for the current development of safety policies and requirements for the Space Exploration Initiatives (SEI) Nuclear Propulsion Technology development program. The Safety Division of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Quality has initiated efforts to develop policies for the safe use of nuclear propulsion in space through involvement in the joint agency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG), encouraged expansion of the initial policy development into proposed programmatic requirements, and suggested further expansion into the overall risk assessment and risk management process for the NASA Exploration Program. Similar efforts are underway within the Department of Energy to ensure the safe development and testing of nuclear propulsion systems on Earth. This paper describes the NASA safety policy related to requirements for the design of systems that may operate where Earth re-entry is a possibility. The expected plan of action is to support and oversee activities related to the technology development of nuclear propulsion in space, and support the overall safety and risk management program being developed for the NASA Exploration Program.

  17. The impact of the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program on fellows' career choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Eva M.

    Maintaining diversity in the technical workforce and in higher education has been identified as one way to increase the outreach, recruitment and retention of students and other faculty from underrepresented, underserved and minority populations, especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses of study and careers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) is a professional development program targeting faculty at Minority Serving Institutions and NASA civil servant employees for a two year work-based professional development experience toward increasing the likelihood of retaining them in STEM careers and supporting the recruitment and retention of minority students in STEM courses of study. This evaluation links the activities of the fellowship program to the impact on fellows' career choices as a result of participation through a series of surveys and interviews. Fellows' personal and professional perceptions of themselves and colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about their professional capabilities as a result of selection and participation were also addressed as they related to career outcomes. The findings indicated that while there was no direct impact on fellows' choice of careers, the exposure, direction and focus offered through travel, mentoring, research and teaching had an impact their perceptions of their own capabilities and, their colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about them as professionals and researchers. The career outcomes reported were an increase in the number publications, promotions, change in career and an increased awareness of the culture of science and engineering.

  18. Crew and Thermal Systems Strategic Communications Initiatives in Support of NASA's Strategic Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory; Jennings, Mallory A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has defined strategic goals to invest in next-generation technologies and innovations, inspire students to become the future leaders of space exploration, and expand partnerships with industry and academia around the world. The Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports these NASA initiatives. In July 2011, CTSD created a strategic communications team to communicate CTSD capabilities, technologies, and personnel to external technical audiences for business development and collaborative initiatives, and to students, educators, and the general public for education and public outreach efforts. This paper summarizes the CTSD Strategic Communications efforts and metrics through the first half of fiscal year 2012 with projections for end of fiscal year data.

  19. Initial Flight Evaluation of the Army/NASA RASCAL Variable Stability Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moralez, Ernesto, III; Hindson, William S.; Arterburn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) [will] have performed initial flight evaluations of the Research Flight Control System (RFCS) that has been integrated into the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) variable stability helicopter. The RASCAL, a highly modified JUH-60A Black Hawk helicopter, is a variable-stability, in-flight simulator that is designed to support flight research programs that leverage on the flight control and handling qualities design tools developed by the Army and NASA. These tools are used in the flight control design life cycle from initial concept definition, through simulation, and ultimately into flight on-board the RASCAL helicopter. The RASCAL will be used to validate methodologies for reducing design cycle costs for new or modified aircraft, and it will serve as a base for the investigation of new rotorcraft technology.

  20. NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative: A Program Manager's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Stephen M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the National Science Foundation (NSF)/United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)/National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) Research in Digital Libraries Initiative (DLI). Highlights include benefits of digital libraries; the Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCC); and program…

  1. Enabling the space exploration initiative: NASA's exploration technology program in space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    Space power requirements for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) are reviewed, including the results of a NASA 90-day study and reports by the National Research Council, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), NASA, the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program, and the Synthesis Group. The space power requirements for the SEI robotic missions, lunar spacecraft, Mars spacecraft, and human missions are summarized. Planning for exploration technology is addressed, including photovoltaic, chemical and thermal energy conversion; high-capacity power; power and thermal management for the surface, Earth-orbiting platform and spacecraft; laser power beaming; and mobile surface systems.

  2. Airborne laser topographic mapping results from initial joint NASA/US Army Corps of Engineers experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Initial results from a series of joint NASA/US Army Corps of Engineers experiments are presented. The NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) was exercised over various terrain conditions, collecting both profile and scan data from which river basin cross sections are extracted. Comparisons of the laser data with both photogrammetry and ground surveys are made, with 12 to 27 cm agreement observed over open ground. Foliage penetration tests, utilizing the unique time-waveform sampling capability of the AOL, indicate 50 cm agreement with photogrammetry (known to have difficulty in foliage covered terrain).

  3. NASA Administrator, U.S. Secretary of State watch STS-88 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At the Banana Creek Viewing Site, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left), U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright (center) and astronaut Michael Lopez-Alegria watch the launch of STS-88 from Launch Pad 39A at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. STS-88 is the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Lopez-Alegria is part of the STS-92 crew that is assigned to the fourth ISS assembly flight scheduled for launch on Oct. 28, 1999, aboard Discovery.

  4. STS-35 MS Hoffman is greeted by JSC manager Puddy and NASA administrator Lenoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight Dr. William B. Lenoir (second left) shakes hands with Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman soon after the seven crewmembers egressed Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Also pictured are JSC Flight Crew Operations Directorate (FCOD) Director Donald R. Puddy (left) and Commander Vance D. Brand. OV-102 landed on EAFB concrete runway 22 at 9:54:09 pm (Pacific Standard Time) ending its nine-day STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) mission.

  5. The JOVE initiative - A NASA/university Joint Venture in space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, F.; Chappell, R.

    1990-01-01

    The JOVE (NASA/university Joint Venture in space science) initiative is a point program between NASA and institutions of higher education whose aim is to bring about an extensive merger between these two communities. The project is discussed with emphasis on suggested contributions of partnership members, JOVE process timeline, and project schedules and costs. It is suggested that NASA provide a summer resident research associateship (one ten week stipend); scientific on-line data from space missions; an electronic network and work station, providing a link to the data base and to other scientists; matching student support, both undergraduate and graduate; matching summer salary for up to three faculty participants; and travel funds. The universities will be asked to provide research time for faculty participants, matching student support, matching summer salary for faculty participants, an instructional unit in space science, and an outreach program to pre-college students.

  6. Powering the Space Exploration Initiative - NASA future space power requirements and issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) establishes the long-term goal of returning to the moon and then exploring Mars. One of the prerequisites for SEI is the exploration technology program which includes program elements on space nuclear power and surface solar power. These program elements in turn build upon the ongoing NASA research and technology base program in space energy conversion. NASA's future space mission planning encompasses both robotic and piloted missions spanning a range of power levels and operational conditions. In response to the breadth of future candidate missions, NASAs current research and technology program in space energy conversion spans a number of technologies so that spacecraft designers can be make intelligent decisions about future power system options. These technologies are discussed.

  7. 77 FR 11798 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Revised Seller Concessions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Chapter II Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives... title (Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Revised Seller Concessions)....

  8. NASA RECON: Course development, administration, and evaluation. A research and development proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Roquemore, Leroy

    1984-01-01

    This proposal addresses the development, administration, and evaluation of a set of transportable, college-level courses to educate science and engineering students in the effective use of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems, and, in particular, in the use of the NASA RECON system. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction. Chapter 2 identifies general and specific objectives, i.e., needs analysis, course development, course administration, and course evaluation. Chapter 3 proposes the methodology to be used in successfully accomplishing these objectives. Chapter 4 highlights expected results and product deliverables, and Chapter 5 presents the project evaluation plan to be followed. Chapter 6 is a brief overview of the institutional resources available at the proposing institutions, i.e., at the University of Southwestern Louisiana and at Southern University to support the project. Chapter 7 proposes a budget, time schedule, and management plan. Chapter 8 is a summary of the foregoing.

  9. NASA Earth Sciences Data Support System and Services for the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    The presentation describes data management of NASA remote sensing data for Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI). Many types of ground and integrative (e.g., satellite, GIs) data will be needed and many models must be applied, adapted or developed for properly understanding the functioning of Northern Eurasia cold and diverse regional system. Mechanisms for obtaining the requisite data sets and models and sharing them among the participating scientists are essential. The proposed project targets integration of remote sensing data from AVHRR, MODIS, and other NASA instruments on board US- satellites (with potential expansion to data from non-US satellites), customized data products from climatology data sets (e.g., ISCCP, ISLSCP) and model data (e.g., NCEPNCAR) into a single, well-architected data management system. It will utilize two existing components developed by the Goddard Earth Sciences Data & Information Services Center (GES DISC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: (1) online archiving and distribution system, that allows collection, processing and ingest of data from various sources into the online archive, and (2) user-friendly intelligent web-based online visualization and analysis system, also known as Giovanni. The former includes various kinds of data preparation for seamless interoperability between measurements by different instruments. The latter provides convenient access to various geophysical parameters measured in the Northern Eurasia region without any need to learn complicated remote sensing data formats, or retrieve and process large volumes of NASA data. Initial implementation of this data management system will concentrate on atmospheric data and surface data aggregated to coarse resolution to support collaborative environment and climate change studies and modeling, while at later stages, data from NASA and non-NASA satellites at higher resolution will be integrated into the system.

  10. Shaping NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Workforce Development Initiative to Address Industry Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosage, David; Meeson, Blanche W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It has been well recognized that the commercial remote sensing industry will expand in new directions, resulting in new applications, thus requiring a larger, more skilled workforce to fill the new positions. In preparation for this change, NASA has initiated a Remote Sensing Professional Development Program to address the workforce needs of this emerging industry by partnering with the private sector, academia, relevant professional societies, and other R&D organizations. Workforce needs will in part include understanding current industry concerns, personnel competencies, current and future skills, growth rates, geographical distributions, certifications, and sources of pre-service and in-service personnel. Dave Rosage of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a panel of MAPPS members will lead a discussion to help NASA specifically address private firms' near and long-term personnel needs to be included in NASA's Remote Sensing Professional Development Program. In addition, Dave Rosage will present perspectives on how remote sensing technologies are evolving, new NASA instruments being developed, and what future workforce skills are expected to support these new developments.

  11. Initial results from a test of the NASA EAARL lidar in the Tampa Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, Wayne C.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Clayton, Tonya; Hansen, Mark; Longenecker, John; Gesch, Dean B.; Crane, Michael; Dutton, S.

    2002-01-01

    An initial test of the performance of the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) over coastal environments around the margins of an urbanized Gulf of Mexico estuary was performed over Tampa Bay in January 2002. The EAARL is a raster-scanning, water-penetrating, full-waveform adaptive lidar that is coupled to aircraft positioning systems and a downlooking color digital camera. The EAARL has unique capabilities for simultaneously mapping topography, shallow bathymetry, and vegetation. Initial analysis within 2 Tampa Bay subregions traversed by the survey flightlines has revealed that the EAARL can survey shallow bathymetry and variables associated with benthic cover in remarkable detail. The results of this ongoing study will aid in developing recommendations on the appropriate use of NASA EAARL surveys for mapping bathymetry and benthic habitats in estuaries around the Gulf of Mexico.

  12. Gulf of Mexico Initiative: NASA Capacity Building in the Gulf Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D.; Graham, W. D.; Searby, N. D.

    2012-12-01

    In the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, NASA created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) to help the region recover and to build the capacity of local and regional organizations to utilize NASA Earth science assets to establish effective policies, encourage sustainable natural resource management and utilization, and to expeditiously respond to crises. GOMI worked closely with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), a regional collaboration of the five US Gulf states and 13 federal agencies, to select projects that addressed high priority issues of the region. Many capabilities developed by this initiative have been adopted by end-users and have been leveraged to respond to other natural and man made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), record breaking floods along the Mississippi River (2011), unprecedented tornado supercells (2011), and extreme drought (2012). Examples of successful capacity building projects will be presented and the lessons learned from these projects will be discussed.

  13. 75 FR 34625 - Administrative Remedy Program: Exception to Initial Filing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... exception will state that formal administrative remedy requests regarding initial decisions that did not... administrative remedy requests regarding initial decisions that did not originate with the Warden, or his/her... regarding initial decisions that did not originate with the Warden, or his/her staff, may be initially...

  14. Crew and Thermal Systems Division Strategic Communications Initiatives in Support of NASA's Strategic Goals: Fiscal Year 2012 Summary and Initial Fiscal Year 2013 Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA strategic plan includes overarching strategies to inspire students through interactions with NASA people and projects, and to expand partnerships with industry and academia around the world. The NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) actively supports these NASA initiatives. At the end of fiscal year 2011, CTSD created a strategic communications team to communicate CTSD capabilities, technologies, and personnel to internal NASA and external technical audiences for collaborative and business development initiatives, and to students, educators, and the general public for education and public outreach efforts. The strategic communications initiatives implemented in fiscal year 2012 resulted in 707 in-reach, outreach, and commercialization events with 39,731 participant interactions. This paper summarizes the CTSD Strategic Communications metrics for fiscal year 2012 and provides metrics for the first nine months of fiscal year 2013.

  15. NASA Kicks Off Summer of Innovation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, astronaut Leland Melvin and others joined students at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to kick off the Summer of Innovation, an initiative to engage...

  16. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets Neil Armstrong at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible, former Apollo astronaut Neil A. Armstrong (left) shakes the hand of Judy Goldin (center), wife of NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (right). The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7.

  17. NASA Engineering and Technology Advancement Office: A proposal to the administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    NASA has continually had problems with cost, schedule, performance, reliability, quality, and safety aspects in programs. Past solutions have not provided the answers needed, and a major change is needed in the way of doing business. A new approach is presented for consideration. These problems are all engineering matters, and therefore, require engineering solutions. Proper engineering tools are needed to fix engineering problems. Headquarters is responsible for providing the management structure to support programs with appropriate engineering tools. A guide to define those tools and an approach for putting them into place is provided. Recommendations include establishing a new Engineering and Technology Advancement Office, requesting a review of this proposal by the Administrator since this subject requires a top level decision. There has been a wide peer review conducted by technical staff at Headquarters, the Field Installations, and others in industry as discussed.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  3. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center Environmental Modeling System (EMS). The suite of SPoRT products for use in the EMS consists of a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite that includes a Lake Surface Temperature (LST) analysis over the Great Lakes, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent within the SST composite, a real-time Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This paper and companion poster describe each dataset and provide recent upgrades made to the SST, Great Lakes LST, GVF composites, and the real-time LIS runs.

  4. The europa initiative for esa's cosmic vision: a potential european contribution to nasa's Europa mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Michel; Jones, Geraint H.; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the habitability of Jupiter's icy moons is considered of high priority in the roadmaps of the main space agencies, including the decadal survey and esa's cosmic vision plan. the voyager and galileo missions indicated that europa and ganymede may meet the requirements of habitability, including deep liquid aqueous reservoirs in their interiors. indeed, they constitute different end-terms of ocean worlds, which deserve further characterization in the next decade. esa and nasa are now both planning to explore these ice moons through exciting and ambitious missions. esa selected in 2012 the juice mission mainly focused on ganymede and the jupiter system, while nasa is currently studying and implementing the europa mission. in 2015, nasa invited esa to provide a junior spacecraft to be carried on board its europa mission, opening a collaboration scheme similar to the very successful cassini-huygens approach. in order to define the best contribution that can be made to nasa's europa mission, a europa initiative has emerged in europe. its objective is to elaborate a community-based strategy for the proposition of the best possible esa contribution(s) to nasa's europa mission, as a candidate for the upcoming selection of esa's 5th medium-class mission . the science returns of the different potential contributions are analysed by six international working groups covering complementary science themes: a) magnetospheric interactions; b) exosphere, including neutrals, dust and plumes; c) geochemistry; d) geology, including expressions of exchanges between layers; e) geophysics, including characterization of liquid water distribution; f) astrobiology. each group is considering different spacecraft options in the contexts of their main scientific merits and limitations, their technical feasibility, and of their interest for the development of esa-nasa collaborations. there are five options under consideration: (1) an augmented payload to the europa mission main

  5. 31 CFR 29.404 - Initial benefit determinations and reconsideration by the Benefits Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial benefit determinations and... Claims and Appeals Procedures § 29.404 Initial benefit determinations and reconsideration by the Benefits Administrator. (a) Initial benefit determinations. The Benefits Administrator will process applications...

  6. 76 FR 82311 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Food and Drug Administration Report on Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... and Drug Administration Report on Good Guidance Practices: Improving Efficiency and Transparency... announcing the availability of a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Report on Good Guidance... Office of the Commissioner prepared a report entitled ``Food and Drug Administration Report on...

  7. Initial results from the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project at NASA Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built, and tested a 2 kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum, and solar flux as encountered in low earth orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station Alpha.

  8. NASA Standard Initiator Susceptibility to UHF and S-Band Radio Frequency Power and Lightning Strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, Karen; Scully, Robert; Norgard, John

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Standard Initiator (NSI) is an important piece of pyrotechnic equipment used in many space applications. This presentation will outline the results of a series of tests done at UHF and S-Band frequencies to determine NSI susceptibility to Radio Frequency (RF) power. The results show significant susceptibility to pulsed RF power in the S-Band region. Additional testing with lightning pulses injected into the firing line harness, modelling the indirect effects of a lightning strike to a spacecraft, showed no vulnerability

  9. NASA Standard Initiator Susceptibility to UHF and S-Band Radio Frequency Power and Lightning Strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, Karen; Scully, Robert C.; Norgard, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Standard Initiator (NSI) is an important piece of pyrotechnic equipment used in many space applications. This paper outlines the results of a series of tests done at UHF and S-Band frequencies to determine NSI susceptibility to Radio Frequency (RF) power. The results show significant susceptibility to pulsed RF power in the S-Band region. Additional testing with lightning pulses injected into the firing line harness, modelling the indirect effects of a lightning strike to a spacecraft, showed no vulnerability.

  10. 21 CFR 10.25 - Initiation of administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... refrain from taking any other form of administrative action. A petition must be either: (1) In the form specified in other applicable FDA regulations, e.g., the form for a color additive petition in § 71.1, for a... application in § 514.1, or (2) in the form for a citizen petition in § 10.30. (b) The Commissioner...

  11. 22 CFR 103.7 - Initiation of administrative enforcement proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... enforcement proceedings. (a) Issuance of Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office... proceeding by issuing a Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Office of Chief Counsel for Export Administration, Department of Commerce shall serve the NOVA as directed by the Secretary. (b) Content of...

  12. 22 CFR 103.7 - Initiation of administrative enforcement proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... enforcement proceedings. (a) Issuance of Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office... proceeding by issuing a Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Office of Chief Counsel for Export Administration, Department of Commerce shall serve the NOVA as directed by the Secretary. (b) Content of...

  13. 22 CFR 103.7 - Initiation of administrative enforcement proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... enforcement proceedings. (a) Issuance of Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office... proceeding by issuing a Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Office of Chief Counsel for Export Administration, Department of Commerce shall serve the NOVA as directed by the Secretary. (b) Content of...

  14. 22 CFR 103.7 - Initiation of administrative enforcement proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... enforcement proceedings. (a) Issuance of Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office... proceeding by issuing a Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Office of Chief Counsel for Export Administration, Department of Commerce shall serve the NOVA as directed by the Secretary. (b) Content of...

  15. 22 CFR 103.7 - Initiation of administrative enforcement proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... enforcement proceedings. (a) Issuance of Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Director of the Office... proceeding by issuing a Notice of Violation and Assessment (NOVA). The Office of Chief Counsel for Export Administration, Department of Commerce shall serve the NOVA as directed by the Secretary. (b) Content of...

  16. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Jennings, Mallory A.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory

    2012-01-01

    NASA's goals to send humans beyond low Earth orbit will involve the need for a strong engineering workforce. Research indicates that student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) areas is on the decline. According to the Department of Education, the United States President has mandated that 100,000 educators be trained in STEM over the next decade to reduce this trend. NASA has aligned its Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiatives to include emphasis in promoting STEM. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems Project Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports this NASA initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for exploration missions. This paper summarizes the EVA Systems EPO efforts and metrics from fiscal year 2011.

  17. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory

    2011-01-01

    NASA's goals to send humans beyond low Earth orbit will involve the need for a strong engineering workforce. Research indicates that student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) areas is on the decline. According to the Department of Education, the United States President has mandated that 100,000 educators be trained in STEM over the next decade to reduce this trend. NASA has aligned its Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiatives to include emphasis in promoting STEM. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems Project Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports this NASA initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for exploration missions. This paper summarizes the EVA Systems EPO efforts and metrics from fiscal year 2011.

  18. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  20. STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk chats with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin shortly after

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine (NSAU), at left, chats with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin shortly after the landing of Columbia at Kennedy Space Center. Looking on is back-up Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, also of NSAU. STS-87 concluded its mission with a main gear touchdown at 7:20:04 a.m. EST Dec. 5, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33, drawing the 15-day, 16-hour and 34- minute-long mission of 6.5 million miles to a close. Also onboard the orbiter were Commander Kevin Kregel; Pilot Steven Lindsey; and Mission Specialists Winston Scott, Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan. During the 88th Space Shuttle mission, the crew performed experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 and pollinated plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment. This was the 12th landing for Columbia at KSC and the 41st KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program.

  1. NASA Administrator Paine and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon Await Apollo 11 Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA administrator (left) and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon wait aboard the recovery ship, the U.S.S. Hornet, for splashdown of the Apollo 11 in the Pacific Ocean. Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man crew. The crew was taken to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  2. Precourt presents a flag, flown on Mir to NASA Administrator Goldin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (at microphone) presents an American flag, a special tool, and an optical disc to NASA Administrator Dan Goldin following Discovery's landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, as Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. This landing not only concluded the STS-91 mission, but Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program as well. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program and was brought back to Earth by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:00 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:00 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space.

  3. NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin greets Mme. Aline Chretien at launch of mission STS-96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left) greets Mme. Aline Chretien, wife of the Canadian Prime Minister, at the launch of STS-96. Looking on in the background (between them) is former astronaut Jean-Loup Chretien (no relation), who flew on STS-86. Mme. Chretien attended the launch because one of the STs-96 crew is Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. Space Shuttle Discovery launched on time at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT to begin a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station. Along with such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment, Discovery carries about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission includes a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  4. 12 CFR 505.4 - Administrative appeal of initial determination to deny records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Administrative appeal of initial determination to deny records. 505.4 Section 505.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 505.4 Administrative appeal of initial determination to...

  5. 12 CFR 505.4 - Administrative appeal of initial determination to deny records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Administrative appeal of initial determination to deny records. 505.4 Section 505.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 505.4 Administrative appeal of initial determination to...

  6. 76 FR 61366 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment to Increase Transparency By Promoting Greater Access to the Agency's Compliance... availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: As part of the Transparency Initiative, the Food and...

  7. 76 FR 37820 - Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Proyecto Informar: Food and Drug Administration Hispanic Outreach Initiative (U01) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and... cooperative agreement for the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. The goal of the Food and...

  8. 20 CFR 408.1003 - Which administrative actions are initial determinations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Which administrative actions are initial determinations? 408.1003 Section 408.1003 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Determinations and the Administrative Review Process...

  9. 20 CFR 408.1004 - Which administrative actions are not initial determinations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Which administrative actions are not initial determinations? 408.1004 Section 408.1004 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Determinations and the Administrative Review Process...

  10. Joint NASA/EPA AVIRIS Analysis in the Chesapeake Bay Region: Plans and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lee; Stokely, Peter; Lobitz, Brad; Shelton, Gary

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Ames Research Center is performing an AVIRIS demonstration project in conjunction with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (Region 3). NASA and EPA scientists have jointly defined a Study Area in eastern Virginia to include portions of the Chesapeake Bay, southern Delmarva Peninsula, and the mouths of the York and James Rivers. Several environmental issues have been identified for study. These include, by priority: 1) water constituent analysis in the Chesapeake Bay, 2) mapping of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Bay, 3) detection of vegetation stress related to Superfund sites at the Yorktown Naval Weapons Station, and 4) wetland species analysis in the York River vicinity. In support of this project, three lines of AVIRIS data were collected during the Wallops Island deployment on 17 August 1997. The remote sensing payload included AVIRIS, MODIS Airborne Simulator and an RC-10 color infrared film camera. The AVIRIS data were delivered to Ames from the JPL AVIRIS Data Facility, on 29 September 1997. Quicklook images indicate nominal data acquisition, and at the current time an atmospheric correction is being applied. Water constituent analysis of the Bay is our highest priority based on EPA interest and available collateral data, both from the surface and from other remote sensing instruments. Constituents of interest include suspended sediments, chlorophyll-a and accessory pigments, Analysis steps will include: verification of data quality, location of study sites in imagery, incorporation of relevant field data from EPA and other Chesapeake Bay cooperators, processing of imagery to show phenomenon of interest, verification of results with cooperators. By 1st quarter CY98 we plan to circulate initial results to NASA and EPA management for review. In the longer term we will finalize documentation, prepare results for publication, and complete any needed technology transfer to EPA remote sensing personnel.

  11. Leadership in Space: Selected Speeches of NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, May 2005 - October 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Speech topics include: Leadership in Space; Space Exploration: Real and Acceptable Reasons; Why Explore Space?; Space Exploration: Filling up the Canvas; Continuing the Voyage: The Spirit of Endeavour; Incorporating Space into Our Economic Sphere of Influence; The Role of Space Exploration in the Global Economy; Partnership in Space Activities; International Space Cooperation; National Strategy and the Civil Space Program; What the Hubble Space Telescope Teaches Us about Ourselves; The Rocket Team; NASA's Direction; Science and NASA; Science Priorities and Program Management; NASA and the Commercial Space Industry; NASA and the Business of Space; American Competitiveness: NASA's Role & Everyone's Responsibility; Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration; The Next Generation of Engineers; System Engineering and the "Two Cultures" of Engineering; Generalship of Engineering; NASA and Engineering Integrity; The Constellation Architecture; Then and Now: Fifty Years in Space; The Reality of Tomorrow; and Human Space Exploration: The Next 50 Years.

  12. Guidelines for development of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) computer security training programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents guidance for the NASA Computer Security Program Manager and the NASA Center Computer Security Officials as they develop training requirements and implement computer security training programs. NASA audiences are categorized based on the computer security knowledge required to accomplish identified job functions. Training requirements, in terms of training subject areas, are presented for both computer security program management personnel and computer resource providers and users. Sources of computer security training are identified.

  13. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program's Implementation of Open Archives Initiation (OAI) for Data Interoperability and Data Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George J.; Heimerl, Lynn N.; Nelson, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Interoperability and data-exchange are critical for the survival of government information management programs. E-government initiatives are transforming the way the government interacts with the public. More information is to be made available through web-enabled technologies. Programs such as the NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program Office are tasked to find more effective ways to disseminate information to the public. The NASA STI Program is an agency-wide program charged with gathering, organizing, storing, and disseminating NASA-produced information for research and public use. The program is investigating the use of a new protocol called the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) as a means to improve data interoperability and data collection. OAI promotes the use of the OAI harvesting protocol as a simple way for data sharing among repositories. In two separate initiatives, the STI Program is implementing OAI In collaboration with the Air Force, Department of Energy, and Old Dominion University, the NASA STI Program has funded research on implementing the OAI to exchange data between the three organizations. The second initiative is the deployment of OAI for the NASA technical report server (TRS) environment. The NASA TRS environment is comprised of distributed technical report servers with a centralized search interface. This paper focuses on the implementation of OAI to promote interoperability among diverse data repositories.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  15. Investigation of energy transfer in the ignition mechanism of a NASA standard initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objective of the proposed research was to construct a detailed computer model of the NASA Standard Initiator (NSI). The NSI plays a critical role in initiating various pyrotechnic events in the National Space Transportation System and is also used in Shuttle payload applications. Several initiators failed when being tested at very low temperatures (4 to 20 K). During subsequent investigation an unacceptable high failure rate was found even at higher temperatures (100 to 150 K) but the precise cause of failure was not determined. The modelling work was undertaken to investigate reasons for failure and to predict the performance of alternate firing schemes. The work has shown that the most likely cause of failure at low temperature is poor thermal contact between the electrically heated bridgewire and the pyrotechnic charge. This problem may be masked if there is good thermal contact between the bridgewire and the alumina charge cup. The high thermal conductivity of alumina at cryogenic temperatures was overlooked in previous analyses, which assumed that the charge cup acted as a thermal insulator.

  16. Guidelines for health surveillance in the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) workplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The adequacy of biomedical data sheets used by the NASA medical staff for NASA employees and contractors was assessed. Procedures for developing medical histories, conducting medical examinations, and collecting toxicity data were reviewed. Recommendations for employee health maintenance and early detection of work-related abnormalities are given.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  18. Prospective new transportation application initiatives in NASA's earth-to-orbit propulsion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Propulsion Technology Program, a multi-year/multi-task focused technology effort is, today, highly focused on conventional high-thrust cryogenic liquid chemical rocket engines and their envisioned future technology needs. But as highlighted in the U.S. National Ten-Year Space Launch Technology Plan, a set of less-conventional propulsion subjects, ones which offer significant promise for both, improving the state of the art and opening up new propulsion-capability possibilities, is now directed to the space propulsion planning community's attention. In conducting its forward-planning activities, it is highly appropriate that the ETO Program (and other programs as well) carefully consider integrating these "new initiative" subjects into the taskwork of future years. After an introductory consideration of the National Plan's propulsion-related directives, followed by a brief background overview of the ETO Program, the following specific new-initiative candidates are discussed from the standpoint of technology-program planning: operationally efficient propulsion systems; high-thrust hybrid rocket propulsion; low-cost, low-pressure expendable propulsion subsystems; advanced cryogenic in-space propulsion systems; integrated modular engine (IME) configured propulsion systems, and combined-cycle airbreathing/rocket propulsion systems.

  19. NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Local Model Runs in the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carcione, Brian; Wood, Lance; Maloney, Joseph; Estupinan, Jeral; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Blottman, Peter; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can be used to initialize local model runs within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). These real-time datasets consist of surface-based information updated at least once per day, and produced in a composite or gridded product that is easily incorporated into the WRF EMS. The primary goal for making these NASA datasets available to the WRF EMS community is to provide timely and high-quality information at a spatial resolution comparable to that used in the local model configurations (i.e., convection-allowing scales). The current suite of SPoRT products supported in the WRF EMS include a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. The SPoRT SST composite is a blend of primarily the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System data for non-precipitation coverage over the oceans at 2-km resolution. The composite includes a special lake surface temperature analysis over the Great Lakes using contributions from the Remote Sensing Systems temperature data. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ice Percentage product is used to create a sea-ice mask in the SPoRT SST composite. The sea-ice mask is produced daily (in-season) at 1.8-km resolution and identifies ice percentage from 0 100% in 10% increments, with values above 90% flagged as ice.

  20. The NASA astrobiology program.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D

    2001-01-01

    The new discipline of astrobiology addresses fundamental questions about life in the universe: "Where did we come from?" "Are we alone in the universe?" "What is our future beyond the Earth?" Developing capabilities in biotechnology, informatics, and space exploration provide new tools to address these old questions. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has encouraged this new discipline by organizing workshops and technical meetings, establishing a NASA Astrobiology Institute, providing research funds to individual investigators, ensuring that astrobiology goals are incorporated in NASA flight missions, and initiating a program of public outreach and education. Much of the initial effort by NASA and the research community was focused on determining the technical content of astrobiology. This paper discusses the initial answer to the question "What is astrobiology?" as described in the NASA Astrobiology Roadmap.

  1. 77 FR 10695 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Revised Seller Concessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Chapter II Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Revised Seller Concessions AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Housing--Federal...

  2. 24 CFR 16.7 - Administrative review of initial denial of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative review of initial denial of access. 16.7 Section 16.7 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.7 Administrative review...

  3. 20 CFR 658.702 - Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., ETA staff shall review the State agency's efforts as documented by the State agency at the end of the... to State Agencies § 658.702 Initial action by the Regional Administrator. (a) The ETA Regional... are elevated to ETA after the exhaustion of State agency administrative remedies, the...

  4. A Modeling and Verification Study of Summer Precipitation Systems Using NASA Surface Initialization Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonathan L. Case; Kumar, Sujay V.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging weather forecast problems in the southeastern U.S. is daily summertime pulse-type convection. During the summer, atmospheric flow and forcing are generally weak in this region; thus, convection typically initiates in response to local forcing along sea/lake breezes, and other discontinuities often related to horizontal gradients in surface heating rates. Numerical simulations of pulse convection usually have low skill, even in local predictions at high resolution, due to the inherent chaotic nature of these precipitation systems. Forecast errors can arise from assumptions within parameterization schemes, model resolution limitations, and uncertainties in both the initial state of the atmosphere and land surface variables such as soil moisture and temperature. For this study, it is hypothesized that high-resolution, consistent representations of surface properties such as soil moisture, soil temperature, and sea surface temperature (SST) are necessary to better simulate the interactions between the surface and atmosphere, and ultimately improve predictions of summertime pulse convection. This paper describes a sensitivity experiment using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Interpolated land and ocean surface fields from a large-scale model are replaced with high-resolution datasets provided by unique NASA assets in an experimental simulation: the Land Information System (LIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) SSTs. The LIS is run in an offline mode for several years at the same grid resolution as the WRF model to provide compatible land surface initial conditions in an equilibrium state. The MODIS SSTs provide detailed analyses of SSTs over the oceans and large lakes compared to current operational products. The WRF model runs initialized with the LIS+MODIS datasets result in a reduction in the overprediction of rainfall areas; however, the skill is almost equally as low in both experiments using

  5. Cost efficient operations: Challenge from NASA administrator and lessons learned from hunting sacred cows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Casasanta, Ralph; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Hawkins, Frederick J.; Burke, Eugene S., Jr.; Todd, Jacqueline E.; Bell, Jerome A.; Miller, Raymond E.; Willoughby, John K.; Gardner, Jo Anne

    1996-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations that resulted from NASA's Hunting Sacred Cows Workshop are summarized, where a sacred cow is a belief or assumption that is so well established that it appears to be unreasonably immune to criticism. A link was identified between increased complexity and increased costs, especially in relation to automation and autonomy. An identical link was identified for outsourcing and commercialization. The work of NASA's Cost Less team is reviewed. The following conclusions were stated by the Cost Less team and considered at the workshop: the way Nasa conducts business must change; NASA makes its best contributions to the public areas not addressed by other government organizations; the management tool used for the last 30 years is no longer suitable; the most important work on any program or project is carried out before the development or operations stages; automation should only be used to achieve autonomy if the reasons for automation are well understood, and NASA's most critical resources are its personnel.

  6. Activities of NASA's Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) in the Assessment of Subsonic Aircraft Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, J. M.; Logan, J. A.; Rotman, D. A.; Bergmann, D. J.; Baughcum, S. L.; Friedl, R. R.; Anderson, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated a peak increase in ozone ranging from 7-12 ppbv (zonal and annual average, and relative to a baseline with no aircraft), due to the subsonic aircraft in the year 2015, corresponding to aircraft emissions of 1.3 TgN/year. This range of values presumably reflects differences in model input (e.g., chemical mechanism, ground emission fluxes, and meteorological fields), and algorithms. The model implemented by the Global Modeling Initiative allows testing the impact of individual model components on the assessment calculations. We present results of the impact of doubling the 1995 aircraft emissions of NOx, corresponding to an extra 0.56 TgN/year, utilizing meteorological data from NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO), the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), and the Middle Atmosphere Community Climate Model, version 3 (MACCM3). Comparison of results to observations can be used to assess the model performance. Peak ozone perturbations ranging from 1.7 to 2.2 ppbv of ozone are calculated using the different fields. These correspond to increases in total tropospheric ozone ranging from 3.3 to 4.1 Tg/Os. These perturbations are consistent with the IPCC results, due to the difference in aircraft emissions. However, the range of values calculated is much smaller than in IPCC.

  7. Impact of DYNAMO observations on NASA GEOS-5 reanalyses and the representation of MJO initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achuthavarier, D.; Wang, H.; Schubert, S. D.; Sienkiewicz, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the impact of the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) campaign in situ observations on NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) reanalyses and the improvements gained thereby in the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation processes. To this end, we produced a global, high-resolution (1/4° spatially) reanalysis that assimilates the level-4, quality-controlled DYNAMO upper air soundings from about 87 stations in the equatorial Indian Ocean region along with a companion data-denied control reanalysis. The DYNAMO reanalysis produces a more realistic vertical structure of the temperature and moisture in the central tropical Indian Ocean by correcting the model biases, namely, the cold and dry biases in the lower troposphere and warm bias in the upper troposphere. The reanalysis horizontal winds are substantially improved, in that, the westerly acceleration and vertical shear of the zonal wind are enhanced. The DYNAMO reanalysis shows enhanced low-level diabatic heating, moisture anomalies and vertical velocity during the MJO initiation. Due to the warmer lower troposphere, the deep convection is invigorated, which is evident in convective cloud fraction. The GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) employed in the reanalysis is overall successful in assimilating the additional DYNAMO observations, except for an erroneous model response for medium rain rates, between 700 and 600 hPa, reminiscent of a bias in earlier versions of the AGCM. The moist heating profile shows a sharp decrease there due to the excessive convective rain re-evaporation, which is partly offset by the temperature increment produced by the analysis.

  8. NASA's East and Southeast Asia Initiatives: BASE-ASIA and EAST-AIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.; Maring, H.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne dust from northern China influences air quality and regional climate in Asia during springtime. However, with the economic growth in China, increased emission of particulate air pollutants from industrial and vehicular sources will not only impact the earth's radiation balance, but also adversely affect human health year round. In addition, both of dust and aerosol pollutants can be transported swiftly across the Pacific affecting North America within a few days. Asian dust and pollutant aerosols can be detected by their colored appearance using current Earth observing satellites (e.g., MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS, etc.) and by sunphotometers deployed on the surface of the earth. Biomass burning has been a regular practice for land clearing and conversion in many countries, especially those in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia. However, the climatology of Southeast Asia is very different than that of Africa and South America, such that large-scale biomass burning causes smoke to interact extensively with clouds during the peak-burning season of March to April. Globally significant sources of greenhouse gases (eg., CO2, CH4), chemically active gases (e.g., NO, CO, HC, CH3Br), and atmospheric aerosols are produced by biomass burning. These gases influence the Earth-atmosphere system, impacting both global climate and tropospheric chemistry. Some aerosols can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, which play a role in determining cloud lifetime and precipitation, altering the earth's radiation and water budgets. Biomass burning also affects the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and carbon compounds; the hydrological cycle; land surface reflectivity and emissivity; and ecosystem biodiversity and stability. Two NASA initiatives, EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) and BASE-ASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South East-Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment) will be presented. The objectives of these initiatives is to

  9. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program's Implementation of Open Archives Initiative (OAI) for Data Interoperability and Data Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George J.; Heimerl, Lynn N.; Nelson, Michael L.

    Interoperability and data-exchange are critical for the survival of government information management programs. E-government initiatives are transforming the way the government interacts with the public. More information is to be made available through Web-enabled technologies. Programs such as the NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI)…

  10. Administrative interventions associated with increased initiation on antiretroviral therapy in Irkutsk, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Ogarkov, O. B.; Ebers, A.; Zhdanova, S.; Moiseeva, E.; Koshcheyev, M. E.; Zorkaltseva, E.; Shugaeva, S.; Vitko, S.; Lyles, G.; Houpt, E. R.

    2016-01-01

    A bundle of initiatives to integrate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) services was assessed for the impact on antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation at a TB referral hospital in Irkutsk, Russian Federation, from February 2014 to December 2015. The ART initiation rates in 166 ART-naïve patients undergoing anti-tuberculosis treatment (34.1% with multidrug or extensively drug-resistant TB) increased significantly from 14 (17%) pre-intervention to 44 (54%) post-intervention (P < 0.001). A survey of TB hospital staff identified administrative prioritisation as the most important initiative for increasing ART initiation. PMID:28123963

  11. Administrative interventions associated with increased initiation on antiretroviral therapy in Irkutsk, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Ogarkov, O B; Ebers, A; Zhdanova, S; Moiseeva, E; Koshcheyev, M E; Zorkaltseva, E; Shugaeva, S; Vitko, S; Lyles, G; Houpt, E R; Heysell, S K

    2016-12-21

    A bundle of initiatives to integrate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) services was assessed for the impact on antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation at a TB referral hospital in Irkutsk, Russian Federation, from February 2014 to December 2015. The ART initiation rates in 166 ART-naïve patients undergoing anti-tuberculosis treatment (34.1% with multidrug or extensively drug-resistant TB) increased significantly from 14 (17%) pre-intervention to 44 (54%) post-intervention (P < 0.001). A survey of TB hospital staff identified administrative prioritisation as the most important initiative for increasing ART initiation.

  12. Guidelines for developing NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk management plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents guidance to NASA Computer security officials for developing ADP security risk management plans. The six components of the risk management process are identified and discussed. Guidance is presented on how to manage security risks that have been identified during a risk analysis performed at a data processing facility or during the security evaluation of an application system.

  13. Risk management. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Interim rule adopted as final with changes.

    PubMed

    2000-11-22

    This is a final rule amending the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to emphasize considerations of risk management, including safety, security (including information technology security), health, export control, and damage to the environment, within the acquisition process. This final rule addresses risk management within the context of acquisition planning, selecting sources, choosing contract type, structuring award fee incentives, administering contracts, and conducting contractor surveillance.

  14. Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Threats to NASA's Docking Seals: Initial Assessment and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Gallo, Christopher A.; Nahra, Henry K.

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) will be exposed to the Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) during missions to the International Space Station (ISS) and to the micrometeoroid environment during lunar missions. The CEV will be equipped with a docking system which enables it to connect to ISS and the lunar module known as Altair; this docking system includes a hatch that opens so crew and supplies can pass between the spacecrafts. This docking system is known as the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) and uses a silicone rubber seal to seal in cabin air. The rubber seal on LIDS presses against a metal flange on ISS (or Altair). All of these mating surfaces are exposed to the space environment prior to docking. The effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, and MMOD have been estimated using ground based facilities. This work presents an initial methodology to predict meteoroid and orbital debris threats to candidate docking seals being considered for LIDS. The methodology integrates the results of ground based hypervelocity impacts on silicone rubber seals and aluminum sheets, risk assessments of the MMOD environment for a variety of mission scenarios, and candidate failure criteria. The experimental effort that addressed the effects of projectile incidence angle, speed, mass, and density, relations between projectile size and resulting crater size, and relations between crater size and the leak rate of candidate seals has culminated in a definition of the seal/flange failure criteria. The risk assessment performed with the BUMPER code used the failure criteria to determine the probability of failure of the seal/flange system and compared the risk to the allotted risk dictated by NASA s program requirements.

  15. Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Threats to NASA's Docking Seals: Initial Assessment and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Nahra, Henry K.

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) will be exposed to the Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) during missions to the International Space Station (ISS) and to the micrometeoroid environment during lunar missions. The CEV will be equipped with a docking system which enables it to connect to ISS and the lunar module known as Altair; this docking system includes a hatch that opens so crew and supplies can pass between the spacecrafts. This docking system is known as the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) and uses a silicone rubber seal to seal in cabin air. The rubber seal on LIDS presses against a metal flange on ISS (or Altair). All of these mating surfaces are exposed to the space environment prior to docking. The effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, and MMOD have been estimated using ground based facilities. This work presents an initial methodology to predict meteoroid and orbital debris threats to candidate docking seals being considered for LIDS. The methodology integrates the results of ground based hypervelocity impacts on silicone rubber seals and aluminum sheets, risk assessments of the MMOD environment for a variety of mission scenarios, and candidate failure criteria. The experimental effort that addressed the effects of projectile incidence angle, speed, mass, and density, relations between projectile size and resulting crater size, and relations between crater size and the leak rate of candidate seals has culminated in a definition of the seal/flange failure criteria. The risk assessment performed with the BUMPER code used the failure criteria to determine the probability of failure of the seal/flange system and compared the risk to the allotted risk dictated by NASA's program requirements.

  16. Review of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA has planned a supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research since the mid-1970's. With the approval of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program as a FY 1984 new start, Congress requested an assessment of the program's objectives, projected short- and long-term uses, program design, computer architecture, user needs, and handling of proprietary and classified information. Specifically requested was an examination of the merits of proceeding with multiple high speed processor (HSP) systems contrasted with a single high speed processor system. The panel found NASA's objectives and projected uses sound and the projected distribution of users as realistic as possible at this stage. The multiple-HSP, whereby new, more powerful state-of-the-art HSP's would be integrated into a flexible network, was judged to present major advantages over any single HSP system.

  17. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  18. Guidelines for contingency planning NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk reduction decision studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Guidance is presented to NASA Computer Security Officials for determining the acceptability or unacceptability of ADP security risks based on the technical, operational and economic feasibility of potential safeguards. The risk management process is reviewed as a specialized application of the systems approach to problem solving and information systems analysis and design. Reporting the results of the risk reduction analysis to management is considered. Report formats for the risk reduction study are provided.

  19. Hydrogen and Storage Initiatives at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel; Woods, Stephen S.

    2006-01-01

    NASA WSTF Hydrogen Activities: a) Aerospace Test; b) System Certification & Verification; c) Component, System, & Facility Hazard Assessment; d) Safety Training Technical Transfer: a) Development of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Practices; b) Support of National Hydrogen Infrastructure Development.

  20. Initial results from the joint NASA-Lewis/U.S. Army icing flight research tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belte, Daumants; Ranaudo, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Army/NASA joint testing of the various aspects of in-flight and ground-based icing simulation facilities and instrumentation is reviewed. The NASA DN-6 icing research aircraft, the U.S. Army JU-21A aircraft, the portable spray rig, helicopter icing spray system, and icing research tunnel are examined. Natural and artificial icing tests, turbulence measurements, and calibration and icing research tunnel tests are described and test results are reported.

  1. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center (STRC) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). In last year's NWA abstract on this topic, the suite of SPoRT products supported in the STRC EMS was presented, which includes a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This abstract and companion presentation describes recent upgrades made to the SST and GVF composites, as well as the real-time LIS runs. The Great Lakes sea-ice product is unchanged from 2011. The SPoRT SST composite product has been expanded geographically and as a result, the resolution has been coarsened from 1 km to 2 km to accommodate the larger domain. The expanded domain covers much of the northern hemisphere from eastern Asia to western Europe (0 N to 80 N latitude and 150 E to 10 E longitude). In addition, the NESDIS POES-GOES product was added to fill in gaps caused by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) being unable to sense in cloudy regions, replacing the recently-lost Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS with negligible change to product fidelity. The SST product now runs twice per day for Terra and Aqua combined data collections from 0000 to 1200 UTC and from 1200 to 0000 UTC, with valid analysis times at 0600 and 1800 UTC. The twice-daily compositing technique reduces the overall latency of the previous version while still representing the diurnal cycle characteristics. The SST composites are available at approximately four hours after the end of each collection period (i.e. 1600 UTC for the nighttime analysis and 0400 UTC for the daytime analysis). The real-time MODIS GVF composite has only received minor updates in the

  2. Spacecraft Hybrid Control At NASA: A Look Back, Current Initiatives, and Some Future Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Neil

    2014-01-01

    There is a heightened interest within NASA for the design, development, and flight implementation of mixed actuator hybrid attitude control systems for science spacecraft that have less than three functional reaction wheel actuators. This interest is driven by a number of recent reaction wheels failures on aging, but still scientifically productive, NASA spacecraft. This paper describes the highlights of the first NASA Cross-Center Hybrid Control Workshop that was held in Greenbelt, Maryland in April of 2013 under the sponsorship of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). A brief historical summary of NASA's past experiences with spacecraft mixed actuator hybrid attitude control approaches, some of which were implemented on-orbit, will be provided. This paper will also convey some of the lessons learned and best practices captured at that workshop. Some relevant recent and current hybrid control activities will be described with an emphasis on work in support of a repurposed Kepler spacecraft. Specific technical areas for future considerations regarding spacecraft hybrid control will also be identified.

  3. 78 FR 33052 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Co. Ltd Autocraft Industry Ltd Autocraft Industry (Shanghai) Ltd Billion Land Ltd C and H... examination of respondents and conduct respondent selection under section 777A(c)(2) of the Act: In general... of Reviews In accordance with 19 CFR 351.221(c)(1)(i), we are initiating administrative reviews...

  4. 15 CFR 720.2 - Initiation of administrative action denying export privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Initiation of administrative action denying export privileges. 720.2 Section 720.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL...

  5. 78 FR 8551 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Changes to Maximum Loan-to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: Changes to Maximum...--Federal Housing Commissioner, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This proposed notice would make changes to the... long-term outlook. HUD has determined that this proposed change to the LTV requirements is necessary...

  6. 15 CFR 720.2 - Initiation of administrative action denying export privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initiation of administrative action denying export privileges. 720.2 Section 720.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL...

  7. 40 CFR 180.29 - Establishment, modification, and revocation of tolerance on initiative of Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment, modification, and revocation of tolerance on initiative of Administrator. 180.29 Section 180.29 Protection of Environment... RESIDUES IN FOOD Procedural Regulations § 180.29 Establishment, modification, and revocation of...

  8. Enabling the Space Exploration Initiative - NASA's Exploration Technology Program in space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    Space power requirements for SEI are reviewed, including the results of a NASA 90-day study and reports by the National Research Council, AIAA, NASA, the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program, and the Synthesis Group. The space power requirements for the SEI robotic missions, lunar spacecraft, Mars spacecraft, and human missions are summarized. Planning for the exploration technology is addressed, including: photovoltaic, chemical, and thermal energy conversion; power management; thermal management; space nuclear power; high-capacity power; power and thermal management for the surface, earth-orbiting platform, and spacecraft; laser power beaming; and mobile surface systems.

  9. NASA Launch Services Program - Project ELaNa and Educational CubeSat Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrobot, Garrett Lee

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA program to use expendable lift vehicles (ELVs) to launch nanosatellites for the purpose of enhancing educational research. The Education Launch of Nanosatellite (ELaNa) project, run out of the Launch Services Program is requesting proposals for CubeSat type payload to provide information that will aid or verify NASA Projects designs while providing higher educational research opportunities. Information is included about the launch vehicles, launch sites that are available to support the Poly Picosatellite Orbital Developer System (PPOD) that could be used on the available ELVs. There is an overview of the services that are provided for a launch.

  10. The effect of environmental initiatives on NASA specifications and standards activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Dennis; Webb, David; Cook, Beth

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) has conducted a survey of NASA centers specifications and standards that require the use of Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS's) (Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Halons, and chlorinated solvents). The results of this survey are presented here, along with a pathfinder approach utilized at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to eliminate the use of ODS's in targeted specifications and standards. Presented here are the lessons learned from a pathfinder effort to replace CFC-113 in a significant MSFC specification for cleaning and cleanliness verification methods for oxygen, fuel and pneumatic service, including Shuttle propulsion elements.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  13. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  14. Estimating the Cost of NASA's Space Launch Initiative: How SLI Cost Stack Up Against the Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph H.; Roth, Axel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA is planning to replace the Space Shuttle with a new completely reusable Second Generation Launch System by approximately 2012. Numerous contracted and NASA in-house Space Transportation Architecture Studies and various technology maturation activities are proceeding and have resulted in scores of competing architecture configurations being proposed. Life cycle cost is a key discriminator between all these various concepts. However, the one obvious analogy for costing purposes remains the current Shuttle system. Are there credible reasons to believe that a second generation reusable launch system can be accomplished at less cost than the Shuttle? The need for a credible answer to this question is critical. This paper reviews the cost estimating approaches being used by the contractors and the government estimators to address this issue and explores the rationale behind the numbers.

  15. Refining the Ares V Design to Carry Out NASA's Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle is part of an overall architecture for u.S. space exploration that will span decades. The Ares V, together with the Ares I crew launch vehicle, Orion crew exploration vehicle and Altair lunar lander, will carry out the national policy goals of retiring the Space Shuttle, completing the International Space Station program, and expanding exploration of the Moon as a steps toward eventual human exploration of Mars. The Ares fleet (Figure 1) is the product of the Exploration Systems Architecture study which, in the wake of the Columbia accident, recommended separating crew from cargo transportation. Both vehicles are undergoing rigorous systems design to maximize safety, reliability, and operability. They take advantage of the best technical and operational lessons learned from the Apollo, Space Shuttle and more recent programs. NASA also seeks to maximize commonality between the crew and cargo vehicles in an effort to simplify and reduce operational costs for sustainable, long-term exploration.

  16. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  17. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 12: An initial investigation into the production and use of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) at five NASA centers: Results of a telephone survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Nanci A.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide NASA management with an 'initial' look at the production and use of scientific and technical information (STI) at five NASA centers (Ames, Goddard, Langley, Lewis, and Marshall). The 550 respondents who were interviewed by telephone held favorable views regarding the NASA STI system. About 65 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to publish their work through the NASA STI system. About 10 percent of those respondents encountered problems using the NASA STI system services for publication. The most frequently reported problem was 'the process is too time consuming' (8.6 percent). Overall, those respondents using the NASA STI system to publish their work rated the system as excellent (24.6 percent) or good (37.6 percent). About 79 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to use the NASA STI system to access information. The most frequently reported problems were 'the time and effort it takes to locate and obtain information through the system' (14.4 percent). Overall, about 83 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system is important to performing their work. Overall, about 73 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system meets their information needs.

  19. Initial Treatment of Men With Newly Diagnosed Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Lu, Xin; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Kreder, Karl J.; Breyer, Benjamin N.; Cram, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine initial treatments given to men with newly diagnosed lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) within a large integrated health care system in the United States. METHODS We used data from 2003 to 2009 from the Veteran's Health Administration to identify newly diagnosed cases of LUTD using established ICD-9CM codes. Our primary outcome was initial LUTD treatment (3 months), categorized as watchful waiting (WW), medical therapy (MT), or surgical therapy (ST); our secondary outcome was pharmacotherapy class received. We used logistic regression models to examine patient, provider, and health system factors associated with receiving MT or ST when compared with WW. RESULTS There were 393,901 incident cases of LUTD, of which 58.0% initially received WW, 41.8% MT, and 0.2% ST. Of the MT men, 79.8% received an alpha-blocker, 7.7% a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, 3.3% an anticholinergic, and 7.3% combined therapy (alpha-blocker and 5-alpha reductase inhibitor). In our regression models, we found that age (higher), race (white/black), income (low), region (northeast/south), comorbidities (greater), prostate-specific antigen (lower), and provider (nonurologist) were associated with an increased odds of receiving MT. We found that age (higher), race (white), income (low), region (northeast/south), initial provider (urologist), and prostate-specific antigen (higher) increased the odds of receiving ST. CONCLUSION Most men with newly diagnosed LUTD in the Veteran's Health Administration receive WW, and initial surgical treatment is rare. A large number of men receiving MT were treated with monotherapy, despite evidence that combination therapy is potentially more effective in the long-term, suggesting opportunities for improvement in initial LUTD management within this population. PMID:24286603

  20. Partnering With NASA JSC for Community Research Needs; Collaborative and Student Opportunities via Jacobs and PSAMS Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa; Draper, David

    2016-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division houses a unique combination of laboratories and other assets for conducting cutting-edge planetary research. These facilities have been accessed for decades by outside scientists; over the past five years, the 16 full time contract research and technical staff members in our division have hosted a total of 223 visiting researchers, representing 35 institutions. In order to continue to provide this level of support to the planetary sciences community, and also expand our services and collaboration within the broader scientific community, we intend to submit a proposal to NASA specifically for facilities support and establishment of our laboratories as a collective, PSAMS, Planetary Sample Analyses and Mission Science. This initiative should result in substantial cost savings to PIs with NASA funding who wish to use our facilities. Another cost saving could be realized by aggregating visiting user experiments and analyses through COMPRES, which would be of particular interest to researchers in earth and material sciences. JSC is a recognized NASA center of excellence for curation, and in future will allow PIs and mission teams easy access to samples in Curation facilities that they have been approved to study. Our curation expertise could also be used for a collection of experimental run products that could be shared and distributed to COMPRES community members. These experimental run products could range from 1 bar controlled atmosphere furnace, piston cylinder, multi-anvil, CETUS (see companion abstract), to shocked products. Coordinated analyses of samples is one of the major strengths of our division, where a single sample can be prepared with minimal destruction for a variety of chemical and structural analyses, from macro to nano-scale.

  1. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  2. OAI and NASA's Scientific and Technical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael L.; Rocker, JoAnne; Harrison, Terry L.

    2003-01-01

    Details NASA's (National Aeronautics & Space Administration (USA)) involvement in defining and testing the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) and experience with adapting existing NASA distributed searching DLs (digital libraries) to use the OAI-PMH and metadata harvesting. Discusses some new digital…

  3. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  4. NASA Controller Acceptability Study 1(CAS-1) Experiment Description and Initial Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Munoz, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the Controller Acceptability Study 1 (CAS-1) experiment that was conducted by NASA Langley Research Center personnel from January through March 2014 and presents partial CAS-1 results. CAS-1 employed 14 air traffic controller volunteers as research subjects to assess the viability of simulated future unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operating alongside manned aircraft in moderate-density, moderate-complexity Class E airspace. These simulated UAS were equipped with a prototype pilot-in-the-loop (PITL) Detect and Avoid (DAA) system, specifically the Self-Separation (SS) function of such a system based on Stratway+ software to replace the see-and-avoid capabilities of manned aircraft pilots. A quantitative CAS-1 objective was to determine horizontal miss distance (HMD) values for SS encounters that were most acceptable to air traffic controllers, specifically HMD values that were assessed as neither unsafely small nor disruptively large. HMD values between 0.5 and 3.0 nautical miles (nmi) were assessed for a wide array of encounter geometries between UAS and manned aircraft. The paper includes brief introductory material about DAA systems and their SS functions, followed by descriptions of the CAS-1 simulation environment, prototype PITL SS capability, and experiment design, and concludes with presentation and discussion of partial CAS-1 data and results.

  5. Initial Evaluations of LoC Prediction Algorithms Using the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Stepanyan, Vahram; Barlow, Jonathan; Hardy, Gordon; Dorais, Greg; Poolla, Chaitanya; Reardon, Scott; Soloway, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Flying near the edge of the safe operating envelope is an inherently unsafe proposition. Edge of the envelope here implies that small changes or disturbances in system state or system dynamics can take the system out of the safe envelope in a short time and could result in loss-of-control events. This study evaluated approaches to predicting loss-of-control safety margins as the aircraft gets closer to the edge of the safe operating envelope. The goal of the approach is to provide the pilot aural, visual, and tactile cues focused on maintaining the pilot's control action within predicted loss-of-control boundaries. Our predictive architecture combines quantitative loss-of-control boundaries, an adaptive prediction method to estimate in real-time Markov model parameters and associated stability margins, and a real-time data-based predictive control margins estimation algorithm. The combined architecture is applied to a nonlinear transport class aircraft. Evaluations of various feedback cues using both test and commercial pilots in the NASA Ames Vertical Motion-base Simulator (VMS) were conducted in the summer of 2013. The paper presents results of this evaluation focused on effectiveness of these approaches and the cues in preventing the pilots from entering a loss-of-control event.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1996. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  8. SMOS Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in the NASA Land Information System: Impact on LSM Initialization and NWP Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Land surface models are important components of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, partitioning incoming energy into latent and sensitive heat fluxes that affect boundary layer growth and destabilization. During warm-season months, diurnal heating and convective initiation depend strongly on evapotranspiration and available boundary layer moisture, which are substantially affected by soil moisture content. Therefore, to properly simulate warm-season processes in NWP models, an accurate initialization of the land surface state is important for accurately depicting the exchange of heat and moisture between the surface and boundary layer. In this study, soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite radiometer are assimilated into the Noah Land Surface Model via an Ensemble Kalman Filter embedded within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) software framework. The output from LIS-Noah is subsequently used to initialize runs of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) NWP model. The impact of assimilating SMOS retrievals is assessed by initializing the WRF model with LIS-Noah output obtained with and without SMOS data assimilation. The southeastern United States is used as the domain for a preliminary case study. During the summer months, there is extensive irrigation in the lower Mississippi Valley for rice and other crops. The irrigation is not represented in the meteorological forcing used to drive the LIS-Noah integration, but the irrigated areas show up clearly in the SMOS soil moisture retrievals, resulting in a case with a large difference in initial soil moisture conditions. The impact of SMOS data assimilation on both Noah soil moisture fields and on short-term (0-48 hour) WRF weather forecasts will be presented.

  9. The Proposed NASA Pyroshock Test Criteria Standard - Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himelblau, H.; Kern, D. L.; Piersol, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has traditionally left the task of specifying design and test criteria to each of the several NASA Centers. Faced with the wide variety fo resulting criteria used for resolving similar or identical problems, the NASA Office of Chief Engineer initiated a program to develop consistent NASA-wide standards if the various NASA Centers could agree to a set of common requirements.

  10. TOMORROW: EPA Administrator in Chicago to Tour Coalition: Energy and Announce Target of Installing One Million New Smart Thermostats Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CHICAGO - Tomorrow, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will tour Coalition: Energy and join state and local leaders in a press conference to announce a new smart thermostat initiative for Illinois with a target of installing one million smart thermosta

  11. TODAY: EPA Administrator in Chicago to Tour Coalition: Energy and Announce Target of Installing One Million New Smart Thermostats Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CHICAGO - Today, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will tour Coalition: Energy and join state and local leaders in a press conference to announce a new smart thermostat initiative for Illinois with a target of installing one million smart thermostats

  12. Initial Investigation of Operational Concept Elements for NASA's NextGen-Airportal Project Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary; Lee, Jonathan; Poage, James L.; Tobias, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The NextGen-Airportal Project is organized into three research focus areas: Safe and Efficient Surface Operations, Coordinated Arrival/Departure Operations Management, and Airportal Transition and Integration Management. The content in this document was derived from an examination of constraints and problems at airports for accommodating future increases in air traffic, and from an examination of capabilities envisioned for NextGen. The concepts are organized around categories of constraints and problems and therefore do not precisely match, but generally reflect, the research focus areas. The concepts provide a framework for defining and coordinating research activities that are, and will be, conducted by the NextGen-Airportal Project. The concepts will help the research activities function as an integrated set focused on future needs for airport operations and will aid aligning the research activities with NextGen key capabilities. The concepts are presented as concept elements with more detailed sub-elements under each concept element. For each concept element, the following topics are discussed: constraints and problems being addressed, benefit descriptions, required technology and infrastructure, and an initial list of potential research topics. Concept content will be updated and more detail added as the research progresses. The concepts are focused on enhancing airportal capacity and efficiency in a timeframe 20 to 25 years in the future, which is similar to NextGen's timeframe.

  13. Whither SDI (Strategic Defensive Initiative): Strategic defenses in the next administration

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, A.

    1988-09-01

    This document examines the legacy of strategic defenses the next president will inherit from the Reagan administration. Concentrating on SDI, it describes the programmatic, budgetary, arms control, and political contours of the strategic defense agenda that the new president is likely to confront. It then considers the options he will face and plots a course he should take. This essay is intended to stimulate and structure debate about the future of strategic defenses. An earlier version of this paper was prepared for a Council on Foreign Relations study group on the Arms Control Agenda of the Next Administration. Since it was initially drafted in spring 1988, the politics of SDI have changed with a speed that few could have predicted. Abruptly and unexpectedly, SDI all but disappeared from the political debate at precisely the time when a multitude of candidates were vying for their parties' nominations, and then the two nominees were seeking to define and distinguish their positions. Despite these changed circumstances, this document should be of interest to those who are concerned with how developments in strategic defense bear on nuclear policy, programs, and arms control.

  14. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are as follows: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  17. Code of conduct for the International Space Station Crew. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-12-21

    NASA is issuing new regulations entitled "International Space Station Crew," to implement certain provisions of the International Space Station (ISS) Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) regarding ISS crewmembers' observance of an ISS Code of Conduct.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993 is presented.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1994, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard; Sickorez, Donn G.

    1995-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to: (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1994.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) /American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1996.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the NASA/ASEE program were: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent 10 weeks at Johnson Space Center engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation is presented of the final reports on the research projects done by the fellows during the summer of 1987. This is volume 1 of a 2 volume report.

  3. NASA spinoffs to energy and the environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Ray L.; Lehrman, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    Thousands of aerospace innovations have found their way into everyday use, and future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions promise to provide many more spinoff opportunities. Each spinoff has contributed some measure of benefit to the national economy, productivity, or lifestyle. In total, these spinoffs represent a substantial dividend on the national investment in aerospace research. Along with examples of the many terrestrial applications of NASA technology to energy and the environment, this paper presents the mechanisms by which NASA promotes technology transfer. Also discussed are new NASA initiatives in superconductivity research, global warming, and aeropropulsion.

  4. NASA Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains several articles, primarily on International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and their activities, as well as the activities of NASA administrators. Other subjects covered in the articles include the investigation of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, activities at NASA centers, Mars exploration, a collision avoidance test on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The ISS articles cover landing in a Soyuz capsule, photography from the ISS, and the Expedition Seven crew.

  5. NASA's explorer school and spaceward bound programs: Insights into two education programs designed to heighten public support for space science initiatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allner, M.; McKay, C.; Coe, L.; Rask, J.; Paradise, J.; Wynne, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: NASA has played an influential role in bringing the enthusiasm of space science to schools across the United States since the 1980s. The evolution of this public outreach has led to a variety of NASA funded education programs designed to promote student interest in science, technology, engineering, math, and geography (STEM-G) careers. Purpose: This paper investigates the educational outreach initiatives, structure, and impact of two of NASA's largest educational programs: the NASA Explorer School (NES) and NASA Spaceward Bound programs. Methods: The investigation further provides a detailed overview of the structure of these two NASA education outreach programs, while providing information regarding selection criteria and program developments over time. Results: Since its induction in 2003 the NES program has networked and provided resources to over 300 schools across the United States. Future directions include further development of mentor schools for each new NES school selected, while also developing a longitudinal student tracking system for NES students to monitor their future involvement in STEM-G careers. The Spaceward Bound program, now in its third year of teacher outreach, is looking to further expand its teacher network and scientific collaboration efforts, while building on its teacher mentorship framework.

  6. Preliminary Results of a U.S. Deep South Modeling Experiment Using NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Operational National Weather Service Local Model Runs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Lance; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Case, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A joint collaborative modeling effort among the NWS offices in Mobile, AL, and Houston, TX, and NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center began during the 2011-2012 cold season, and continued into the 2012 warm season. The focus was on two frequent U.S. Deep South forecast challenges: the initiation of deep convection during the warm season; and heavy precipitation during the cold season. We wanted to examine the impact of certain NASA produced products on the Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System in improving the model representation of mesoscale boundaries such as the local sea-, bay- and land-breezes (which often leads to warm season convective initiation); and improving the model representation of slow moving, or quasi-stationary frontal boundaries (which focus cold season storm cell training and heavy precipitation). The NASA products were: the 4-km Land Information System, a 1-km sea surface temperature analysis, and a 4-km greenness vegetation fraction analysis. Similar domains were established over the southeast Texas and Alabama coastlines, each with an outer grid with a 9 km spacing and an inner nest with a 3 km grid spacing. The model was run at each NWS office once per day out to 24 hours from 0600 UTC, using the NCEP Global Forecast System for initial and boundary conditions. Control runs without the NASA products were made at the NASA SPoRT Center. The NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package was used to evaluate both the positive and negative impacts of the NASA products on the model forecasts. Select case studies will be presented to highlight the influence of the products.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995.. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at JSC, including the White Sands Test Facility, by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports.

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the first fifteen of twenty-seven final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports included in Volume 2.

  9. Preliminary Results of a U.S. Deep South Warm Season Deep Convective Initiation Modeling Experiment using NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Operational National Weather Service Local Model Runs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Wood, Lance; Zavodsky, Brad; Case, Jon; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The initiation of deep convection during the warm season is a forecast challenge in the relative high instability and low wind shear environment of the U.S. Deep South. Despite improved knowledge of the character of well known mesoscale features such as local sea-, bay- and land-breezes, observations show the evolution of these features fall well short in fully describing the location of first initiates. A joint collaborative modeling effort among the NWS offices in Mobile, AL, and Houston, TX, and NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center was undertaken during the 2012 warm season to examine the impact of certain NASA produced products on the Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System. The NASA products were: a 4-km Land Information System data, a 1-km sea surface temperature analysis, and a 4-km greenness vegetation fraction analysis. Similar domains were established over the southeast Texas and Alabama coastlines, each with a 9 km outer grid spacing and a 3 km inner nest spacing. The model was run at each NWS office once per day out to 24 hours from 0600 UTC, using the NCEP Global Forecast System for initial and boundary conditions. Control runs without the NASA products were made at the NASA SPoRT Center. The NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package was used to evaluate both the forecast timing and location of the first initiates, with a focus on the impacts of the NASA products on the model forecasts. Select case studies will be presented to highlight the influence of the products.

  10. Building 1100--NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Building 1100 is the NASA administrative building. Services located in this building include two banks, a post office, barber shop, cafeteria, snack bar, travel agency, dry cleaners, the NASA Exchange retail store and medical facilities for employees.

  11. Using Ensemble Short-Term Initialized Coupled NASA GEOS5 Climate Model Integrations to Study Convective Bias Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charlie; Robertson, Franklin; Molod, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The representation of convective processes, particularly deep convection in the tropics, remains a persistent problem in climate models. In fact structural biases in the distribution of tropical rainfall in the CMIP5 models is hardly different than that of the CMIP3 versions. Given that regional climate change at higher latitudes is sensitive to the configuration of tropical forcing, this persistent bias is a major issue for the credibility of climate change projections. In this study we use model output from integrations of the NASA Global Earth Observing System Five (GEOS5) climate modeling system to study the evolution of biases in the location and intensity of convective processes. We take advantage of a series of hindcast experiments done in support of the US North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) initiative. For these experiments a nine-month forecast using a coupled model configuration is made approximately every five days over the past 30 years. Each forecast is started with an updated analysis of the ocean, atmosphere and land states. For a given calendar month we have approximately 180 forecasts with daily means of various quantities. These forecasts can be averaged to essentially remove "weather scales" and highlight systematic errors as they evolve. Our primary question is to ask how the spatial structure of daily mean precipitation over the tropics evolves from the initial state and what physical processes are involved. Errors in parameterized convection, various water and energy fluxes and the divergent circulation are found to set up on fast time scales (order five days) compared to errors in the ocean, although SST changes can be non-negligible over that time. For the month of June the difference between forecast day five versus day zero precipitation looks quite similar to the difference between the June precipitation climatology and that from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). We focus much of our analysis on the influence of

  12. Recommended techniques for effective maintainability. A continuous improvement initiative of the NASA Reliability and Maintainability Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This manual presents a series of recommended techniques that can increase overall operational effectiveness of both flight and ground based NASA systems. It provides a set of tools that minimizes risk associated with: (1) restoring failed functions (both ground and flight based); (2) conducting complex and highly visible maintenance operations; and (3) sustaining a technical capability to support the NASA mission using aging equipment or facilities. It considers (1) program management - key elements of an effective maintainability effort; (2) design and development - techniques that have benefited previous programs; (3) analysis and test - quantitative and qualitative analysis processes and testing techniques; and (4) operations and operational design techniques that address NASA field experience. This document is a valuable resource for continuous improvement ideas in executing the systems development process in accordance with the NASA 'better, faster, smaller, and cheaper' goal without compromising safety.

  13. Understanding and Implementing Reading First Initiatives. The Changing Role of Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Carrice Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Administrators in the U.S. education system need to be more than good managers, they need to understand high-quality reading instruction, so they can serve their teachers and help their school meet Reading First requirements. Although written with the administrator in mind, this collection also can be used by teachers, teacher educators, staff…

  14. Gender Adeptness among Educational Administrators for Leading Innovative Initiatives in Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Oladunjoye, G. Titi; Onyefulu, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    It may be concluded that female administrators are perceived as being more adept than their male counterparts for leading innovation in schools and leveraging resources into productive outputs. It may be concluded that both genders of administrators perceive such efforts similarly. The only two skills where gender is significant are the two…

  15. 20 CFR 658.702 - Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... JS regulations. (b) Wherever a Regional Administrator discovers or is apprised of possible State agency violations of JS regulations by the review and assessment activities under subpart G of this part... a State agency has violated JS regulations. (c) The Regional Administrator shall accept...

  16. 20 CFR 658.702 - Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... compliance with JS regulations. (b) Wherever a Regional Administrator discovers or is apprised of possible State agency violations of JS regulations by the review and assessment activities under subpart G of... that a State agency has violated JS regulations. (c) The Regional Administrator shall accept...

  17. 20 CFR 658.702 - Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... compliance with JS regulations. (b) Wherever a Regional Administrator discovers or is apprised of possible State agency violations of JS regulations by the review and assessment activities under subpart G of... that a State agency has violated JS regulations. (c) The Regional Administrator shall accept...

  18. 20 CFR 658.702 - Initial action by the Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... compliance with JS regulations. (b) Wherever a Regional Administrator discovers or is apprised of possible State agency violations of JS regulations by the review and assessment activities under subpart G of... that a State agency has violated JS regulations. (c) The Regional Administrator shall accept...

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/american Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1991 are presented. Some of the topics covered include: collision avoidance for rover vehicles, bioinstrumentation, neural nets, total quality management of flexible space structures, project scheduling, nondestructive tests, orthostatic intolerance to bedrest, hypersonic reentry simulation, measuring human energy expenditure, tribological models, trace element movement in Anarctic ice, gastrointestinal function, and computer assisted instruction.

  20. NASA's explorer school and spaceward bound programs: Insights into two education programs designed to heighten public support for space science initiatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allner, M.; McKay, C.; Coe, L.; Rask, J.; Paradise, J.; Judson Wynne, J.J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: NASA has played an influential role in bringing the enthusiasm of space science to schools across the United States since the 1980s. The evolution of this public outreach has led to a variety of NASA funded education programs designed to promote student interest in science, technology, engineering, math, and geography (STEM-G) careers. Purpose: This paper investigates the educational outreach initiatives, structure, and impact of two of NASA's largest educational programs: the NASA Explorer School (NES) and NASA Spaceward Bound programs. Results: Since its induction in 2003 the NES program has networked and provided resources to over 300 schools across the United States. Future directions include further development of mentor schools for each new NES school selected, while also developing a longitudinal student tracking system for NES students to monitor their future involvement in STEM-G careers. The Spaceward Bound program, now in its third year of teacher outreach, is looking to further expand its teacher network and scientific collaboration efforts, while building on its teacher mentorship framework. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative: an administrative model that facilitated a successful city-wide integration initiative.

    PubMed

    Young, Justin; McLellan, Barry; Escaf, Marnie; Dzavik, Vladimir; Michaud, Susan; Newton, Janet; Newman, Erone

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a description of the administrative model that enabled a city-wide integration effort between Greater Toronto Area hospitals and Toronto Emergency Medical Services in the care of patients within the city of Toronto with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This administrative structure, known as the Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative (THAC), enabled universal 24/7 access to primary percutaneous coronary intervention within Toronto, improving patient efficacy and outcomes. The lessons and administrative enablers from this experience may be useful for regions that are embarking on multi-centre integration efforts. This article presents a five-year perspective on the THAC integration effort.

  2. Defining the PACS profession: an initial survey of skills, training, and capabilities for PACS administrators.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Paul; Bowers, George; Reiner, Bruce I; Siegel, Eliot L

    2005-12-01

    The need for specialized individuals to manage picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) has been recognized with the creation of a new professional title: PACS administrator. This position requires skill sets that bridge the current domains of radiology technologists (RTs), information systems analysts, and radiology administrators. Health care organizations, however, have reported difficulty in defining the functions that a PACS administrator should perform-a challenge compounded when the tries to combine this complex set of capabilities into one individual. As part of a larger effort to define the PACS professional, we developed an extensive but not exclusive consensus list of business, technical, and behavioral competencies desirable in the dedicated PACS professional. Through an on-line survey, radiologists, RTs, information technology specialists, corporate information officers, and radiology administrators rated the importance of these competencies. The results of this survey are presented, and the implications for implementation in training and certification efforts are discussed.

  3. The Obama Administration’s Open Government Initiative: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-17

    Administrator Cass Sunstein wrote a blog posting that recognized certain agencies for their Open Government Plans that were “above and beyond the requirements...revisions to such policies, to promote greater openness in government.”132 On April 7, 2010, Cass Sunstein , the administrator at OIRA, released a...not clear how or why those ratings were modified. As noted earlier in this report, On August 12, 2010, Mr. Chopra and Mr. Sunstein wrote a blog

  4. Implementation and testing of a Neighborhood Office Center (NOC) and integration of the NOC with an administrative correspondence management information system. [for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The application of telecommunications and telecomputing was investigated as a means of reducing NASA's consumption of natural resources and the proliferation of paper copies of correspondence. The feasibility, operational advantages, and limitations of decentralized (remote) neighborhood offices (NOC) linked through an electronic network are demonstrated. These offices are joined to a management information system for correspondence tracking, and to an administrative office center service based on the use of magnetic medium word processing typewriters which handle the daily typing load. In connection with an augmented teleconference network, a uniform means is provided for creating, storing, and retrieving administrative documents, records, and data, while simultaneously permitting users of the system to track their status. Information will be transferred without using paper - merely through digital electronic communication and display, as a step toward the establishment of an agency-wide electronic mail system.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Capability Roadmap Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts. Although detailed requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, near-term technology investment decisions need to be guided by the anticipated capabilities needed to enable or enhance the mission concepts. This paper describes a roadmap that NASA has formulated to guide the development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing, flight-proven state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed. When SOA capabilities fell short of meeting the needs, those "gaps" were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The resulting list of enabling and enhancing capability gaps can be used to guide future ECLSS development. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies needed to enable and enhance exploration may be developed in a manner that synergistically benefits the ISS operational capability, supports Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) development, and sustains long-term technology investments for longer duration missions. This paper summarizes NASA s ECLSS capability roadmap

  6. Latino Initiatives: Progress and Challenges. A Report by the Administration of Mayor David N. Dinkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Adelita M.

    This annual report for 1990 details initiatives by a select group of New York City (New York) agencies on matters of particular concern to Latinos. New York City's mayor, David Dinkins, originally presented these initiatives in August of 1990 to a meeting of Latino leaders representing diverse agencies and community organization. Highlights of…

  7. Success factors for strategic change initiatives: a qualitative study of healthcare administrators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita Arbab; Spaulding, Aaron; Johnson, Christopher E; Gamm, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Success factors related to the implementation of change initiatives are well documented and discussed in the management literature, but they are seldom studied in healthcare organizations engaged in multiple strategic change initiatives. The purpose of this study was to identify key success factors related to implementation of change initiatives based on rich qualitative data gathered from health leader interviews at two large health systems implementing multiple change initiatives. In-depth personal interviews with 61 healthcare leaders in the two large systems were conducted and inductive qualitative analysis was employed to identify success factors associated with 13 change initiatives. Results from this analysis were compared to success factors identified in the literature, and generalizations were drawn that add significantly to the management literature, especially to that in the healthcare sector. Ten specific success factors were identified for the implementation of change initiatives. The top three success factors were (1) culture and values, (2) business processes, and (3) people and engagement. Two of the identified success factors are unique to the healthcare sector and not found in the literature on change models: service quality and client satisfaction (ranked fourth of 10) and access to information (ranked ninth). Results demonstrate the importance of human resource functions, alignment of culture and values with change, and business processes that facilitate effective communication and access to information to achieve many change initiatives. The responses also suggest opportunities for leaders of healthcare organizations to more formally recognize the degree to which various change initiatives are dependent on one another.

  8. Aeronautics in NACA and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Initiated in 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NACA/NASA) aeronautical programs have been the keystone of a sustained U.S. Government, industry, and university research effort which has been a primary factor in the development of our remarkable air transportation systems, the country's largest positive trade balance component, and the world's finest military Air Force. This overview summarizes the flow of events, and the major trends, that have led from the NACA origins to the present NASA Aeronautics program, and indicates some important directions for the years ahead.

  9. Engaging Law Enforcement in Overdose Reversal Initiatives: Authorization and Liability for Naloxone Administration.

    PubMed

    Davis, Corey S; Carr, Derek; Southwell, Jessica K; Beletsky, Leo

    2015-08-01

    Opioid overdose is reversible through the timely administration of naloxone, which has been used by emergency medical services for decades. Law enforcement officers (LEOs) are often the first emergency responders to arrive at an overdose, but they are not typically equipped with naloxone. This is rapidly changing; more than 220 law enforcement agencies in 24 states now carry naloxone. However, rollout in some departments has been hampered by concerns regarding officer and agency liability. We systematically examined the legal risk associated with LEO naloxone administration. LEOs can be authorized to administer naloxone through a variety of mechanisms, and liability risks related to naloxone administration are similar to or lower than those of other activities in which LEOs commonly engage.

  10. Thinking Change Inclusively: Views of Educational Administrators on Inclusive Education as a Reform Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Halis

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to delve into the debate about educational change and evaluate this concept around the paradigms introduced by inclusive education. The paper embarks on views of 27 educational administrators working in different educational institutions in Turkey. Participants are asked to provide their views on educational change and the…

  11. 76 FR 45227 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews, Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... with 19 CFR 351.213(b), for administrative reviews of various antidumping and countervailing duty... subject to review previously were collapsed, and (b) provide a citation to the proceeding in which they...., Ltd. Hangzhou Sanxin Paper Co., Ltd. Nantong Luolai Chemical Fiber Co., Ltd. Nan Yang Textiles...

  12. 78 FR 75238 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management Initiatives: New Manual Underwriting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Chapter II RIN 2502-AJ07 Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Risk Management... relationship between compensating factors and ``stretch ratios'' that permit borrowers to exceed the housing... through risk management practices. The lower costs are a gain to FHA. The target of the document is...

  13. 77 FR 53830 - Rules of Practice in Proceedings Relative to Administrative Offsets Initiated Against Former...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Center or its successor installation. (b) Administrative offset refers to the withholding of money... and an opportunity for review as soon as practicable and will promptly refund any money ultimately..., ``Petition for Review Under 39 CFR Part 966''; (2) The former employee's name; (3) The former employee's...

  14. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  15. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-10-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  16. 78 FR 72630 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Shoes Plant Shanghai Ding Ying Printing & Dyeing Co. Ltd..... Shanghai Guoxing Metal Products Co. Ltd... of initiation of the review, will determine, consistent with FAG Italia v. United States, 291...

  17. 29 CFR 417.13 - Initial decision of Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... To Determine Adequacy of Constitution and Bylaws for Removal of Officers of Local Labor Organizations..., file an initial decision as to the adequacy of the constitution and bylaws for the purpose of...

  18. 78 FR 31879 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation (GSAR); Electronic Contracting Initiative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES... Regulation (GSAR); Electronic Contracting Initiative (ECI) AGENCY: Office of Acquisition Policy, General... (Federal Supply Schedule) clause, and an Alternate I version of the clause that will require...

  19. History at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The efforts of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to capture and record the events of the past are described, particularly the research accomplishments of NASA's agency-wide history program. A concise guide to the historical research resources available at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., at NASA facilities around the country, and through the federal records systems is given.

  20. The Obama Administration’s Open Government Initiative: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    April 7, 2010, Cass Sunstein , the administrator at OIRA, released a series of memoranda addressing new social media issues and how the Paperwork...departments and 126 Cass Sunstein , Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, and...Reduction Act would affect new social media policies.124 In one of the memoranda, Mr. Sunstein wrote that many of the federal government’s social media

  1. The Food and Drug Administration's initiative for safe design and effective use of home medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Weick-Brady, Mary; Singh, Simran

    2014-06-01

    Although home-use medical devices provide significant benefits, including improved quality of life and cost savings, they are associated with unique risks. These risks result from interactions among the user, the use environment, and the device, and they can greatly impact user and patient safety. This article describes measures being taken by the Food and Drug Administration to address safe use of medical equipment by trained and untrained people outside of clinical facilities.

  2. Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing in NASA: An Overview of Current Projects and Future Initiatives for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA, including each Mission Directorate, is investing in, experimenting with, and/or utilizing AM across a broad spectrum of applications and projects; Centers have created and are continuing to create partnerships with industry, other Government Agencies, other Centers, and Universities; In-house additive manufacturing capability enables rapid iteration of the entire design, development and testing process, increasing innovation and reducing risk and cost to projects; For deep space exploration, AM offers significant reduction to logistics costs and risk by providing ability to create on demand; There are challenges: Overwhelming message from recent JANNAF AM for Propulsion Applications TIM was "certification."; NASA will continue to work with our partners to address this and other challenges to advance the state of the art in AM and incorporate these capabilities into an array of applications from aerospace to science missions to deep space exploration.

  3. 76 FR 67133 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    .... Ltd. AR Printing & Packaging (I) Artesign Impex Arun Art Printers Pvt. Ltd. Aryan Worldwide Bafna... Sonal Printers Pvt. Ltd. Super Impex Swati Growth Funds Ltd. Swift Freight (India) Pvt. Ltd V&M Yash... initiation of the review, will determine, consistent with FAG Italia v. United States, 291 F.3d 806 (Fed...

  4. Investigation of heat transfer in zirconium potassium perchlorate at low temperature: A study of the failure mechanism of the NASA standard initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the reasons for the failure of pyrotechnic initiators at very low temperatures (10 to 100 K). A two-dimensional model of the NASA standard initiator was constructed to model heat transfer from the electrically heated stainless steel bridgewire to the zirconium potassium perchlorate explosive charge and the alumina charge cup. Temperature dependent properties were used in the model to simulate initiator performance over a wide range of initial temperatures (10 to 500 K). A search of the thermophysical property data base showed that pure alumina has a very high thermal conductivity at low temperatures. It had been assumed to act as a thermal insulator in all previous analyses. Rapid heat transfer from the bridgewire to the alumina at low initial temperatures was shown to cause failure of the initiators if the wire did not also make good contact with the zirconium potassium perchlorate charge. The mode is able to reproduce the results of the tests that had been conducted to investigate the cause for failure. It also provides an explanation for previously puzzling results and suggests simple design changes that will increase reliability at very low initial temperatures.

  5. Transcriptional Response in Mouse Thyroid Tissue after 211At Administration: Effects of Absorbed Dose, Initial Dose-Rate and Time after Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z.; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are potentially useful for tumor therapy. However, a limitation has been the preferential accumulation of released 211At in the thyroid gland, which is a critical organ for such therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of absorbed dose, dose-rate, and time after 211At exposure on genome-wide transcriptional expression in mouse thyroid gland. Methods BALB/c mice were i.v. injected with 1.7, 7.5 or 100 kBq 211At. Animals injected with 1.7 kBq were killed after 1, 6, or 168 h with mean thyroid absorbed doses of 0.023, 0.32, and 1.8 Gy, respectively. Animals injected with 7.5 and 100 kBq were killed after 6 and 1 h, respectively; mean thyroid absorbed dose was 1.4 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and the Illumina RNA microarray platform was used to determine mRNA levels. Differentially expressed transcripts and enriched GO terms were determined with adjusted p-value <0.01 and fold change >1.5, and p-value <0.05, respectively. Results In total, 1232 differentially expressed transcripts were detected after 211At administration, demonstrating a profound effect on gene regulation. The number of regulated transcripts increased with higher initial dose-rate/absorbed dose at 1 or 6 h. However, the number of regulated transcripts decreased with mean absorbed dose/time after 1.7 kBq 211At administration. Furthermore, similar regulation profiles were seen for groups administered 1.7 kBq. Interestingly, few previously proposed radiation responsive genes were detected in the present study. Regulation of immunological processes were prevalent at 1, 6, and 168 h after 1.7 kBq administration (0.023, 0.32, 1.8 Gy). PMID:26177204

  6. CubeSat Launch Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recognizes the tremendous potential that CubeSats (very small satellites) have to inexpensively demonstrate advanced technologies, collect scientific data, and enhance student engagement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) was created to provide launch opportunities for CubeSats developed by academic institutions, non-profit entities, and NASA centers. This presentation will provide an overview of the CSLI, its benefits, and its results.

  7. Characterizing the Survey Strategy and Initial Orbit Determination Abilities of the NASA MCAT Telescope for Geosynchronous Orbital Debris Environmental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, J.; Barker, E. S.; Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.; Lederer, S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) recently commissioned the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island with the primary goal of obtaining population statistics of the geosynchronous (GEO) orbital debris environment. To help facilitate this, studies have been conducted using MCAT's known and projected capabilities to estimate the accuracy and timeliness in which it can survey the GEO environment. A simulated GEO debris population is created and sampled at various cadences and run through the Constrained Admissible Region Multi Hypotheses Filter (CAR-MHF). The orbits computed from the results are then compared to the simulated data to assess MCAT's ability to determine accurately the orbits of debris at various sample rates. Additionally, estimates of the rate at which MCAT will be able produce a complete GEO survey are presented using collected weather data and the proposed observation data collection cadence. The specific methods and results are presented here.

  8. Measuring Sustainability within the Veterans Administration Mental Health System Redesign Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ford, James H.; Krahn, Dean; Wise, Meg; Oliver, Karen Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine how attributes affecting sustainability differ across VHA organizational components and by staff characteristics. Subjects Surveys of 870 change team members and 50 staff interviews within the VA’s Mental Health System Redesign initiative. Methods A one-way ANOVA with a Tukey post-hoc test examined differences in sustainability by VISN, job classification, and tenure from staff survey data of the Sustainability Index. Qualitative interviews used an iterative process to identify “a priori” and “in vivo” themes. A simple stepwise linear regression explored predictors of sustainability. Results Sustainability differed across VISN and staff tenure. Job classification differences existed for: 1) Benefits and Credibility of the change and 2) staff involvement and attitudes toward change. Sustainability barriers were: staff and institutional resistance, and non-supportive leadership. Facilitators were: commitment to veterans, strong leadership, and use of QI Tools. Sustainability predictors were outcomes tracking, regular reporting, and use of PDSA cycles. Conclusions Creating homogeneous implementation and sustainability processes across a national health system is difficult. Despite the VA’s best evidence-based implementation efforts, there was significant variance. Locally tailored interventions might better support sustainability than “one-size-fits all” approaches. Further research is needed to understand how participation in a QI collaborative affects sustainability. PMID:21971024

  9. NASA establishes office of exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a new Office of Exploration that will coordinate agency activities that would “expand the human presence beyond Earth,” particularly to the moon and Mars.Sally K. Ride is serving as the office's acting assistant administrator until mid August. Ride, the first U.S. woman in space, has been in charge of a NASA study to determine a possible new major space goal for the United States. Her study group recently identified four major areas for concentrated examination as possible initiatives for a new national space objective: intensive study of Earth systems for better understanding of how to protect Earth's environment,a stepped-up robotic program to explore the planets, moons, and other solar system bodies,the establishment of a scientific base and a permanent human presence on the moon, andintensive exploration of Mars by robot, followed by human exploration of the planet.

  10. Using monosodium glutamate to initiate ethanol self-administration in inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    McCool, Brian A; Chappell, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary oral ethanol consumption in rodents is generally limited by strong taste-aversion in these species. Historically, this has been overcome by combining ethanol with a sweetener, typically sucrose or saccharine, and then slowly 'fading' away the sweetener. While useful in most instances, this approach has not proven as successful for some inbred strains of mice (e.g. DBA/2J) despite consistent evidence in the literature that these same strains express strong conditioned place preference for intraperitoneal- or intragastric-administered ethanol. Importantly, DBA/2J mice express a polymorphism in a 'sweet' taste receptor subunit gene that reduces the potency of sweet substances in these mice. We hypothesized that the presence of this polymorphism might help explain the contrasting behavioral findings of weak voluntary oral ethanol consumption following sucrose-fade yet robust conditioned place preference for ethanol in this strain. To test this, we compared ethanol consumption initiated by either a 'traditional' sucrose-fade or a fade from an alternative tastant, monosodium glutamate (MSG). We found that in both C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, the MSG-fade produced robust increases in home cage ethanol consumption relative to the traditional sucrose-fade. This increased ethanol intake following MSG-fade was evident across a range of ethanol concentrations. Our findings suggest the potential utility of the MSG-fade to establish stable voluntary oral ethanol consumption in mice, particularly ethanol 'non-preferring' strains such as DBA/2J and lend additional support to the notion that ethanol consumption in DBA/2J mice is limited by pronounced taste aversion.

  11. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  12. NASA Technical Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Technical Standards Program was officially established in 1997 as result of a directive issued by the Administrator. It is responsible for Agency wide technical standards development, adoption (endorsement), and conversion of Center-unique standards for Agency wide use. One major element of the Program is the review of NSA technical standards products and replacement with non-Government Voluntary Consensus Standards in accordance with directions issued by the Office of Management and Budget. As part of the Program's function, it developed a NASA Integrated Technical Standards Initiative that consists of and Agency wide full-text system, standards update notification system, and lessons learned-standards integration system. The Program maintains a 'one stop-shop' Website for technical standards ad related information on aerospace materials, etc. This paper provides information on the development, current status, and plans for the NAS Technical Standards Program along with metrics on the utility of the products provided to both users within the nasa.gov Domain and the Public Domain.

  13. NASA Technical Standards Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, WIlliam W.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technical Standards Program was officially established in 1997 as result of a directive issued by the Administrator. It is responsible for Agency wide technical standards development, adoption (endorsement), and conversion of Center-unique standards for Agency wide use. One major element of the Program is the review of NSA technical standards products and replacement with non-Government Voluntary Consensus Standards in accordance with directions issued by the Office of Management and Budget. As part of the Program s function, it developed a NASA Integrated Technical Standards Initiative that consists of and Agency wide full-text system, standards update notification system, and lessons learned - standards integration system. The Program maintains a "one stop-shop" Website for technical standards ad related information on aerospace materials, etc. This paper provides information on the development, current status, and plans for the NAS Technical Standards Program along with metrics on the utility of the products provided to both users within the nasa.gov Domain and the Public Domain.

  14. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Evaluation of initial perforated configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Clukey, Patricia G.; Stack, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial evaluation of a large-chord, swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating an active laminar-flow-control (LFC) suction system with a perforated upper surface is documented in a chronological manner, and the deficiencies in the suction capability of the perforated panels as designed are described. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Also included is an evaluation of the influence of the proximity of the tunnel liner to the upper surface of the airfoil pressure distribution.

  15. 75 FR 13598 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, April 15, 2010...; 2939943. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC, Room 2O43 FOR...

  16. 20 CFR 410.672 - Reopening initial, revised or reconsidered determinations of the Administration and decisions of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... determinations of the Administration and decisions of an Administrative Law Judge or the Appeals Council... Administration and decisions of an Administrative Law Judge or the Appeals Council; finality of determinations... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS...

  17. Patient-centered medical home initiative produced modest economic results for Veterans Health Administration, 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Wong, Edwin S; Hernandez, Susan E; Batten, Adam; Lo, Sophie; Lemon, Jaclyn M; Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-06-01

    In 2010 the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began a nationwide initiative called Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) that reorganized care at all VHA primary care clinics in accordance with the patient-centered medical home model. We analyzed data for fiscal years 2003-12 to assess how trends in health care use and costs changed after the implementation of PACT. We found that PACT was associated with modest increases in primary care visits and with modest decreases in both hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions and outpatient visits with mental health specialists. We estimated that these changes avoided $596 million in costs, compared to the investment in PACT of $774 million, for a potential net loss of $178 million in the study period. Although PACT has not generated a positive return, it is still maturing, and trends in costs and use are favorable. Adopting patient-centered care does not appear to have been a major financial risk for the VHA.

  18. NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER AND THE TIDEWATER INTERAGENCY POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Langley Research Center (LaRC) is an 807-acre research center devoted to aeronautics and space research. aRC has initiated a broad-based pollution prevention program guided by a Pollution Prevention Program Plan and implement...

  19. Faculty Roles, Responsibilities, and Involvement in Campus Safety Initiatives as Perceived by Faculty and Administrators: A Case Study at a Large State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollings, Meda Janeen

    2010-01-01

    The study addressed the problem of campus safety and the extent to which faculty and administrators are aware of institutional security policies. Further, the research compared perceptions of administrators and faculty regarding faculty awareness of and involvement in campus safety policy initiatives. The research sought to determine if the…

  20. NASA Report to Education, Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This is an edition of 'NASA Report to Education' covering NASA's Educational Workshop, Lewis Research Center's T-34 and the Space Exploration Initiative. The first segment shows NASA Education Workshop program (NEWEST - NASA Educational Workshops for Elementary School Teachers). Highlights of the 14 days of intense training, lectures, fieldtrips and simple projects that the educators went through to teach the program are included. Participants are shown working on various projects such as the electromagnetic spectrum, living in Space Station Freedom, experience in T-34, tour of tower at the Federal Aviation Administrative Facilities, conducting an egg survival system and an interactive video conference with astronaut Story Musgrave. Participants share impressions of the workshop. The second segment tells how Lewis Research Center's T-34 aircraft is used to promote aerospace education in several Cleveland schools and excite students.

  1. Flow-Field Simulations and Hemolysis Estimates for the Food and Drug Administration Critical Path Initiative Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Heck, Margaret L; Yen, Allen; Snyder, Trevor A; O'Rear, Edgar A; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2017-02-07

    The design of blood pumps for use in ventricular assist devices, which provide life-saving circulatory support in patients with heart failure, require remarkable precision and attention to detail to replicate the functionality of the native heart. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initiated a Critical Path Initiative to standardize and facilitate the use of computational fluid dynamics in the study and development of these devices. As a part of the study, a simplified centrifugal blood pump model generated by computer-aided design was released to universities and laboratories nationwide. The effects of changes in fluid rheology due to temperature, hematocrit, and turbulent flow on key metrics of the FDA pump were examined in depth using results from a finite volume-based commercial computational fluid dynamics code. Differences in blood damage indices obtained using Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations were considered. These results are presented and discussed awaiting future validation using experimental results, which will be released by the FDA at a future date.

  2. Contribution of the NASA Land-Cover/Land-Use Change Program to the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, Garik

    2007-04-01

    The Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) is a rapidly growing program that involves national government agencies, academia and private organizations in the U.S., Europe, Japan and Northern Eurasia. During the last decade the Northern Eurasian region have been undergoing socioeconomic, climatic and demographic changes. The causes of these changes, the associated interactions between the land surface, the atmosphere and the surrounding ocean and the resultant impact on the sustainability of land use of the region are important topics for scientific research. The NEESPI Science Plan has been prepared as an integrated regional study to better understand these hemispheric-scale interactions, to evaluate the combined role of climate and anthropogenic impacts on the Northern Eurasia ecosystems, and to assess how future human actions would affect the global climate and ecosystems of the region. Projections of the consequence of global changes on the regional environment, the economy and the quality of life in Northern Eurasia that is of primary importance to the nations in the region is an additional focus of this initiative. The NASA Land-Cover/Land-Use Change (LCLUC) Program has supported NEESPI since its inception, and currently funds 26 NEESPI projects. Several other NASA programs are also currently supporting or planning to support the NEESPI. The NEESPI program links to the major international programs under the Earth System Science Partnership (IGBP, IHDP, DIVERSITAS and WCRP) and under the Global Terrestrial Observing System, such as the Global Observation of Forest Cover/Global Observation of Landcover Dynamics (GOFC/GOLD). A number of the NEESPI science activities are aligned with the Global Earth System of Systems (GEOSS) objectives, giving an emphasis to societal benefits, so that the NEESPI framework can serve as a regional test bed for international cooperation in developing a system of observational systems. Since it is a new

  3. NASA Facts, Voyager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This document is one of a series of publications of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on facts about the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. This NASA mission consists of two unmanned Voyager spacecrafts launched in August and September of 1977, and due to arrive at Jupiter in 1979. An account of the scientific equipment…

  4. 76 FR 67482 - NASA Advisory Council; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Charter Renewal AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of renewal and amendment of the charter of the NASA Advisory Council... NASA Administrator has determined that renewal and amendment of the charter of the NASA...

  5. Model based verification of the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) Protocol for NASA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John D.; Gilliam, David

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has tens of thousands of networked computer systems and applications. Software Security vulnerabilities present risks such as lost or corrupted data, information theft, and unavailability of critical systems. These risks represent potentially enormous costs to NASA. The NASA Code Q research initiative 'Reducing Software Security Risk (RSSR) Trough an Integrated Approach' offers formal verification of information technology (IT), through the creation of a Software Security Assessment Instrument (SSAI), to address software security risks.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Research for Energy Management. Part 1; Overview of Energy Issues and an Assessment of the Potential for Application of NASA Earth Science Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, E.; Engel-Cox, J.

    2005-01-01

    Effective management of energy resources is critical for the U.S. economy, the environment, and, more broadly, for sustainable development and alleviating poverty worldwide. The scope of energy management is broad, ranging from energy production and end use to emissions monitoring and mitigation and long-term planning. Given the extensive NASA Earth science research on energy and related weather and climate-related parameters, and rapidly advancing energy technologies and applications, there is great potential for increased application of NASA Earth science research to selected energy management issues and decision support tools. The NASA Energy Management Program Element is already involved in a number of projects applying NASA Earth science research to energy management issues, with a focus on solar and wind renewable energy and developing interests in energy modeling, short-term load forecasting, energy efficient building design, and biomass production.

  7. 14 CFR 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true NASA employees. 1212.700 Section 1212.700 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is responsible for...

  8. 14 CFR 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA employees. 1212.700 Section 1212.700 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is responsible for...

  9. 14 CFR 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NASA employees. 1212.700 Section 1212.700 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is responsible for...

  10. 14 CFR 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA employees. 1212.700 Section 1212.700 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is responsible for...

  11. 77 FR 13153 - Information Collection; NASA Contractor Financial Management Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Information Collection; NASA Contractor Financial Management Reports AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of information collection. SUMMARY... collection instrument(s) and instructions should be directed to Ms. Frances Teel, NASA Clearance...

  12. Initial results from the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus experiment. [of steady-state ion heating method based on modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Richardson, R. W.; Gerdin, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Initial results were obtained from low power operation of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus experiment, in which a steady-state ion heating method based on the modified Penning discharge is applied in a bumpy torus confinement geometry. The magnet facility consists of 12 superconducting coils, each 19 cm i.d. and capable of 3.0 T, equally spaced in a toroidal array 1.52 m in major diameter. A 18 cm i.d. anode ring is located at each of the 12 midplanes and is maintained at high positive potentials by a dc power supply. Initial observations indicate electron temperatures from 10 to 150 eV, and ion kinetic temperatures from 200 eV to 1200 eV. Two modes of operation were observed, which depend on background pressure, and have different radial density profiles. Steady state neutron production was observed. The ion heating process in the bumpy torus appears to parallel closely the mechanism observed when the modified Penning discharge was operated in a simple magnetic mirror field.

  13. NASA Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    Introduces NASA Quest as part of NASA's Learning Technologies Project, which connects students to the people of NASA through the various pages at the website where students can glimpse the various types of work performed at different NASA facilities and talk to NASA workers about the type of work they do. (ASK)

  14. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  15. Transitioning a Fundamental Research Program to Align with the NASA Exploration Initiative-Perspectives from Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    A new Vision for Space Exploration was announced earlier this year by U.S. President George W. Bush. NASA has evaluated on-going programs for strategic alignment with this vision. The evaluation proceeded at a rapid pace and is resulting in changes to the scope and focus of experimental research that will be conducted in support of the new vision. The existing network of researchers in the physical sciences - a highly capable, independent, and loosely knitted community - typically have shared conclusions derived from their work within appropriate discipline-specific peer reviewed journals and publications. The initial result of introducing this Vision for Space Exploration has been to shift research focus from a broad coverage of numerous, widely varying topics into a research program focused on a nearly-singular set of supporting research objectives to enable advances in space exploration. Two of these traditional physical science research disciplines, Combustion Science and Fluid Physics, are implementing a course adjustment from a portfolio dominated by "Fundamental Science Research" to one focused nearly exclusively on supporting the Exploration Vision. Underlying scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure of the Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics disciplines do provide essential research capabilities to support the contemporary thrusts of human life support, radiation countermeasures, human health, low gravity research for propulsion and materials and, ultimately, research conducted on the Moon and Mars. A perspective on how these two research disciplines responded to the course change will be presented. The relevance to the new NASA direction is provided, while demonstrating through two examples how the prior investment in fundamental research is being brought to bear on solving the issues confronting the successful implementation of the exploration goals.

  16. NASA's Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA's current education programs, which will be examined under its Strategic Plan for Education are presented. It is NASA's first goal to maintain this base - revising, expanding, or eliminating programs as necessary. Through NASA's second goal, new education reform initiatives will be added which specifically address NASA mission requirements, national educational reform, and Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET) priorities. The chapters in this publication are divided by educational levels, with additional sections on programs to improve the technological competence of students and on an array of NASA published materials to supplement programs. The resource section lists NASA's national and regional Teacher Resource Centers and introduces the reader to NASA's Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE), which distributes materials in audiovisual format.

  17. Women at work in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Photographs and brief descriptions summarize the diversity of the female work force at NASA. Jobs are classified as: (1) technical support positions; (2) clerical and nonprofessional administrative; (3) professional administrative; and (4) professional scientific and engineering.

  18. NASA and CD Radio's TDRSS industrial test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.; Hollansworth, James E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on a joint test program with CD Radio Inc. The program will demonstrate spatial diversity techniques in support of industrial development of a new satellite direct broadcast national radio service called Satellite Radio. Satellite Radio will operate in the FCC approved frequency band 2310-2360 MHz which is close to NASA's Tracking and Data Relay System (TDRSS) satellites' high power transmit frequency near 2110 MHz. The cooperative test program in which NASA provides use of a TDRSS satellite and CD Radio provides the measurement equipped vehicle is described as well as its current status. Some initial measurement data are presented.

  19. 78 FR 11235 - Information Collection Notice/NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Information Collection Notice/NASA Great Moonbuggy Race AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: NASA Information Collection Notice; Correction. Federal... comment on a proposed information collection; the NASA Great Moonbuggy Race, as required by the...

  20. 77 FR 66082 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the ] Human Exploration and Operations Committee of the NASA..., Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW.,...

  1. Knowledge Sharing at NASA: Extending Social Constructivism to Space Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chindgren, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    Social constructivism provides the framework for exploring communities of practice and storytelling at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in this applied theory paper. A brief overview of traditional learning and development efforts as well as the current knowledge sharing initiative is offered. In addition, a conceptual plan…

  2. 76 FR 64122 - NASA Advisory Committee; Renewal of NASA's International Space Station Advisory Committee Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Committee; Renewal of NASA's International Space Station Advisory Committee Charter AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of renewal... imposed on NASA by law. The renewed Charter is for a one-year period ending September 30, 2012. It...

  3. Advanced Air Traffic Management Research (Human Factors and Automation): NASA Research Initiatives in Human-Centered Automation Design in Airspace Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Condon, Gregory W. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has initiated a significant thrust of research and development focused on providing the flight crew and air traffic managers automation aids to increase capacity in en route and terminal area operations through the use of flexible, more fuel-efficient routing, while improving the level of safety in commercial carrier operations. In that system development, definition of cognitive requirements for integrated multi-operator dynamic aiding systems is fundamental. The core processes of control and the distribution of decision making in that control are undergoing extensive analysis. From our perspective, the human operators and the procedures by which they interact are the fundamental determinants of the safe, efficient, and flexible operation of the system. In that perspective, we have begun to explore what our experience has taught will be the most challenging aspects of designing and integrating human-centered automation in the advanced system. We have performed a full mission simulation looking at the role shift to self-separation on board the aircraft with the rules of the air guiding behavior and the provision of a cockpit display of traffic information and an on-board traffic alert system that seamlessly integrates into the TCAS operations. We have performed and initial investigation of the operational impact of "Dynamic Density" metrics on controller relinquishing and reestablishing full separation authority. (We follow the assumption that responsibility at all times resides with the controller.) This presentation will describe those efforts as well as describe the process by which we will guide the development of error tolerant systems that are sensitive to shifts in operator work load levels and dynamic shifts in the operating point of air traffic management.

  4. NASA geodynamics program: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Seventh Geodynamics Program report summarizes program activities and achievements during 1988 and 1989. Included is a 115 page bibliography of the publications associated with the NASA Geodynamics Program since its initiation in 1979.

  5. NASA and General Aviation. NASA SP-485.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethell, Jeffrey L.

    A detailed examination of the nature and function of general aviation and a discussion of how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology are offered in this publication. The intricacies of aerodynamics, energy, and safety as well as the achievements in aeronautical experimentation are…

  6. Initial recovery and rebound of type f intestinal colonization botulism after administration of investigational heptavalent botulinum antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Ryan P; Neil, Karen P; Sasich, Randy; Luquez, Carolina; Asaad, Hakam; Maslanka, Susan; Khalil, Wajahat

    2011-11-01

    Investigational heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is now the primary antitoxin for US noninfant botulism patients. HBAT consists of equine Fab/F(ab')2 IgG fragments, which are cleared from circulation faster than whole immunoglobulins. Rebound botulism after antitoxin administration is not previously documented but occurred in our patient 10 days after HBAT administration.

  7. Handbook To Facilitate Faculty Awareness of Library Resources and Services: One Library's Initial Response to the College of Business Administration's Search for AACSB Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Katherine Weeks

    Created by the College of Business Administration (COBA) and the libraries of the University of Northern Colorado, this 1988-89 handbook was part of a strategic plan to achieve initial accreditation by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Constructed by the reference librarian who works directly with COBA, the handbook…

  8. Status of a NASA Standard and Three NASA Handbooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA-STD-7003 Pyroshock Test Criteria, May 18, 1999, has been revised per direction of NASA Headquarters to make it a mandatory standard and to update it for advances in the discipline since it's initial release. NASA-HDBK-7004B Force Limited Vibration Testing, January 31, 2003, and NASA-HDBK-7005 Dynamic Environmental Criteria, March 13, 2001, are being updated to reflect advances in the disciplines since their last release. Additionally, a new NASA handbook, NASA-HDBK-7008 Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing is currently being prepared. This paper provides an overview of each document, summarizes the major revisions for the documents undergoing update, and provides the development schedules.

  9. 77 FR 34093 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Heliophysics Subcommittee of the NASA...

  10. 77 FR 62536 - Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Meeting of Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council Science Committee AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA...

  11. 76 FR 66998 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance... Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA...

  12. NASA overhauls grant process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    A university recently received a NASA grant so quickly that the recipients, used to a long wait for money even after a grant had been approved, assumed a mistake had been made. Such a story has been making the rounds since NASA began to refurbish the procedure by which it issues grants, speeding up and streamlining the process in response to suggestions from space scientists.One way NASA has measured success so far is how quickly it has cleared the decks of pending grants. The agency reduced the backlog from 572 grants on September 11 to zero by the end of the month, according to Don Bush, NASA's deputy assistant administrator for procurement. But that's just the beginning of changes Bush expects to be completed by March or April next year. The new procedures are first being tested out at headquarters, which issues over half of the agency's space science grants. NASA centers will also adopt the procedures after full approval.

  13. 14 CFR 1221.111 - Use of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of the NASA Logotype. 1221.111 Section 1221.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  14. 14 CFR 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NASA Seal. 1221.109 Section 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  15. 14 CFR 1221.113 - Use of the NASA Flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NASA Flags. 1221.113 Section 1221.113 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  16. 14 CFR 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NASA Seal. 1221.109 Section 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  17. 14 CFR 1221.110 - Use of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of the NASA Insignia. 1221.110 Section 1221.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  18. 14 CFR 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of the NASA Seal. 1221.109 Section 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  19. 14 CFR 1221.113 - Use of the NASA Flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NASA Flags. 1221.113 Section 1221.113 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  20. 14 CFR 1221.110 - Use of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NASA Insignia. 1221.110 Section 1221.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  1. 14 CFR 1221.111 - Use of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NASA Logotype. 1221.111 Section 1221.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  2. 14 CFR 1221.113 - Use of the NASA Flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NASA Flags. 1221.113 Section 1221.113 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  3. 14 CFR 1221.110 - Use of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NASA Insignia. 1221.110 Section 1221.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  4. 14 CFR 1221.110 - Use of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NASA Insignia. 1221.110 Section 1221.110 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  5. 14 CFR 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NASA Seal. 1221.109 Section 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  6. 14 CFR 1221.111 - Use of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NASA Logotype. 1221.111 Section 1221.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  7. 14 CFR 1221.111 - Use of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NASA Logotype. 1221.111 Section 1221.111 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  8. 14 CFR 1221.113 - Use of the NASA Flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of the NASA Flags. 1221.113 Section 1221.113 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  9. NASA Explorer School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Explorer School-East Oktibbeha County School District team recently celebrated the start of its three-year partnership with NASA during a two-part kickoff event Nov. 7 and 8. Pictured from left are, Oktibbeha County School District Superintendent Dr. Walter Conley; NES Team Administrator James Covington; Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Gene Goldman; Sharon Bonner; NES Team Lead Yolanda Magee; Andrea Temple; Carolyn Rice; and special guest astronaut Roger Crouch.

  10. 76 FR 65540 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces that the meeting of the NASA Advisory Council scheduled to be held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and...

  11. 78 FR 54680 - NASA Federal Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Federal Advisory Committees AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Annual Invitation for Public Nominations by U.S. Citizens for Service on NASA Federal Advisory Committees. SUMMARY: NASA announces its annual invitation for public nominations for service...

  12. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  13. NASA/NBS (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Bureau of Standards) standard reference model for telerobot control system architecture (NASREM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.; Mccain, Harry G.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The document describes the NASA Standard Reference Model (NASREM) Architecture for the Space Station Telerobot Control System. It defines the functional requirements and high level specifications of the control system for the NASA space Station document for the functional specification, and a guideline for the development of the control system architecture, of the 10C Flight Telerobot Servicer. The NASREM telerobot control system architecture defines a set of standard modules and interfaces which facilitates software design, development, validation, and test, and make possible the integration of telerobotics software from a wide variety of sources. Standard interfaces also provide the software hooks necessary to incrementally upgrade future Flight Telerobot Systems as new capabilities develop in computer science, robotics, and autonomous system control.

  14. NASA Agency Overview Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The briefing opened with Dean Acosta (NASA Press Secretary) introducing Michael Griffin (NASA Administrator) and Bill Gerstenmaier (Associate Administrator for Space Operations). Bill Griffin stated that they would resume the Shuttle Fight to Return process, that the vehicle was remarkably clean and if the weather was good, the Shuttle would be ready to launch as scheduled. Bill Gerstenmaier stated that the preparations and processing of the vehicle went extremely well and they are looking forward to increasing the crew size to three. Then the floor was open to questions from the press.

  15. Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Part 2: Space shuttle program. Section 1: Observations and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The NASA and contractor management systems, including policies, practices, and procedures for the development of critical systems, subsystems and integration of the program elements, were investigated. The technical development status of critical systems, subsystems, and interfaces is presented. Space shuttle elements were qualified as to potential risks and hazards. The elements included the orbiter, external tanks, main engine, solid rocket boosters, and the ground support facilities.

  16. 20 CFR 410.672 - Reopening initial, revised or reconsidered determinations of the Administration and decisions of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969... entitlement of a party was established, is later found to be alive; or (4) The death of the individual on whose account a party's claim was denied for lack of proof of death is established— (i) By reason of...

  17. Initial Role Delineation for Entry-Level Health Services Administration Personnel. Comprehensive Report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ. Center for Occupational and Professional Assessment.

    Results of a job analysis for the position of entry-level health services administrator (HSA) are presented. The following products of the study are presented: a list of 132 tasks grouped into 10 job dimensions (e.g., policy direction, financial management), ratings of the importance of each task at entry-level, a list of 39 qualifications,…

  18. This Week @ NASA May 3, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Deputy Administrator Lori Garver tours two NASA facilities, The Expedition 36/37 crew train at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, NASA's newest scientific rover named GROVER, and m...

  19. This Week @ NASA - 11/5/10

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA. Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Twee...

  20. Paine Appointed Administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

  1. Nasa's Emerging Productivity Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunstein, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The goals, membership, and organizational structure of the NASA Productivity Steering Committee are described as well as steps taken to make NASA a leader in the development and application of productivity and quality concepts at every level of agency management. The overall strategy for the Productivity Improvement and Quality Enhancement (PIQE) Program is through employee involvement, both civil servant and contractor, in all phases of agency-wide activity. Elements of the PIQE program and initial thrusts are examined.

  2. Small Can Be Beautiful: The NASA Lear Jet and the Initiation of Astronomical Far-Infrared Fine-Structure-Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In the early 1970s, NASA offered infrared astronomers two new facilities --- a 30-cm telescope aboard the NASA Lear Jet, and a 91-cm telescope aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory --- for conducting far-infrared astronomical observations from altitudes ranging up to 12 km above sea level. Here I will describe the exceptional opportunities the Lear Jet offered our community for advancing the study of both cool/neutral and hot/ionized interstellar clouds through studies of previously inaccessible atomic and ionic far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines.

  3. Summary Report for National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and Centro Para Prevencao da Poluicao (C3P) 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The C3P &. NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on November 15-18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. The theme of the workshop was "Global Collaboration in Environmental and Alternative Energy Strategies". The workshop was held at ESTEC's conference center. More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop. For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session. Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students. In addition to the students, thirty eight U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics: (1) Hazardous materials management and substitution in support of space operations (2) Emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies (3) Sustainable development and redevelopment (4) Remediation technologies and strategies The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of the challenges of operating installations across borders. Throughout the workshop, attendees heard about the scope of environmental and energy challenges that industry and governments face. They heard about technologies for increasing energy efficiency and increasing use of renewable energy. They learned about ways companies and government agencies are using materials, processes, goods and services in a manner more respectful with the environment and in compliance with health and safety rules. The concept of partnerships and their inherent benefits was evidenced throughout the workshop. Partnering is a key aspect of sustainability because sustainable development is complicated. Through formal presentations and side discussions, attendees

  4. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft (manned or unmanned) launched that did not have a computer on board that provided vital command and control services. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Led by the NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard (STD-18l9.13B) has recently undergone a significant update in an attempt to provide that consistency. This paper will discuss the key features of the new NASA Software Safety Standard. It will start with a brief history of the use and development of software in safety critical applications at NASA. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Working Group and the approach it took to revise the software engineering process across the Agency.

  5. Report to the administrator by the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the Skylab program. Volume 1: Summary report. [systems management evaluation and design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Contractor and NASA technical management for the development and manufacture of the Skylab modules is reviewed with emphasis on the following management controls: configuration and interface management; vendor control; and quality control of workmanship. A review of the modified two-stage Saturn V launch vehicle which focused on modifications to accommodate the Skylab payload; resolution of prior flight anomalies; and changes in personnel and management systems is presented along with an evaluation of the possible age-life and storage problems for the Saturn 1-B launch vehicle. The NASA program management's visibility and control of contractor operations, systems engineering and integration, the review process for the evaluation of design and flight hardware, and the planning process for mission operations are investigated. It is concluded that the technical management system for development and fabrication of the modules, spacecraft, and launch vehicles, the process of design and hardware acceptance reviews, and the risk assessment activities are satisfactory. It is indicated that checkout activity, integrated testing, and preparations for and execution of mission operation require management attention.

  6. The NASA Technical Report Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M. L.; Gottlich, G. L.; Bianco, D. J.; Paulson, S. S.; Binkley, R. L.; Kellogg, Y. D.; Beaumont, C. J.; Schmunk, R. B.; Kurtz, M. J.; Accomazzi, A.; Syed, O.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and charged it to "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning...its activities and the results thereof". The search for innovative methods to distribute NASA's information led a grass-roots team to create the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), which uses the World Wide Web and other popular Internet-based information systems .

  7. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  8. This is NASA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is space exploration and research in space and aeronautics for peaceful purposes and for the benefit of all mankind. The organization and programs which have been established to carry out this mission are described. Full color illustrations for the book were selected from the…

  9. NASA Facts, Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This newsletter from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contains a description of the purposes and potentials of the Space Shuttle craft. The illustrated document explains some of the uses for which the shuttle is designed; how the shuttle will be launched from earth, carry out its mission, and land again on earth; and what a…

  10. NASA Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Network includes nine NASA operated and partner operated stations covering North America, the west coast of South America, the Pacific, and Western Australia . A new station is presently being setup in South Africa and discussions are underway to add another station in Argentina. NASA SLR operations are supported by Honeywell Technical Solutions, Inc (HTSI), formally AlliedSignal Technical Services, The University of Texas, the University of Hawaii and Universidad Nacional de San Agustin.

  11. NASA Facts, The Viking Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of publications of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. The Viking mission to Mars, consisting of two unmanned NASA spacecraft launched in August and September, 1975, is described. A description of the spacecraft and their paths is given. A diagram identifying the…

  12. The future of NASA's missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2017-04-01

    Can the recent Discovery mission selections be used as tea leaves to understand the future directions of NASA? In an age of many programmes being used to advance administrative and programmatic goals, Discovery appears to be driven almost entirely by science and by NASA's goal of cheaper missions.

  13. NASA Solve

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Solve lists opportunities available to the general public to contribute to solving tough problems related to NASA’s mission through challenges, prize competitions, and crowdsourcing activities...

  14. 78 FR 77501 - NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory...:00 p.m., Local Time. ] ADDRESSES: NASA Johnson Space Center, Room 966, NASA Parkway, Building...

  15. 75 FR 2892 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This... Standard Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 3H46 (Tuesday, February 16, 2010)...

  16. 75 FR 14472 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Building 1, Room E100E, ] 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and...

  17. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Building 34, Room 120B, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal...

  18. 77 FR 2765 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  19. 77 FR 41203 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  20. 78 FR 49296 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  1. 78 FR 77502 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  2. 77 FR 66082 - NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA International Space Station Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  3. Complete NASA Dryden Staff of 1985, in front of building 4800

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985 the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility employees and contractors gathered around the base of the X-1E for a picture. The X-1E is mounted in front of building 4800, the main building at Dryden. On Wednesday, October 1, 1958, the NACA yellow-backed winged symbol (see E-33718) that represented the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics for 43-years, was removed from the front of the main building at the NASA High Speed Flight Station, making room for a new insignia belonging to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This NASA Insignia was created by retiree James J. Modarelli, former Chief of Technical Publication of Lewis Research Center; designed by the Army Institute of Heraldry; and approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the NASA Administrator. This official insignia of the NASA is a dark blue disc with white stars. The white hand-cut letters 'NASA' are in the center of the disc and are encircled by a white diagonal orbit. A solid red 'V' shape appears behind and in front of the letters and extends beyond the disc. The 'V' is patterned after an actual wing design being tested by NACA researchers during the late 1950s. This insignia was used from 1958 to 1975 and was affectionately known at the 'meatball,' returning to NASA Insignia status in 1992. In the photo above the NASA Logotype appearing on the front of the main building replaced the NASA Insignia. The NASA Logotype was developed under the Federal Design Improvement Program initiated by the President in 1972, with the preferred color being red. It was approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the NASA Administrator in October 1975. It symbolized NASA's role in aeronautics and space from 1975 to 1992 and has since been retired. In the logotype, the letters 'NASA' are reduced with the strokes being of one width; the elimination of cross strokes in the two 'A' letters imparts a quality of uniqueness and contemporary character. This familiar logo was known as 'The Worm'. On

  4. Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Social Security Administration's Compassionate Allowances Initiative: An Evaluative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Burke, Shanna L; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) launched the Compassionate Allowances List (CAL) in 2008. This created a mechanism for expediting review and delivery of disability benefits, while decreasing application backlog. This study hypothesized that developmental disorders, such as Smith-Magenis syndrome, may meet criterion for inclusion. An evaluative review of the literature was undertaken to determine if the expedited review criterion was met. Ten databases were searched and articles meeting pre-defined criteria were coded according to the SSA definition of disability to determine if severity indices screen in or screen out certain severity levels or exclude Smith-Magenis syndrome entirely in relation to the CAL program. It was strongly recommended that Smith-Magenis syndrome receive consideration for inclusion in the CAL.

  5. Evaluating the outcomes of complex nursing initiatives: Insights from the CANO/ACIO National Strategy for Chemotherapy Administration Project.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally; Rashleigh, Laura; Truant, Tracy; Hartzell, Renée; McQuestion, Maurene

    2015-01-01

    Because nursing interventions are typically complex and dynamic, evaluating their impact upon care and care systems is a notoriously daunting challenge. Nursing organizations seeking to evaluate the impact of their efforts are frequently frustrated by the gap between the evaluation research ideal and their available resources. In this paper, we describe a practical and manageable process developed to address such an evaluation challenge. Using a three-step inquiry approach, supported by modest organizational funding and a realistic level of voluntary member time, we were able to generate a meaningful understanding of intersecting outcomes arising from the implementation of CANO/ACIO's National Strategy for Chemotherapy Administration. On the basis of our experience, we see considerable merit in both process and outcomes of this form of targeted evaluation.

  6. Dynamic Teachers Re-NEW with NASA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Implementation Plan for Education which provides support to inservice teacher educators in the areas of technology and science. (ASK)

  7. The Use of Social Media and Mobile applications in content delivery for the MY NASA DATA and SCOOL Projects in support of Education and Outreach Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. M.; Oostra, D.; Moore, S. W.; Crecelius, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    So you have a social media site for the project you are working on. Now what? How do you know if you are reaching your target audience? What are the demographics of those that you are reaching? These are just a few of the questions to ask when venturing into the social media world as a way to further your outreach opportunities. With this important information you will have the ability to make small changes "on the fly", or to switch focus to other Web 2.0 tools for the project. An important aspect to social media tools as an outreach strategy is the ease of development and implementation for use in reaching your targeted audience. They are also equally easy to remove from use. This allows a project to shift to a new method of communication should your metrics point you in that direction. The MY NASA DATA (MND) project enables K-12 teachers, students and citizen scientists to explore the large volumes of satellite data that NASA collects from space. With the large number of interactions that surround conference and outreach meetings, social media plays several important roles in the project. The main function of social media is to be an open channel for communication and discovery of the project. The other important role is as a vehicle to share new information, media and other useful educational tools. With a target age of middle school and older, the MY NASA DATA project is able to effectively utilize a wide variety of social media tools through proper monitoring of metrics and usage. Some of the social media tools utilized by the MY NASA DATA project include, Facebook, YouTube and the Observe Your World blog. Students' Clouds Observations On-Line (S'COOL) is a hands-on project, which supports NASA research on the Earth's climate. Students are engaged in identifying cloud-types and levels and sending that information to NASA. Since the topic of clouds is a popular one in many elementary curricula, the target age for the S'COOL project is younger than that of the

  8. 14 CFR 1221.106 - Establishment of the NASA Flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Flag. 1221.106 Section 1221.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  9. 14 CFR 1221.102 - Establishment of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Establishment of the NASA Seal. 1221.102 Section 1221.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  10. 14 CFR 1221.104 - Establishment of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Logotype. 1221.104 Section 1221.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA...

  11. 14 CFR 1221.106 - Establishment of the NASA Flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Flag. 1221.106 Section 1221.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  12. 14 CFR 1215.112 - User/NASA contractual arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User/NASA contractual arrangement. 1215.112... User/NASA contractual arrangement. (a) The NASA Administrator reserves the right to waive any portion of the reimbursement due to NASA under the provisions of the reimbursement policy. (b) When NASA...

  13. 14 CFR 1221.106 - Establishment of the NASA Flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Flag. 1221.106 Section 1221.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  14. 14 CFR § 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA employees. § 1212.700 Section § 1212.700 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is...

  15. 14 CFR 1221.104 - Establishment of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Logotype. 1221.104 Section 1221.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA...

  16. 14 CFR 1221.104 - Establishment of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Establishment of the NASA Logotype. 1221.104 Section 1221.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  17. 14 CFR 1221.103 - Establishment of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Establishment of the NASA Insignia. 1221.103 Section 1221.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  18. 14 CFR 1221.103 - Establishment of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Insignia. 1221.103 Section 1221.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA...

  19. 14 CFR 1221.102 - Establishment of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Seal. 1221.102 Section 1221.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  20. 14 CFR 1215.112 - User/NASA contractual arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true User/NASA contractual arrangement. 1215.112... User/NASA contractual arrangement. (a) The NASA Administrator reserves the right to waive any portion of the reimbursement due to NASA under the provisions of the reimbursement policy. (b) When NASA...

  1. 14 CFR 1221.103 - Establishment of the NASA Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Insignia. 1221.103 Section 1221.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA...

  2. 14 CFR 1221.102 - Establishment of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Seal. 1221.102 Section 1221.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  3. 14 CFR 1221.106 - Establishment of the NASA Flag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Establishment of the NASA Flag. 1221.106 Section 1221.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  4. 14 CFR 1212.703 - NASA Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA Chief Information Officer. 1212.703 Section 1212.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.703 NASA Chief Information Officer. (a) The NASA...

  5. 14 CFR 1215.112 - User/NASA contractual arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User/NASA contractual arrangement. 1215.112... User/NASA contractual arrangement. (a) The NASA Administrator reserves the right to waive any portion of the reimbursement due to NASA under the provisions of the reimbursement policy. (b) When NASA...

  6. 14 CFR § 1212.703 - NASA Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA Chief Information Officer. § 1212.703 Section § 1212.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.703 NASA Chief Information Officer. (a) The NASA...

  7. 14 CFR 1221.102 - Establishment of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Seal. 1221.102 Section 1221.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype,...

  8. 14 CFR 1221.104 - Establishment of the NASA Logotype.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Logotype. 1221.104 Section 1221.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA...

  9. NASA Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, Edwin J.

    2003-01-01

    The political, economic, and enivronmental conditions of the twenty-first century demand new goals for NASA. These goals include the imaging of habitable extrasolar planets, expanded commercialization of low earth orbit, clean and rapid air transportation, environment protection, and distance learning. The presentation recommends strategies for pursuing these goals, and summarizes activities at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  10. Urban Environment Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Urban Environment Initiative (UEI), has been established as part of a Cooperative Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The UEI is part of NASA's overall High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) and the Information Infrastructure Technology Applications (IITA) programs. The goal of the UEI is to provide public access to Earth Science information and promote its use with a focus on the environment of urban areas. This goal will be accomplished through collaborative efforts of the UEI team with both community-based and local/regional governmental organizations. The UEI team is comprised of four organizations representing private industry, NASA, and universities: Prime Technologies Service Corporation, NASA's Minority University Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) California State University, at Los Angeles, and Central State University (Wilberforce, OH). "Urban Environment" refers to the web of environmental, economic, and social factors that combine to create the urban world in which we live. Examples of these factors are population distribution, neighborhood demographic profiles, economic resources, business activities, location and concentration of environmental hazards and various pollutants, proximity and level of urban services, which form the basis of the urban environment and ultimately affect our lives and experiences. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing allows data to be visualized in the forms of maps and spatial images. The use of these tools allow analysis of information about urban environments. Also included are descriptions of the four query types which will assist in understanding the maps.

  11. 14 CFR 1221.108 - Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual Communications System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual... ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA Program Identifiers, NASA Flags, and the Agency's Unified...

  12. 14 CFR 1221.108 - Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual Communications System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual... ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA Program Identifiers, NASA Flags, and the Agency's Unified...

  13. 14 CFR § 1221.108 - Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual Communications System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual... ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA Program Identifiers, NASA Flags, and the Agency's Unified...

  14. 76 FR 69292 - NASA Advisory Council Science Committee Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council Science Committee Planetary Science Subcommittee; Meeting... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces that the meeting of the Planetary Science Subcommittee... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Marian Norris, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters,...

  15. 77 FR 38679 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory... following topics: General Financial Management Financial Statement Audit Unfunded Environmental...

  16. 76 FR 5405 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Update from the James Webb...

  17. 75 FR 13597 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update. --Kepler Data Release Policy. It is imperative that...

  18. 76 FR 14106 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... meeting includes the following topic: --Astrophysics Division Update. It is imperative that the meeting...

  19. 78 FR 21421 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to the Science Committee of the NAC. The...

  20. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Technology and Innovation Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  1. Chemoprevention of DMH-induced rat colon carcinoma initiation by combination administration of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2012-02-01

    Cancer research illustrated that combinatorial studies can provide significant improvement in safety and effectiveness over the monotherapy regimens. A combination of two drugs may restrain precancerous colon polyps, opening a new possible opportunity for chemoprevention of colon cancer. In this context, chemopreventive efficacy of a combination regimen of C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein present in Spirulina platensis, a cyanobacterium, which is a selective cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor and piroxicam, a traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug was considered in 1,2 dimethylhyadrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, DNA fragmentation, fluorescent staining, PGE(2) enzyme immunoassay, and carrageenan-induced paw edema test were performed along with morphological and histological analysis. DMH treatment showed a rich presence of preneoplastic lesions such as multiple plaque lesions, aberrant crypt foci, and well-characterized dysplasia. These features were reduced with piroxicam and C-phycocyanin administration. The number of apoptotic cells was featured prominently in all the groups compared with DMH. DMH treatment revealed intact high molecular weight genomic DNA with no signs of laddering/DNA fragmentation while it was noticeable significantly in control and DMH + piroxicam + C-phycocyanin. DMH group showed highest COX-2 expression and PGE(2) level in comparison with other groups. Doses of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin used in the present study were established at an anti-inflammatory range. A combination regimen of piroxicam and C-phycocyanin, rather than individually has the much greater potential for reduction of DMH-induced colon cancer development and COX-2 being the prime possible target in such chemoprevention.

  2. Overview of NASA's space radiation research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, Walter

    2003-01-01

    NASA is developing the knowledge required to accurately predict and to efficiently manage radiation risk in space. The strategy employed has three research components: (1) ground-based simulation of space radiation components to develop a science-based understanding of radiation risk; (2) space-based measurements of the radiation environment on planetary surfaces and interplanetary space, as well as use of space platforms to validate predictions; and, (3) implementation of countermeasures to mitigate risk. NASA intends to significantly expand its support of ground-based radiation research in line with completion of the Booster Applications Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, expected in summer of 2003. A joint research solicitation with the Department of Energy is under way and other interagency collaborations are being considered. In addition, a Space Radiation Initiative has been submitted by the Administration to Congress that would provide answers to most questions related to the International Space Station within the next 10 years.

  3. Overview of NASA's space radiation research program.

    PubMed

    Schimmerling, Walter

    2003-06-01

    NASA is developing the knowledge required to accurately predict and to efficiently manage radiation risk in space. The strategy employed has three research components: (1) ground-based simulation of space radiation components to develop a science-based understanding of radiation risk; (2) space-based measurements of the radiation environment on planetary surfaces and interplanetary space, as well as use of space platforms to validate predictions; and, (3) implementation of countermeasures to mitigate risk. NASA intends to significantly expand its support of ground-based radiation research in line with completion of the Booster Applications Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, expected in summer of 2003. A joint research solicitation with the Department of Energy is under way and other interagency collaborations are being considered. In addition, a Space Radiation Initiative has been submitted by the Administration to Congress that would provide answers to most questions related to the International Space Station within the next 10 years.

  4. NASA Education Implementation Plan 2015-2017

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Education Implementation Plan (NEIP) provides an understanding of the role of NASA in advancing the nation's STEM education and workforce pipeline. The document outlines the roles and responsibilities that NASA Education has in approaching and achieving the agency's and administration's strategic goals in STEM Education. The specific…

  5. 77 FR 9997 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Thursday, March 8, 2012, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., local time and Friday, March 9, 2012, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Room...

  6. 78 FR 20357 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., and Thursday, April 25, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW., Room...

  7. 75 FR 5629 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 18, 2010, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST; Friday, February 19, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20456, James...

  8. 75 FR 18240 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. CDT; Thursday, April 29, 2010, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. CDT ADDRESSES: NASA Johnson Space Center, Gilruth Conference Center, Lonestar Room,...

  9. 75 FR 4588 - NASA Advisory Council; meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the purpose of....m. to 3 p.m. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC, Room 6B42. FOR...

  10. 75 FR 39973 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, August 5, 2010, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (local time) Friday, August 6, 2010, 8 a.m.-12 a.m. (local time). ADDRESSES: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Von Karman...

  11. 78 FR 72719 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Wednesday, December 11, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-5:15 p.m., Local Time; and Thursday, December 12, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Kennedy Space...

  12. 76 FR 41825 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). The agenda topics for the meeting will include: DATES: Thursday, August 4, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and Friday, August 5, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA...

  13. 78 FR 41804 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council (NAC). DATES: Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., Local Time; and Thursday, August 1, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Local Time ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 9H40,...

  14. 76 FR 4133 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 10, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Local Time. Friday, February 11, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room...

  15. 75 FR 4588 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... newly formed Information Technology Infrastructure Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This will be...-877-613-3958; 2939943. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC, Room 2N35...

  16. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  17. NASA Airborne Science Program: NASA Stratospheric Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducts a wide variety of remote sensing projects using several unique aircraft platforms. These vehicles have been selected and modified to provide capabilities that are particularly important for geophysical research, in particular, routine access to very high altitudes, long range, long endurance, precise trajectory control, and the payload capacity to operate multiple, diverse instruments concurrently. While the NASA program has been in operation for over 30 years, new aircraft and technological advances that will expand the capabilities for airborne observation are continually being assessed and implemented. This presentation will review the current state of NASA's science platforms, recent improvements and new missions concepts as well as provide a survey of emerging technologies unmanned aerial vehicles for long duration observations (Global Hawk and Predator). Applications of information technology that allow more efficient use of flight time and the ability to rapidly reconfigure systems for different mission objectives are addressed.

  18. NASA develops Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Space Station program's planning stage began in 1982, with a view to development funding in FY1987 and initial operations within a decade. An initial cost of $8 billion is projected for the continuously habitable, Space Shuttle-dependent system, not including either operational or scientific and commercial payload-development costs. As a customer-oriented facility, the Space Station will be available to foreign countries irrespective of their participation in the development phase.

  19. NASA Water Resources Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    projects under five functional themes. I) Streamflow and Flood Forecasting 2) Water Supply and Irrigation (includes evapotranspiration) 3) Drought 4) Water Quality 5) Climate and Water Resources. To maximize this activity NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies (e.g., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USAID, the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)), universities, non-profit national and international organizations, and the private sector. The NASA Water Resources program currently is funding 21 active projects under the functional themes (http://wmp.gsfc.nasa.gov & http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/applied-sciences/).

  20. NASA science committee appointments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has made three new appointments to the NASA Advisory Council's (NAC' Science Committee, NASA announced on 22 September. Edward David, president of EED, Inc., and science advisor to the President from 1970 to 1973, will serve as the committee-s chair. Also appointed to the committee were Owen Garriott, a retired scientist astronaut, and Alan Stern, executive director of the Space Science and Engineering Division of the Southwest Research Institute (San Antonio, Tex.). David, Garriott, and Stern-who are among nine new members of the full advisory committee that were announced on 22 September-will replace three members of the Science Committee who resigned in August: Science Committee Chair Charles Kennel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography), Wesley Huntress (Carnegie Institution of Washington), and Eugene Levy (Rice University). The NAC's next public meeting will be held on 12 October at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

  1. Swamp Works: A New Approach to Develop Space Mining and Resource Extraction Technologies at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; Sibille, L.; Leucht, K.; Smith, J. D.; Townsend, I. I.; Nick, A. J.; Schuler, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The first steps for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on target bodies such as the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), and even comets, involve the same sequence of steps as in the terrestrial mining of resources. First exploration including prospecting must occur, and then the resource must be acquired through excavation methods if it is of value. Subsequently a load, haul and dump sequence of events occurs, followed by processing of the resource in an ISRU plant, to produce useful commodities. While these technologies and related supporting operations are mature in terrestrial applications, they will be different in space since the environment and indigenous materials are different than on Earth. In addition, the equipment must be highly automated, since for the majority of the production cycle time, there will be no humans present to assist or intervene. This space mining equipment must withstand a harsh environment which includes vacuum, radical temperature swing cycles, highly abrasive lofted dust, electrostatic effects, van der Waals forces effects, galactic cosmic radiation, solar particle events, high thermal gradients when spanning sunlight terminators, steep slopes into craters / lava tubes and cryogenic temperatures as low as 40 K in permanently shadowed regions. In addition the equipment must be tele-operated from Earth or a local base where the crew is sheltered. If the tele-operation occurs from Earth then significant communications latency effects mandate the use of autonomous control systems in the mining equipment. While this is an extremely challenging engineering design scenario, it is also an opportunity, since the technologies developed in this endeavor could be used in the next generations of terrestrial mining equipment, in order to mine deeper, safer, more economical and with a higher degree of flexibility. New space technologies could precipitate new mining solutions here on Earth. The NASA KSC Swamp Works is an innovation

  2. NASA Shared Services Center breaks ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA officials and elected leaders were on hand for the groundbreaking ceremony of the NASA Shared Services Center Feb. 24, 2006, on the grounds of Stennis Space Center. The NSSC provides agency centralized administrative processing, human resources, procurement and financial services. From left, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Mike Olivier, Stennis Space Center Director Rick Gilbrech, Computer Sciences Corp. President Michael Laphen, NASA Deputy Administrator Shana Dale, Rep. Gene Taylor, Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin and Shared Services Center Executive Director Arbuthnot use golden shovels to break ground at the site.

  3. "Festival of Flight Special": Opening Space for Next Generation Explorers. NASA CONNECT[TM]. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Program will ultimately move from the explorations of the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle missions to a new period of pioneering in which people and businesses are more routinely traveling, working, and living in space. (Author/NB)

  4. NASA Programs and IYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) has embraced the opportunity presented by the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009, to take the exciting science generated by NASA's missions in astrophysics, planetary science and heliophysics to students, educators and the public worldwide. NASA is an Organizational Associate of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) IYA 2009 program, and as an integral component of national U.S. IYA team, is aligning its activities to the overarching themes outlined by the team. A website was launched in May 2008 to guide visitors to NASA resources and enable participation in special events. The website includes science themes, celestial objects to observe, and mission milestones for each month of 2009. Existing programs will be expanded to provide a variety of IYA-themed educational materials, while new programs are being initiated. Sun-Earth Day 2009 celebrates Galileo's first telescope observations by extending IYA activities to day-time astronomy. The program "Are We Alone?" is a series of special one-hour SETI Institute radio and podcast programs linked to the NASA monthly highlights throughout 2009. The NASA IYA Student Ambassador program will help spread the excitement of NASA's astronomy discoveries into local communities through the efforts of College and University students. Two of these students will represent NASA at the IYA Opening Ceremony in Paris in January 2009. These and other special programs being developed will be described in this talk. The philosophy behind the IYA programs is to make them exciting and sustainable beyond 2009. IYA is viewed as the beginning of a journey into the world of astronomy by the uninitiated and the continue of a quest by those already enraptured by the wonders of the sky.

  5. NASA science communications strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, the Clinton Administration issued a report, 'Science in the National Interest', which identified new national science goals. Two of the five goals are related to science communications: produce the finest scientists and engineers for the 21st century, and raise scientific and technological literacy of all Americans. In addition to the guidance and goals set forth by the Administration, NASA has been mandated by Congress under the 1958 Space Act to 'provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination concerning its activities and the results thereof'. In addition to addressing eight Goals and Plans which resulted from a January 1994 meeting between NASA and members of the broader scientific, education, and communications community on the Public Communication of NASA's Science, the Science Communications Working Group (SCWG) took a comprehensive look at the way the Agency communicates its science to ensure that any changes the Agency made were long-term improvements. The SCWG developed a Science Communications Strategy for NASA and a plan to implement the Strategy. This report outlines a strategy from which effective science communications programs can be developed and implemented across the agency. Guiding principles and strategic themes for the strategy are provided, with numerous recommendations for improvement discussed within the respective themes of leadership, coordination, integration, participation, leveraging, and evaluation.

  6. 77 FR 38336 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Building 1, Rooms E100D/E, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a...

  7. Research Funding Set for NSF, NASA, EPA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Funds (1983) for National Science Foundation (NSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) research programs include $1,092,200,000 (NSF), $5.5 billion (NASA), and $119 million (EPA). NSF's science education activities were raised to $30 million in spite of the Administration's plan to phase…

  8. NASA Vision. Volume 1, No. 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Administrator O'Keefe addresses NASA's return to flight. New independent engineering and safety center. Around the centers. NASA and your library: local libraries making room for space. Robonaut: the next generation. Inspiring the next generation ... of Hispanics. NASA and teachers focus on parks. GSFC director gives keynote address. Agency honor awards. Summer interns join the NASA team. Catching a comet's tail in Earth's atmosphere.

  9. NASA Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  10. NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.; Charnock, James K.; Bagwell, Donald R.; Grigsby, Donner

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several systems to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These systems provide current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, and real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors. The goal of the NASA program is to provide the research and development to demonstrate an engineering model AVOSS in real-time operation at a major airport. The demonstration is only of concept feasibility, and additional effort is required to deploy an operational system for actual aircraft spacing reduction. This paper describes the AVOSS system architecture, a wake vortex facility established at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), initial operational experience with the AVOSS system, and emerging considerations for subsystem requirements. Results of the initial system operation suggest a significant potential for reduced spacing.

  11. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at center) to control fluid flow. A fresh nutrient bag is installed at top; a flattened waste bag behind it will fill as the nutrients are consumed during the course of operation. The drive chain and gears for the rotating wall vessel are visible at bottom center center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  12. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at right center) to control fluid flow. The rotating wall vessel is at top center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Electronics control module for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior of a Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  15. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior view of the gas supply for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell and with thermal blankets partially removed. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  18. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Laptop computer sits atop the Experiment Control Computer for a NASA Bioreactor. The flight crew can change operating conditions in the Bioreactor by using the graphical interface on the laptop. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  19. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exterior view of the NASA Bioreactor Engineering Development Unit flown on Mir. The rotating wall vessel is behind the window on the face of the large module. Control electronics are in the module at left; gas supply and cooling fans are in the module at back. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  20. NASA Information Technology Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Information Technology (IT) resources and IT support continue to be a growing and integral part of all NASA missions. Furthermore, the growing IT support requirements are becoming more complex and diverse. The following are a few examples of the growing complexity and diversity of NASA's IT environment. NASA is conducting basic IT research in the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) and Intelligent Systems (IS) Initiatives. IT security, infrastructure protection, and privacy of data are requiring more and more management attention and an increasing share of the NASA IT budget. Outsourcing of IT support is becoming a key element of NASA's IT strategy as exemplified by Outsourcing Desktop Initiative for NASA (ODIN) and the outsourcing of NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN) support. Finally, technology refresh is helping to provide improved support at lower cost. Recently the NASA Automated Data Processing (ADP) Consolidation Center (NACC) upgraded its bipolar technology computer systems with Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology systems. This NACC upgrade substantially reduced the hardware maintenance and software licensing costs, significantly increased system speed and capacity, and reduced customer processing costs by 11 percent.

  1. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  2. 75 FR 60484 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory Group Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied...

  3. 77 FR 55863 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory Group Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied Science Advisory Group....

  4. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Research Subcommittee of the...

  5. 75 FR 2892 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Heliophysics Subcommittee of the...

  6. 75 FR 30074 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Heliophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Heliophysics Subcommittee of the...

  7. 77 FR 71641 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of...

  8. 78 FR 49296 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. ] SUMMARY: In... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the...

  9. 75 FR 33837 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the...

  10. 75 FR 2893 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the...

  11. 77 FR 20851 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In... and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of...

  12. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Astronaut John Blaha replaces an exhausted media bag and filled waste bag with fresh bags to continue a bioreactor experiment aboard space station Mir in 1996. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. This image is from a video downlink. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The heart of the bioreactor is the rotating wall vessel, shown without its support equipment. Volume is about 125 mL. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. The initiation and administration of drugs for advanced life support by critical care nurses in the absence of a medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Rochelle; Lodder, Teresa; Trapani, Tony; Hanlon, Gabrielle; Cleary, Carmel

    2002-08-01

    Current legislation does not permit the administration of first line resuscitation medications by suitably qualified Division 1 registered nurses (RNs) in the absence of a medical officer. This omission by the Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981 (Vic) and the Drugs, Poisons and The Controlled Substances Regulations 1995 (Vic) leaves many critical care nurses in a vulnerable legal position. The primary aim of this study was to gauge the view of critical care nurses with respect to lobbying for change to the current legislation. In addition, the study aimed to explore and describe the educational preparation, practice perceptions and experiences of RNs working in critical care regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the administration of first line advanced life support (ALS) medications in the absence of a medical officer. It was anticipated that data collected would demonstrate some of the dilemmas associated with the initiation and administration of ALS medications for practising critical care nurses and could be used to inform controlling bodies in order for them to gain an appreciation of the issues facing critical care nurses during resuscitation. A mailout survey was sent to all members of the Victorian Branch of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN). The results showed that the majority of nurses underwent an annual ALS assessment and had current ALS accreditation. Nurses indicated that they felt educationally prepared and were confident to manage cardiopulmonary resuscitation without a medical officer; indeed, the majority had done so. The differences in practice issues for metropolitan, regional and rural nurses were highlighted. There is therefore clear evidence to suggest that legislative amendments are appropriate and necessary, given the time critical nature of cardiopulmonary arrest. There was overwhelming support for ACCCN Vic. Ltd to lobby the Victorian government for changes to the law.

  15. NASA information resources management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Handbook (NHB) implements recent changes to Federal laws and regulations involving the acquisition, management, and use of Federal Information Processing (FIP) resources. This document defines NASA's Information Resources Management (IRM) practices and procedures and is applicable to all NASA personnel. The dynamic nature of the IRM environment requires that the controlling management practices and procedures for an Agency at the leading edge of technology, such as NASA, must be periodically updated to reflect the changes in this environment. This revision has been undertaken to accommodate changes in the technology and the impact of new laws and regulations dealing with IRM. The contents of this document will be subject to a complete review annually to determine its continued applicability to the acquisition, management, and use of FIP resources by NASA. Updates to this document will be accomplished by page changes. This revision cancels NHB 2410.1D, dated April 1985.

  16. NASA spinoffs to public service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ault, L. A.; Cleland, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Technology Utilization (TU) Division of the Office of Commercial Programs has been quite successful in directing the transfer to technology into the public sector. NASA developments of particular interest have been those in the areas of aerodynamics and aviation transport, safety, sensors, electronics and computing, and satellites and remote sensing. NASA technology has helped law enforcement, firefighting, public transportation, education, search and rescue, and practically every other sector of activity serving the U.S. public. NASA works closely with public service agencies and associations, especially those serving local needs of citizens, to expedite technology transfer benefits. A number of examples exist to demonstrate the technology transfer method and opportunities of NASA spinoffs to public service.

  17. 14 CFR § 1221.109 - Use of the NASA Seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of the NASA Seal. § 1221.109 Section § 1221.109 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia, NASA Logotype, NASA...

  18. NASA's Plan for SDLS Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The Space Data Link Security (SDLS) Protocol is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standard which extends the known Data Link protocols to secure data being sent over a space link by providing confidentiality and integrity services. This plan outlines the approach by National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) in performing testing of the SDLS protocol using a prototype based on an existing NASA missions simulator.

  19. Oral administration of the citrus coumarin, isopimpinellin, blocks DNA adduct formation and skin tumor initiation by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in SENCAR mice.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Heather E; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; Starost, Matthew F; Reed, Melissa J; DiGiovanni, John

    2002-10-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of oral administration of the citrus coumarin, isopimpinellin, on skin tumor initiation by topically applied benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). To evaluate the effects of orally administered isopimpinellin on skin tumor initiation by B[a]P and DMBA, its effects on DNA adduct formation were first evaluated. Female SENCAR mice were pre-treated twice with corn oil, or isopimpinellin (70 mg/kg body wt per os) at 24 h and 2 h prior to topical treatment with B[a]P or DMBA. Another citrus coumarin, imperatorin, was also included in these experiments for comparison. Orally administered isopimpinellin and imperatorin significantly inhibited B[a]P-DNA adduct formation by 37 and 26%, respectively. Imperatorin also blocked DMBA-DNA adduct formation by 43%. In a second dose-response study, orally administered isopimpinellin (35, 70 and 150 mg/kg) blocked DMBA-DNA adduct formation by 23, 56 and 69%, respectively. For the tumor study, mice were pretreated orally with corn oil or isopimpinellin at 24 and 2 h prior to initiation with DMBA, and 2 weeks later promotion began with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Isopimpinellin significantly reduced the mean number of papillomas per mouse by 49, 73 and 78% compared to corn oil controls at 30, 70 and 150 mg/kg body wt, respectively. Orally administered isopimpinellin also significantly reduced the percentage of mice with papillomas at the highest dose tested (150 mg/kg). The effectiveness of isopimpinellin given topically over a broad dose range against DMBA tumor initiation was also evaluated for comparison. As part of this study, several parameters of systemic toxicity were evaluated following oral dosing with isopimpinellin and imperatorin. Mice were treated orally with corn oil, isopimpinellin or imperatorin (35, 70 and 150 mg/kg body wt per os) once daily for four consecutive days, killed at 24 h after the last dose, and livers, lungs

  20. 14 CFR 1221.105 - Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers. 1221.105 Section 1221.105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia,...

  1. 14 CFR 1221.105 - Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers. 1221.105 Section 1221.105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia,...

  2. 14 CFR 1221.105 - Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers. 1221.105 Section 1221.105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia,...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator...

  4. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator...

  6. 14 CFR 1221.105 - Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of NASA Program Identifiers. 1221.105 Section 1221.105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR NASA Seal, NASA Insignia,...

  7. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator...

  9. 78 FR 64442 - NASA FAR Supplement: Proposal Adequacy Checklist

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Parts 1815 and 1852 RIN 2700-AE13 NASA FAR Supplement: Proposal Adequacy Checklist AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: NASA is proposing to amend the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to incorporate a proposal adequacy checklist for...

  10. 78 FR 41115 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  11. 76 FR 41824 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  12. 75 FR 35091 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  13. 76 FR 8380 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  14. 75 FR 54389 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  15. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the... Administration Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or susan.l.minor@nasa.gov ....

  16. 76 FR 17158 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  17. 76 FR 59446 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  18. 78 FR 77502 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA..., 2014, 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 3P40, 300 E Street...

  19. 77 FR 6824 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  20. 78 FR 67202 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports...

  1. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...., Washington, DC 20405, (202) 501-4755. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several... Acquisition Policy. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Final Rule Stage Regulation Sequence Title Identifier Number...

  2. NASA Crew Launch Vehicle Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The US. Vision for Space Exploration, announced January 2004, outlines the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) strategic goals and objectives. These include: 1) Flying the Shuttle as safely as possible until its retirement, not later than 2010. 2) Bringing a new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) into service as soon as possible after Shuttle retirement. 3) Developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics at NASA, consistent with the redirection of the human spaceflight program to focus on exploration. 4) Completing the International Space Station (ISS) in a manner consistent with international partner commitments and the needs of human exploration. 5) Encouraging the pursuit of appropriate partnerships with the emerging commercial space sector. 6) Establishing a lunar return program having the maximum possible utility for later missions to Mars and other destinations. Following the confirmation of the new NASA Administrator in April 2005, the Agency commissioned a team of aerospace subject matter experts from government and industry to perform the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), which provided in-depth information for selecting the follow-on launch vehicle designs to enable these goals, The ESAS team analyzed a number of potential launch systems, with a focus on: (1) a human-rated launch vehicle for crew transport and (2) a heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) to carry cargo. After several months of intense study utilizing technical performance, budget, and schedule objectives, the results showed that the optimum architecture to meet the challenge of safe, reliable crew transport is a two-stage variant of the Space Shuttle propulsion system - utilizing the reusable Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as the first stage, along with a new upper stage that uses a derivative of the RS-25 Space Shuttle Main Engine to deliver 25 metric tons to low-Earth orbit. The CEV that this new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) lofts into space

  3. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Sovey, James S.

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt- and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities.

  4. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James R.; Sovey, James S.

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt- and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities.

  5. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Sovey, James S.

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities.

  6. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James R.; Sovey, James S.

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities.

  7. Highlighting Your Science to NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, C.

    2003-12-01

    An effort is underway to provide greater visibility within NASA headquarters, and to those who provide funding to NASA, of the outstanding work that is being performed by scientists involved in the Solar System Exploration Research and Analysis Programs, most of whom are DPS members. In support of this effort, a new feature has been developed for the NASA Headquarters Solar System Exploration Division web site whereby researchers can provide a synopsis of their current research results. The site (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/spotlight/ - Username: your email address Password: sse) is an online submission area where NASA-funded scientists can upload the results of their research. There they provide their contact information, briefly describe their research, and upload any associated images or graphics. The information is available to a limited number of reviewers and writers at JPL. Each month, one researcher's work will be chosen as a science spotlight. After a writer interviews the scientist, a brief Power Point presentation that encapsulates their work will be given to Dr. Colleen Hartman at NASA headquarters. She will then present the exciting findings to Associate Administrator for Space Science, Dr. Ed Weiler. The information from some of these highlights can serve as a basis to bring Principal Investigators to NASA Headquarters for exposure to media through Space Science Updates on NASA television. In addition, the science results may also be incorporated into briefing material for the Office of Management and Budget and congressional staffers. Some spotlights will also be converted into feature stories for the Solar System Exploration website so the public, too, can learn about exciting new research. The site, http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/, is one of NASA's most visited. Over the past decade, there has been a trend of flat budgets for Research and Analysis activities. By giving more visibility to results of Solar System research, our goal is to encourage

  8. APPLICATION OF A BIP CONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION MODEL COMBINED WITH NASA's ATLAS MODEL TO OPTIMIZE THE SOCIETAL BENEFITS OF THE USA's INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION AND UTILIZATION INITIATIVE OF 1/14/04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Glover, Fred W.; Woodcock, Gordon R.; Laguna, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The 1/14/04 USA Space Exploratiofltilization Initiative invites all Space-faring Nations, all Space User Groups in Science, Space Entrepreneuring, Advocates of Robotic and Human Space Exploration, Space Tourism and Colonization Promoters, etc., to join an International Space Partnership. With more Space-faring Nations and Space User Groups each year, such a Partnership would require Multi-year (35 yr.-45 yr.) Space Mission Planning. With each Nation and Space User Group demanding priority for its missions, one needs a methodology for obiectively selecting the best mission sequences to be added annually to this 45 yr. Moving Space Mission Plan. How can this be done? Planners have suggested building a Reusable, Sustainable, Space Transportation Infrastructure (RSSn) to increase Mission synergism, reduce cost, and increase scientific and societal returns from this Space Initiative. Morgenthaler and Woodcock presented a Paper at the 55th IAC, Vancouver B.C., Canada, entitled Constrained Optimization Models For Optimizing Multi - Year Space Programs. This Paper showed that a Binary Integer Programming (BIP) Constrained Optimization Model combined with the NASA ATLAS Cost and Space System Operational Parameter Estimating Model has the theoretical capability to solve such problems. IAA Commission III, Space Technology and Space System Development, in its ACADEMY DAY meeting at Vancouver, requested that the Authors and NASA experts find several Space Exploration Architectures (SEAS), apply the combined BIP/ATLAS Models, and report the results at the 56th Fukuoka IAC. While the mathematical Model is in Ref.[2] this Paper presents the Application saga of that effort.

  9. 75 FR 70951 - NASA Advisory Council; NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; NASA Commercial Space Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space...

  10. [A case of anaphylactoid shock occurring immediately after the initiation of second intravenous administration of high-dose immunoglobulin (IVIg) in a patient with Crow-Fukase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Ono, Shin-ichi; Ogawa, Katuhiko; Tamura, Masato; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2003-06-01

    We report a case of anaphylactoid shock occurring immediately after the initiation of second intravenous administration of high-dose immunoglobulin (IVIg) in a patient with Crow-Fukase syndrome. The patient was a 57-year-old woman, who was admitted to our hospital because of numbness and muscle weakness in the four extremities, difficulty in walking, and foot edema. On admission, her skin was dry and rough, and also showing scattered pigmentation, small hemangiomas, and hypertrichosis in both legs. She had distal dominant muscle weakness, more prominent in her legs, and was not able to walk. Deep tendon reflexes in her four extremities were markedly diminished or absent. She had a glove and stocking type of paresthesia, severe impairment of vibration, and absence of joint position sensation in her four extremities. On laboratory data, serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was markedly elevated to 5,184 pg/ml (normal: below 220 pg/ml). Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed cell counts of 2/microliter and protein level of 114 mg/dl. Abdominal echo showed marked hepatosplenomegaly. On peripheral nerve conduction study, both motor and sensory conduction velocity were undetectable in her legs. We diagnosed her condition as Crow-Fukase syndrome, and started IVIg of polyethyleneglycol-treated gamma-globulin (PEG-glob) at 400 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days for polyneuropathy. Since the first IVIg mildly improved muscle weakness, we tried the second IVIg of PEG-glob. However, immediately after the initiation of second IVIg of PEG-glob, she developed hypotention, dyspnea, cold sweating, cyanosis, and became lethargic. We immediately stopped IVIg and started first-aid treatment with epinephrine and corticosteroid for these symptoms. This treatment was successful and the patient fully recovered without any sequelae. Since serum IgE level remained unchanged and lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) was positive against the same rot number of PEG-glob, we diagnosed

  11. NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Materials Science research programs are funded by NASA through the Microgravity Research Division. Such programs are normally designated as flight definition or ground based and can be awarded initially for up to four years. Selection is through a peer review process in response to a biennial NASA Research Announcement (NRA). The next announcement is due in November 1998 with proposals due in March 1999. Topics of special interest to NASA are described in the guidelines for proposal writing within the NRA. NASA's interest in materials is wide and covers a range which includes metals and alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, non-linear optics, aerogels and nanostructures. With increasing interest in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) program, the materials research funded will not be exclusively devoted to processes dependent on microgravity, but will also support materials of strategic interest in meeting NASA's long range plans of interplanetary travel.

  12. NASA balloon technology developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program's technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, ballooncraft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  13. NASA Balloon Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program s technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, balloon-craft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  14. 77 FR 68152 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and...) announces a meeting of the Science Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Committee reports to... 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Marian Norris, Science Mission Directorate,...

  15. NASA UAS Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey Ervin; Mulac, Brenda Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Last year may prove to be a pivotal year for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) arena, especially in relation to routine UAS access to airspace as NASA accepted an invitation to join the UAS Executive Committee (UAS ExCom). The UAS ExCom is a multi-agency, Federal executive-level committee comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA with the goals to: 1) Coordinate and align efforts between key Federal Government agencies to achieve routine safe federal public UAS operations in the National Airspace System (NAS); 2) Coordinate and prioritize technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions needed to deliver incremental capabilities; 3) Develop a plan to accommodate the larger stakeholder community at the appropriate time; and 4) Resolve conflicts between Federal Government agencies (FAA, DoD, DHS, and NASA), related to the above goals. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. In order to meet that need, technical, procedural, regulatory, and policy solutions are required to deliver incremental capabilities leading to routine access. The formation of the UAS ExCom is significant in that it represents a tangible commitment by FAA senior leadership to address the UAS access challenge. While the focus of the ExCom is government owned and operated UAS, civil UAS operations are bound to benefit by the progress made in achieving routine access for government UAS. As the UAS ExCom was forming, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate began to show renewed interest in UAS, particularly in relation to the future state of the air transportation system under the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). NASA made funding from the American

  16. Science and Observation Recommendations for Future NASA Carbon Cycle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Collatz, G. J.; Kawa, S. R.; Gregg, W. W.; Gervin, J. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Andrews, A. E.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Demaio, L. D.; Knox, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Between October 2000 and June 2001, an Agency-wide planning, effort was organized by elements of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to define future research and technology development activities. This planning effort was conducted at the request of the Associate Administrator of the Office of Earth Science (Code Y), Dr. Ghassem Asrar, at NASA Headquarters (HQ). The primary points of contact were Dr. Mary Cleave, Deputy Associate Administrator for Advanced Planning at NASA HQ (Headquarters) and Dr. Charles McClain of the Office of Global Carbon Studies (Code 970.2) at GSFC. During this period, GSFC hosted three workshops to define the science requirements and objectives, the observational and modeling requirements to meet the science objectives, the technology development requirements, and a cost plan for both the science program and new flight projects that will be needed for new observations beyond the present or currently planned. The plan definition process was very intensive as HQ required the final presentation package by mid-June 2001. This deadline was met and the recommendations were ultimately refined and folded into a broader program plan, which also included climate modeling, aerosol observations, and science computing technology development, for contributing to the President's Climate Change Research Initiative. This technical memorandum outlines the process and recommendations made for cross-cutting carbon cycle research as presented in June. A separate NASA document outlines the budget profiles or cost analyses conducted as part of the planning effort.

  17. NASA Earth Remote Sensing Programs: An Overview with Special Emphasis on the NASA/JAXA Led Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of NASA's operations monitoring the earth from space. It includes information on NASA's administrative divisions and key operating earth science missions with specific information on the Landsat satellites, Seastar spacecraft, and the TRMM satellite.

  18. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101824 for a version with labels, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic.

  19. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Biotechnology Specimen Temperature Controller (BSTC) will cultivate cells until their turn in the bioreactor; it can also be used in culturing experiments that do not require the bioreactor. The BSTC comprises four incubation/refrigeration chambers individually set at 4 to 50 degreesC (near-freezing to above body temperature). Each chamber holds three rugged tissue chamber modules (12 total), clear Teflon bags holding 30 ml of growth media, all positioned by a metal frame. Every 7 to 21 days (depending on growth rates), an astronaut uses a shrouded syringe and the bags' needleless injection ports to transfer a few cells to a fresh media bag, and to introduce a fixative so that the cells may be studied after flight. The design also lets the crew sample the media to measure glucose, gas, and pH levels, and to inspect cells with a microscope. The controller is monitored by the flight crew through a 23-cm (9-inch) color computer display on the face of the BSTC. This view shows the BTSC with the front panel open. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  20. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101823 for a version without labels, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic.