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  1. #NASATweetup @NASA_Langley

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Langley Research Center's first tweet-up involved a diverse group of more than 40 that included an astronaut's daughter, a physics student from Wisconsin, one of NASA's newest space camp crew ...

  2. NASA Langley Highlights, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  3. NASA Langley Highlights, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. A color electronic version of this report is available at URL http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1998/.

  4. #NASATweetup @NASA_Langley Audio Slideshow

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Langley Research Center's first tweet-up involved a diverse group of more than 40 that included an astronaut's daughter, a physics student from Wisconsin, one of NASA's newest space camp crew ...

  5. Implementing DSpace at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Greta

    2007-01-01

    This presentation looks at the implementation of the DSpace institutional repository system at the NASA Langley Technical Library. NASA Langley Technical Library implemented DSpace software as a replacement for the Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). DSpace was also used to develop the Langley Technical Library Digital Repository (LTLDR). LTLDR contains archival copies of core technical reports in the aeronautics area dating back to the NACA era and other specialized collections relevant to the NASA Langley community. Extensive metadata crosswalks were created to facilitate moving data from various systems and formats to DSpace. The Dublin Core metadata screens were also customized. The OpenURL standard and Ex Libris Metalib are being used in this environment to assist our customers with either discovering full-text content or with initiating a request for the item.

  6. Third NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This publication constitutes the proceedings of NASA Langley Research Center's third workshop on the application of formal methods to the design and verification of life-critical systems. This workshop brought together formal methods researchers, industry engineers, and academicians to discuss the potential of NASA-sponsored formal methods and to investigate new opportunities for applying these methods to industry problems. contained herein are copies of the material presented at the workshop, summaries of many of the presentations, a complete list of attendees, and a detailed summary of the Langley formal methods program. Much of this material is available electronically through the World-Wide Web via the following URL.

  7. Overview of military technology at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Wallace C.; Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Langley Research Center began addressing major research topics pertinent to the design of military aircraft under the egis of The National Advisory Council on Aeronautics in 1917, until 1958, when it passed under the control of the newly-instituted NASA research facilities system. A historical account is presented of NASA-Langley's involvement in the experimental investigation of twin-engined jet aircraft nozzle interfairings, thrust reversers, high-efficiency supersonic cruise configurations, high-alpha aerodynamics, air-to-air combat handling qualities, wing/stores flutter suppression, and store carriage and separation characteristics.

  8. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  9. NASA Langley/CNU Distance Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caton, Randall; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    NASA Langley Research Center and Christopher Newport University (CNU) provide, free to the public, distance learning programs that focus on math, science, and/or technology over a spectrum of education levels from K-adult. The effort started in 1997, and currently there are a suite of five distance-learning programs. This paper presents the major…

  10. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  11. Fourth NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael (Compiler); Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication consists of papers presented at NASA Langley Research Center's fourth workshop on the application of formal methods to the design and verification of life-critical systems. Topic considered include: Proving properties of accident; modeling and validating SAFER in VDM-SL; requirement analysis of real-time control systems using PVS; a tabular language for system design; automated deductive verification of parallel systems. Also included is a fundamental hardware design in PVS.

  12. Spaceflight revolution: NASA Langley Research Center from Sputnik to Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the transition to the broad research scope of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) starting in the late 1950's, the Langley Research Center underwent many changes in program content, organization and management, and areas of personnel expertise. This book describes and evaluates the evolution and activities of the Langley Research Center during the seventeen-year period from 1958 to 1975. The book was based on the analysis of hundreds of written records, both published and unpublished, as well as numerous personal interviews with many of the key individuals involved in the transition of Langley. Some of the projects and research areas covered include Project Echo, magnetoplasmadynamics research, Scout Rocket Program, lunar-orbit rendezvous research, manned space laboratory development, and Apollo and the Lunar Orbiter Project.

  13. Experiences From NASA/Langley's DMSS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed such a system into production use. This paper will present the experiences, both good and bad, we have had with this system since putting it into production usage. The system is comprised of: 1) National Storage Laboratory (NSL)/UniTree 2.1, 2) IBM 9570 HIPPI attached disk arrays (both RAID 3 and RAID 5), 3) IBM RS6000 server, 4) HIPPI/IPI3 third party transfers between the disk array systems and the supercomputer clients, a CRAY Y-MP and a CRAY 2, 5) a "warm spare" file server, 6) transition software to convert from CRAY's Data Migration Facility (DMF) based system to DMSS, 7) an NSC PS32 HIPPI switch, and 8) a STK 4490 robotic library accessed from the IBM RS6000 block mux interface. This paper will cover: the performance of the DMSS in the following areas: file transfer rates, migration and recall, and file manipulation (listing, deleting, etc.); the appropriateness of a workstation class of file server for NSL/UniTree with LaRC's present storage requirements in mind the role of the third party transfers between the supercomputers and the DMSS disk array systems in DMSS; a detailed comparison (both in performance and functionality) between the DMF and DMSS systems LaRC's enhancements to the NSL/UniTree system administration environment the mechanism for DMSS to provide file server redundancy the statistics on the availability of DMSS the design and experiences with the locally developed transparent transition software which allowed us to make over 1.5 million DMF files available to NSL/UniTree with minimal system outage

  14. Nasa Langley Research Center seventy-fifth anniversary publications, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The following are presented: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Charter; Exploring NASA's Roots, the History of NASA Langley Research Center; NASA Langley's National Historic Landmarks; The Mustang Story: Recollections of the XP-51; Testing the First Supersonic Aircraft: Memoirs of NACA Pilot Bob Champine; NASA Langley's Contributions to Spaceflight; The Rendezvous that was Almost Missed: Lunar Orbit Rendezvous and the Apollo Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Apollo Program; Scout Launch Vehicle Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Space Shuttle; 69 Months in Space: A History of the First LDEF; NACA TR No. 460: The Characteristics of 78 Related Airfoil Sections from Tests in the Variable-Density Wind Tunnel; NACA TR No. 755: Requirements for Satisfactory Flying Qualities of Airplanes; 'Happy Birthday Langley' NASA Magazine Summer 1992 Issue.

  15. Aerothermodynamics at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James

    2001-01-01

    The Aerothermodynamics Branch at NASA - Langley Research Center is tasked with developing, assessing and applying aerothermodynamic technologies to enable the development of hypersonic aircraft, launch vehicles, and planetary/earth entry systems. To accomplish this mission, the Branch capitalizes on the synergism between the experimental and computational facilities/tools which reside in the branch and a staff that can draw on five decades of experience in aerothermodynamics. The Aerothermodynamics Branch is staffed by 30 scientists/engineers. The staff, of which two-thirds are less than 40 years old, is split evenly between experimentalists and computationalists. Approximately 90 percent of the staff work on space transportation systems while the remainder work on planetary missions. The Branch manages 5 hypersonic wind tunnels which are staffed by 14 technicians, numerous high end work stations and a SGI Origin 2000 system. The Branch also utilizes other test facilities located at Langley as well as other national and international test sites. Large scale computational requirements are met by access to Agency resources.

  16. ARIES: NASA Langley's Airborne Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wusk, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1994, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) acquired a B-757-200 aircraft to replace the aging B-737 Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The TSRV was a modified B-737-100, which served as a trailblazer in the development of glass cockpit technologies and other innovative aeronautical concepts. The mission for the B-757 is to continue the three-decade tradition of civil transport technology research begun by the TSRV. Since its arrival at Langley, this standard 757 aircraft has undergone extensive modifications to transform it into an aeronautical research "flying laboratory". With this transformation, the aircraft, which has been designated Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES), has become a unique national asset which will continue to benefit the U.S. aviation industry and commercial airline customers for many generations to come. This paper will discuss the evolution of the modifications, detail the current capabilities of the research systems, and provide an overview of the research contributions already achieved.

  17. The NASA Langley Mars Tumbleweed Rover Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Chattin, Richard L.; Copeland, Benjamin M.; Krizann, Shawn A.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Tumbleweed is a concept for an autonomous rover that would achieve mobility through use of the natural winds on Mars. The wind-blown nature of this vehicle make it an ideal platform for conducting random surveys of the surface, scouting for signs of past or present life as well as examining the potential habitability of sites for future human exploration. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been studying the dynamics, aerodynamics, and mission concepts of Tumbleweed rovers and has recently developed a prototype Mars Tumbleweed Rover for demonstrating mission concepts and science measurement techniques. This paper will provide an overview of the prototype design, instrumentation to be accommodated, preliminary test results, and plans for future development and testing of the vehicle.

  18. The NASA Langley Isolator Dynamics Research Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Humphreys, William M.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2010-01-01

    The Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) is under construction at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A unique test apparatus is being fabricated to support both wall and in-stream measurements for investigating the internal flow of a dual-mode scramjet isolator model. The test section is 24 inches long with a 1-inch by 2-inch cross sectional area and is supplied with unheated, dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The test section is being fabricated with two sets (glass and metallic) of interchangeable sidewalls to support flow visualization and laser-based measurement techniques as well as static pressure, wall temperature, and high frequency pressure measurements. During 2010, a CFD code validation experiment will be conducted in the lab in support of NASA s Fundamental Aerodynamics Program. This paper describes the mechanical design of the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab test apparatus and presents a summary of the measurement techniques planned for investigating the internal flow field of a scramjet isolator model.

  19. Holographic Flow Visualization at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    2005-01-01

    Holographic flow visualization systems at two NASA Langley facilities, a hypersonic blow-down tunnel using CF4 gas and an expansion tube with very short test time, are described. A pulsed ruby laser is used at a CF4 tunnel for single pulse holography, double pulse with several minutes between exposures, and dual plate holographic interferometry. Shadow-graph, schlieren, and interferograms are reconstructed from the holograms in a separate reconstruction lab. At the expansion tube the short run time of 200 microseconds requires precise triggering of its double pulsed ruby laser. With pulse separation, one pulse can occur before and one after flow is established to obtain fringe free background interferograms (perfect infinite fringe) or both pulses can occur during flow in order to study flow instabilities. Holograms are reconstructed at the expansion tube with an in-place setup which makes use of a high power CW Argon laser and common optics for both recording and reconstructing the holograms. The holographic systems at the CF4 tunnel and expansion tube are operated routinely for flow visualization by tunnel technicians. Typical flow visualization photographs from both facilities are presented.

  20. Experimental Supersonic Combustion Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. Clayton; Capriotti, Diego P.; Guy, R. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Experimental supersonic combustion research related to hypersonic airbreathing propulsion has been actively underway at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) since the mid-1960's. This research involved experimental investigations of fuel injection, mixing, and combustion in supersonic flows and numerous tests of scramjet engine flowpaths in LaRC test facilities simulating flight from Mach 4 to 8. Out of this research effort has come scramjet combustor design methodologies, ground test techniques, and data analysis procedures. These technologies have progressed steadily in support of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program and the current Hyper-X flight demonstration program. During NASP nearly 2500 tests of 15 scramjet engine models were conducted in LaRC facilities. In addition, research supporting the engine flowpath design investigated ways to enhance mixing, improve and apply nonintrusive diagnostics, and address facility operation. Tests of scramjet combustor operation at conditions simulating hypersonic flight at Mach numbers up to 17 also have been performed in an expansion tube pulse facility. This paper presents a review of the LaRC experimental supersonic combustion research efforts since the late 1980's, during the NASP program, and into the Hyper-X Program.

  1. Holographic flow visualization at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1979-01-01

    Holographic flow visualization systems at two NASA Langley facilities, a hypersonic blow-down tunnel using CF4 gas and an expansion tube with very short test time, are described. A pulsed ruby laser is used at a CF4 tunnel for single pulse holography, double pulse with several minutes between exposures, and dual plate holographic interferometry. Shadowgraph, schlieren, and interferograms are reconstructed from the holograms in a separate reconstruction lab. At the expansion tube the short run time of 200 microseconds requires precise triggering of its double pulsed ruby laser. With double pulse capability of 20 to 1200 microseconds pulse separation, one pulse can occur before and one later after flow is established to obtain fringe free background interferograms (perfect infinite fringe) or both pulses can occur during flow in order to study flow instabilities. Holograms are reconstructed at the expansion tube with an in-place setup which makes use of a high power CW Argon laser and common optics for both recording and reconstructing the holograms. The holographic systems at the CF4 tunnel and expansion tube are operated routinely for flow visualization by tunnel technicians. Typical flow visualization photographs from both facilities are presented.

  2. NASA Langley/CNU Distance Learning Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caton, Randall; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center and Christopher Newport University (CNU) provide, free to the public, distance learning programs that focus on math, science, and/or technology over a spectrum of education levels from K-adult. The effort started in 1997, and we currently have a suite of five distance-learning programs. We have around 450,000 registered educators and 12.5 million registered students in 60 countries. Partners and affiliates include the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the Aerospace Education Coordinating Committee (AECC), the Alliance for Community Media, the National Educational Telecommunications Association, Public Broadcasting System (PBS) affiliates, the NASA Learning Technologies Channel, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the Council of the Great City Schools, Hampton City Public Schools, Sea World Adventure Parks, Busch Gardens, ePALS.com, and Riverdeep. Our mission is based on the "Horizon of Learning," a vision for inspiring learning across a continuum of educational experiences. The programs form a continuum of educational experiences for elementary youth through adult learners. The strategic plan for the programs will evolve to reflect evolving national educational needs, changes within NASA, and emerging system initiatives. Plans for each program component include goals, objectives, learning outcomes, and rely on sound business models. It is well documented that if technology is used properly it can be a powerful partner in education. Our programs employ both advances in information technology and in effective pedagogy to produce a broad range of materials to complement and enhance other educational efforts. Collectively, the goals of the five programs are to increase educational excellence; enhance and enrich the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology; increase scientific and technological literacy; and communicate the results of NASA discovery, exploration, innovation and research

  3. Computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center. Computational analysis is a major component and tool in many of Langley's diverse research disciplines, as well as in the interdisciplinary research. Examples are given for algorithm development and advanced applications in aerodynamics, transition to turbulence and turbulence simulation, hypersonics, structures, and interdisciplinary optimization.

  4. NASA Langley in two studies of pollution and climate

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-05

    article title:  NASA Langley in two studies of pollution and climate     View Larger ... campaigns, one of which will study how forest fire smoke, air pollution and natural emissions are transported to the upper troposphere ...

  5. NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER AND THE TIDEWATER INTERAGENCY POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Langley Research Center (LaRC) is an 807-acre research center devoted to aeronautics and space research. aRC has initiated a broad-based pollution prevention program guided by a Pollution Prevention Program Plan and implement...

  6. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  7. Lfm2000: Fifth NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This is the proceedings of Lfm2000: Fifth NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop. The workshop was held June 13-15, 2000, in Williamsburg, Virginia. See the web site nasa.gov/lfm2000/> for complete information about the event.

  8. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  9. Overview of NASA Langley's Systems Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, Stephen; Kumar, Ajay; Brewer, Laura; Kimmel, Bill; Korte, John; Moul, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Systems Analysis and Concepts Directorate (SACD) has been in the systems analysis business line supporting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aeronautics, exploration, space operations and science since the 1960 s. Our current organization structure is shown in Figure 1. SACD mission can be summed up in the following statements: 1. We conduct advanced concepts for Agency decision makers and programs. 2. We provide aerospace systems analysis products such as mission architectures, advanced system concepts, system and technology trades, life cycle cost and risk analysis, system integration and pre-decisional sensitive information. 3. Our work enables informed technical, programmatic and budgetary decisions. SACD has a complement of 114 government employees and approximately 50 on-site contractors which is equally split between supporting aeronautics and exploration. SACD strives for technical excellence and creditability of the systems analysis products delivered to its customers. The Directorate office is continuously building market intelligence and working with other NASA centers and external partners to expand our business base. The Branches strive for technical excellence and credibility of our systems analysis products by seeking out existing and new partnerships that are critical for successful systems analysis. The Directorates long term goal is to grow the amount of science systems analysis business base.

  10. Revitalization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Mastaler, Michael D.; Craft, Stephen J.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Hope, Drew J.; Mangum, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (Langley) was founded in 1917 as the nation's first civilian aeronautical research facility and NASA's first field center. For nearly 100 years, Langley has made significant contributions to the Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Earth Science missions through research, technology, and engineering core competencies in aerosciences, materials, structures, the characterization of earth and planetary atmospheres and, more recently, in technologies associated with entry, descent, and landing. An unfortunate but inevitable outcome of this rich history is an aging infrastructure where the longest serving building is close to 80 years old and the average building age is 44 years old. In the current environment, the continued operation and maintenance of this aging and often inefficient infrastructure presents a real challenge to Center leadership in the trade space of sustaining infrastructure versus not investing in future capabilities. To address this issue, the Center has developed a forward looking revitalization strategy that ties future core competencies and technical capabilities to the Center Master Facility Plan to maintain a viable Center well into the future. This paper documents Langley's revitalization strategy which integrates the Center's missions, the Langley 2050 vision, the Center Master Facility Plan, and the New Town repair-by-replacement program through the leadership of the Vibrant Transformation to Advance Langley (ViTAL) Team.

  11. Enhanced Capabilities of the NASA Langley Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Turner, Travis L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents newly enhanced acoustic capabilities of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the NASA Langley Research Center. The facility is a progressive wave tube used for sonic fatigue testing of aerospace structures. Acoustic measurements for each of the six facility configurations are shown and comparisons with projected performance are made.

  12. Snapshot of Active Flow Control Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, A. E.; Gorton, S. Althoff; Anders, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley is aggressively investigating the potential advantages of active flow control as opposed to more traditional aerodynamic techniques. Many of these techniques will be blended with advanced materials and structures to further enhance payoff. Therefore a multi-disciplinary approach to technology development is being attempted that includes researchers from the more historical disciplines of fluid mechanics. acoustics, material science, structural mechanics, and control theory. The overall goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids rather than on specific engineering problems. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several programs such as the Morphing Project under Breakthrough Vehicle Technologies Program (BVT). the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), and the 21st Century Aircraft Technology Program (TCAT) is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research, as part of the fundamental NASA R and D (research and development) program. will be demonstrated as either bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight tests. Later they will be transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD (Department of Defense), and U.S. industry.

  13. Active Control Technology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; McGowan, Anna-Marie R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley has a long history of attacking important technical Opportunities from a broad base of supporting disciplines. The research and development at Langley in this subject area range from the test tube to the test flight, The information covered here will range from the development of innovative new materials, sensors and actuators, to the incorporation of smart sensors and actuators in practical devices, to the optimization of the location of these devices, to, finally, a wide variety of applications of these devices utilizing Langley's facilities and expertise. Advanced materials are being developed for sensors and actuators, as well as polymers for integrating smart devices into composite structures. Contributions reside in three key areas: computational materials; advanced piezoelectric materials; and integrated composite structures.

  14. High performance flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II; Sudik, Steven J.; Grove, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of real-time simulation at the NASA facility is reviewed specifically with regard to hardware, software, and the use of a fiberoptic-based digital simulation network. The network hardware includes supercomputers that support 32- and 64-bit scalar, vector, and parallel processing technologies. The software include drivers, real-time supervisors, and routines for site-configuration management and scheduling. Performance specifications include: (1) benchmark solution at 165 sec for a single CPU; (2) a transfer rate of 24 million bits/s; and (3) time-critical system responsiveness of less than 35 msec. Simulation applications include the Differential Maneuvering Simulator, Transport Systems Research Vehicle simulations, and the Visual Motion Simulator. NASA is shown to be in the final stages of developing a high-performance computing system for the real-time simulation of complex high-performance aircraft.

  15. High performance composites research at NASA-Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, Terry L.; Johnston, Norman J.; Baucom, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Barriers to the more extensive use of advanced composites in heavily loaded structures on commercial transports are discussed from a materials viewpoint. NASA-Langley matrix development activities designed to overcome these barriers are presented. These include the synthesis of processible, tough, durable matrices, the development of resin property/composite property relationships which help guide the synthesis program, and the exploitation of new processing technology to effectively combine reinforcement filament with polymer matrices. Examples of five classes of polymers being investigated as matrix resins at NASA Langley are presented, including amorphous and semicrystalline thermoplastics, lightly crosslinked thermoplastics, semi-interpenetrating networks and toughened thermosets. Relationships between neat resin modulus, resin fracture energy, interlaminar fracture energy, composite compression strength, and post-impact compression strength are shown. Powder and slurry processing techniques are discussed.

  16. Educator Resource Center for NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgford, Todd; Koltun, Nick R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the ERCN is to provide expertise and facilities to help educators access and utilize science, mathematics, and technology instructional products aligned with national standards and appropriate state frameworks and based on NASA s unique mission and results. The NASA Langley s Office of Education has established the service area for this ERC to be the five states of Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. This educational grant activity is associated with NASA s Mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can. The communication of NASA s knowledge is the prime role of this ERC. Functioning as a dissemination system of instructional materials and support for pre-college education programs we have met the NASA Education ERCN Program's goal. The following ERCN objectives have been accomplished: Demonstrate and facilitate the use of NASA educational products and technologies in print, video and web based formats. Examples include but are not limited to NASA approved Educator s Guides with Activities based on national standards for appropriate subjects and grade levels. We have demonstrated the use videotape series in analogue format and the new digital video instructional systems along with the use of NASA TV. The promotion of web page based resources such as the new NASA Portal web and the ability to download print resources is continuously facilitated in workshops. This objective has been completed by educator contacts that include on-site visits, phone requests, postal mail requests, e-mail requests, fax requests and workshops offered.

  17. A strategy for electronic dissemination of NASA Langley technical publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, Donna G.; Mccaskill, Mary K.; Holland, Scott D.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Nelson, Michael L.; Adkins, Susan L.; Ambur, Manjula Y.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    1994-01-01

    To demonstrate NASA Langley Research Center's relevance and to transfer technology to external customers in a timely and efficient manner, Langley has formed a working group to study and recommend a course of action for the electronic dissemination of technical reports (EDTR). The working group identified electronic report requirements (e.g., accessibility, file format, search requirements) of customers in U.S. industry through numerous site visits and personal contacts. Internal surveys were also used to determine commonalities in document preparation methods. From these surveys, a set of requirements for an electronic dissemination system was developed. Two candidate systems were identified and evaluated against the set of requirements: the Full-Text Electronic Documents System (FEDS), which is a full-text retrieval system based on the commercial document management package Interleaf, and the Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), which is a Langley-developed system based on the publicly available World Wide Web (WWW) software system. Factors that led to the selection of LTRS as the vehicle for electronic dissemination included searching and viewing capability, current system operability, and client software availability for multiple platforms at no cost to industry. This report includes the survey results, evaluations, a description of the LTRS architecture, recommended policy statement, and suggestions for future implementations.

  18. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  19. A future perspective on technological obsolescenceat NASA, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The present research effort was the first phase of a study to forecast whether technological obsolescence will be a problem for the engineers, scientists, and technicians at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). There were four goals of the research: to review the literature on technological obsolescence; to determine through interviews of division chiefs and branch heads Langley's perspective on future technological obsolescence; to begin making contacts with outside industries to find out how they view the possibility of technological obsolescence; and to make preliminary recommendations for dealing with the problem. A complete description of the findings of this research can be reviewed in a technical report in preparation. The following are a small subset of the key findings of the study: NASA's centers and divisions vary in their missions and because of this, in their capability to control obsolescence; research-oriented organizations within NASA are believed by respondents to keep up to date more than the project-oriented organizations; asked what are the signs of a professional's technological obsolescence, respondents had a variety of responses; top performing scientists were viewed as continuous learners, keeping up to date by a variety of means; when asked what incentives were available to aerospace technologists for keeping up to data, respondents specified a number of ideas; respondents identified many obstacles to professionals' keeping up to date in the future; and most respondents expressed some concern for the future of the professionals at NASA vis a vis the issue of professional obsolescence.

  20. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  1. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  2. NASA Langley Research Center outreach in astronautical education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has traditionally maintained an active relationship with the academic community, especially at the graduate level, to promote the Center's research program and to make graduate education available to its staff. Two new institutes at the Center - the Joint Institute for Acoustics and Flight Sciences, and the Institute for Computer Applications - are discussed. Both provide for research activity at the Center by university faculties. The American Society of Engineering Education Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA-NRC Postdoctoral Resident Research Associateship Program are also discussed.

  3. Progress in multidisciplinary design optimization at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.

    1993-01-01

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization refers to some combination of disciplinary analyses, sensitivity analysis, and optimization techniques used to design complex engineering systems. The ultimate objective of this research at NASA Langley Research Center is to help the US industry reduce the costs associated with development, manufacturing, and maintenance of aerospace vehicles while improving system performance. This report reviews progress towards this objective and highlights topics for future research. Aerospace design problems selected from the author's research illustrate strengths and weaknesses in existing multidisciplinary optimization techniques. The techniques discussed include multiobjective optimization, global sensitivity equations and sequential linear programming.

  4. NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Instrument Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John W.; Mack, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed the LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make measurements of aerosol and cloud distribution and optical properties. The Airborne HSRL has undergone as series of test flights and was successfully deployed on the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field mission in March 2006 (see Hair et al. in these proceedings). This paper provides an overview of the design of the Airborne HSRL and descriptions of some key subsystems unique to this instrument.

  5. Current research in composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the mechanics of composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center is discussed. The advantages and limitations of special purpose and general purpose analysis tools used in research are reviewed. Future directions in computational structural mechanics are described to address analysis short-comings. Research results on the buckling and postbuckling of unstiffened and stiffened composite structures are presented. Recent investigations of the mechanics of failure in compression and shear are reviewed. Preliminary studies of the dynamic response of composite structures due to impacts encountered during crash-landings are presented. Needs for future research are discussed.

  6. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  7. NASA, NOAA administrators nominated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan recently said he intended to nominate James Montgomery Beggs as NASA Administrator and John V. Byrne as NOAA Administrator. These two positions are key scientific posts that have been vacant since the start of the Reagan administration on January 20. The President also said he intends to nominate Hans Mark as NASA Deputy Administrator. At press time, Reagan had not designated his nominee for the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  8. Active Control Technology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; McGowan, Anna-Marie R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley has a long history of attacking important technical opportunities from a broad base of supporting disciplines. The research and development at Langley in this subject area range from the test tube to the test flight. The information covered here will range from the development of innovative new materials, sensors and actuators, to the incorporation of smart sensors and actuators in practical devices, to the optimization of the location of these devices, to, finally, a wide variety of applications of these devices utilizing Langley's facilities and expertise. Advanced materials are being developed for sensors and actuators, as well as polymers for integrating smart devices into composite structures. Contributions reside in three key areas: computational materials; advanced piezoelectric materials; and integrated composite structures. The computational materials effort is focused on developing predictive tools for the efficient design of new materials with the appropriate combination of properties for next generation smart airframe systems. Research in the area of advanced piezoelectrics includes optimizing the efficiency, force output, use temperature, and energy transfer between the structure and device for both ceramic and polymeric materials. For structural health monitoring, advanced non-destructive techniques including fiber optics are being developed for detection of delaminations, cracks and environmental deterioration in aircraft structures. The computational materials effort is focused on developing predictive tools for the efficient design of new materials with the appropriate combination of properties for next generation smart airframe system. Innovative fabrication techniques processing structural composites with sensor and actuator integration are being developed.

  9. Heavy Gas Conversion of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, James M.; Cole, Stanley, R.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy gas test medium has recently been changed in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at the NASA Langley Research Center. A NASA Construction of Facilities project has converted the TDT heavy gas from dichlorodifluoromethane (R12) to 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane (R134a). The facility s heavy gas processing system was extensively modified to implement the conversion to R134a. Additional system modifications have improved operator interfaces, hardware reliability, and quality of the research data. The facility modifications included improvements to the heavy gas compressor and piping, the cryogenic heavy gas reclamation system, and the heavy gas control room. A series of wind tunnel characterization and calibration tests are underway. Results of the flow characterization tests show the TDT operating envelope in R134a to be very similar to the previous operating envelope in R12.

  10. Acoustic fatigue: Overview of activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixson, John S.; Roussos, Louis A.

    1987-04-01

    A number of aircraft and spacecraft configurations are being considered for future development. These include high-speed turboprop aircraft, advanced vertical take-off and landing fighter aircraft, and aerospace planes for hypersonic intercontinental cruise or flight to orbit and return. Review of the acoustic environment expected for these vehicles indicates levels high enough that acoustic fatigue must be considered. Unfortunately, the sonic fatique design technology used for current aircraft may not be adequate for these future vehicles. This has resulted in renewed emphasis on acoustic fatigue research at the NASA Langley Research Center. The overall objective of the Langley program is to develop methods and information for design of aerospace vehicles that will resist acoustic fatigue. The program includes definition of the acoustic loads acting on structures due to exhaust jets of boundary layers, and subsequent determination of the stresses within the structure due to these acoustic loads. Material fatigue associated with the high frequency structural stress reversal patterns resulting from acoustic loadings is considered to be an area requiring study, but no activity is currently underway.

  11. Acoustic fatigue: Overview of activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Roussos, Louis A.

    1987-01-01

    A number of aircraft and spacecraft configurations are being considered for future development. These include high-speed turboprop aircraft, advanced vertical take-off and landing fighter aircraft, and aerospace planes for hypersonic intercontinental cruise or flight to orbit and return. Review of the acoustic environment expected for these vehicles indicates levels high enough that acoustic fatigue must be considered. Unfortunately, the sonic fatique design technology used for current aircraft may not be adequate for these future vehicles. This has resulted in renewed emphasis on acoustic fatigue research at the NASA Langley Research Center. The overall objective of the Langley program is to develop methods and information for design of aerospace vehicles that will resist acoustic fatigue. The program includes definition of the acoustic loads acting on structures due to exhaust jets of boundary layers, and subsequent determination of the stresses within the structure due to these acoustic loads. Material fatigue associated with the high frequency structural stress reversal patterns resulting from acoustic loadings is considered to be an area requiring study, but no activity is currently underway.

  12. Matrix resin development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The polymer program at NASA Langley Research Center involves exploratory studies in polymer science. These include the synthesis of novel polymers and their characterization. Polymer synthesis programs involve the development of novel thermoplastics, pseudothermoplastics, and thermosets. Recent investigations have led to the development of more easily processable polyimides, solvent-resistant polysulfones and polyphenylquinoxalines, and tougher high and intermediate-temperature polymers. Characterization efforts have included high-pressure liquid chromatography methodology, the development of toughness tests for fiber-reinforced composites, a study of electrical properties of metal-ion-filled polyimides, and a study of the mutagenicity of aromatic diamines. Also the mechanism of cure/degradation of experimental polymers has been studied by rheology, mechanical behavior, separation techniques and spectroscopy. Some of these programs have involved the degradation crosslinking of alkyl-containing polyimides, the separation and identification of crosslinked phenylquinoxalines, the rheological behavior of hot-melt polyimides, and the elucidation of the cure of norbornene endcapped imides.

  13. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  14. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  15. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  16. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  17. X-34 Ceramic Model Tested In NASA Langley Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic aerothermodynamic heat transfer model of the X-34 is being prepared for testing in the 31-Inch Mach 10 Wind Tunnel located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The model is a 0.018-scale version of the X-34 advanced technology flight demonstration vehicle. The X-34 is an autonomous rocket-powered, air-launched winged concept that is smaller, lighter and much less expensive than other lifting body vehicles, for example, the X-33. The X-34 is intended for hypersonic flight up to speeds of Mach 8, and would be used to demonstrate technologies for future reusable space transportation vehicles. The first flight of the X-34 vehicle is currently scheduled for early 1999.

  18. Model-Based Systems Engineering Pilot Program at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin G.; Murphy, Douglas G.; Infeld, Samatha I.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center conducted a pilot program to evaluate the benefits of using a Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) approach during the early phase of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The goal of the pilot was to leverage MBSE tools and methods, including the Systems Modeling Language (SysML), to understand the net gain of utilizing this approach on a moderate size flight project. The System Requirements Review (SRR) success criteria were used to guide the work products desired from the pilot. This paper discusses the pilot project implementation, provides SysML model examples, identifies lessons learned, and describes plans for further use on MBSE on MISSE-X.

  19. Overview of NASA Langley's Piezoelectric Ceramic Packaging Technology and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed several actuator packaging concepts designed to enhance the performance of commercial electroactive ceramics. NASA LaRC focused on properly designed actuator and sensor packaging for the following reasons, increased durability, protect the working material from the environment, allow for proper mechanical and electrical contact, afford "ready to use" mechanisms that are scalable, and develop fabrication methodology applicable to any active material of the same physical class. It is more cost effective to enhance or tailor the performance of existing systems, through innovative packaging, than to develop, test and manufacture new materials. This approach led to the development of several solid state actuators that include THUNDER, the Macrofiber Composite or (MFC) and the Radial Field Diaphragm or (RFD). All these actuators are fabricated using standard materials and processes derived from earlier concepts. NASA s fabrication and packaging technology as yielded, piezoelectric actuators and sensors that are easy to implement, reliable, consistent in properties, and of lower cost to manufacture in quantity, than their predecessors (as evidenced by their continued commercial availability.) These piezoelectric actuators have helped foster new research and development in areas involving computational modeling, actuator specific refinements, and engineering system redesign which led to new applications for piezo-based devices that replace traditional systems currently in use.

  20. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  1. Dynamic tests on the NASA Langley CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troidl, H.; Elliott, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A modal analysis study, representing one of the anticipated 'Cooperative Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Experiments on the NASA Langley CSI Evolutionary Model', was carried out as a sub-task under the NASA/DLR collaboration in dynamics and control of large space systems. The CSI evolutionary testbed (CEM) is designed for the development of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to improve space science platform pointing. For orbiting space structures like large flexible trusses, new identification challenges arise due to their specific dynamic characteristics (low frequencies and high modal density) on the one hand, and the limited possibilities of exciting such structures and measuring their responses on orbit on the other. The main objective was to investigate the modal identification potential of several different types of forcing functions that could possibly be realized with on-board excitation equipment using a minimum number of exciter locations as well as response locations. These locations were defined in an analytical test prediction process used to study the implications of measuring and analyzing the responses thus produced. It turned out that broadband excitation is needed for a general modal survey, but if only certain modes are of particular interest, combinations of exponentially decaying sine functions provide favorable excitation conditions as they allow to concentrate the available energy on the modes being of special interest. From a practical point-of-view structural nonlinearities as well as noisy measurements make the analysis more difficult, especially in the low frequency range and when the modes are closely spaced.

  2. Experimental Stage Separation Tool Development in NASA Langley's Aerothermodynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Scallion, William I.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the research effort at NASA in support of the stage separation and ascent aerothermodynamics research program, proximity testing of a generic bimese wing-body configuration was conducted in NASA Langley's Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The objective of this work is the development of experimental tools and testing methodologies to apply to hypersonic stage separation problems for future multi-stage launch vehicle systems. Aerodynamic force and moment proximity data were generated at a nominal Mach number of 6 over a small range of angles of attack. The generic bimese configuration was tested in a belly-to-belly and back-to-belly orientation at 86 relative proximity locations. Over 800 aerodynamic proximity data points were taken to serve as a database for code validation. Longitudinal aerodynamic data generated in this test program show very good agreement with viscous computational predictions. Thus a framework has been established to study separation problems in the hypersonic regime using coordinated experimental and computational tools.

  3. Upgrades at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2012-01-01

    Several projects have been completed or are nearing completion at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) National Transonic Facility (NTF). The addition of a Model Flow-Control/Propulsion Simulation test capability to the NTF provides a unique, transonic, high-Reynolds number test capability that is well suited for research in propulsion airframe integration studies, circulation control high-lift concepts, powered lift, and cruise separation flow control. A 1992 vintage Facility Automation System (FAS) that performs the control functions for tunnel pressure, temperature, Mach number, model position, safety interlock and supervisory controls was replaced using current, commercially available components. This FAS upgrade also involved a design study for the replacement of the facility Mach measurement system and the development of a software-based simulation model of NTF processes and control systems. The FAS upgrades were validated by a post upgrade verification wind tunnel test. The data acquisition system (DAS) upgrade project involves the design, purchase, build, integration, installation and verification of a new DAS by replacing several early 1990's vintage computer systems with state of the art hardware/software. This paper provides an update on the progress made in these efforts. See reference 1.

  4. Model Deformation Measurement Technique NASA Langley HSR Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Goad, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    Model deformation measurement techniques have been investigated and developed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The current technique is based upon a single video camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. Variations of this technique have been used to measure wing twist and bending at a few selected spanwise locations near the wing tip on HSR models at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Automated measurements have been made at both the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and at Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel during the past year. Automated measurements were made for the first time at the NTF during the recently completed HSR Reference H Test 78 in early 1996. A major problem in automation for the NTF has been the need for high contrast targets which do not exceed the stringent surface finish requirements. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Wing twist examples from the HSR Reference H model are presented to illustrate the run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode at the NTF. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode at the NTF are also presented.

  5. The NASA Langley 8-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Reagon, Patricia G.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel is a continuous-flow, variable-pressure wind tunnel with control capability to independently vary Mach number, stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and humidity. The top and bottom walls of the test section are axially slotted to permit continuous variation of the test section Mach number from 0.2 to 1.2, the slot-width contour provides a gradient-free test section 50 in. long for Mach numbers equal to or greater than 1.0 and 100 in. long for Mach numbers less than 1.0. The stagnation pressure may be varied from 0.25 to 2.0 atm. The tunnel test section has been recalibrated to determine the relationship between the free-stream Mach number and the test chamber reference Mach number. The hardware was the same as that of an earlier calibration in 1972 but the pressure measurement instrumentation available for the recalibration was about an order of magnitude more precise. The principal result of the recalibration was a slightly different schedule of reentry flap settings for Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 than that determined during the 1972 calibration. Detailed tunnel contraction geometry, test section geometry, and limited test section wall boundary layer data are presented.

  6. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  7. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  8. Collaborative Mission Design at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Kerry M.; Allen, B. Danette; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed and tested two facilities dedicated to increasing efficiency in key mission design processes, including payload design, mission planning, and implementation plan development, among others. The Integrated Design Center (IDC) is a state-of-the-art concurrent design facility which allows scientists and spaceflight engineers to produce project designs and mission plans in a real-time collaborative environment, using industry-standard physics-based development tools and the latest communication technology. The Mission Simulation Lab (MiSL), a virtual reality (VR) facility focused on payload and project design, permits engineers to quickly translate their design and modeling output into enhanced three-dimensional models and then examine them in a realistic full-scale virtual environment. The authors were responsible for envisioning both facilities and turning those visions into fully operational mission design resources at LaRC with multiple advanced capabilities and applications. In addition, the authors have created a synergistic interface between these two facilities. This combined functionality is the Interactive Design and Simulation Center (IDSC), a meta-facility which offers project teams a powerful array of highly advanced tools, permitting them to rapidly produce project designs while maintaining the integrity of the input from every discipline expert on the project. The concept-to-flight mission support provided by IDSC has shown improved inter- and intra-team communication and a reduction in the resources required for proposal development, requirements definition, and design effort.

  9. Proceedings of the Sixth NASA Langley Formal Methods (LFM) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozier, Kristin Yvonne (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    Today's verification techniques are hard-pressed to scale with the ever-increasing complexity of safety critical systems. Within the field of aeronautics alone, we find the need for verification of algorithms for separation assurance, air traffic control, auto-pilot, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), adaptive avionics, automated decision authority, and much more. Recent advances in formal methods have made verifying more of these problems realistic. Thus we need to continually re-assess what we can solve now and identify the next barriers to overcome. Only through an exchange of ideas between theoreticians and practitioners from academia to industry can we extend formal methods for the verification of ever more challenging problem domains. This volume contains the extended abstracts of the talks presented at LFM 2008: The Sixth NASA Langley Formal Methods Workshop held on April 30 - May 2, 2008 in Newport News, Virginia, USA. The topics of interest that were listed in the call for abstracts were: advances in formal verification techniques; formal models of distributed computing; planning and scheduling; automated air traffic management; fault tolerance; hybrid systems/hybrid automata; embedded systems; safety critical applications; safety cases; accident/safety analysis.

  10. The Fight Deck Perspective of the NASA Langley AILS Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rine, Laura L.; Abbott, Terence S.; Lohr, Gary W.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Waller, Marvin C.; Perry, R. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Many US airports depend on parallel runway operations to meet the growing demand for day to day operations. In the current airspace system, Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) reduce the capacity of close parallel runway operations; that is, runways spaced closer than 4300 ft. These capacity losses can result in landing delays causing inconveniences to the traveling public, interruptions in commerce, and increased operating costs to the airlines. This document presents the flight deck perspective component of the Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) approaches to close parallel runways in IMC. It represents the ideas the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) AILS Development Team envisions to integrate a number of components and procedures into a workable system for conducting close parallel runway approaches. An initial documentation of the aspects of this concept was sponsored by LaRC and completed in 1996. Since that time a number of the aspects have evolved to a more mature state. This paper is an update of the earlier documentation.

  11. Analysis and Design of the NASA Langley Cryogenic Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Stevens, Jonathan C.; Vause, R. Frank; Winn, Peter M.; Maguire, James F.; Driscoll, Glenn C.; Blackburn, Charles L.; Mason, Brian H.

    1999-01-01

    A cryogenic pressure box was designed and fabricated for use at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to subject 72 in. x 60 in. curved panels to cryogenic temperatures and biaxial tensile loads. The cryogenic pressure box is capable of testing curved panels down to -423 F (20K) with 54 psig maximum pressure on the concave side, and elevated temperatures and atmospheric pressure on the convex surface. The internal surface of the panel is cooled by high pressure helium as that is cooled to -423 F by liquid helium heat exchangers. An array of twelve independently controlled fans circulate the high pressure gaseous helium to provide uniform cooling on the panel surface. The load introduction structure, consisting of four stainless steel load plates and numerous fingers attaching the load plates to the test panel, is designed to introduce loads into the test panel that represent stresses that will he observed in the actual tank structure. The load plates are trace cooled with liquid nitrogen to reduce thermal gradients that may result in bending the load plates, and thus additional stresses in the test panel. The design of the cryogenic systems, load introduction structure, and control system are discussed in this report.

  12. Recent progress in NASA Langley textile reinforced composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Harris, Charles E.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structural concepts. In addition to in-house research, the program was recently expanded to include major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house focus is as follows: development of a science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of design, fabrication and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3D weaving, 2D and 3D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile reinforced

  13. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  14. Electronic Photography at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jack; Judge, Nancianne

    1995-01-01

    An electronic photography facility has been established in the Imaging & Photographic Technology Section, Visual Imaging Branch, at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of this facility is to provide the LaRC community with access to digital imaging technology. In particular, capabilities have been established for image scanning, direct image capture, optimized image processing for storage, image enhancement, and optimized device dependent image processing for output. Unique approaches include: evaluation and extraction of the entire film information content through scanning; standardization of image file tone reproduction characteristics for optimal bit utilization and viewing; education of digital imaging personnel on the effects of sampling and quantization to minimize image processing related information loss; investigation of the use of small kernel optimal filters for image restoration; characterization of a large array of output devices and development of image processing protocols for standardized output. Currently, the laboratory has a large collection of digital image files which contain essentially all the information present on the original films. These files are stored at 8-bits per color, but the initial image processing was done at higher bit depths and/or resolutions so that the full 8-bits are used in the stored files. The tone reproduction of these files has also been optimized so the available levels are distributed according to visual perceptibility. Look up tables are available which modify these files for standardized output on various devices, although color reproduction has been allowed to float to some extent to allow for full utilization of output device gamut.

  15. High performance real-time flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1994-01-01

    In order to meet the stringent time-critical requirements for real-time man-in-the-loop flight simulation, computer processing operations must be deterministic and be completed in as short a time as possible. This includes simulation mathematical model computational and data input/output to the simulators. In 1986, in response to increased demands for flight simulation performance, personnel at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC), working with the contractor, developed extensions to a standard input/output system to provide for high bandwidth, low latency data acquisition and distribution. The Computer Automated Measurement and Control technology (IEEE standard 595) was extended to meet the performance requirements for real-time simulation. This technology extension increased the effective bandwidth by a factor of ten and increased the performance of modules necessary for simulator communications. This technology is being used by more than 80 leading technological developers in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Included among the commercial applications of this technology are nuclear process control, power grid analysis, process monitoring, real-time simulation, and radar data acquisition. Personnel at LaRC have completed the development of the use of supercomputers for simulation mathematical model computational to support real-time flight simulation. This includes the development of a real-time operating system and the development of specialized software and hardware for the CAMAC simulator network. This work, coupled with the use of an open systems software architecture, has advanced the state of the art in real time flight simulation. The data acquisition technology innovation and experience with recent developments in this technology are described.

  16. Lunar Lander Structural Design Studies at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Antol, Jeffrey; Watson, Judith J.; Flick, John J.; Saucillo, Rudolph J.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; North, David D.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently developing mission architectures, vehicle concepts and flight hardware to support the planned human return to the Moon. During Phase II of the 2006 Lunar Lander Preparatory Study, a team from the Langley Research Center was tasked with developing and refining two proposed Lander concepts. The Descent-Assisted, Split Habitat Lander concept uses a disposable braking stage to perform the lunar orbit insertion maneuver and most of the descent from lunar orbit to the surface. The second concept, the Cargo Star Horizontal Lander, carries ascent loads along its longitudinal axis, and is then rotated in flight so that its main engines (mounted perpendicular to the vehicle longitudinal axis) are correctly oriented for lunar orbit insertion and a horizontal landing. Both Landers have separate crew transport volumes and habitats for surface operations, and allow placement of large cargo elements very close to the lunar surface. As part of this study, lightweight, efficient structural configurations for these spacecraft were proposed and evaluated. Vehicle structural configurations were first developed, and preliminary structural sizing was then performed using finite element-based methods. Results of selected structural design and trade studies performed during this activity are presented and discussed.

  17. Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating

  18. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output, 1995. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler); Phillips, Marilou S. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1995. Included are citations for formal reports, high-numbered conference publications, high-numbered technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles and other publications, meeting presentations, technical talks, computer programs, tech briefs, and patents.

  19. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output: 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler); Phillips, Marilou S. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1996. Included are citations for Formal Reports, High-Numbered Conference Publications, High-Numbered Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  20. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output?2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 2003. Included are citations for Special Publications, Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, and Patents.

  1. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 2002. Included are citations for Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, and Patents.

  2. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output: 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler); Machie, Harriet B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1997. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Conference Publications, High-Numbered Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, and Patents.

  3. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output: 1994. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Marilou S. (Compiler); Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for Formal Reports, High-Numbered Conference Publications, High-Numbered Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  4. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the 2001 calendar year. Included are citations for Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, and Patents.

  5. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output: 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machie, Harriet B. (Compiler); Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1998. Included are citations for Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, and Patents.

  6. NASA Langley scientific and technical information output: 1994, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Marilou S. (Compiler); Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for Formal Reports, High-Numbered Conference Publications, High-Numbered Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  7. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output: 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler); Machie, Harriet (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1999. Included are citations for Special Publications, Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  8. NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machie, Harriet B. (Compiler); Stewart, Susan H. (Compiler)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 2000. Included are citations for Special Publications, Technical Publications, Conference Publications, Technical Memorandum, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Book Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  9. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  10. Aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center Recent progress, new challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in aeroelasticity, particularly at the NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed to look at the questions answered and questions raised, and to attempt to define appropriate research emphasis needed in the near future and beyond. The paper is focused primarily on the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Program because Langley is the lead NASA center for aerospace structures research, and essentially is the only one working in depth in the area of aeroelasticity. Historical trends in aeroelasticity are reviewed broadly in terms of technology and staffing particularly at the LaRC. Then, selected studies of the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division at LaRC and others over the past three years are presented with attention paid to unresolved questions. Finally, based on the results of these studies and on perceptions of design trends and aircraft operational requirements, future research needs in aeroelasticity are discussed.

  11. A Selection of Composites Simulation Practices at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major areas of study at NASA Langley Research Center is the development of technologies that support the use of advanced composite materials in aerospace applications. Amongst the supporting technologies are analysis tools used to simulate the behavior of these materials. This presentation will discuss a number of examples of analysis tools and simulation practices conducted at NASA Langley. The presentation will include examples of damage tolerance analyses for both interlaminar and intralaminar failure modes. Tools for modeling interlaminar failure modes include fracture mechanics and cohesive methods, whilst tools for modeling intralaminar failure involve the development of various progressive failure analyses. Other examples of analyses developed at NASA Langley include a thermo-mechanical model of an orthotropic material and the simulation of delamination growth in z-pin reinforced laminates.

  12. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  13. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  14. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  15. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  16. NASA Langley Teacher Resource Center (TRC): Brochure and Home Page Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogbill, Monet Leigh

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's Educational Programs Officer, Marchelle D. Canright, gave me two main assignments to be completed by the end of the ten-week LARSS Program. These assignments were to redesign the NASA Langley Teacher Research Center (TRC) brochure and create new home page templates for the TRC and Office of Education. I worked with NASA Education Specialist, Jane George and the TRC director Nick Koltun for instruction in copmleting these assignments. The main objective of my assigned projects was to create designs that reflected NASA's educational goals, related to the TRC, and the Office of Education's desire for high aesthetics in their multimedia materials. The Office of Education did not just want their current TRC brochure and home page to be reworked, but; they wanted these items to be strong visual representations of the TRC's purpose.

  17. UAV Research at NASA Langley: Towards Safe, Reliable, and Autonomous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are fundamental components in several aspects of research at NASA Langley, such as flight dynamics, mission-driven airframe design, airspace integration demonstrations, atmospheric science projects, and more. In particular, NASA Langley Research Center (Langley) is using UAVs to develop and demonstrate innovative capabilities that meet the autonomy and robotics challenges that are anticipated in science, space exploration, and aeronautics. These capabilities will enable new NASA missions such as asteroid rendezvous and retrieval (ARRM), Mars exploration, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), pollution measurements in historically inaccessible areas, and the integration of UAVs into our everyday lives all missions of increasing complexity, distance, pace, and/or accessibility. Building on decades of NASA experience and success in the design, fabrication, and integration of robust and reliable automated systems for space and aeronautics, Langley Autonomy Incubator seeks to bridge the gap between automation and autonomy by enabling safe autonomous operations via onboard sensing and perception systems in both data-rich and data-deprived environments. The Autonomy Incubator is focused on the challenge of mobility and manipulation in dynamic and unstructured environments by integrating technologies such as computer vision, visual odometry, real-time mapping, path planning, object detection and avoidance, object classification, adaptive control, sensor fusion, machine learning, and natural human-machine teaming. These technologies are implemented in an architectural framework developed in-house for easy integration and interoperability of cutting-edge hardware and software.

  18. NASA Langley Research Center Force and Strain Measurement Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of forces and moments are some of the most important data acquired during aerodynamic testing. This paper deals with the force and strain measurement capabilities at the Langley Research Center (LaRC). It begins with a progressive history of LaRC force measurement developments beginning in the 1940's and ends with the center's current capabilities. Various types of force and moment transducers used at LaRC are discussed including six-component sting mounted balances, semi-span balances, hinge moment balances, flow-through balances, rotor balances, and many other unique transducers. Also discussed are some unique strain-gage applications, such as those used in extreme environments. The final topics deal with the LaRC's ability to perform custom calibrations and our current levels of effort in the area of force and strain measurement.

  19. The NASA Langley Research Center's Unmanned Aerial System Surrogate Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Charles T., III; Jessup, Artie; Jones, Frank; Joyce, Claude; Sugden, Paul; Verstynen, Harry; Mielnik, John

    2010-01-01

    Research is needed to determine what procedures, aircraft sensors and other systems will be required to allow Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to safely operate with manned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS). The NASA Langley Research Center has transformed a Cirrus Design SR22 general aviation (GA) aircraft into a UAS Surrogate research aircraft to serve as a platform for UAS systems research, development, flight testing and evaluation. The aircraft is manned with a Safety Pilot and systems operator that allows for flight operations almost anywhere in the NAS without the need for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA). The UAS Surrogate can be controlled from a modular, transportable ground station like a true UAS. The UAS Surrogate is able to file and fly in the NAS with normal traffic and is a better platform for real world UAS research and development than existing vehicles flying in restricted ranges or other sterilized airspace. The Cirrus Design SR22 aircraft is a small, singleengine, four-place, composite-construction aircraft that NASA Langley acquired to support NASA flight-research programs like the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Project. Systems were installed to support flight test research and data gathering. These systems include: separate research power; multi-function flat-panel displays; research computers; research air data and inertial state sensors; video recording; data acquisition; data-link; S-band video and data telemetry; Common Airborne Instrumentation System (CAIS); Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B); instrumented surfaces and controls; and a systems operator work station. The transformation of the SR22 to a UAS Surrogate was accomplished in phases. The first phase was to modify the existing autopilot to accept external commands from a research computer that was connected by redundant data-link radios to a ground control station. An electro-mechanical auto

  20. A Storm Surge and Inundation Model of the Back River Watershed at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftis, Jon Derek; Wang, Harry V.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    This report on a Virginia Institute for Marine Science project demonstrates that the sub-grid modeling technology (now as part of Chesapeake Bay Inundation Prediction System, CIPS) can incorporate high-resolution Lidar measurements provided by NASA Langley Research Center into the sub-grid model framework to resolve detailed topographic features for use as a hydrological transport model for run-off simulations within NASA Langley and Langley Air Force Base. The rainfall over land accumulates in the ditches/channels resolved via the model sub-grid was tested to simulate the run-off induced by heavy precipitation. Possessing both the capabilities for storm surge and run-off simulations, the CIPS model was then applied to simulate real storm events starting with Hurricane Isabel in 2003. It will be shown that the model can generate highly accurate on-land inundation maps as demonstrated by excellent comparison of the Langley tidal gauge time series data (CAPABLE.larc.nasa.gov) and spatial patterns of real storm wrack line measurements with the model results simulated during Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Irene (2011), and a 2009 Nor'easter. With confidence built upon the model's performance, sea level rise scenarios from the ICCP (International Climate Change Partnership) were also included in the model scenario runs to simulate future inundation cases.

  1. Aeroservoelastic and structural dynamics research on smart structures conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas McGowan, Anna-Maria; Wilkie, W. K.; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Pinkerton Florance, Jennifer L.; Weiseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-06-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway a the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental test to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind-tunnel of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory/NASA/Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials.

  2. NASA Administrative Data Base Management Systems, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radosevich, J. D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Strategies for converting to a data base management system (DBMS) and the implementation of the software packages necessary are discussed. Experiences with DBMS at various NASA centers are related including Langley's ADABAS/NATURAL and the NEMS subsystem of the NASA metrology informaton system. The value of the integrated workstation with a personal computer is explored.

  3. Historical Contributions to Vertical Flight at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, William T.; Gorton, Susan A.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has had a long and distinguished history in powered lift technology development. This research has formed the foundation of knowledge for the powered lift community worldwide. From aerodynamics to structures, aeromechanics, powered lift, acoustics, materials, stability & control, structural dynamics and human factors, Langley has made significant contributions to the advancement of vertical lift technologies. This research has encompassed basic phenomenological studies through subscale laboratory testing, analytical tool development, applied demonstrations and full scale flight-testing. Since the dedication of Langley in 1920, it has contributed to the understanding, design, analysis, and flight test development of experimental and production V/STOL configurations. This paper will chronicle significant areas of research through the decades from 1920 to 2015 with historical photographs and references.

  4. Damaged stiffened shell research at NASA. Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1992-07-01

    The structural behavior of stiffened fuselage shells with local cracks is influenced by the local deformations and stress gradients near the cracks, and this behavior must be understood to predict fuselage structural integrity and residual strength. As a crack grows, the stiffness and internal load distributions in a stiffened shell change, affecting the local deformations and stress gradients near the crack. Transport fuselage shells are designed to support internal pressure and mechanical loads which cause a geometrically nonlinear response. Research is being conducted at NASA LaRC to develop and demonstrate a verified nonlinear stiffened shell analysis methodology for accurately predicting the global and local behavior of nonlinear stiffened fuselage shells with local cracks and with combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. The nonlinear structural analysis methodology being developed and planned at NASA LaRC for damaged stiffened fuselage shells and the experiments being planned to verify this analysis methodology are summarized in the present paper.

  5. Airborne Trailblazer: Two decades with NASA Langley's 737 flying laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Lane E.

    1994-01-01

    This book is the story of a very unique aircraft and the contributions it has made to the air transportation industry. NASA's Boeing 737-100 Transport Systems Research Vehicle started life as the prototype for Boeing's 737 series of aircraft. The airplane was acquired by LaRC in 1974 to conduct research into advanced transport aircraft technologies. In the twenty years that followed, the airplane participated in more than twenty different research projects, evolving from a research tool for a specific NASA program into a national airborne research facility. It played a critical role in developing and gaining acceptance for numerous significant transport technologies including 'glass cockpits,' airborne windshear detection systems, data links for air traffic control communications, the microwave landing system, and the satellite-based global positioning system (GPS).

  6. Oshkosh Logistic Management and Public Relations Responsibilities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Danielle

    1995-01-01

    The central focus of my study for the summer of 1995 was to provide logistical support to Margaret Hunt, the logistics manager of the OSHKOSH airshow. In this capacity responsibilities included making arrangements for participants from NASA centers and SBIR companies for their stay in Wisconsin, while visiting the airshow, and managing staff for exhibits and the aerospace theater. A secondary purpose was to serve in other public service capacities by writing news releases, fact sheets, announcements, and articles for the Researcher News.

  7. Practical Application of NASA-Langley Advanced Satellite Products to In-Flight Icing Nowcasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Ben C.; Wolff, Cory A.; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Experimental satellite-based icing products developed by the NASA Langley Research Center provide new tools to identify the locations of icing and its intensity. Since 1997, research forecasters at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have been helping to guide the NASA Glenn Research Center's Twin Otter aircraft into and out of clouds and precipitation for the purpose of characterizing in-flight icing conditions, including supercooled large drops, the accretions that result from such encounters and their effect on aircraft performance. Since the winter of 2003-04, the NASA Langley satellite products have been evaluated as part of this process, and are being considered as an input to NCAR s automated Current Icing Potential (CIP) products. This has already been accomplished for a relatively straightforward icing event, but many icing events have much more complex characteristics, providing additional challenges to all icing diagnosis tools. In this paper, four icing events with a variety of characteristics will be examined, with a focus on the NASA Langley satellite retrievals that were available in real time and their implications for icing nowcasting and potential applications in CIP.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Wu, M. C.; Allison, S. G.; DeHaven, S. L.; Ghoshal, A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is applying considerable effort on the development of sensor technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). This research is targeted toward increasing the safety and reliability of aerospace vehicles, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Research programs are focused on applications to both aircraft and space vehicles. Sensor technologies under development span a wide range including fiber-optic sensing, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and are the major focus of this presentation. In addition, recent advances in active and passive acoustic sensing will also be discussed.

  9. Open Rotor Noise Prediction at NASA Langley - Capabilities, Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, Fereidoun

    2010-01-01

    The high fuel prices of recent years have caused the operating cost of the airlines to soar. In an effort to bring down the fuel consumption, the major aircraft engine manufacturers are now taking a fresh look at open rotors for the propulsion of future airliners. Open rotors, also known as propfans or unducted fans, can offer up to 30 per cent improvement in efficiency compared to high bypass engines of 1980 vintage currently in use in most civilian aircraft. NASA Langley researchers have contributed significantly to the development of aeroacoustic technology of open rotors. This report discusses the current noise prediction technology at Langley and reviews the input data requirements, strengths and limitations of each method as well as the associated problems in need of attention by the researchers. We present a brief history of research on the aeroacoustics of rotating blade machinery at Langley Research Center. We then discuss the available noise prediction codes for open rotors developed at NASA Langley and their capabilities. In particular, we present the two useful formulations used for the computation of noise from subsonic and supersonic surfaces. Here we discuss the open rotor noise prediction codes ASSPIN and one based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with penetrable data surface (FW - Hpds). The scattering of sound from surfaces near the rotor are calculated using the fast scattering code (FSC) which is also discussed in this report. Plans for further improvements of these codes are given.

  10. Investigation and Development of Control Laws for the NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Craig R.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Zaychik, Kirill B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop highly advanced simulators is a critical need that has the ability to significantly impact the aerospace industry. The aerospace industry is advancing at an ever increasing pace and flight simulators must match this development with ever increasing urgency. In order to address both current problems and potential advancements with flight simulator techniques, several aspects of current control law technology of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base simulator were examined. Preliminary investigation of linear models based upon hardware data were examined to ensure that the most accurate models are used. This research identified both system improvements in the bandwidth and more reliable linear models. Advancements in the compensator design were developed and verified through multiple techniques. The position error rate feedback, the acceleration feedback and the force feedback were all analyzed in the heave direction using the nonlinear model of the hardware. Improvements were made using the position error rate feedback technique. The acceleration feedback compensator also provided noteworthy improvement, while attempts at implementing a force feedback compensator proved unsuccessful.

  11. NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

    1993-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

  12. Research in Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Drummond, J. Philip; McClinton, Charles R.; Hunt, James L.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been conducting research for over four decades to develop technology for an airbreathing-propelled vehicle. Several other organizations within the United States have also been involved in this endeavor. Even though significant progress has been made over this period, a hypersonic airbreathing vehicle has not yet been realized due to low technology maturity. One of the major reasons for the slow progress in technology development has been the low level and cyclic nature of funding. The paper provides a brief historical overview of research in hypersonic airbreathing technology and then discusses current efforts at NASA Langley to develop various analytical, computational, and experimental design tools and their application in the development of future hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. The main focus of this paper is on the hypersonic airbreathing propulsion technology.

  13. The NASA Langley building solar project and the supporting Lewis solar technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, R. G.; Namkoong, D.

    1974-01-01

    The use of solar energy to heat and cool a new office building that is now under construction is reported. Planned for completion in December 1975, the 53,000 square foot, single story building will utilize 15,000 square feet of various types of solar collectors in a test bed to provide nearly all of the heating demand and over half of the air conditioning demand. Drawing on its space-program-developed skills and resources in heat transfer, materials, and systems studies, NASA-Lewis will provide technology support for the Langley building project. A solar energy technology program underway at Lewis includes solar collector testing in an indoor solar simulator facility and in an outdoor test facility, property measurements of solar panel coatings, and operation of a laboratory-scale solar model system test facility. Based on results obtained in this program, NASA-Lewis will select and procure the solar collectors for the Langley test bed.

  14. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  15. Electroforming of a throat nozzle for a combustion facility (NASA Langley Reimbursable Program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Special procedures were developed and then utilized for plating nickel over channels of a throat nozzle section of a NASA Langley combustor facility. When tested hydrostatically, the part failed in the stainless-steel substrate and not at the interface between the plating and substrate. The procedures used for plating the part are detailed as are high-temperature property data which show that the part can withstand long-term, high-temperature exposure without suffering degradation of the plated bond.

  16. Development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The current scope, recent progress, and plans for research and development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center are reviewed. Both integral equations and finite difference methods for inviscid and viscous flows are discussed. Although the great bulk of the effort has focused on finite difference solution of the transonic small perturbation equation, the integral equation program is given primary emphasis here because it is less well known.

  17. Development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The current scope, recent progress, and plans for research and development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center are reviewed. Both integral-equations and finite-difference method for inviscid and viscous flows are discussed. Although the great bulk of the effort has focused on finite-difference solution of the transonic small-perturbation equation, the integral-equation program is given primary emphasis here because it is less well known.

  18. Development of Advanced Computational Aeroelasticity Tools at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has continued to develop its long standing computational tools to address new challenges in aircraft and launch vehicle design. This paper discusses the application and development of those computational aeroelastic tools. Four topic areas will be discussed: 1) Modeling structural and flow field nonlinearities; 2) Integrated and modular approaches to nonlinear multidisciplinary analysis; 3) Simulating flight dynamics of flexible vehicles; and 4) Applications that support both aeronautics and space exploration.

  19. Recent Developments at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2011-01-01

    Several upgrade projects have been completed or are just getting started at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility. These projects include a new high capacity semi-span balance, model dynamics damping system, semi-span model check load stand, data acquisition system upgrade, facility automation system upgrade and a facility reliability assessment. This presentation will give a brief synopsis of each of these efforts.

  20. Entry, Descent, and Landing Aerothermodynamics: NASA Langley Experimental Capabilities and Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Berger, Karen T.; Berry, Scott A.; Bruckmann, Gregory J.; Buck, Gregory M.; DiFulvio, Michael; Horvath, Thomas J.; Liechty, Derek S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Murphy, Kelly J.; Rufer, Shann J.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A review is presented of recent research, development, testing and evaluation activities related to entry, descent and landing that have been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. An overview of the test facilities, model development and fabrication capabilities, and instrumentation and measurement techniques employed in this work is provided. Contributions to hypersonic/supersonic flight and planetary exploration programs are detailed, as are fundamental research and development activities.

  1. Reverberation Time Measurements in the NASA Langley Exterior Effects Room (EER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2006-01-01

    One-third octave band background noise and reverberation time measurements were conducted in the Exterior Effect Room (EER) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The related overall acoustic absorption of the room was calculated. The acoustic field in the room was characterized. Reverberation time measurements were performed using the integrated impulse response method. The results were compared with independent measurements using the interrupted noise reverberation time method and different instrumentation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the reverberation times of the two methods.

  2. An optical flameout detection system for NASA Langley's 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, S. E.; West, J. W.; Lawrence, R. M.; Harper, S. E.; Alderfer, D. W.; Connelly, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    A brief description is presented of an optical flameout detection system under development at NASA Langley's 8-Foot High Temperature Wind Tunnel. The system design, theory of operation, and performance are addressed. The system can respond quickly to sudden changes in combustor light intensity and is a reliable indicator of flame activity within the combustor. Deviations of the system could provide more detailed information on various aspects of the combustion process.

  3. NASA-Langley Web-Based Operational Real-time Cloud Retrieval Products from Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palikonda, Rabindra; Minnis, Patrick; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Nordeen, Michele L.; Ayers, Jeffrey K.; Nguyen, Louis; Yi, Yuhong; Chan, P. K.; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chang, Fu-Lung; Smith, William L, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    At NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), radiances from multiple satellites are analyzed in near real-time to produce cloud products over many regions on the globe. These data are valuable for many applications such as diagnosing aircraft icing conditions and model validation and assimilation. This paper presents an overview of the multiple products available, summarizes the content of the online database, and details web-based satellite browsers and tools to access satellite imagery and products.

  4. Optically Based Flame Detection in the NASA Langley 8-ft High- Temperature Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    Two optically based flame-detection systems have been developed for use in NASA Langley's 8-Foot High-Temperature Tunnel (8-ft HTT). These systems are used to detect the presence and stability of the main-burner and pilot-level flames during facility operation. System design considerations will be discussed, and a detailed description of the system components and circuit diagrams will be provided in the Appendices of this report. A more detailed description of the manufacturing process used in the fabrication of the fiber-optic probes is covered in NASA TM-2001-211233.

  5. NASA Langley Research and Technology-Transfer Program in Formal Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Caldwell, James L.; Carreno, Victor A.; Holloway, C. Michael; Miner, Paul S.; DiVito, Ben L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of NASA Langley research program in formal methods. The major goals of this work are to make formal methods practical for use on life critical systems, and to orchestrate the transfer of this technology to U.S. industry through use of carefully designed demonstration projects. Several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of five NASA civil servants and contractors from Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, and VIGYAN Inc.

  6. NASA-Langley Research Center's Aircraft Condition Analysis and Management System Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Mark W.; Bailey, Roger M.; Jessup, Artie D.

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the hardware implementation design and architecture of Aeronautical Radio Incorporated (ARINC)'s Aircraft Condition Analysis and Management System (ACAMS), which was developed at NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) for use in its Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES) Laboratory. This activity is part of NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), the Single Aircraft Accident Prevention (SAAP) project to develop safety-enabling technologies for aircraft and airborne systems. The fundamental intent of these technologies is to allow timely intervention or remediation to improve unsafe conditions before they become life threatening.

  7. A brief overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    An overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods is presented. The major goal of this work is to bring formal methods technology to a sufficiently mature level for use by the United States aerospace industry. Towards this goal, work is underway to design and formally verify a fault-tolerant computing platform suitable for advanced flight control applications. Also, several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of six NASA civil servants and contractors from Boeing Military Aircraft Company, Computational Logic Inc., Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, University of California at Davis, and Vigyan Inc.

  8. The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

  9. Journey in Aeronautical Research: A Career at NASA Langley Research Center. No. 12; Monographs in Aerospace History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. Hewitt

    1998-01-01

    An autobiography, of a noted aeronautical engineer, W. Hewitt Phillips, whose career spanned 58 years (1940-1998) at NASA Langley is presented. This work covers his early years to the Sputnik launch. His interests have been in research in aeronautics and in the related problems of spaceflight. After an introduction, his early life through the college years is reviewed, and his early interest in model airplanes is described. The first assignment for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which would later become NASA, was with the Flight Research Division. His early work involved "Flying Qualities", i.e., the stability and control characteristics of an airplane. The next chapter describes his early analytical studies. His work during World War II in the design of military airplanes, and the other effects of the war on research activities, is covered in the next two chapters. This research was involved in such innovations and refinements as the swept wing, the flettner tabs, servo tabs, spring tabs and whirlerons. The rest of the work covers the research which Mr. Hewitt was involved in, after the war until the Sputnik launch. These areas include unsteady lift, measurements of turbulence in the atmosphere, gust alleviation, and lateral response to random turbulence. He was also involved in several investigations of airplane accidents. The last two chapters cover the administration of the Langley Research Center, and the dawn of the Space Age. A complete bibliography of reports written by Mr. Hewitt, is included.

  10. A review of head-worn display research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Williams, Steven P.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Jones, Denise R.; Houston, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    NASA Langley has conducted research in the area of helmet-mounted/head-worn displays over the past 30 years. Initially, NASA Langley's research focused on military applications, but recently has conducted a line of research in the area of head-worn displays for commercial and business aircraft. This work has revolved around numerous simulation experiments as well as flight tests to develop technology and data for industry and regulatory guidance. The paper summarizes the results of NASA's helmet-mounted/head-worn display research. Of note, the work tracks progress in wearable collimated optics, head tracking, latency reduction, and weight. The research lends credence that a small, sunglasses-type form factor of the head-worn display would be acceptable to commercial pilots, and this goal is now becoming technologically feasible. The research further suggests that a head-worn display may serve as an "equivalent" Head-Up Display (HUD) with safety, operational, and cost benefits. "HUD equivalence" appears to be the economic avenue by which head-worn displays can become main-stream on the commercial and business aircraft flight deck. If this happens, NASA's research suggests that additional operational benefits using the unique capabilities of the head-worn display can open up new operational paradigms.

  11. A Review of Head-Worn Display Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis (Trey) J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Williams, Steven P.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Jones, Denise R.; Houston, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley has conducted research in the area of helmet-mounted/head-worn displays over the past 30 years. Initially, NASA Langley's research focused on military applications, but recently it has conducted a line of research in the area of head-worn displays for commercial and business aircraft. This work has revolved around numerous simulation experiments as well as flight tests to develop technology and data for industry and regulatory guidance. The paper summarizes the results of NASA's helmet-mounted/head-worn display research. Of note, the work tracks progress in wearable collimated optics, head tracking, latency reduction, and weight. The research lends credence that a small, sunglasses-type form factor of the head-worn display would be acceptable to commercial pilots, and this goal is now becoming technologically feasible. The research further suggests that a head-worn display may serve as an "equivalent" Head-Up Display (HUD) with safety, operational, and cost benefits. "HUD equivalence" appears to be the economic avenue by which head-worn displays can become main-stream on the commercial and business aircraft flight deck. If this happens, NASA's research suggests that additional operational benefits using the unique capabilities of the head-worn display can open up new operational paradigms.

  12. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  13. NASA Langley Teacher Resource Center at the Virginia Air and Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, Kim L.

    1999-01-01

    Nation's education goals through expanding and enhancing the scientific an technological competence of students and educators. To help disseminate NASA instructional materials and educational information, NASA's Education Division has established the Educator Resource Center Network. Through this network (ERCN), educators are provided the opportunity to receive free instructional information, materials, consultation, and training workshops on NASA educational products. The Office of Education at NASA Langley Research Center offers an extension of its Precollege Education program by supporting the NASA LARC Educator Resource Center at the Virginia Air & Space Center, the official visitor center for NASA LARC. This facility is the principal distribution point for educators in the five state service region that includes Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina and South Carolina. The primary goal, to provide expertise and facilities to help educators access and utilize science, mathematics, and technology instructional products aligned with national standards and appropriate state frameworks and based on NASA's unique mission and results, has been accomplished. This ERC had 15,200 contacts and disseminated over 190,000 instructional items during the period of performance. In addition the manager attended 35 conferences, workshops, and educational meetings as an GR, presenter, or participant. The objective to demonstrate and facilitate the use of educational technologies has been accomplished through the following: The ERC's web page has been developed as a cyber-gateway to a multitude of NASA and other educational resources as well as to Our own database of current resource materials. NASA CORE CD-ROM technology is regularly demonstrated and promoted using the center's computers. NASA TV is available, demonstrated to educators, and used to facilitate the downlinking of NASA educational programming.

  14. Aeroservoelastic and Structural Dynamics Research on Smart Structures Conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas; Wilkie, W. Keats; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Florance, Jennifer Pinkerton; Wieseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally-validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental tests to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind- tunnel tests to demonstrate system performance. The key aeroservoelastic applications of this research include: active twist control of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/ Air Force Research Laboratory/ NASA/ Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials. Keywords: aeroelasticity, smart structures, piezoelectric actuators, active fiber composites, rotorcraft, buffet load alleviation, individual blade control, aeroservoelasticity, shape memory alloys, damping augmentation, piezoelectric power consumption

  15. Aeroservoelastic and Structural Dynamics Research on Smart Structures Conducted at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas; Wilkie, W. Keats; Moses, Robert W.; Lake, Renee C.; Florance, Jennifer Pinkerton; Wieseman, Carol D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Mathew L.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of smart structures research currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center in the areas of aeroservoelasticity and structural dynamics is presented. Analytical and experimental results, plans, potential technology pay-offs, and challenges are discussed. The goal of this research is to develop the enabling technologies to actively and passively control aircraft and rotorcraft vibration and loads using smart devices. These enabling technologies and related research efforts include developing experimentally-validated finite element and aeroservoelastic modeling techniques; conducting bench experimental tests to assess feasibility and understand system trade-offs; and conducting large-scale wind tunnel tests to demonstrate system performance. The key aeroservoelastic applications of this research include: active twist control of rotor blades using interdigitated electrode piezoelectric composites and active control of flutter, and gust and buffeting responses using discrete piezoelectric patches. In addition, NASA Langley is an active participant in the DARPA/Air Force Research Laboratory/NASA/Northrop Grumman Smart Wing program which is assessing aerodynamic performance benefits using smart materials.

  16. Recent Developments in Aircraft Flyover Noise Simulation at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Aumann, Aric R.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is involved in the development of a new generation of synthesis and simulation tools for creation of virtual environments used in the study of aircraft community noise. The original emphasis was on simulation of flyover noise associated with subsonic fixed wing aircraft. Recently, the focus has shifted to rotary wing aircraft. Many aspects of the simulation are applicable to both vehicle classes. Other aspects, particularly those associated with synthesis, are more vehicle specific. This paper discusses the capabilities of the current suite of tools, their application to fixed and rotary wing aircraft, and some directions for the future.

  17. Cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Bradshaw, J. F.; Rush, H. F., Jr.; Wallace, J. W.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current cryogenic wind-tunnel model technology development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These research and development activities are being conducted in support of the design and fabrication of models for the new National Transonic Facility (NTF). The scope and current status of major research and development work is described and where available, data are presented from various investigations conducted to date. In addition, design and fabrication experience for existing developmental models to be tested in the NTF is discussed.

  18. Aeroacoustic Experiments in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Lockard, David P.; Macaraeg, Michele G.; Singer, Bart A.; Streett, Craig L.; Neubert, Guy R.; Stoker, Robert W.; Underbrink, James R.; Berkman, Mert E.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2002-01-01

    A phased microphone array was used in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to obtain acoustic data radiating from high-lift wing configurations. The data included noise localization plots and acoustic spectra. The tests were performed at Reynolds numbers based on the cruise-wing chord, ranging from 3.6 x 10(exp 6) to 19.2 x 10(exp 6). The effects of Reynolds number were small and monotonic for Reynolds numbers above 7.2 x 10(exp 6).

  19. Recent studies at NASA-Langley of vortical flows interacting with neighboring surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of leading edge vortical flows, which occur near and interact with neighboring surfaces, is stressed. Research in this area conducted or sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center since 1978 is surveyed. Particular attention is given to the cumulative results of a number of theoretical and experimental studies. It is noted that these studies have been carried out in order to understand and use this kind of flow. Much of the work has been devoted to improving the lift-to-drag ratio and pitch characteristics for wings in this flow, although work has also been done on examining the unsteady and lateral characteristics.

  20. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  1. Hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Cubbage, J. M.; Dillon, J. L.; Richie, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Carlson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and performance of several tactical and strategic hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed from an evolutionary perspective. A mid- and chin inlet missile design, constrained to the Navy's vertical box launcher, was investigated; a performance comparison is presented that is favorable to the mid-inlet approach. Parasol wing, confined flow field, and spatula-like cruise missile configurations were examined with strategic applications in mind. The preliminary results are encouraging with respect to aerodynamic and volumetric efficiency and choice of engine integration schemes.

  2. Computations for the 16-foot transonic tunnel, NASA, Langley Research Center, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Charles E.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Capone, Francis J.; Grayston, Alan M.; Sherman, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    The equations used by the 16 foot transonic tunnel in the data reduction programs are presented in eight modules. Each module consists of equations necessary to achieve a specific purpose. These modules are categorized in the following groups: tunnel parameters; jet exhaust measurements; skin friction drag; balance loads and model attitudes calculations; internal drag (or exit-flow distributions); pressure coefficients and integrated forces; thrust removal options; and turboprop options. This document is a companion document to NASA TM-83186, A User's Guide to the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel, August 1981.

  3. Assessment team report on flight-critical systems research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewiorek, Daniel P. (Compiler); Dunham, Janet R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The quality, coverage, and distribution of effort of the flight-critical systems research program at NASA Langley Research Center was assessed. Within the scope of the Assessment Team's review, the research program was found to be very sound. All tasks under the current research program were at least partially addressing the industry needs. General recommendations made were to expand the program resources to provide additional coverage of high priority industry needs, including operations and maintenance, and to focus the program on an actual hardware and software system that is under development.

  4. Development of Background-Oriented Schlieren for NASA Langley Research Center Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Borg, Stephen; Jones, Stephen; Overmeyer, Austin; Walker, Eric; Goad, William; Clem, Michelle; Schairer, Edward T.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent wind tunnel tests performed at the NASA Langley Research Center where the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique was used to provide information pertaining to flow-field density disturbances. The facilities in which the BOS technique was applied included the National Transonic Facility (NTF), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, 15-Inch Mach 6 High-Temperature Air Tunnel, Rotor Test Cell at the 14 by 22 Subsonic Tunnel, and a 13-Inch Low-Speed Tunnel.

  5. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics, The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C. (Technical Monitor); Klein, Vladislav

    2005-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in GW at NASA Langley Research Center, which was originated March 20, 1975, and in the renewals of the research program from January 1, 2003 to September 30, 2005. The program in its present form includes three major topics: 1. the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for wind tunnel and flight data analysis, 2. the application of these methods to wind tunnel and flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes, 3. the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  6. Program of research in flight dynamics in the JIAFS at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled 'Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in the Joint Institute for the Advancement of Flight Sciences (JIAFS) at NASA-Langley Research Center,' which was originated March 20, 1975 and in the renewal of the research program dated December 1, 1991. The program includes four major topics: (1) the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for flight test data analysis; (2) the application of these methods to real flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes; (3) the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements; and (4) the modeling, and control of aircraft, space structures, and spacecraft.

  7. Flow Control Research at NASA Langley in Support of High-Lift Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Jones, Gregory S.; Moore, Mark D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the efforts at NASA Langley to apply active and passive flow control techniques for improved high-lift systems, and advanced vehicle concepts utilizing powered high-lift techniques. The development of simplified high-lift systems utilizing active flow control is shown to provide significant weight and drag reduction benefits based on system studies. Active flow control that focuses on separation, and the development of advanced circulation control wings (CCW) utilizing unsteady excitation techniques will be discussed. The advanced CCW airfoils can provide multifunctional controls throughout the flight envelope. Computational and experimental data are shown to illustrate the benefits and issues with implementation of the technology.

  8. Low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1986-01-01

    The present status of various types of low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research being conducted at the Fluid Dynamics Branch of NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed. The facilities, testing techniques, airfoil design, and experimental verification are addressed, and ongoing studies of laminar separation bubbles, boundary layer stability and transition control, and low-Reynolds number juncture flow are discussed. The possibility of improving vehicle characteristics at low Reynolds numbers and the general trends of the most promising research in these areas are examined.

  9. Wind tunnel productivity status and improvement activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    Over the last three years, a major effort has been underway to re-engineering the way wind tunnel testing is accomplished at the NASA Langley Research Center. This effort began with the reorganization of the LaRC and the consolidation of the management of the wind tunnels in the Aerodynamics Division under one operations branch. This paper provides an overview of the re-engineering activities and gives the status of the improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and customer satisfaction that have resulted from the new ways of working.

  10. Aerosol Profile Measurements from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John W.; Roers, Raymond R.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Since achieving first light in December of 2005, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been involved in seven field campaigns, accumulating over 450 hours of science data across more than 120 flights. Data from the instrument have been used in a variety of studies including validation and comparison with the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite mission, aerosol property retrievals combining passive and active instrument measurements, aerosol type identification, aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud top and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height determinations. Measurements and lessons learned from the HSRL are leading towards next-generation HSRL instrument designs that will enable even further studies of aerosol intensive and extensive parameters and the effects of aerosols on the climate system. This paper will highlight several of the areas in which the NASA Airborne HSRL is making contributions to climate science.

  11. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wing-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  12. Selected topics in experimental aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of selected studies that have been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center in the last three years are presented. The topics presented focus primarily on the ever-important transonic flight regime and include the following: body-freedom flutter of a forward-swept-wing configuration with and without relaxed static stability; instabilities associated with a new tilt-rotor vehicle; effects of winglets, supercritical airfoils, and spanwise curvature on wing flutter; wind-tunnel investigation of a flutter-like oscillation on a high-aspect-ratio flight research wing; results of wind-tunnel demonstration of the NASA decoupler pylon concept for passive suppression of wing/store flutter; and, new flutter testing methods which include testing at cryogenic temperatures for full scale Reynolds number simulation, subcritical response techniques for predicting onset of flutter, and a two-degree-of-freedom mount system for testing side-wall-mounted models.

  13. Recent Advances in Durability and Damage Tolerance Methodology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) issues are critical to the development of lighter, safer and more efficient aerospace vehicles. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. Both D&DT methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of damage that may occur during the vehicle s service lifetime. The result of unanticipated D&DT response is often manifested in the form of catastrophic and potentially fatal accidents. As such, durability and damage tolerance requirements must be rigorously addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA spacecraft systems. This paper presents an overview of the recent and planned future research in durability and damage tolerance analytical and experimental methods for both metallic and composite aerospace structures at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  14. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) Measurements in Supersonic Combustors at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; OByrne, Sean B.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the recent use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study supersonic combustion at NASA Langley Research Center. CARS is a nonlinear optical measurement technique used to measure temperature and species mole fractions remotely in harsh environments. A CARS system has been applied to two different combustor geometries at NASA Langley. Both experiments used the same vitiated wind-tunnel facility to create an air flow that simulates flight at Mach numbers of 6 and 7 for the combustor inlet and both experiments used hydrogen fuel. In the first experiment, the hydrogen was injected supersonically at a 30-degree angle with respect to the incoming flow. In the second experiment, the hydrogen was injected sonically at normal incidence. While these injection schemes produced significantly different flow features, the CARS method provided mean temperature, N2, O2 and H2 maps at multiple downstream locations for both. The primary aim of these measurements was to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  15. Doppler Lidar System Design via Interdisciplinary Design Concept at NASA Langley Research Center - Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Charles M.; Jackson, Trevor P.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petway, Larry B.

    2013-01-01

    Optimized designs of the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) instrument for Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) were accomplished via Interdisciplinary Design Concept (IDEC) at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2013. Three branches in the Engineering Directorate and three students were involved in this joint task through the NASA Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program. The Laser Remote Sensing Branch (LRSB), Mechanical Systems Branch (MSB), and Structural and Thermal Systems Branch (STSB) were engaged to achieve optimal designs through iterative and interactive collaborative design processes. A preliminary design iteration was able to reduce the power consumption, mass, and footprint by removing redundant components and replacing inefficient components with more efficient ones. A second design iteration reduced volume and mass by replacing bulky components with excessive performance with smaller components custom-designed for the power system. Mechanical placement collaboration reduced potential electromagnetic interference (EMI). Through application of newly selected electrical components and thermal analysis data, a total electronic chassis redesign was accomplished. Use of an innovative forced convection tunnel heat sink was employed to meet and exceed project requirements for cooling, mass reduction, and volume reduction. Functionality was a key concern to make efficient use of airflow, and accessibility was also imperative to allow for servicing of chassis internals. The collaborative process provided for accelerated design maturation with substantiated function.

  16. Measurements on NASA Langley Durable Combustor Rig by TDLAT: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busa, Kristin; Ellison, Erik N.; McGovern, Brian J.; McDaniel, James C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; DePiro, Maxwell J.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Gaffney, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the internal structure of high-enthalpy flows can provide valuable insight to the performance of scramjet combustors. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is often employed to measure temperature and species concentration. However, TDLAS is a path-integrated line-of-sight (LOS) measurement, and thus does not produce spatially resolved distributions. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography (TDLAT) is a non-intrusive measurement technique for determining two-dimensional spatially resolved distributions of temperature and species concentration in high enthalpy flows. TDLAT combines TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction. Several separate line-of-sight TDLAS measurements are analyzed in order to produce highly resolved temperature and species concentration distributions. Measurements have been collected at the University of Virginia's Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF) as well as at the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility (DCSCTF). Measurements collected at the DCSCTF required significant modifications to system hardware and software designs due to its larger measurement area and shorter test duration. Initial LOS measurements from the NASA Langley DCSCTF operating at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are presented. Results show the capability of TDLAT to adapt to several experimental setups and test parameters.

  17. Testing of the Trim Tab Parametric Model in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Watkins, Anthony N.; Korzun, Ashley M.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    In support of NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing technology development efforts, testing of Langley's Trim Tab Parametric Models was conducted in Test Section 2 of NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The objectives of these tests were to generate quantitative aerodynamic data and qualitative surface pressure data for experimental and computational validation and aerodynamic database development. Six component force-and-moment data were measured on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations at Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5, angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg, and angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg. Configuration parameters investigated in this study were forebody shape, tab area, tab cant angle, and tab aspect ratio. Pressure Sensitive Paint was used to provide qualitative surface pressure mapping for a subset of these flow and configuration variables. Over the range of parameters tested, the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than varying tab aspect ratio relative to key aerodynamic performance requirements. Qualitative surface pressure data supported the integrated aerodynamic data and provided information to aid in future analyses of localized phenomena for trim tab configurations.

  18. Current research in oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites at NASA. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Barrett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The significant potential of carbon-carbon composites for high-temperature structural applications is well established. For hypersonic vehicle applications, desirable properties include low density, high specific strength and stiffness, low coefficients of thermal expansion, and retention of mechanical properties above 3000 F. A significant problem associated with carbon materials, however, is that they oxidize rapidly in air at temperatures above about 800 F, and therefore must be protected from oxidation. Successful development of effective methods of oxidation protection is key to the eventual utilization of carbon-carbon composites on hypersonic vehicles such as NASP. In this presentation, the basic elements of an oxidation-protection system are described. Results from oxidation-performance evaluations of state-of-the-art ACC-4 type material in simulated airframe vehicle environments (temperature, pressure, and time) conducted at NASA Langley are also presented. NASA Langley has an active research effort to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon materials for airframe structural and vehicle thermal protection applications. Conversion coating and sealant development research is highlighted.

  19. Doppler Lidar System Design via Interdisciplinary Design Concept at NASA Langley Research Center - Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasner, Aaron I.; Scola,Salvatore; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petway, Larry B.

    2014-01-01

    Optimized designs of the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) instrument for Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) were accomplished via Interdisciplinary Design Concept (IDEC) at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2013. Three branches in the Engineering Directorate and three students were involved in this joint task through the NASA Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program. The Laser Remote Sensing Branch (LRSB), Mechanical Systems Branch (MSB), and Structural and Thermal Systems Branch (STSB) were engaged to achieve optimal designs through iterative and interactive collaborative design processes. A preliminary design iteration was able to reduce the power consumption, mass, and footprint by removing redundant components and replacing inefficient components with more efficient ones. A second design iteration reduced volume and mass by replacing bulky components with excessive performance with smaller components custom-designed for the power system. Thermal modeling software was used to run steady state thermal analyses, which were used to both validate the designs and recommend further changes. Analyses were run on each redesign, as well as the original system. Thermal Desktop was used to run trade studies to account for uncertainty and assumptions about fan performance and boundary conditions. The studies suggested that, even if the assumptions were significantly wrong, the redesigned systems would remain within operating temperature limits.

  20. Doppler Lidar System Design via Interdisciplinary Design Concept at NASA Langley Research Center - Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Sessions, Alaric M.; Beyon, Jeffrey; Petway, Larry B.

    2014-01-01

    Optimized designs of the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) instrument for Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) were accomplished via Interdisciplinary Design Concept (IDEC) at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2013. Three branches in the Engineering Directorate and three students were involved in this joint task through the NASA Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program. The Laser Remote Sensing Branch (LRSB), Mechanical Systems Branch (MSB), and Structural and Thermal Systems Branch (STSB) were engaged to achieve optimal designs through iterative and interactive collaborative design processes. A preliminary design iteration was able to reduce the power consumption, mass, and footprint by removing redundant components and replacing inefficient components with more efficient ones. A second design iteration reduced volume and mass by replacing bulky components with excessive performance with smaller components custom-designed for the power system. The existing power system was analyzed to rank components in terms of inefficiency, power dissipation, footprint and mass. Design considerations and priorities are compared along with the results of each design iteration. Overall power system improvements are summarized for design implementations.

  1. Who's Got the Bridge? - Towards Safe, Robust Autonomous Operations at NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, B. Danette; Cross, Charles D.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna C.; Crisp, Vicki K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA aeronautics research has made decades of contributions to aviation. Both aircraft and air traffic management (ATM) systems in use today contain NASA-developed and NASA sponsored technologies that improve safety and efficiency. Recent innovations in robotics and autonomy for automobiles and unmanned systems point to a future with increased personal mobility and access to transportation, including aviation. Automation and autonomous operations will transform the way we move people and goods. Achieving this mobility will require safe, robust, reliable operations for both the vehicle and the airspace and challenges to this inevitable future are being addressed now in government labs, universities, and industry. These challenges are the focus of NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator whose R&D portfolio includes mission planning, trajectory and path planning, object detection and avoidance, object classification, sensor fusion, controls, machine learning, computer vision, human-machine teaming, geo-containment, open architecture design and development, as well as the test and evaluation environment that will be critical to prove system reliability and support certification. Safe autonomous operations will be enabled via onboard sensing and perception systems in both data-rich and data-deprived environments. Applied autonomy will enable safety, efficiency and unprecedented mobility as people and goods take to the skies tomorrow just as we do on the road today.

  2. Review of fatigue and fracture research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Most dynamic components in helicopters are designed with a safe-life constant-amplitude testing approach that has not changed in many years. In contrast, the fatigue methodology in other industries has advanced significantly in the last two decades. Recent research at the NASA Langley Research Center and the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate at Langley are reviewed relative to fatigue and fracture design methodology for metallic components. Most of the Langley research was directed towards the damage tolerance design approach, but some work was done that is applicable to the safe-life approach. In the areas of testing, damage tolerance concepts are concentrating on the small-crack effect in crack growth and measurement of crack opening stresses. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of a machining scratch on the fatigue life of a high strength steel. In the area of analysis, work was concentrated on developing a crack closure model that will predict fatigue life under spectrum loading for several different metal alloys including a high strength steel that is often used in the dynamic components of helicopters. Work is also continuing in developing a three-dimensional, finite-element stress analysis for cracked and uncracked isotropic and anisotropic structures. A numerical technique for solving simultaneous equations called the multigrid method is being pursued to enhance the solution schemes in both the finite-element analysis and the boundary element analysis. Finally, a fracture mechanics project involving an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of J-resistance curve is also being pursued.

  3. Research on Subjective Response to Simulated Sonic Booms at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center has conducted many tests investigating subjective response to simulated sonic booms. Most tests have used the Sonic Boom Booth, an airtight concrete booth fitted with loudspeakers that play synthesized sonic booms pre-processed to compensate for the response of the booth/loudspeaker system. Tests using the Booth have included investigations of shaped booms, booms with simulated ground reflections, recorded booms, outdoor and indoor booms, booms with differing loudness for bow and tail shocks, and comparisons of aircraft flyover recordings with sonic booms. Another study used loudspeakers placed inside people s houses, so that they could experience the booms while in their own homes. This study investigated the reactions of people to different numbers of booms heard within a 24-hour period. The most recent Booth test used predicted boom shapes from candidate low-boom aircraft. At present, a test to compare the Booth with boom simulators constructed by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company is underway. The Lockheed simulator is an airtight booth similar to the Langley booth; the Gulfstream booth uses a traveling wave method to create the booms. Comparison of "realism" as well as loudness and other descriptors is to be studied.

  4. Acoustic treatment of the NASA Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Abrahamson, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    A feasibility study for upgrading the NASA Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel so that it may be used for aeroacoustic research related to helicopters is described. The requirements for noise research leading to the design of the next generation of helicopters impose a set of acoustic test criteria that no existing wind tunnel in the United States can presently meet. Included in this feasibility study are the following considerations: (1) an evaluation of general wind-tunnel requirements and desired tunnel background noise levels for helicopter aeroacoustic research; (2) an assessment of the present acoustic environment for testing model rotors; (3) a diagnostic investigation of tunnel background noise sources and paths; (4) acoustic treatment options for tunnel background noise reduction and a trade-off study between these options; (5) an engineering feasibility assessment of the selected option; and (6) an integrated analysis of study components and recommendations of treatment for an approach to meet the tunnel background noise reduction goal. It is concluded that the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel is a fundamentally suitable facility for helicopter aeroacoustic research. It is also concluded that acoustic treatment of this facility for meeting the required tunnel background noise goal can be accomplished technically at reasonable risk and cost.

  5. Open Rotor Noise Prediction Methods at NASA Langley- A Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tinetti, Ana F.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    Open rotors are once again under consideration for propulsion of the future airliners because of their high efficiency. The noise generated by these propulsion systems must meet the stringent noise standards of today to reduce community impact. In this paper we review the open rotor noise prediction methods available at NASA Langley. We discuss three codes called ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic-Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise), FW - Hpds (Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings with penetrable data surface) and the FSC (Fast Scattering Code). The first two codes are in the time domain and the third code is a frequency domain code. The capabilities of these codes and the input data requirements as well as the output data are presented. Plans for further improvements of these codes are discussed. In particular, a method based on equivalent sources is outlined to get rid of spurious signals in the FW - Hpds code.

  6. Overview of an Indoor Sonic Boom Simulator at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    A facility has been constructed at NASA Langley Research Center to simulate the soundscape inside residential houses that are exposed to environmental noise from aircraft. This controllable indoor listening environment, the Interior Effects Room, enables systematic study of parameters that affect psychoacoustic response. The single-room facility, built using typical residential construction methods and materials, is surrounded on adjacent sides by two arrays of loudspeakers in close proximity to the exterior walls. The arrays, containing 52 subwoofers and 52 mid-range speakers, have a usable bandwidth of 3 Hz to 5 kHz and sufficient output to allow study of sonic boom noise. In addition to these exterior arrays, satellite speakers placed inside the room are used to augment the transmitted sound with rattle and other audible contact ]induced noise that can result from low frequency excitation of a residential house. The layout of the facility, operational characteristics, acoustic characteristics and equalization approaches are summarized.

  7. Photogrammetric Tracking of Aerodynamic Surfaces and Aerospace Models at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortis, Mark R.; Robson, Stuart; Jones, Thomas W.; Goad, William K.; Lunsford, Charles B.

    2016-06-01

    Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF) position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  8. Evaluation of an Indoor Sonic Boom Subjective Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Rathsam, Jonathan; Klos, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    A sonic boom simulator at NASA Langley Research Center has been constructed for research on human response to low-amplitude sonic booms heard indoors. Research in this facility will ultimately lead to development of a psychoacoustic model for single indoor booms. The first subjective test was designed to explore indoor human response to variations in sonic boom rise time and amplitude. Another goal was to identify loudness level variability across listener locations within the facility. Finally, the test also served to evaluate the facility as a laboratory research tool for studying indoor human response to sonic booms. Subjects listened to test sounds and were asked to rate their annoyance relative to a reference boom. Measurements of test signals were conducted for objective analysis and correlation with subjective responses. Results confirm the functionality of the facility and effectiveness of the test methods and indicate that loudness level does not fully describe indoor annoyance to the selected sonic boom signals.

  9. Finite and Boundary Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC arrangements were in good agreement with experimental modal survey data. Finite element modal analyses were performed for 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions. Acoustic cylinder modes for the interior of the ATC were calculated with an acoustic finite element model. Frequency transfer functions between a unit force on the structure and the acoustic response inside the ATC cylinder were measured and were compared with predictions based on a boundary element model. Comparisons between predicted and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  10. Application of the CIRSSE cooperating robot path planner to the NASA Langley truss assembly problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Jonathan M.; Derby, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for autonomously planning collision free paths for two cooperating robots in a static environment was developed at the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE). The method utilizes a divide-and-conquer type of heuristic and involves non-exhaustive mapping of configuration space. While there is no guarantee of finding a solution, the planner was successfully applied to a variety of problems including two cooperating 9 degrees of freedom (dof) robots. Although developed primarily for cooperating robots the method is also applicable to single robot path planning problems. A single 6 dof version of the planner was implemented for the truss assembly east, at NASA Langley's Automated Structural Assembly Lab (ASAL). The results indicate that the planner could be very useful in addressing the ASAL path planning problem and that further work along these lines is warranted.

  11. Development and status of data quality assurance program at NASA Langley research center: Toward national standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to re-engineer the wind tunnel testing process, a comprehensive data quality assurance program is being established at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The ultimate goal of the program is routing provision of tunnel-to-tunnel reproducibility with total uncertainty levels acceptable for test and evaluation of civilian transports. The operational elements for reaching such levels of reproducibility are: (1) statistical control, which provides long term measurement uncertainty predictability and a base for continuous improvement, (2) measurement uncertainty prediction, which provides test designs that can meet data quality expectations with the system's predictable variation, and (3) national standards, which provide a means for resolving tunnel-to-tunnel differences. The paper presents the LaRC design for the program and discusses the process of implementation.

  12. NASA Langley developments in response calculations needed for failure and life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerrold M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley developments in response calculations needed for failure and life predictions are discussed. Topics covered include: structural failure analysis in concurrent engineering; accuracy of independent regional modeling demonstrated on classical example; functional interface method accurately joins incompatible finite element models; interface method for insertion of local detail modeling extended to curve pressurized fuselage window panel; interface concept for joining structural regions; motivation for coupled 2D-3D analysis; compression panel with discontinuous stiffener coupled 2D-3D model and axial surface strains at the middle of the hat stiffener; use of adaptive refinement with multiple methods; adaptive mesh refinement; and studies on quantity effect of bow-type initial imperfections on reliability of stiffened panels.

  13. Reduced-Order Modeling: Cooperative Research and Development at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Beran, Philip S.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Guendel, Randal E.; Kurdila, Andrew; Prazenica, Richard J.; Librescu, Liviu; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Raveh, Daniella E.

    2001-01-01

    Cooperative research and development activities at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involving reduced-order modeling (ROM) techniques are presented. Emphasis is given to reduced-order methods and analyses based on Volterra series representations, although some recent results using Proper Orthogonal Deco in position (POD) are discussed as well. Results are reported for a variety of computational and experimental nonlinear systems to provide clear examples of the use of reduced-order models, particularly within the field of computational aeroelasticity. The need for and the relative performance (speed, accuracy, and robustness) of reduced-order modeling strategies is documented. The development of unsteady aerodynamic state-space models directly from computational fluid dynamics analyses is presented in addition to analytical and experimental identifications of Volterra kernels. Finally, future directions for this research activity are summarized.

  14. A Sample of NASA Langley Unsteady Pressure Experiments for Computational Aerodynamics Code Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Edwards, John W.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics methods mature, code development is rapidly transitioning from prediction of steady flowfields to unsteady flows. This change in emphasis offers a number of new challenges to the research community, not the least of which is obtaining detailed, accurate unsteady experimental data with which to evaluate new methods. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been actively measuring unsteady pressure distributions for nearly 40 years. Over the last 20 years, these measurements have focused on developing high-quality datasets for use in code evaluation. This paper provides a sample of unsteady pressure measurements obtained by LaRC and available for government, university, and industry researchers to evaluate new and existing unsteady aerodynamic analysis methods. A number of cases are highlighted and discussed with attention focused on the unique character of the individual datasets and their perceived usefulness for code evaluation. Ongoing LaRC research in this area is also presented.

  15. Wall Boundary Layer Measurements for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the boundary layer parameters in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics tunnel were conducted during extensive calibration activities following the facility conversion from a Freon-12 heavy-gas test medium to R-134a. Boundary-layer rakes were mounted on the wind-tunnel walls, ceiling, and floor. Measurements were made over the range of tunnel operation envelope in both heavy gas and air and without a model in the test section at three tunnel stations. Configuration variables included open and closed east sidewall wall slots, for air and R134a test media, reentry flap settings, and stagnation pressures over the full range of tunnel operation. The boundary layer thickness varied considerably for the six rakes. The thickness for the east wall was considerably larger that the other rakes and was also larger than previously reported. There generally was some reduction in thickness at supersonic Mach numbers, but the effect of stagnation pressure, and test medium were not extensive.

  16. Acoustical Evaluation of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of the acoustical measurements made to supply NASA Langley operating personnel with the acoustical characteristics of the tunnel test section needed for the planning of acoustical measurements and to identify the major noise sources. The results of the preliminary measurements of the spatial distribution of the sound field in the closed tunnel configuration indicate that the total sound power output of an unknown sound source placed in the test section could most probably be evaluated by measuring the sound pressure in two properly chosen locations in the duct - one upstream and one downstream of the test section. However, it is recommended that the practicability of this method of sound power output measurements be further investigated, preferably in a small scale model of the V/STOL Tunnel.

  17. Real-Gas Flow Properties for NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    1996-01-01

    A computational algorithm has been developed which can be employed to determine the flow properties of an arbitrary real (virial) gas in a wind tunnel. A multiple-coefficient virial gas equation of state and the assumption of isentropic flow are used to model the gas and to compute flow properties throughout the wind tunnel. This algorithm has been used to calculate flow properties for the wind tunnels of the Aerothermodynamics Facilities Complex at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which air, CF4. He, and N2 are employed as test gases. The algorithm is detailed in this paper and sample results are presented for each of the Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex wind tunnels.

  18. Research and Applications in Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Irving

    1997-01-01

    An overview of recently completed programs in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics research at the NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Methods used to perform flutter clearance studies in the wind-tunnel on a high performance fighter are discussed. Recent advances in the use of smart structures and controls to solve aeroelastic problems, including flutter and gust response are presented. An aeroelastic models program designed to support an advanced high speed civil transport is described. An extension to transonic small disturbance theory that better predicts flows involving separation and reattachment is presented. The results of a research study to determine the effects of flexibility on the taxi and takeoff characteristics of a high speed civil transport are presented. The use of photogrammetric methods aboard Space Shuttle to measure spacecraft dynamic response is discussed. Issues associated with the jitter response of multi-payload spacecraft are discussed. Finally a Space Shuttle flight experiment that studied the control of flexible spacecraft is described.

  19. The NASA Langley Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A large-chord, swept, supercritical, laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil was designed and constructed and is currently undergoing tests in the Langley 8 ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The experiment was directed toward evaluating the compatibility of LFC and supercritical airfoils, validating prediction techniques, and generating a data base for future transport airfoil design as part of NASA's ongoing research program to significantly reduce drag and increase aircraft efficiency. Unique features of the airfoil included a high design Mach number with shock free flow and boundary layer control by suction. Special requirements for the experiment included modifications to the wind tunnel to achieve the necessary flow quality and contouring of the test section walls to simulate free air flow about a swept model at transonic speeds. Design of the airfoil with a slotted suction surface, the suction system, and modifications to the tunnel to meet test requirements are discussed.

  20. Offshore Wind Measurements Using Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The latest flight demonstration of Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is presented. The goal of the campaign was to demonstrate the improvement of DAWN system since the previous flight campaign in 2012 and the capabilities of DAWN and the latest airborne wind profiling algorithm APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) developed at LaRC. The comparisons of APOLO and another algorithm are discussed utilizing two and five line-of-sights (LOSs), respectively. Wind parameters from DAWN were compared with ground-based radar measurements for validation purposes. The campaign period was June - July in 2013 and the flight altitude was 8 km in inland toward Charlotte, NC, and offshores in Virginia Beach, VA and Ocean City, MD. The DAWN system was integrated into a UC12B with two operators onboard during the campaign.

  1. Desktop Access to Full-Text NACA and NASA Reports: Systems Developed by NASA Langley Technical Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Manjula Y.; Adams, David L.; Trinidad, P. Paul

    1997-01-01

    NASA Langley Technical Library has been involved in developing systems for full-text information delivery of NACA/NASA technical reports since 1991. This paper will describe the two prototypes it has developed and the present production system configuration. The prototype systems are a NACA CD-ROM of thirty-three classic paper NACA reports and a network-based Full-text Electronic Reports Documents System (FEDS) constructed from both paper and electronic formats of NACA and NASA reports. The production system is the DigiDoc System (DIGItal Documents) presently being developed based on the experiences gained from the two prototypes. DigiDoc configuration integrates the on-line catalog database World Wide Web interface and PDF technology to provide a powerful and flexible search and retrieval system. It describes in detail significant achievements and lessons learned in terms of data conversion, storage technologies, full-text searching and retrieval, and image databases. The conclusions from the experiences of digitization and full- text access and future plans for DigiDoc system implementation are discussed.

  2. Investigation of Liner Characteristics in the NASA Langley Curved Duct Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR), which is designed to investigate propagation of sound in a duct with flow, has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The duct incorporates an adaptive control system to generate a tone in the duct at a specific frequency with a target Sound Pressure Level and a target mode shape. The size of the duct, the ability to isolate higher order modes, and the ability to modify the duct configuration make this rig unique among experimental duct acoustics facilities. An experiment is described in which the facility performance is evaluated by measuring the sound attenuation by a sample duct liner. The liner sample comprises one wall of the liner test section. Sound in tones from 500 to 2400 Hz, with modes that are parallel to the liner surface of order 0 to 5, and that are normal to the liner surface of order 0 to 2, can be generated incident on the liner test section. Tests are performed in which sound is generated without axial flow in the duct and with flow at a Mach number of 0.275. The attenuation of the liner is determined by comparing the sound power in a hard wall section downstream of the liner test section to the sound power in a hard wall section upstream of the liner test section. These experimentally determined attenuations are compared to numerically determined attenuations calculated by means of a finite element analysis code. The code incorporates liner impedance values educed from measured data from the NASA Langley Grazing Incidence Tube, a test rig that is used for investigating liner performance with flow and with (0,0) mode incident grazing. The analytical and experimental results compare favorably, indicating the validity of the finite element method and demonstrating that finite element prediction tools can be used together with experiment to characterize the liner attenuation.

  3. Review of Skin Friction Measurements Including Recent High-Reynolds Number Results from NASA Langley NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Hall, Robert M.; Anders, John B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews flat plate skin friction data from early correlations of drag on plates in water to measurements in the cryogenic environment of The NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) in late 1996. The flat plate (zero pressure gradient with negligible surface curvature) incompressible skin friction at high Reynolds numbers is emphasized in this paper, due to its importance in assessing the accuracy of measurements, and as being important to the aerodynamics of large scale vehicles. A correlation of zero pressure gradient skin friction data minimizing extraneous effects between tests is often used as the first step in the calculation of skin friction in complex flows. Early data compiled by Schoenherr for a range of momentum thickness Reynolds numbers, R(sub Theta) from 860 to 370,000 contained large scatter, but has proved surprisingly accurate in its correlated form. Subsequent measurements in wind tunnels under more carefully controlled conditions have provided inputs to this database, usually to a maximum R(sub Theta) of about 40,000. Data on a large axisymmetric model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility extends the upper limit in incompressible R(sub Theta) to 619,800 using the van Driest transformation. Previous data, test techniques, and error sources ar discussed, and the NTF data will be discussed in detail. The NTF Preston tube and Clauser inferred data accuracy is estimated to be within -2 percent of a power-law curve fit, and falls above the Spalding theory by 1 percent at R(sub Theta) of about 600,000.

  4. Mixed Layer Heights Derived from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarino, Amy J.; Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.; Fast, Jerome; Dasilva, Arlindo; Benedetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center's B200 aircraft to several locations in North America from 2006 to 2012 to aid in characterizing aerosol properties for over fourteen field missions. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) during 349 science flights, many in coordination with other participating research aircraft, satellites, and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as properties and variability of the Mixing Layer (ML) height. We describe the use of the HSRL data collected during these missions for computing ML heights and show how the HSRL data can be used to determine the fraction of aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML, which is important for air quality assessments. We describe the spatial and temporal variations in ML heights found in the diverse locations associated with these experiments. We also describe how the ML heights derived from HSRL have been used to help assess simulations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) derived using various models, including the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem), NASA GEOS-5 model, and the ECMWF/MACC models.

  5. A Survey of Research Performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    2003-01-01

    The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The facility was originally built in 1963 as a lunar landing simulator, allowing the Apollo astronauts to practice lunar landings under realistic conditions. The IDRF was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 based on its significant contributions to the Apollo Program. In 1972, the facility was converted to a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft. Since that time, the IDRF has been used to perform a wide variety of impact tests on full-scale aircraft and structural components in support of the General Aviation (GA) aircraft industry, the US Department of Defense, the rotorcraft industry, and NASA in-house aeronautics and space research programs. The objective of this paper is to describe most of the major full-scale crash test programs that were performed at this unique, world-class facility since 1974. The past research is divided into six sub-topics: the civil GA aircraft test program, transport aircraft test program, military test programs, space test programs, basic research, and crash modeling and simulation.

  6. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  7. Design of an Indoor Sonic Boom Simulator at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    Construction of a simulator to recreate the soundscape inside residential buildings exposed to sonic booms is scheduled to start during the summer of 2008 at NASA Langley Research Center. The new facility should be complete by the end of the year. The design of the simulator allows independent control of several factors that create the indoor soundscape. Variables that will be isolated include such factors as boom duration, overpressure, rise time, spectral shape, level of rattle, level of squeak, source of rattle and squeak, level of vibration and source of vibration. Test subjects inside the simulator will be asked to judge the simulated soundscape, which will represent realistic indoor boom exposure. Ultimately, this simulator will be used to develop a functional relationship between human response and the sound characteristics creating the indoor soundscape. A conceptual design has been developed by NASA personnel, and is currently being vetted through small-scale risk reduction tests that are being performed in-house. The purpose of this document is to introduce the conceptual design, identify how the indoor response will be simulated, briefly outline some of the risk reduction tests that have been completed to vet the design, and discuss the impact of these tests on the simulator design.

  8. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  9. Climate Change and Vector Borne Diseases on NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Shepanek, Marc A.; Kamel, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Increasing global temperature, weather patterns with above average storm intensities, and higher sea levels have been identified as phenomena associated with global climate change. As a causal system, climate change could contribute to vector borne diseases in humans. Vectors of concern originate from the vicinity of Langley Research Center include mosquitos and ticks that transmit disease that originate regionally, nationwide, or from outside the US. Recognizing changing conditions, vector borne diseases propagate under climate change conditions, and understanding the conditions in which they may exist or propagate, presents opportunities for monitoring their progress and mitigating their potential impacts through communication, continued monitoring, and adaptation. Personnel comprise a direct and fundamental support to NASA mission success, continuous and improved understanding of climatic conditions, and the resulting consequence of disease from these conditions, helps to reduce risk in terrestrial space technologies, ground operations, and space research. This research addresses conditions which are attributed to climatic conditions which promote environmental conditions conducive to the increase of disease vectors. This investigation includes evaluation of local mosquito population count and rainfall data for statistical correlation and identification of planning recommendations unique to LaRC, other NASA Centers to assess adaptation approaches, Center-level planning strategies.

  10. Testing of the Crew Exploration Vehicle in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Borg, Stephen E.; Watkins, Anthony N.; Cole, Daniel R.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a strategic, multi-facility test program, subscale testing of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle was conducted in both legs of NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The objectives of these tests were to generate aerodynamic and surface pressure data over a range of supersonic Mach numbers and reentry angles of attack for experimental and computational validation and aerodynamic database development. To provide initial information on boundary layer transition at supersonic test conditions, transition studies were conducted using temperature sensitive paint and infrared thermography optical techniques. To support implementation of these optical diagnostics in the Unitary Wind Tunnel, the experiment was first modeled using the Virtual Diagnostics Interface software. For reentry orientations of 140 to 170 degrees (heat shield forward), windward surface flow was entirely laminar for freestream unit Reynolds numbers equal to or less than 3 million per foot. Optical techniques showed qualitative evidence of forced transition on the windward heat shield with application of both distributed grit and discreet trip dots. Longitudinal static force and moment data showed the largest differences with Mach number and angle of attack variations. Differences associated with Reynolds number variation and/or laminar versus turbulent flow on the heat shield were very small. Static surface pressure data supported the aforementioned trends with Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack.

  11. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Centers Near Real-Time Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, T.; Parker, L.; Rinsland, P. L.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center has archived and distributed a variety of satellite mission data sets. NASA's goal in Earth science is to observe, understand, and model the Earth system to discover how it is changing, to better predict change, and to understand the consequences for life on Earth. The ASDC has collaborated with Science Teams to accommodate emerging science users in the climate and modeling communities. The ASDC has expanded its original role to support operational usage by related Earth Science satellites, support land and ocean assimilations, support of field campaigns, outreach programs, and application projects for agriculture and energy industries to bridge the gap between Earth science research results and the adoption of data and prediction capabilities for reliable and sustained use in Decision Support Systems (DSS). For example; these products are being used by the community performing data assimilations to regulate aerosol mass in global transport models to improve model response and forecast accuracy, to assess the performance of components of a global coupled atmospheric-ocean climate model, improve atmospheric motion vector (winds) impact on numerical weather prediction models, and to provide internet-based access to parameters specifically tailored to assist in the design of solar and wind powered renewable energy systems. These more focused applications often require Near Real-Time (NRT) products. Generating NRT products pose their own unique set challenges for the ASDC and the Science Teams. Examples of ASDC NRT products and challenges will be discussed.

  12. NASA Langley Systems Analysis & Concepts Directorate Technology Assessment/Portfolio Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, Stephen; Chytka, Trina; Arcara, Phil; Jones, Sharon; Stanley, Doug; Wilhite, Alan W.

    2006-01-01

    Systems analysis develops and documents candidate mission and architectures, associated system concepts, enabling capabilities and investment strategies to achieve NASA s strategic objectives. The technology assessment process connects the mission and architectures to the investment strategies. In order to successfully implement a technology assessment, there is a need to collect, manipulate, analyze, document, and disseminate technology-related information. Information must be collected and organized on the wide variety of potentially applicable technologies, including: previous research results, key technical parameters and characteristics, technology readiness levels, relationships to other technologies, costs, and potential barriers and risks. This information must be manipulated to facilitate planning and documentation. An assessment is included of the programmatic and technical risks associated with each technology task as well as potential risk mitigation plans. Risks are assessed and tracked in terms of likelihood of the risk occurring and consequences of the risk if it does occur. The risk assessments take into account cost, schedule, and technical risk dimensions. Assessment data must be simplified for presentation to decision makers. The Systems Analysis and Concepts Directorate (SACD) at NASA Langley Research Center has a wealth of experience in performing Technology Assessment and Portfolio Analysis as this has been a business line since 1978.

  13. A Summary of DOD-Sponsored Research Performed at NASA Langley's Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2004-01-01

    The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft.-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The IDRF was originally built in the early 1960's for use as a Lunar Landing Research Facility. As such, the facility was configured to simulate the reduced gravitational environment of the Moon, allowing the Apollo astronauts to practice lunar landings under realistic conditions. In 1985, the IDRF was designated a National Historic Landmark based on its significant contributions to the Apollo Moon Landing Program. In the early 1970's the facility was converted into its current configuration as a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft. Since that time, the IDRF has been used to perform a wide variety of impact tests on full-scale aircraft, airframe components, and space vehicles in support of the General Aviation (GA) aircraft industry, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), the rotorcraft industry, and the NASA Space program. The objectives of this paper are twofold: to describe the IDRF facility and its unique capabilities for conducting structural impact testing, and to summarize the impact tests performed at the IDRF in support of the DOD. These tests cover a time period of roughly 2 1/2 decades, beginning in 1975 with the full-scale crash test of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter, and ending in 1999 with the external fuel system qualification test of a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. NASA officially closed the IDRF in September 2003; consequently, it is important to document the past contributions made in improved human survivability and impact tolerance through DOD-sponsored research performed at the IDRF.

  14. NASA Langley's Formal Methods Research in Support of the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.

    2008-01-01

    This talk will provide a brief introduction to the formal methods developed at NASA Langley and the National Institute for Aerospace (NIA) for air traffic management applications. NASA Langley's formal methods research supports the Interagency Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) effort to define and develop the 2025 Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS). The JPDO was created by the passage of the Vision 100 Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act in Dec 2003. The NGATS vision calls for a major transformation of the nation s air transportation system that will enable growth to 3 times the traffic of the current system. The transformation will require an unprecedented level of safety-critical automation used in complex procedural operations based on 4-dimensional (4D) trajectories that enable dynamic reconfiguration of airspace scalable to geographic and temporal demand. The goal of our formal methods research is to provide verification methods that can be used to insure the safety of the NGATS system. Our work has focused on the safety assessment of concepts of operation and fundamental algorithms for conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) and self- spacing in the terminal area. Formal analysis of a concept of operations is a novel area of application of formal methods. Here one must establish that a system concept involving aircraft, pilots, and ground resources is safe. The formal analysis of algorithms is a more traditional endeavor. However, the formal analysis of ATM algorithms involves reasoning about the interaction of algorithmic logic and aircraft trajectories defined over an airspace. These trajectories are described using 2D and 3D vectors and are often constrained by trigonometric relations. Thus, in many cases it has been necessary to unload the full power of an advanced theorem prover. The verification challenge is to establish that the safety-critical algorithms produce valid solutions that are guaranteed to maintain separation

  15. Contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center to the DARPA/AFRL/NASA/ Northrop Grumman Smart Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.; Martin, Christopher A.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to the DARPA/AFRL/NASA/ Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) Smart Wing program is presented. The overall objective of the Smart Wing program was to develop smart** technologies and demonstrate near-flight-scale actuation systems to improve the aerodynamic performance of military aircraft. NASA LaRC s roles were to provide technical guidance, wind-tunnel testing time and support, and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses. The program was divided into two phases, with each phase having two wind-tunnel entries in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). This paper focuses on the fourth and final wind-tunnel test: Phase 2, Test 2. During this test, a model based on the NGC Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept was tested at Mach numbers up to 0.8 and dynamic pressures up to 150 psf to determine the aerodynamic performance benefits that could be achieved using hingeless, smoothly-contoured control surfaces actuated with smart materials technologies. The UCAV-based model was a 30% geometric scale, full-span, sting-mounted model with the smart control surfaces on the starboard wing and conventional, hinged control surfaces on the port wing. Two LaRC-developed instrumentation systems were used during the test to externally measure the shapes of the smart control surface and quantify the effects of aerodynamic loading on the deflections: Videogrammetric Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI). VMD is an optical technique that uses single-camera photogrammetric tracking of discrete targets to determine deflections at specific points. PMI provides spatially continuous measurements of model deformation by computationally analyzing images of a grid projected onto the model surface. Both the VMD and PMI measurements served well to validate the use of on-board (internal) rotary potentiometers to measure the smart control surface deflection angles. Prior to the final

  16. Effects of Liner Length and Attenuation on NASA Langley Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the effects of liner length and attenuation on the CHE (convected Helmholtz equation) impedance eduction method, in which the surface impedance of an acoustic liner is inferred through an iterative process based on repeated solutions to the convected Helmholtz equation. Wire mesh-over-honeycomb and perforate-over-honeycomb acoustic liners are tested in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, and the resultant data are processed using two impedance eduction methods. The first is the CHE method, and the second is a direct method (labeled the KT method) that uses the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm to compute the impedance directly. The CHE method has been extensively used for acoustic liner evaluation, but experiences anomalous behavior under some test conditions. It is postulated that the anomalies are related to the liner length and/or attenuation. Since the KT method only employs data measured over the length of the liner, it is expected to be unaffected by liner length. A comparison of results achieved with the two impedance eduction methods is used to explore the interactive effects of liner length and attenuation on the CHE impedance eduction method.

  17. Uncertainty Analysis of Sonic Boom Levels Measured in a Simulator at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Ely, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom simulator has been constructed at NASA Langley Research Center for testing the human response to sonic booms heard indoors. Like all measured quantities, sonic boom levels in the simulator are subject to systematic and random errors. To quantify these errors, and their net influence on the measurement result, a formal uncertainty analysis is conducted. Knowledge of the measurement uncertainty, or range of values attributable to the quantity being measured, enables reliable comparisons among measurements at different locations in the simulator as well as comparisons with field data or laboratory data from other simulators. The analysis reported here accounts for acoustic excitation from two sets of loudspeakers: one loudspeaker set at the facility exterior that reproduces the exterior sonic boom waveform and a second set of interior loudspeakers for reproducing indoor rattle sounds. The analysis also addresses the effect of pressure fluctuations generated when exterior doors of the building housing the simulator are opened. An uncertainty budget is assembled to document each uncertainty component, its sensitivity coefficient, and the combined standard uncertainty. The latter quantity will be reported alongside measurement results in future research reports to indicate data reliability.

  18. Aerodynamic Measurements on a Large Splitter Plate for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Tests conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) assess the aerodynamic characteristics of a splitter plate used to test some semispan models in this facility. Aerodynamic data are analyzed to determine the effect of the splitter plate on the operating characteristics of the TDT, as well as to define the range of conditions over which the plate can be reasonably used to obtain aerodynamic data. Static pressures measurements on the splitter plate surface and the equipment fairing between the wind tunnel wall and the splitter plate are evaluated to determine the flow quality around the apparatus over a range of operating conditions. Boundary layer rake data acquired near the plate surface define the viscous characteristics of the flow over the plate. Data were acquired over a range of subsonic, transonic and supersonic conditions at dynamic pressures typical for models tested on this apparatus. Data from this investigation should be used as a guide for the design of TDT models and tests using the splitter plate, as well as to guide future splitter plate design for this facility.

  19. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) Experience with Aircraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J.; Sorlie, S.; Parker, L.; Mason, K. L.; Rinsland, P.; Kusterer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade the NASA Langley ASDC has archived and distributed a variety of aircraft mission data sets. These datasets posed unique challenges for archiving from the rigidity of the archiving system and formats to the lack of metadata. The ASDC developed a state-of-the-art data archive and distribution system to serve the atmospheric sciences data provider and researcher communities. The system, called Archive - Next Generation (ANGe), is designed with a distributed, multi-tier, serviced-based, message oriented architecture enabling new methods for searching, accessing, and customizing data. The ANGe system provides the ease and flexibility to ingest and archive aircraft data through an ad hoc workflow or to develop a new workflow to suit the providers needs. The ASDC will describe the challenges encountered in preparing aircraft data for archiving and distribution. The ASDC is currently providing guidance to the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Earth Venture-1 project on developing collection, granule, and browse metadata as well as supporting the ADAM (Airborne Data For Assessing Models) site.

  20. Acoustic Calibration of the Exterior Effects Room at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, Kenneth J., II; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Klos, Jacob; Chapin, William L.; Surucu, Fahri; Aumann, Aric R.

    2010-01-01

    The Exterior Effects Room (EER) at the NASA Langley Research Center is a 39-seat auditorium built for psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. The original reproduction system employed monaural playback and hence lacked sound localization capability. In an effort to more closely recreate field test conditions, a significant upgrade was undertaken to allow simulation of a three-dimensional audio and visual environment. The 3D audio system consists of 27 mid and high frequency satellite speakers and 4 subwoofers, driven by a real-time audio server running an implementation of Vector Base Amplitude Panning. The audio server is part of a larger simulation system, which controls the audio and visual presentation of recorded and synthesized aircraft flyovers. The focus of this work is on the calibration of the 3D audio system, including gains used in the amplitude panning algorithm, speaker equalization, and absolute gain control. Because the speakers are installed in an irregularly shaped room, the speaker equalization includes time delay and gain compensation due to different mounting distances from the focal point, filtering for color compensation due to different installations (half space, corner, baffled/unbaffled), and cross-over filtering.

  1. Test Capabilities and Recent Experiences in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Jeffrey S.; Harvin, Stephen F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel is a combustion-heated hypersonic blowdown-to-atmosphere wind tunnel that provides flight enthalpy simulation for Mach numbers of 4, 5, and 7 through an altitude range from 50,000 to 120,000 feet. The open-.jet test section is 8-ft. in diameter and 12-ft. long. The test section will accommodate large air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems as well as structural and thermal protection system components. Stable wind tunnel test conditions can be provided for 60 seconds. Additional test capabilities are provided by a radiant heater system used to simulate ascent or entry heating profiles. The test medium is the combustion products of air and methane that are burned in a pressurized combustion chamber. Oxygen is added to the test medium for air-breathing propulsion tests so that the test gas contains 21 percent molar oxygen. The facility was modified extensively in the late 1980's to provide airbreathing propulsion testing capability. In this paper, a brief history and general description of the facility are presented along with a discussion of the types of supported testing. Recently completed tests are discussed to explain the capabilities this facility provides and to demonstrate the experience of the staff.

  2. The New Heavy Gas Testing Capability in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for over thirty-five years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports and military aircraft. The facility has many features which contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing; however, perhaps the most important facility capability is the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel models. The heavy gas also provides other testing benefits, including reduction in the power requirements to operate the facility during testing. Unfortunately, the use of the original heavy gas has been curtailed due to environmental concerns. A new gas, referred to as R-134a, has been identified as a suitable replacement for the former TDT heavy gas. The TDT is currently undergoing a facility upgrade to allow testing in R-134a heavy gas. This replacement gas will result in an operational test envelope, model scaling advantages, and general testing capabilities similar to those available with the former TDT heavy gas. As such, the TDT is expected to remain a viable facility for aeroelasticity research and aircraft dynamic clearance testing well into the 21st century. This paper describes the anticipated advantages and facility calibration plans for the new heavy gas and briefly reviews several past test programs that exemplify the possible benefits of heavy gas testing.

  3. Contributions of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to Launch Vehicle and Spacecraft Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Keller, Donald F.; Piatak, David J.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided wind-tunnel experimental validation and research data for numerous launch vehicles and spacecraft throughout its forty year history. Most of these tests have dealt with some aspect of aeroelastic or unsteady-response testing, which is the primary purpose of the TDT facility. However, some space-related test programs that have not involved aeroelasticity have used the TDT to take advantage of specific characteristics of the wind-tunnel facility. In general. the heavy gas test medium, variable pressure, relatively high Reynolds number and large size of the TDT test section have made it the preferred facility for these tests. The space-related tests conducted in the TDT have been divided into five categories. These categories are ground wind loads, launch vehicle dynamics, atmospheric flight of space vehicles, atmospheric reentry. and planetary-probe testing. All known TDT tests of launch vehicles and spacecraft are discussed in this report. An attempt has been made to succinctly summarize each wind-tunnel test, or in the case of multiple. related tests, each wind-tunnel program. Most summaries include model program discussion, description of the physical wind-tunnel model, and some typical or significant test results. When available, references are presented to assist the reader in further pursuing information on the tests.

  4. Analysis of Dynamic Data from Supersonic Retropropulsion Experiments in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codoni, Joshua R.; Berry, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental supersonic retropropulsion tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2 for a range of Mach numbers from 2.4 to 4.6. A 5-inch 70-degree sphere-cone forebody model with a 10-inch cylindrical aftbody experimental model was used which is capable of multiple retrorocket configurations. These configurations include a single central nozzle on the center point of the forebody, three nozzles at the forebody half-radius, and a combination of the first two configurations with no jets being plugged. A series of measurements were achieved through various instrumentation including forebody and aftbody pressure, internal pressures and temperatures, and high speed Schlieren visualization. Specifically, several high speed pressure transducers on the forebody and in the plenum were implemented to look at unsteady flow effects. The following work focuses on analyzing frequency traits due to the unsteady flow for a range of thrust coefficients for single, tri, and quad-nozzle test cases at freestream Mach 4.6 and angle of attack ranging from -8 degrees to +20 degrees. This analysis uses Matlab s fast Fourier transform, Welch's method (modified average of a periodogram), to create a power spectral density and analyze any high speed pressure transducer frequency traits due to the unsteady flow.

  5. Validation of CALIPSO Lidar Observations Using Data From the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan; Liu, Zhaoyan; Ferrare, Rich; Harper, David; Cook, Anthony; Vaughan, Mark; Trepte, Chip; Winker, David

    2006-01-01

    This poster focuses on preliminary comparisons of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft with data acquired by the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). A series of 20 aircraft validation flights was conducted from 14 June through 27 September 2006, under both day and night lighting conditions and a variety of aerosol and cloud conditions. This poster presents comparisons of CALIOP measurements of attenuated backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm and depolarization at 532 nm with near coincident measurements from the Airborne HSRL as a preliminary assessment of CALIOP calibration accuracy. Note that the CALIOP data presented here are the pre-release version. These data have known artifacts in calibration which have been corrected in the December 8 CALIPSO data release which was not available at the time the comparisons were conducted for this poster. The HSRL data are also preliminary. No artifacts are known to exist; however, refinements in calibration and algorithms are likely to be implemented before validation comparisons are made final.

  6. Recent activities within the aeroservoelasticity branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  7. Recent activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of research in aeroservoelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center is to enhance the modeling, analysis, and multidisciplinary design methodologies for obtaining multifunction digital control systems for application to flexible flight vehicles. Recent accomplishments are discussed, and a status report on current activities within the Aeroservoelasticity Branch is presented. In the area of modeling, improvements to the Minimum-State Method of approximating unsteady aerodynamics are shown to provide precise, low-order aeroservoelastic models for design and simulation activities. Analytical methods based on Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory to provide efficient and direct predictions of the critical gust profile and the time-correlated gust loads for linear structural design considerations are also discussed. Two research projects leading towards improved design methodology are summarized. The first program is developing an integrated structure/control design capability based on hierarchical problem decomposition, multilevel optimization and analytical sensitivities. The second program provides procedures for obtaining low-order, robust digital control laws for aeroelastic applications. In terms of methodology validation and application the current activities associated with the Active Flexible Wing project are reviewed.

  8. Contributions to Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs by the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  9. Preliminary Design of a Solar Photovoltaic Array for Net-Zero Energy Buildings at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate photovoltaic (solar electric systems) systems for a single building at NASA Langley as a representative case for alternative sustainable power generation. Building 1250 in the Science Directorate is comprised of office and laboratory space, and currently uses approximately 250,000 kW/month of electrical power with a projected use of 200,000 kW/month with additional conservation measures. The installation would be applied towards a goal for having Building 1250 classified as a net-zero energy building as it would produce as much energy as it uses over the course of a year. Based on the facility s electrical demand, a photovoltaic system and associated hardware were characterized to determine the optimal system, and understand the possible impacts from its deployment. The findings of this investigation reveal that the 1.9 MW photovoltaic electrical system provides favorable and robust results. The solar electric system should supply the needed sustainable power solution especially if operation and maintenance of the system will be considered a significant component of the system deployment.

  10. NASA Langley and NLR Research of Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Hoekstra, Jacco M.; Wing, David J.; Lohr, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) is a concept of future air traffic operations that proposes to distribute information, decision-making authority, and responsibility among flight crews, the air traffic service provider, and aeronautical operational control organizations. This paper provides an overview and status of DAG-TM research at NASA Langley Research Center and the National Aerospace Laboratory of The Netherlands. Specific objectives of the research are to evaluate the technical and operational feasibility of the autonomous airborne component of DAG-TM, which is founded on the operational paradigm of free flight. The paper includes an overview of research approaches, the airborne technologies under development, and a summary of experimental investigations and findings to date. Although research is not yet complete, these findings indicate that free flight is feasible and will significantly enhance system capacity and safety. While free flight cannot alone resolve the complex issues faced by those modernizing the global airspace, it should be considered an essential part of a comprehensive air traffic management modernization activity.

  11. Survey of Primary Flow Measurement Parameters at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatak, David J.

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the methods and locations used to measure the primary flow conditions in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was conducted during calibration activities following the facility conversion from a Freon-12 heavy-gas test medium to R-134a. A survey of stagnation pressure, plenum static pressure, and stagnation temperature was undertaken at many pertinent locations in the settling chamber, plenum, and contraction section of the wind tunnel and these measurements were compared to those of the existing primary flow measurement systems. Local flow velocities were measured in the settling chamber using a pitot probe. Results illustrate that small discrepancies exist between measured primary tunnel flow conditions and the survey measurements. These discrepancies in tunnel stagnation pressure, plenum pressure, and stagnation temperature were found to be approximately +/- 1-3 psf and 2-3 degrees Fahrenheit. The propagation of known instrument errors in measured primary flow conditions and its impact on tunnel Mach number, dynamic pressure, flow velocity, and Reynolds number have been investigated analytically and shown to require careful attention when considering the uncertainty in measured test section conditions.

  12. Measurements of Flow Turbulence in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesman, Carol D.; Sleeper, Robert K.

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the flow turbulence in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) was conducted during calibration activities following the facility conversion from a Freon-12 heavy-gas test medium to an R134a heavy-gas test medium. Total pressure, static pressure, and acoustic pressure levels were measured at several locations on a stingmounted rake. The test measured wall static pressures at several locations although this paper presents only those from one location. The test used two data acquisition systems, one sampling at 1000 Hz and the second sampling at 125 000 Hz, for acquiring time-domain data. This paper presents standard deviations and power spectral densities of the turbulence points throughout the wind tunnel envelope in air and R134a. The objective of this paper is to present the turbulence characteristics for the test section. No attempt is made to assess the causes of the turbulence. The present paper looks at turbulence in terms of pressure fluctuations. Reference 1 looked at tunnel turbulence in terms of velocity fluctuations.

  13. Lidar remote sensing of tropospheric pollutants and trace gases - Programs of NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is engaged in a number of in-house and contracted programs to develop, evaluate, and apply lidar techniques to remote measurements of pollutant gases, trace molecules, and aerosols. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) research programs include the development and evaluation of a UV DIAL system for remote measurements of SO2 and O3 concentrations and aerosol dispersion in urban and power-plant stack plumes, a near-IR DIAL system for vertical measurements of water vapor concentrations, and a high-power tunable IR DIAL system which will measure the concentration of gas species that have absorption features in the 1.4- to 4.4-micron wavelength range. The lidar programs which deal with aerosol measurements include the evaluation of a mobile ruby lidar system for use in plume dispersion model verification and the development of a high-spectral-resolution lidar system for measurement of aerosol extinction and backscattering coefficients. System characteristics and measurement sensitivities are discussed, and comparisons are made between simulations and experimental results.

  14. NASA Langley Research Center's Contributions to International Active Buffeting Alleviation Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. This buffeting is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. By means of wind-tunnel and flight tests, this phenomenon is well studied to the point that buffet loads can be estimated and fatigue life can be increased by structural enhancements to the airframe. In more recent years, buffeting alleviation through active control of smart materials has been highly researched in wind-tunnel proof-of-concept demonstrations and full-scale ground tests using the F/A-18 as a test bed. Because the F/A-18 resides in fleets outside as well as inside the United States, these tests have evolved into international collaborative research activities with Australia and Canada, coordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). With the recent successes and advances in smart materials, the main focus of these buffeting alleviation tests has also evolved to a new level: utilize the F/A-18 as a prototype to mature smart materials for suppressing vibrations of aerospace structures. The role of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in these programs is presented.

  15. Application of Pressure-Based Wall Correction Methods to Two NASA Langley Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, V.; Everhart, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a description and status report on the implementation and application of the WICS wall interference method to the National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the 14 x 22-ft subsonic wind tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The method calculates free-air corrections to the measured parameters and aerodynamic coefficients for full span and semispan models when the tunnels are in the solid-wall configuration. From a data quality point of view, these corrections remove predictable bias errors in the measurement due to the presence of the tunnel walls. At the NTF, the method is operational in the off-line and on-line modes, with three tests already computed for wall corrections. At the 14 x 22-ft tunnel, initial implementation has been done based on a test on a full span wing. This facility is currently scheduled for an upgrade to its wall pressure measurement system. With the addition of new wall orifices and other instrumentation upgrades, a significant improvement in the wall correction accuracy is expected.

  16. Climate Change Predictions and Adaption Strategies for Coastal NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change could significantly impact the personal and operations of federal coastal laboratories. The Goddard Institute for Space Studies has made downscaled climate projections for Hampton Roads, Virginia a coastal region which includes NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). These projections are being used to formulate adaptation and mitigation strategies to reduce climate change impacts at the center. Sea level rise and hurricanes will have significant impacts on LaRC and strategies such as surge modeling and tide gauge measurements and now underway. A proposed windbreak will reduce the impact of hurricane winds on center infrastructure. Disease vectors such as mosquitoes and ticks are being monitored and studied for their response to climate change. LaRC has significant forest and ecosystems which will be impacted by climate change and these impacts are being quantified. Mitigation strategies are being proposed such as the design of a 3 MW solar photovoltaic array to protect the center from brownouts and loss of power to critical missions. These and other programs will be discussed to reduce climate change impacts and allow LaRC to accomplish its mission into the next century.

  17. Open Architecture Data System for NASA Langley Combined Loads Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightfoot, Michael C.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    The Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) is a new structures test complex that is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to test large curved panels and cylindrical shell structures. These structural components are representative of aircraft fuselage sections of subsonic and supersonic transport aircraft and cryogenic tank structures of reusable launch vehicles. Test structures are subjected to combined loading conditions that simulate realistic flight load conditions. The facility consists of two pressure-box test machines and one combined loads test machine. Each test machine possesses a unique set of requirements or research data acquisition and real-time data display. Given the complex nature of the mechanical and thermal loads to be applied to the various research test articles, each data system has been designed with connectivity attributes that support both data acquisition and data management functions. This paper addresses the research driven data acquisition requirements for each test machine and demonstrates how an open architecture data system design not only meets those needs but provides robust data sharing between data systems including the various control systems which apply spectra of mechanical and thermal loading profiles.

  18. NASA Langley and AF RADC high-speed fiber optic transceiver program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.; Cook, Anthony L.; Mack, Terry L.; Hunter, James R.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley and the USAF Rome Air Development Center have been pursuing the development of military- and space-qualified fiber optic transceivers for a variety of ground-based, space-based, and general avionic applications. An initial development pursued a design called the multipurpose fiber optic transceiver (MFOX) and provided a family of fiber optic transceivers which operated up to 1 Gb/s. Currently, a second generation of high-speed fiber optic transceivers (HSFOX) is being developed. This design will utilize an all-integrated-circuits approach in order to develop a lighter-weight, smaller-size, and more efficient transceiver. The high-speed fiber optic transceiver will be military-and-space-operating in the 0.05-5 Gb/s data rate range. The initial results of tests, performance, and availability of commercial high-speed all-integrated-circuit chipsets for fiber-optic transceivers are discussed, as well as the performance of transceivers fabricated from these chipsets.

  19. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  20. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

  1. Characterization of the Reverberation Chamber at the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 the noise generating capabilities in the reverberation chamber of the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center were enhanced with two fiberglass reinforced polyester resin exponential horns, each coupled to Wyle Acoustic Source WAS-3000 airstream modulators. This report describes the characterization of the reverberation chamber in terms of the background noise, diffusivity, sound pressure levels, the reverberation times and the related overall acoustic absorption in the empty chamber and with the acoustic horn(s) installed. The frequency range of interest includes the 80 Hz to 8000 Hz one-third octave bands. Reverberation time and sound pressure level measurements were conducted and standard deviations from the mean were computed. It was concluded that a diffuse field could be produced above the Schroeder frequency in the 400 Hz one-third octave band and higher for all applications. This frequency could be lowered by installing panel diffusers or moving vanes to improve the acoustic modal overlap in the chamber. In the 80 Hz to 400 Hz one-third octave bands a successful measurement will be dependent on the type of measurement, the test configuration, the source and microphone locations and the desired accuracy. It is recommended that qualification measurements endorsed in the International Standards be conducted for each particular application.

  2. NASA Langley Research Center Systems Analysis & Concepts Directorate Participation in the Exploration Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, Jennifer; Troutman, Patrick A.; Saucillo, Rudolph; Cirillo, William M.; Cavanaugh, Steve; Stromgren, Chel

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Systems Analysis & Concepts Directorate (SACD) began studying human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) in the year 1999. This included participation in NASA s Decadal Planning Team (DPT), the NASA Exploration Team (NExT), Space Architect studies and Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) architecture studies that were used in formulating the new Vision for Space Exploration. In May of 2005, NASA initiated the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS). The primary outputs of the ESAS activity were concepts and functional requirements for the Crewed Exploration Vehicle (CEV), its supporting launch vehicle infrastructure and identification of supporting technology requirements and investments. An exploration systems analysis capability has evolved to support these functions in the past and continues to evolve to support anticipated future needs. SACD had significant roles in supporting the ESAS study team. SACD personnel performed the liaison function between the ESAS team and the Shuttle/Station Configuration Options Team (S/SCOT), an agency-wide team charged with using the Space Shuttle to complete the International Space Station (ISS) by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. The most significant of the identified issues involved the ability of the Space Shuttle system to achieve the desired number of flights in the proposed time frame. SACD with support from the Kennedy Space Center performed analysis showing that, without significant investments in improving the shuttle processing flow, that there was almost no possibility of completing the 28-flight sequence by the end of 2010. SACD performed numerous Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) trades to define top level element requirements and establish architecture propellant needs. Configuration trades were conducted to determine the impact of varying degrees of segmentation of the living capabilities of the combined descent stage, ascent stage, and other

  3. Employee Communication at the NASA Langley Research Center. M.S. Thesis - Coll. of William and Mary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendura, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The means of employee communication at the NASA Langley Research Center are reported, and their effectiveness evaluated. The history, purpose, and structure of the organization as well as the employee educational background and salary status are discussed. Some of the approaches used by Langley Research Center management in communicating with their men are addressed and compared with recommendations of experts in employee communication. The results of personal interviews involving both employee and management assessment of management-employee communication are presented and evaluated. Employees need a great deal more recommunication from management providing rationale behind the cancellation of existing projects or the disapproval of proposed research projects. Also NASA management needs to establish a policy and guidelines for the rapid and simultaneous dissemination of all non-restricted information to employees during organizational activities having potential adverse effects on large numbers of personnel. Finally some improvements should be made in employee orientation procedures.

  4. Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies - STARBUKS In the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2014-01-01

    Several upgrade projects have been completed at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility over the last 1.5 years in an effort defined as STARBUKS - Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies. This multi-year effort was undertaken to improve NTF's overall capabilities by addressing Accuracy and Validation, Productivity, and Reliability areas at the NTF. This presentation will give a brief synopsis of each of these efforts.

  5. Vapor-screen flow-visualization experiments in the NASA Langley 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, G. V.

    1986-01-01

    The vortical flow on the leeward side of a delta-wing model has been visualized at several different tunnel conditions in the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel using a vapor-screen flow-visualization technique. Vapor-screen photographs of the subject flow field are presented and interpreted relative to phenomenological implications. Results indicate that the use of nitrogen fog in conjunction with the vapor-screen technique is feasibile.

  6. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley vortex lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 2: Source code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, H. E.; Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The source code for the latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice Computer Program is presented. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  7. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Herbert, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    The latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley vortex lattice computer program is summarized. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  8. Design and Evaluation of Modifications to the NASA Langley Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    The need to minimize fan noise radiation from commercial aircraft engine nacelles continues to provide an impetus for developing new acoustic liner concepts. If the full value of such concepts is to be attained, an understanding of grazing flow effects is crucial. Because of this need for improved understanding of grazing flow effects, the NASA Langley Research Center Liner Physics Group has invested a large effort over the past decade into the development of a 2-D finite element method that characterizes wave propagation through a lined duct. The original test section in the Langley Grazing IncidenceTube was used to acquire data needed for implementation of this finite element method. This test section employed a stepper motor-driven axial-traversing bar, embedded in the wall opposite the test liner, to position a flush-mounted microphone at pre-selected locations. Complex acoustic pressure data acquired with this traversing microphone were used to educe the acoustic impedance of test liners using this 2-D finite element method and a local optimization technique. Results acquired in this facility have been extensively reported, and were compared with corresponding results from various U.S. aeroacoustics laboratories in the late 1990 s. Impedance data comparisons acquired from this multi-laboratory study suggested that it would be valuable to incorporate more realistic 3-D aeroacoustic effects into the impedance eduction methodology. This paper provides a description of modifications that have been implemented to facilitate studies of 3-D effects. The two key features of the modified test section are (1) the replacement of the traversing bar and its flush-mounted microphone with an array of 95 fixed-location microphones that are flush-mounted in all four walls of the duct, and (2) the inclusion of a suction device to modify the boundary layer upstream of the lined portion of the duct. The initial results achieved with the modified test section are provided in this

  9. Joint NASA Ames/Langley Experimental Evaluation of Integrated Air/Ground Operations for En Route Free Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal; Battiste, Vernol; Doble, Nathan; Johnson, Walter; Lee, Paul; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating a new concept of operations known as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). Under the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM, appropriately equipped autonomous aircraft self separate from other autonomous aircraft and from managed aircraft that continue to fly under today s Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Controllers provide separation services between IFR aircraft and assign traffic flow management constraints to all aircraft. To address concept feasibility issues pertaining to integrated air/ground operations at various traffic levels, NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers conducted a joint human-in-the-loop experiment. Professional airline pilots and air traffic controllers flew a total of 16 scenarios under four conditions: mixed autonomous/managed operations at three traffic levels and a baseline all-managed condition at the lowest traffic level. These scenarios included en route flights and descents to a terminal area meter fix in airspace modeled after the Dallas Ft. Worth area. Pilots of autonomous aircraft met controller assigned meter fix constraints with high success. Separation violations by subject pilots did not appear to vary with traffic level and were mainly attributable to software errors and procedural lapses. Controller workload was lower for mixed flight conditions, even at higher traffic levels. Pilot workload was deemed acceptable under all conditions. Controllers raised several safety concerns, most of which pertained to the occurrence of near-term conflicts between autonomous and managed aircraft. These issues are being addressed through better compatibility between air and ground systems and refinements to air and ground procedures.

  10. Increasing Access to Atmospheric Science Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Bethea, K. L.; LaPan, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Directorate (SD) at NASA's Langley Research Center conducts cutting edge research in fundamental atmospheric science topics including radiation and climate, air quality, active remote sensing, and upper atmospheric composition. These topics matter to the public, as they improve our understanding of our home planet. Thus, we have had ongoing efforts to improve public access to the results of our research. These efforts have accelerated with the release of the February OSTP memo. Our efforts can be grouped in two main categories: 1. Visual presentation techniques to improve science understanding: For fundamental concepts such as the Earth's energy budget, we have worked to display information in a more "digestible" way for lay audiences with more pictures and fewer words. These audiences are iPad-lovers and TV-watchers with shorter attention spans than audiences of the past. They are also educators and students who need a basic understanding of a concept delivered briefly to fit into busy classroom schedules. We seek to reach them with a quick, visual message packed with important information. This presentation will share several examples of visual techniques, such as infographics (e.g., a history of lidar at Langley and a timeline of atmospheric research, ozone garden diagrams (http://science-edu.larc.nasa.gov/ozonegarden/ozone-cycle.php); history of lidar at LaRC; DISCOVER-AQ maps. It will also share examples of animations and interactive graphics (DISCOVER-AQ); and customized presentations (e.g., to explain the energy budget or to give a general overview of research). One of the challenges we face is a required culture shift between the way scientists traditionally share knowledge with each other and the way these public audiences ingest knowledge. A cross-disciplinary communications team in SD is crucial to bridge that gap. 2. Lay research summaries to make research more accessible: Peer-reviewed publications are a primary product of the SD, with more

  11. Crafting Flight: Aircraft Pioneers and the Contributions of the Men and Women of NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, James

    2003-01-01

    While this is a self-contained history of NASA Langley Research Center's contributions to flight, many other organizations around the country played a vital role in the work described in this book.When you pass through the front gates of NASA Langley Research Center you are entering an extraordinary place. You could easily miss that fact, however. A few years cross-state bicycle tour passed through the Center. As interesting as looping around Center was, the riders observed that nothing about the vaguely industrial site fit the conventional stereotypes of what high tech looks like. NASA Langley does not fit many stereotypes. It takes a close examination to discover the many ways it has contributed to development of flight. As part of the national celebrations commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Wright brothers first flight, James Schultz, an experienced journalist with a gift for translating the language of engineers and scientists into prose that nonspecialists can comprehend, has revised and expanded Winds of Change , his wonderful guide to the Center. This revised book, Crafting Flight , invites you inside. You will read about one of the Nation s oldest research and development facilities, a place of imagination and ingenuity.

  12. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  13. Nasa-wide Standard Administrative Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneck, P.

    1984-01-01

    Factors to be considered in developing agency-wide standard administrative systems for NASA include uniformity of hardware and software; centralization vs. decentralization; risk exposure; and models for software development.

  14. NASA Administrator Flies Dream Chaser Simulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden had the opportunity to fly a simulated landing of the Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Dream Chaser while touring the agency's Dryden Flight Research Center in Cali...

  15. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  16. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  17. Biomimetics for NASA Langley Research Center: Year 2000 Report of Findings From a Six-Month Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Anders, John B., Jr.; Cox, David E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Fox, Robert L.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    This report represents an attempt to see if some of the techniques biological systems use to maximize their efficiency can be applied to the problems NASA faces in aeronautics and space exploration. It includes an internal survey of resources available at NASA Langley Research Center for biomimetics research efforts, an external survey of state of the art in biomimetics covering the Materials, Structures, Aerodynamics, Guidance and Controls areas. The Biomimetics Planning team also included ideas for potential research areas, as well as recommendations on how to implement this new program. This six-month survey was conducted in the second half of 1999.

  18. Curation of Federally Owned Archeological Collections at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, John Arnold (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    As a Federal agency, NASA has a moral and legal obligation to the public to manage the archeological heritage resources under its control. Archeological sites are unique, nonrenewable resources that must be preserved so that future generations may experience and interpret the material remains of the past. These sites are protected by a wide array of federal regulations. These regulations are intended to ensure that our nation's cultural heritage is preserved for the study and enjoyment of future generations. Once a site has been excavated, all that remains of it are the artifacts and associated records which, taken together, allow researchers to reconstruct the past. With the contextual information provided by associated records such as field notes, maps and photographs, archeological collections can provide important information about life in the past. An integral component of the federal archeology program is the curation of these databases so that qualified scholars will have access to them in years to come. Standards for the maintenance of archeological collections have been codified by various professional organizations and by the federal government. These guidelines focus on providing secure, climate-controlled archival storage conditions for the collections and an adequate study area in which researchers can examine the artifacts and documents. In the 1970's and early 1980's, a group of NASA employees formed the LRC Historical and Archeological Society (LRCHAS) in order to pursue studies of the colonial plantations that ha been displaced by Langley Research Center (LaRC). They collected data on family histories and land ownership as well as conducting archeological surveys and excavations at two important 17th-20th century plantation sites in LaRC, Cloverdale and Chesterville. The excavations produced a wealth of information in the form of artifacts, photographs, maps and other documents. Unfortunately, interest on the part of the LRCHAS membership waned

  19. Report on Recent Upgrades to the Curved Duct Test Rig at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) is an experimental facility that is designed to assess the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nacelle liners in close to full scale. The test section is between 25% and 100% of the scale of aft bypass ducts of aircraft engines ranging in size from business jet to large commercial passenger jet. The CDTR has been relocated and now shares space with the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube in the Liner Technology Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. As a result of the relocation, research air is supplied to the CDTR from a 50,000 cfm centrifugal fan. This new air supply enables testing of acoustic liner samples at up to Mach 0.500. This paper documents experiments and analysis on a baseline liner sample, which the authors had analyzed and reported on prior to the move to the new facility. In the present paper, the experimental results are compared to those obtained previously in order to ensure continuity of the experimental capability. Experiments that take advantage of the facility s expanded capabilities are also reported. Data analysis features that enhance understanding of the physical properties of liner performance are introduced. The liner attenuation is shown to depend on the mode that is incident on the liner test section. The relevant parameter is the mode cut-on ratio, which determines the angle at which the sound wave is incident on the liner surface. The scattering of energy from the incident mode into higher order, less attenuated modes is demonstrated. The configuration of the acoustic treatment, in this case lined on one surface and hard wall on the opposite surface, is shown to affect the mode energy redistribution.

  20. Experimental Investigations of the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnel (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5 million for five different configurations at both wind tunnels. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained in both facilities but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Nacelle/pylon, tail effects and tunnel to tunnel variations have been assessed. The data from both wind tunnels show that an addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5 and that the tail effects also follow the expected trends. Also, all of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability. The tunnel to tunnel differences are negligible for lift and pitching moment, while the drag shows a difference of less than ten counts for all of the configurations. These differences in drag may be due to the variation in the sting mounting systems at the two tunnels.

  1. Test Capability Enhancements to the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvin, S. F.; Cabell, K. F.; Gallimore, S. D.; Mekkes, G. L.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel produces true enthalpy environments simulating flight from Mach 4 to Mach 7, primarily for airbreathing propulsion and aerothermal/thermo-structural testing. Flow conditions are achieved through a methane-air heater and nozzles producing aerodynamic Mach numbers of 4, 5 or 7 and have exit diameters of 8 feet or 4.5 feet. The 12-ft long free-jet test section, housed inside a 26-ft vacuum sphere, accommodates large test articles. Recently, the facility underwent significant upgrades to support hydrocarbon fueled scramjet engine testing and to expand flight simulation capability. The upgrades were required to meet engine system development and flight clearance verification requirements originally defined by the joint NASA-Air Force X-43C Hypersonic Flight Demonstrator Project and now the Air Force X-51A Program. Enhancements to the 8-Ft. HTT were made in four areas: 1) hydrocarbon fuel delivery; 2) flight simulation capability; 3) controls and communication; and 4) data acquisition/processing. The upgrades include the addition of systems to supply ethylene and liquid JP-7 to test articles; a Mach 5 nozzle with dynamic pressure simulation capability up to 3200 psf, the addition of a real-time model angle-of-attack system; a new programmable logic controller sub-system to improve process controls and communication with model controls; the addition of MIL-STD-1553B and high speed data acquisition systems and a classified data processing environment. These additions represent a significant increase to the already unique test capability and flexibility of the facility, and complement the existing array of test support hardware such as a model injection system, radiant heaters, six-component force measurement system, and optical flow field visualization hardware. The new systems support complex test programs that require sophisticated test sequences and precise management of process fluids. Furthermore, the new systems, such

  2. Uncertainty Reduction using Bayesian Inference and Sensitivity Analysis: A Sequential Approach to the NASA Langley Uncertainty Quantification Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankararaman, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for uncertainty characterization and propagation, and sensitivity analysis under the presence of aleatory and epistemic un- certainty, and develops a rigorous methodology for efficient refinement of epistemic un- certainty by identifying important epistemic variables that significantly affect the overall performance of an engineering system. The proposed methodology is illustrated using the NASA Langley Uncertainty Quantification Challenge (NASA-LUQC) problem that deals with uncertainty analysis of a generic transport model (GTM). First, Bayesian inference is used to infer subsystem-level epistemic quantities using the subsystem-level model and corresponding data. Second, tools of variance-based global sensitivity analysis are used to identify four important epistemic variables (this limitation specified in the NASA-LUQC is reflective of practical engineering situations where not all epistemic variables can be refined due to time/budget constraints) that significantly affect system-level performance. The most significant contribution of this paper is the development of the sequential refine- ment methodology, where epistemic variables for refinement are not identified all-at-once. Instead, only one variable is first identified, and then, Bayesian inference and global sensi- tivity calculations are repeated to identify the next important variable. This procedure is continued until all 4 variables are identified and the refinement in the system-level perfor- mance is computed. The advantages of the proposed sequential refinement methodology over the all-at-once uncertainty refinement approach are explained, and then applied to the NASA Langley Uncertainty Quantification Challenge problem.

  3. Characterization of the NASA Langley Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility Using NO PLIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, F. Gray, III; Narayanaswamy, Venkateswaran; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Cabell, Karen F.; Hass, Neal E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; Johansen, Criag T.

    2014-01-01

    The nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging was used to characterize the air flow of the NASA Langley Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) configured with a Mach 6 nozzle. The arc raises the enthalpy of the test gas in AHSTF, producing nitric oxide. Nitric oxide persists as the temperature drops through the nozzle into the test section. NO PLIF was used to qualitatively visualize the flowfield at different experimental conditions, measure the temperature of the gas flow exiting the facility nozzle, and visualize the wave structure downstream of the nozzle at different operating conditions. Uniformity and repeatability of the nozzle flow were assessed. Expansion and compression waves on the free-jet shear layer as the nozzle flow expands into the test section were visualized. The main purpose of these experiments was to assess the uniformity of the NO in the freestream gas for planned experiments, in which NO PLIF will be used for qualitative fuel-mole-fraction sensitive imaging. The shot-to-shot fluctuations in the PLIF signal, caused by variations in the overall laser intensity as well as NO concentration and temperature variations in the flow was 20-25% of the mean signal, as determined by taking the standard deviation of a set of images obtained at constant conditions and dividing by the mean. The fluctuations within individual images, caused by laser sheet spatial variations as well as NO concentration and temperature variations in the flow, were about 28% of the mean in images, determined by taking standard deviation within individual images, dividing by the mean in the same image and averaged over the set of images. Applying an averaged laser sheet intensity correction reduced the within-image intensity fluctuations to about 10% suggesting that the NO concentration is uniform to within 10%. There was no significant difference in flow uniformity between the low and high enthalpy settings. While not strictly quantitative, the

  4. Advanced turboprop noise prediction: Development of a code at NASA Langley based on recent theoretical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Padula, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a high speed propeller noise prediction code at Langley Research Center is described. The code utilizes two recent acoustic formulations in the time domain for subsonic and supersonic sources. The structure and capabilities of the code are discussed. Grid size study for accuracy and speed of execution on a computer is also presented. The code is tested against an earlier Langley code. Considerable increase in accuracy and speed of execution are observed. Some examples of noise prediction of a high speed propeller for which acoustic test data are available are given. A brisk derivation of formulations used is given in an appendix.

  5. Earth Science Data and Applications for K-16 Education from the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, C. S.; Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate aims to stimulate public interest in Earth system science and to encourage young scholars to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at Langley Research Center houses over 700 data sets related to Earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry that are being produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influence global climate change. However, barriers still exist in the use of these actual satellite observations by educators in the classroom to supplement the educational process. Thus, NASA is sponsoring the "Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs" (MY NASA DATA) project to systematically support educational activities by reducing the ASDC data holdings to `microsets' that can be easily accessible and explored by the K-16 educators and students. The microsets are available via Web site (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) with associated lesson plans, computer tools, data information pages, and a science glossary. A MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) has been populated with ASDC data such that users can create custom microsets online for desired time series, parameters and geographical regions. The LAS interface is suitable for novice to advanced users, teachers or students. The microsets may be visual representations of data or text output for spreadsheet analysis. Currently, over 148 parameters from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), Surface Radiation Budget (SRB), Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are available and provide important information on clouds, fluxes and cycles in the Earth system. Additionally, a MY NASA DATA OPeNDAP server has been established to facilitate file transfer of

  6. The Orbit-on-Demand and Shuttle II Studies at NASA Langley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James A.; Eldred, Charles H.

    1987-04-01

    This paper reviews advanced space transportation studies that have been conducted at the Langley Research Center recently. The Orbit-on-Demand Vehicle Study focused on concepts capable of rapid launch. The Shuttle II Study considered concepts with the potential to reduce the cost of transportation to orbit for payloads in the Shuttle class or less.

  7. Publications in acoustic and noise control from NASA Langley Research Center during 1940-1979. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, B. A. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Reference lists of approximately 900 published Langley Research Center reports in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1979 are presented. Specific topic areas covered include: duct acoustics; propagation and operations; rotating blade noise; jet noise; sonic boom; flow surface interaction noise; structural response/interior noise; human response; and noise prediction.

  8. Strain Gauge Balance Calibration and Data Reduction at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, A. T. Judy

    1999-01-01

    This paper will cover the standard force balance calibration and data reduction techniques used at Langley Research Center. It will cover balance axes definition, balance type, calibration instrumentation, traceability of standards to NIST, calibration loading procedures, balance calibration mathematical model, calibration data reduction techniques, balance accuracy reporting, and calibration frequency.

  9. Calibration and Data Retrieval Algorithms for the NASA Langley/Ames Diode Laser Hygrometer for the NASA Trace-P Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolske, James R.; Sachse, Glen W.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Hipskino, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures and algorithms for the laboratory calibration and the field data retrieval of the NASA Langley / Ames Diode Laser Hygrometer as implemented during the NASA Trace-P mission during February to April 2000. The calibration is based on a NIST traceable dewpoint hygrometer using relatively high humidity and short pathlength. Two water lines of widely different strengths are used to increase the dynamic range of the instrument in the course of a flight. The laboratory results are incorporated into a numerical model of the second harmonic spectrum for each of the two spectral window regions using spectroscopic parameters from the HITRAN database and other sources, allowing water vapor retrieval at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperatures and humidity levels. The data retrieval algorithm is simple, numerically stable, and accurate. A comparison with other water vapor instruments on board the NASA DC-8 and ER-2 aircraft is presented.

  10. CEAS/AIAA/ICASE/NASA Langley International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics 1999. Pt. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jr., Woodrow (Editor); Todd, Emily N. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Confederation of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, D.C., and the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE), Hampton, Virginia, and held in Williamsburg, Virginia June 22-25, 1999 represent a collection of the latest advances in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics from the world community. Research in the areas of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity, structural modeling and optimization, active control and adaptive structures, landing dynamics, certification and qualification, and validation testing are highlighted in the collection of papers. The wide range of results will lead to advances in the prediction and control of the structural response of aircraft and spacecraft.

  11. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithms for the Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Ray, Taylor J.

    2013-01-01

    Two versions of airborne wind profiling algorithms for the pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. Each algorithm utilizes different number of line-of-sight (LOS) lidar returns while compensating the adverse effects of different coordinate systems between the aircraft and the Earth. One of the two algorithms APOLO (Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind Lidar) estimates wind products using two LOSs. The other algorithm utilizes five LOSs. The airborne lidar data were acquired during the NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010. The wind profile products from the two algorithms are compared with the dropsonde data to validate their results.

  12. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav

    2002-01-01

    The program objectives were defined in the original proposal entitled 'Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in the JIAFS at NASA Langley Research Center' which was originated March 20, 1975, and yearly renewals of the research program dated December 1, 1998 to December 31, 2002. The program included three major topics: 1) Improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for flight and wind tunnel data analysis based on system identification methodology; 2) Application of these methods to flight and wind tunnel data obtained from advanced aircraft; 3) Modeling and control of aircraft. The principal investigator of the program was Dr. Vladislav Klein, Professor Emeritus at The George Washington University, DC. Seven Graduate Research Scholar Assistants (GRSA) participated in the program. The results of the research conducted during four years of the total co-operative period were published in 2 NASA Technical Reports, 3 thesis and 3 papers. The list of these publications is included.

  13. An overview of the use of Open Source in the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Archive Next Generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, R. A.; Perez, J.; Piatko, P. J.; Coogan, S. P.; Parker, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for the archive and distribution of Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry. Over the past several years the ASDC has developed and implemented the Archive Next Generation (ANGe) system, a state-of-the-art data ingest, archival, and distribution system to serve the atmospheric sciences data provider and user communities. ANGe employs Open Source technologies including the JBoss Application Server, a PostGIS-enabled PostgreSQL database system to store geospatial metadata, modules from the GeoTools Open Source Java GIS Toolkit including the Java Topology Suite (JTS) and GeoAPI libraries, and other libraries such as the Spring framework. ANGe was developed using a suite of several Open Source tools comprised of Eclipse, Ant, Subversion and Jenkins. ANGe is also deployed into an operational environment that leverages Open Source technologies from the Linux Operating system to tools such as Ganglia for monitoring. This presentation provides an overview of ANGe with a focus on the Open Source technologies employed in the implementation and deployment of the system. The ASDC is part of Langley's Science Directorate. The Data Center was established in 1991 to support NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. It is unique among NASA data centers in the size of its archive, cutting edge computing technology, and full range of data services. For more information regarding ASDC data holdings, documentation, tools and services, visit http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov.

  14. Publications in acoustics and noise control from the NASA Langley Research Center during 1940 - 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. (Compiler); Laneave, J. N. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    This document contains reference lists of published Langley Research Center papers in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1974. The research work was performed either in-house by the center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Duct acoustics, (2) Propagation and operations, (3) Rotating blade noise, (4) Jet noise, (5) Sonic boom, (6) Flow-surface interaction noise, (7) Human response, and (8) Structural response.

  15. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil - Drag equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has designed a swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating Laminar Flow Control for testing at transonic speeds. Analytical expressions have been developed and an evaluation made of the experimental section drag, composed of suction drag and wake drag, using theoretical design information and experimental data. The analysis shows that, although the sweep-induced boundary-layer crossflow influence on the wake drag is too large to be ignored and there is not a practical method for evaluating these crossflow effects on the experimental wake data, the conventional unswept 2-D wake-drag computation used in the reduction of the experimental data is at worst 10 percent too high.

  16. Innovation in Flight: Research of the NASA Langley Research Center on Revolutionary Advanced Concepts for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Joseph R.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this publication is to provide an overview of the topic of revolutionary research in aeronautics at Langley, including many examples of research efforts that offer significant potential benefits, but have not yet been applied. The discussion also includes an overview of how innovation and creativity is stimulated within the Center, and a perspective on the future of innovation. The documentation of this topic, especially the scope and experiences of the example research activities covered, is intended to provide background information for future researchers.

  17. A New High Channel-Count, High Scan-Rate, Data Acquisition System for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Simmons, Scott A.; Babel, Walter C.; Collins, Jesse G.; Ramey, James M.; Heald, Dean M.

    2016-01-01

    A data acquisition system upgrade project, known as AB-DAS, is underway at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. AB-DAS will soon serve as the primary data system and will substantially increase the scan-rate capabilities and analog channel count while maintaining other unique aeroelastic and dynamic test capabilities required of the facility. AB-DAS is configurable, adaptable, and enables buffet and aeroacoustic tests by synchronously scanning all analog channels and recording the high scan-rate time history values for each data quantity. AB-DAS is currently available for use as a stand-alone data system with limited capabilities while development continues. This paper describes AB-DAS, the design methodology, and the current features and capabilities. It also outlines the future work and projected capabilities following completion of the data system upgrade project.

  18. The Data Acquisition and Control Systems of the Jet Noise Laboratory at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, B. J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The features of the data acquisition and control systems of the NASA Langley Research Center's Jet Noise Laboratory are presented. The Jet Noise Laboratory is a facility that simulates realistic mixed flow turbofan jet engine nozzle exhaust systems in simulated flight. The system is capable of acquiring data for a complete take-off assessment of noise and nozzle performance. This paper describes the development of an integrated system to control and measure the behavior of model jet nozzles featuring dual independent high pressure combusting air streams with wind tunnel flow. The acquisition and control system is capable of simultaneous measurement of forces, moments, static and dynamic model pressures and temperatures, and jet noise. The design concepts for the coordination of the control computers and multiple data acquisition computers and instruments are discussed. The control system design and implementation are explained, describing the features, equipment, and the experiences of using a primarily Personal Computer based system. Areas for future development are examined.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Flow about a 65 deg Delta Wing in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation for the flow about a 65 deg. delta wing has been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers, based on the mean aerodynamic chord, ranging from 6 million to 120 million and at Mach numbers ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. The model incorporated four different leading-edge bluntness values. The data include detailed static surfacepressure distributions as well as normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients. The test program was designed to quantify the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and leading-edge bluntness on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation.

  20. Exploratory study to induce fan noise in the test section of the NASA Langley full-scale wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.; Hayden, R. E.; Myles, M. M.; Murray, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    Measures to reduce the intensity of fan noise in the NASA Langley 30 ft x 60 ft subsonic wind tunnel were sought. Measurements were first performed to document existing aerodynamic and acoustic conditions. The purpose of these experiments was to (1) obtain the transfer function between the sound power output of the fan and the sound pressure on the test platform, (2) evaluate the sound attenuation around the tunnel circuit, (3) measure simultaneously the flow profile and the turbulence spectrum of the inflow to the fan and the noise on the test platform, and (4) perform flow observations and identify secondary noise sources. Subsequently, these data were used to predict (1) the relative contribution of the major aerodynamic parameters to total fan noise and (2) the effect of placing a dissipative silencer in the collector duct upstream of the fan. Promising noise control measures were identified and recommendations were made on how to evaluate them.

  1. Current Performance Characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Base and Standardized Test Procedure for Future Performance Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowen, Brandon; Stringer, Mary T.; Hutchinson, Brian K.; Davidson, Paul C.; Gupton, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the updated performance characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Cockpit Motion Base (CMB) after recent revisions that were made to its inner-loop, feedback control law. The modifications to the control law will be briefly described. The performance of the Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) will be presented. A short graphical comparison to the previous control law can be found in the appendix of this report. The revised controller will be shown to yield reduced parasitic accelerations with respect to the previous controller. Metrics based on the AGARD Advisory Report No. 144 are used to assess the overall system performance due to its recent control algorithm modification. This report also documents the standardized simulator test procedure which can be used in the future to evaluate potential updates to the control law.

  2. NASA Langley Research Center's Simulation-To-Flight Concept Accomplished through the Integration Laboratories of the Transport Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Debbie; Davidson, Paul C.; Kenney, P. Sean; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2004-01-01

    The Flight Simulation and Software Branch (FSSB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) maintains the unique national asset identified as the Transport Research Facility (TRF). The TRF is a group of facilities and integration laboratories utilized to support the LaRC's simulation-to-flight concept. This concept incorporates common software, hardware, and processes for both groundbased flight simulators and LaRC s B-757-200 flying laboratory identified as the Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES). These assets provide Government, industry, and academia with an efficient way to develop and test new technology concepts to enhance the capacity, safety, and operational needs of the ever-changing national airspace system. The integration of the TRF enables a smooth continuous flow of the research from simulation to actual flight test.

  3. A History of Full-Scale Aircraft and Rotorcraft Crash Testing and Simulation at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes 2-1/2 decades of full-scale aircraft and rotorcraft crash testing performed at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The IDRF is a 240-ft.-high steel gantry that was built originally as a lunar landing simulator facility in the early 1960's. It was converted into a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft in the early 1970 s. Since the first full-scale crash test was preformed in February 1974, the IDRF has been used to conduct: 41 full-scale crash tests of General Aviation (GA) aircraft including landmark studies to establish baseline crash performance data for metallic and composite GA aircraft; 11 full-scale crash tests of helicopters including crash qualification tests of the Bell and Sikorsky Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) prototypes; 48 Wire Strike Protection System (WSPS) qualification tests of Army helicopters; 3 vertical drop tests of Boeing 707 transport aircraft fuselage sections; and, 60+ crash tests of the F-111 crew escape module. For some of these tests, nonlinear transient dynamic codes were utilized to simulate the impact response of the airframe. These simulations were performed to evaluate the capabilities of the analytical tools, as well as to validate the models through test-analysis correlation. In September 2003, NASA Langley closed the IDRF facility and plans are underway to demolish it in 2007. Consequently, it is important to document the contributions made to improve the crashworthiness of light aircraft and rotorcraft achieved through full-scale crash testing and simulation at the IDRF.

  4. Flow Angularity Measurements in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation using a survey rake with 11 five-hole pyramid-head probes has been conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to measure the test section flow angularity. Flow measurements were made in a 10-ft square grid centered about the test section centerline at a single streamwise location for nine Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 1.19 at dynamic pressures of 100 and 225 pounds per square foot. Test section flow angularity was found to be minimal with a generally random flow pattern. Corrections for survey rake induced in-plane flow were determined to be necessary; however, corrections for rake induced lift effects were not required.

  5. Aeroelasticity matters: Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Testing of wind-tunnel aeroelastic models is a well established, widely used means of studying flutter trends, validating theory and investigating flutter margins of safety of new vehicle designs. The Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was designed specifically for work on dynamics and aeroelastic problems of aircraft and space vehicles. A cross section of aeroelastic research and testing in the facility since it became operational more than two decades ago is presented. Examples selected from a large store of experience illustrate the nature and purpose of some major areas of work performed in the tunnel. These areas include: specialized experimental techniques; development testing of new aircraft and launch vehicle designs; evaluation of proposed "fixes" to solve aeroelastic problems uncovered during development testing; study of unexpected aeroelastic phenomena (i.e., "surprises"); control of aeroelastic effects by active and passive means; and, finally, fundamental research involving measurement of unsteady pressures on oscillating wings and control surface.

  6. Possible safety hazards associated with the operation of the 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at the NASA Langley Research Center was built in 1973 as a facility intended to be used for no more than 60 hours in order to verify the validity of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept at transonic speeds. The role of the 0.3 m TCT has gradually changed until now, after over 3000 hours of operation, it is classified as a major NASA research facility and, under the administration of the Experimental Techniques Branch, it is used extensively for the testing of airfoils at high Reynolds numbers and for the development of various technologies related to the efficient operation and use of cryogenic wind tunnels. The purpose of this report is to document the results of a recent safety analysis of the 0.3 m TCT facility. This analysis was made as part of an on going program with the Experimental Techniques Branch designed to ensure that the existing equipment and current operating procedures of the 0.3 m TCT facility are acceptable in terms of today's standards of safety for cryogenic systems.

  7. NASA RECON: Course Development, Administration, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, W. D.; Roquemore, L.

    1984-01-01

    The R and D activities addressing the development, administration, and evaluation of a set of transportable, college-level courses to educate science and engineering students in the effective use of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems, and, in particular, in the use of the NASA RECON system, are discussed. The long-range scope and objectives of these contracted activities are overviewed and the progress which has been made toward these objectives during FY 1983-1984 is highlighted. In addition, the results of a survey of 237 colleges and universities addressing course needs are presented.

  8. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.; Player, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    A new supersonic retropropulsion experimental effort, intended to provide code validation data, was recently completed in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2 over the Mach number range from 2.4 to 4.6. The experimental model was designed using insights gained from pre-test computations, which were instrumental for sizing and refining the model to minimize tunnel wall interference and internal flow separation concerns. A 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a roughly 10-in long cylindrical aftbody was the baseline configuration selected for this study. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio supersonic nozzles. Primary measurements for this model were a large number of surface pressures on the forebody and aftbody. Supplemental data included high-speed Schlieren video and internal pressures and temperatures. The run matrix was developed to allow for the quantification of various sources of experimental uncertainty, such as random errors due to run-to-run variations and bias errors due to flow field or model misalignments. Preliminary results and observations from the test are presented, while detailed data and uncertainty analyses are ongoing.

  9. An overview of selected NASP aeroelastic studies at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Parker, Ellen C.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-10-01

    Following an initial discussion of the NASP flight environment, the results of recent aeroelastic testing of NASP-type highly swept delta-wing models in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) are summarized. Subsonic and transonic flutter characteristics of a variety of these models are described, and several analytical codes used to predict flutter of these models are evaluated. These codes generally provide good, but conservative predictions of subsonic and transonic flutter. Also, test results are presented on a nonlinear transonic phenomena known as aileron buzz which occurred in the wind tunnel on highly swept delta wings with full-span ailerons. An analytical procedure which assesses the effects of hypersonic heating on aeroelastic instabilities (aerothermoelasticity) is also described. This procedure accurately predicted flutter of a heated aluminum wing on which experimental data exists. Results are presented on the application of this method to calculate the flutter characteristics of a fine-element model of a generic NASP configuration. Finally, it is demonstrated analytically that active controls can be employed to improve the aeroelastic stability and ride quality of a generic NASP vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds.

  10. An overview of selected NASP aeroelastic studies at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Parker, Ellen C.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Following an initial discussion of the NASP flight environment, the results of recent aeroelastic testing of NASP-type highly swept delta-wing models in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) are summarized. Subsonic and transonic flutter characteristics of a variety of these models are described, and several analytical codes used to predict flutter of these models are evaluated. These codes generally provide good, but conservative predictions of subsonic and transonic flutter. Also, test results are presented on a nonlinear transonic phenomena known as aileron buzz which occurred in the wind tunnel on highly swept delta wings with full-span ailerons. An analytical procedure which assesses the effects of hypersonic heating on aeroelastic instabilities (aerothermoelasticity) is also described. This procedure accurately predicted flutter of a heated aluminum wing on which experimental data exists. Results are presented on the application of this method to calculate the flutter characteristics of a fine-element model of a generic NASP configuration. Finally, it is demonstrated analytically that active controls can be employed to improve the aeroelastic stability and ride quality of a generic NASP vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds.

  11. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS): Research Collaborations with the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarry, Scott E.; Bowen, Brent D.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.

    2002-01-01

    The aviation industry is an integral part of the world s economy. Travelers have consistently chosen aviation as their mode of transportation as it is reliable, time efficient and safe. The out- dated Hub and Spoke system, coupled with high demand, has led to delays, cancellations and gridlock. NASA is developing innovative solutions to these and other air transportation problems. This research is being conducted through partnerships with federal agencies, industry stakeholders, and academia, specifically the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Each collaborator is pursuing the NASA General Aviation Roadmap through their involvement in the expansion of the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). SATS will utilize technologically advanced small aircraft to transport travelers to and from rural and isolated communities. Additionally, this system will provide a safe alternative to the hub and spoke system, giving more time to more people through high-speed mobility and increased accessibility.

  12. Solar energy to heat and cool a new NASA Langley office building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system will be installed at a new NASA office building. The objective of this project is to establish a full-scale working test-bed facility to investigate solar energy for heating and cooling buildings. The energy collected will provide between 80 and 100 percent of the heating and cooling requirements during the cool months and between one-half and two-thirds of the cooling requirements in the summer. Thermal energy storage will be provided to bridge the gap between cloudy and clear days.

  13. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  14. Technical Capability Upgrades to the NASA Langley Research Center 6 ft. by 6 ft. Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornblom, Mark N.; Beverly, Joshua; O'Connell, Joseph J.; Mau, Johnny C.; Duncan, Dwight L.

    2014-01-01

    The 6 ft. by 6 ft. thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC), housed in Building 1250 at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and managed by the Systems Integration and Test Branch within the Engineering Directorate, has undergone several significant modifications to increase testing capability, safety, and quality of measurements of articles under environmental test. Significant modifications include: a new nitrogen thermal conditioning unit for controlling shroud temperatures from -150degC to +150degC; two horizontal auxiliary cold plates for independent temperature control from -150degC to +200degC; a suite of contamination monitoring sensors for outgassing measurements and species identification; signal and power feed-throughs; new pressure gauges; and a new data acquisition and control commanding system including safety interlocks. This presentation will provide a general overview of the LaRC 6 ft. by 6 ft. TVAC chamber, an overview of the new technical capabilities, and illustrate each upgrade in detail, in terms of mechanical design and predicted performance. Additionally, an overview of the scope of tests currently being performed in the chamber will be documented, and sensor plots from tests will be provided to show chamber temperature and pressure performance with actual flight hardware under test.

  15. An overview of the Software Development Process for the NASA Langley Atmospheric Data Center Archive Next Generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatko, P.; Perez, J.; Kinney, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for the archive and distribution of Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry. The ASDC has developed and implemented the Archive Next Generation (ANGe) system, a state-of-the-art data ingest, archival, and distribution system to serve the atmospheric sciences data provider and user communities. The ANGe project follows a software development process that covers the full life-cycle of the system, from initial requirements to deployment to production to long-term maintenance of the software. The project uses several tools to support the different stages of the process, such as Subversion for source code control, JIRA for change management, Confluence for documentation and collaboration, and Bamboo for continuous integration. Based on our experience with developing ANGe and other projects at the ASDC, we also provide support for local science projects by setting up Subversion repositories and tools such as Trac, and providing training and support on their use. An overview of the software development process and the tools used to support it will be presented.

  16. Crash Test of Three Cessna 172 Aircraft at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    During the summer of 2015, three Cessna 172 aircraft were crash tested at the Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The three tests simulated three different crash scenarios. The first simulated a flare-to-stall emergency or hard landing onto a rigid surface such as a road or runway, the second simulated a controlled flight into terrain with a nose down pitch on the aircraft, and the third simulated a controlled flight into terrain with an attempt to unsuccessfully recover the aircraft immediately prior to impact, resulting in a tail strike condition. An on-board data acquisition system captured 64 channels of airframe acceleration, along with acceleration and load in two onboard Hybrid II 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices, representing the pilot and co-pilot. Each test contained different airframe loading conditions and results show large differences in airframe performance. This paper presents test methods used to conduct the crash tests and will summarize the airframe results from the test series.

  17. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in the JIAFS, George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav

    2002-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled 'Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in GW at NASA Langley Research Center,' which was originated March 20, 1975, and in the renewals of the research program from December 1, 2000 to November 30, 2001. The program in its present form includes three major topics: 1) the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for wind tunnel and flight test data analysis, 2) the application of these methods to wind tunnel and flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes, 3) the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements, and theoretical predictions. The Principal Investigator of the program is Dr. Vladislav Klein. Three Graduate Research Scholar Assistants (K. G. Mas, M. M. Eissa and N. M. Szyba) also participated in the program. Specific developments in the program during the period Dec. 1, 2001 through Nov. 30, 2002 included: 1) Data analysis of highly swept delta wing aircraft from wind and water tunnel data, and 2) Aerodynamic characteristics of the radio control aircraft from flight test.

  18. Dynamic Deformation Measurements of an Aeroelastic Semispan Model. [conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques used to acquire, reduce, and analyze dynamic deformation measurements of an aeroelastic semispan wind tunnel model are presented. Single-camera, single-view video photogrammetry (also referred to as videogrammetric model deformation, or VMD) was used to determine dynamic aeroelastic deformation of the semispan 'Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation' (MAVRIC) model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. Dynamic deformation was determined from optical retroreflective tape targets at five semispan locations located on the wing from the root to the tip. Digitized video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. Videogrammetric dynamic data were acquired at a 60-Hz rate for time records of up to 6 seconds during portions of this flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) test at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.96. Spectral analysis of the deformation data is used to identify dominant frequencies in the wing motion. The dynamic data will be used to separate aerodynamic and structural effects and to provide time history deflection data for Computational Aeroelasticity code evaluation and validation.

  19. Space Launch System Liftoff and Transition Aerodynamic Characterization in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Erickson, Gary E.; Paulson, John W.; Tomek, William G.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.

    2015-01-01

    A 1.75% scale force and moment model of the Space Launch System was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to quantify the aerodynamic forces that will be experienced by the launch vehicle during its liftoff and transition to ascent flight. The test consisted of two parts: the first was dedicated to measuring forces and moments for the entire range of angles of attack (0deg to 90deg) and roll angles (0 deg. to 360 deg.). The second was designed to measure the aerodynamic effects of the liftoff tower on the launch vehicle for ground winds from all azimuthal directions (0 deg. to 360 deg.), and vehicle liftoff height ratios from 0 to 0.94. This wind tunnel model also included a set of 154 surface static pressure ports. Details on the experimental setup, and results from both parts of testing are presented, along with a description of how the wind tunnel data was analyzed and post-processed in order to develop an aerodynamic database. Finally, lessons learned from experiencing significant dynamics in the mid-range angles of attack due to steady asymmetric vortex shedding are presented.

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 58; Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this paper, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as (1) the order in which report components are read, (2) components used to determine if a report would be read, (3) those components that could be deleted, (4) the placement of such components as the symbols list, (e) the de-sirability of a table of contents, (5) the format of reference citations, (6) column layout and right margin treatment, and (7) and person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 65: Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this article, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as: (a) the order in which report components are read; (b) components used to determine if a report would be read; (c) those components that could be deleted; (d) the placement of such components as the symbols list; (e) the desirability of a table of contents; (f) the format of reference citations; (g) column layout and right margin treatment; and (h) writing style in terms of person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  2. User guide for the digital control system of the NASA/Langley Research Center's 13-inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1987-01-01

    The technical background to the development of the digital control system of the NASA/Langley Research Center's 13 inch Magnetic Supension and Balance Systen (MSBS) is reviewed. The implementation of traditional MSBS control algorithms in digital form is examined. Extensive details of the 13-inch MSBS digital controller and related hardware are given, together with the introductory instructions for systems operators. Full listings of software are included in the Appendices.

  3. Reevaluation of the NOAA/CMDL carbon monoxide reference scale and comparisons with CO reference gases at NASA-Langley and the Fraunhofer Institut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novelli, P. C.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Myers, R. C.; Sachse, G. W.; Scheel, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon monoxide (CO) reference scale created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) is used to quantify measurements of CO in the atmosphere, calibrate standards of other laboratories and to otherwise provide reference gases to the community measuring atmospheric CO. This reference scale was created based upon a set of primary standards prepared by gravimetric methods at CMDL and has been propagated to a set of working standards. In this paper we compare CO mixing ratios assigned to the working standards by three approaches: (1) calibration against the original gravimetric standards, (2) calibration using only working standards as the reference gas, and (3) calibration against three new gravimetric standards prepared to CMDL. The agreement between these values was typically better than 1%. The calibration histories of CMDL working standards are reviewed with respect to expected rates of CO change in the atmosphere. Using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of drifting standards on calculated mixing ratios, we conclude that the error solely associated with the maintenance of standards will limit the ability to detect small CO changes in the atmosphere. We also report results of intercalibration experiments conducted between CMDL and the Diode Laser Sensor Group (DACOM) at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia), and CMDL and the Fraunhofer-Institut (Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany). Each laboratory calibrated several working standards for CO using their reference gases, and these results were compared to calibrations conducted by CMDL. The intercomparison of eight standards (CO concentrations between approximately 100 and approximately 165 ppb) by CMDL and NASA agreed to better than +/- 2%. The calibration of six standards (CO concentrations between approximately 50 and approximately 210 ppb) by CMDL and the Fraunhofer-Institut agreed to within +/- 2% for four

  4. The NASA-Langley Wake Vortex Modelling Effort in Support of an Operational Aircraft Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1998-01-01

    Two numerical modelling efforts, one using a large eddy simulation model and the other a numerical weather prediction model, are underway in support of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity program. The large-eddy simulation model (LES) has a meteorological framework and permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, humidity, and atmospheric turbulence. Results from the numerical simulations are being used to assist in the development of algorithms for an operational wake-vortex aircraft spacing system. A mesoscale weather forecast model is being adapted for providing operational forecast of winds, temperature, and turbulence parameters to be used in the terminal area. This paper describes the goals and modelling approach, as well as achievements obtained to date. Simulation results will be presented from the LES model for both two and three dimensions. The 2-D model is found to be generally valid for studying wake vortex transport, while the 3-D approach is necessary for realistic treatment of decay via interaction of wake vortices and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Meteorology is shown to have an important affect on vortex transport and decay. Presented are results showing that wake vortex transport is unaffected by uniform fog or rain, but wake vortex transport can be strongly affected by nonlinear vertical change in the ambient crosswind. Both simulation and observations show that atmospheric vortices decay from the outside with minimal expansion of the core. Vortex decay and the onset three-dimensional instabilities are found to be enhanced by the presence of ambient turbulence.

  5. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  6. Current state and future direction of computer systems at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L. (Editor); Tucker, Jerry H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Computer systems have advanced at a rate unmatched by any other area of technology. As performance has dramatically increased there has been an equally dramatic reduction in cost. This constant cost performance improvement has precipitated the pervasiveness of computer systems into virtually all areas of technology. This improvement is due primarily to advances in microelectronics. Most people are now convinced that the new generation of supercomputers will be built using a large number (possibly thousands) of high performance microprocessors. Although the spectacular improvements in computer systems have come about because of these hardware advances, there has also been a steady improvement in software techniques. In an effort to understand how these hardware and software advances will effect research at NASA LaRC, the Computer Systems Technical Committee drafted this white paper to examine the current state and possible future directions of computer systems at the Center. This paper discusses selected important areas of computer systems including real-time systems, embedded systems, high performance computing, distributed computing networks, data acquisition systems, artificial intelligence, and visualization.

  7. Curriculum in aerospace science and technology in cooperation with NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner-Gilchrist, Cathine

    1988-01-01

    A curriculum was written to show teachers how to best use the many resources that are available at the Teacher Resource Center (TRC). This curriculum packet was written using teaching units that teachers in both the elementary and middle schools can use to help students better understand some of the research that has been conducted at NASA and will be conducted in the future. The units are written with certain standards. Each unit contains: (1) specific objectives, using the Virginia standards of learning; (2) the materials that are available from the TRC; (3) many activities that teachers can use in a variety of ways; and (4) specific strategies for measuring the objectives to determine if the students mastered the knowledge, concepts or skills that were taught. The curriculum packet contains specific units on several topics. They are: (1) Careers in Aerospece Science and Technology; (2) The History of Flight; (3) The History of Satellites; (4) The History of the Manned Space Projects and the Future of the Future of the Space Program; (5) The Solar System; and (6) The History of Rockets.

  8. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD): Common Variable Naming Schema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Peeters, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has conducted airborne tropospheric chemistry studies for about three decades. These field campaigns have generated a great wealth of observations, which are characterized by a wide range of trace gases and aerosol properties. The airborne observational data have often been used in assessment and validation of models and satellite instruments. One particular issue is a lack of consistent variable naming across field campaigns, which makes cross-mission data discovery difficult. The ASDC Toolset for Airborne Data (TAD) is being designed to meet the user community needs for manipulating aircraft data for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. As part of this effort, a common naming system was developed to provide a link between variables from different aircraft field studies. This system covers all current and past airborne in-situ measurements housed at the ASDC, as well as select NOAA missions. The TAD common variable naming system consists of 6 categories and 3 sub-levels. The top-level category is primarily defined by the physical characteristics of the measurement: e.g., aerosol, cloud, trace gases. The sub-levels were designed to organize the variables according to nature of measurement (e.g., aerosol microphysical and optical properties) or chemical structures (e.g., carbon compound). The development of the TAD common variable naming system was in consultation with staff from the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and referenced/expanded the existing Climate and Forecast (CF) variable naming conventions. The detailed structure of the TAD common variable naming convention and its application in TAD development will be presented.

  9. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD): User Interface Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, A. L., III; Early, A. B.; Chen, G.; Parker, L.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has conducted airborne tropospheric chemistry studies for about three decades. These field campaigns have generated a great wealth of observations, which are characterized by a wide range of trace gases and aerosol properties. The airborne observational data have often been used in assessment and validation of models and satellite instruments. The ASDC Toolset for Airborne Data (TAD) is being designed to meet the user community needs for manipulating aircraft data for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. Given the sheer volume of data variables across field campaigns and instruments reporting data on different time scales, this data is often difficult and time-intensive for researchers to analyze. The TAD web application is designed to provide an intuitive user interface (UI) to facilitate quick and efficient discovery from a vast number of airborne variables and data. Users are given the option to search based on high-level parameter groups, individual common names, mission and platform, as well as date ranges. Experienced users can immediately filter by keyword using the global search option. Once the user has chosen their required variables, they are given the option to either request PI data files based on their search criteria or create merged data, i.e. geo-located data from one or more measurement PIs. The purpose of the merged data feature is to allow users to compare data from one flight, as not all data from each flight is taken on the same time scale. Time bases can be continuous or based on the time base from one of the measurement time scales and intervals. After an order is submitted and processed, an ASDC email is sent to the user with a link for data download. The TAD user interface design, application architecture, and proposed future enhancements will be presented.

  10. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  11. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  12. NASA LaRC FIB Multi-Channel Anemometry Recording System-User's Manual. [conducted at the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sherylene (Compiler); Bertelrud, Arild (Compiler); Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report is part of a series of reports describing a flow physics high-lift experiment conducted in NASA Langley Research Center's Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) in 1996. The anemometry system used in the experiment was originally designed for and used in flight tests with NASA's Boeing 737 airplane. Information that may be useful in the evaluation or use of the experimental data has been compiled. The report also contains details regarding record structure, how to read the embedded time code, as well as the output file formats used in the code reading the binary data.

  13. Sources, paths, and concepts for reduction of noise in the test section of the NASA Langley 4x7m wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    NASA is investigating the feasibility of modifying the 4x7m Wind Tunnel at the Langley Research Center to make it suitable for a variety of aeroacoustic testing applications, most notably model helicopter rotors. The amount of noise reduction required to meet NASA's goal for test section background noise was determined, the predominant sources and paths causing the background noise were quantified, and trade-off studies between schemes to reduce fan noise at the source and those to attenuate the sound generated in the circuit between the sources and the test section were carried out. An extensive data base is also presented on circuit sources and paths.

  14. Observations of the spectral dependence of linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Linear particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust-dominated aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of aerosol containing locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm, respectively. The depolarization in the smoke case may be explained by the presence of coated soot aggregates. We note that in these specific case studies, the linear particle depolarization ratio for smoke and dust-dominated aerosol are more similar at 355 nm than at 532 nm, having possible implications for using the particle depolarization ratio at a single wavelength for aerosol typing.

  15. Observations of the spectral dependence of particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    Particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 (HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm. The depolarization in the smoke case is inferred to be due to the presence of coated soot aggregates. We also point out implications for the upcoming EarthCARE satellite, which will measure particle depolarization ratio only at 355 nm. At 355 nm, the particle depolarization ratios for all three of our case studies are very similar, indicating that smoke and dust may be more difficult to separate with EarthCARE measurements than heretofore supposed.

  16. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The role of the NASA Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests that were performed during calendar year 1989 in the NASA Langley Research Center test facilities are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the NASA Langley Research Center are illustrated along with the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1989 are described in Research and Technology 1989 - Langley Research Center.

  17. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The role of NASA-Langley is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests are highlighted which were performed during 1990 in the NASA-Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1990 are described in Research and Technology 1990 Langley Research Center.

  18. Langley's views on NEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The views of the Langley Research Center regarding the NASA Equipment Management System (EMS) are discussed. One of Langley's greatest concerns is with the reconciliation between NEMS and the General Ledger. Langley's accounting system tracks cost data to the penny level. NEMS deals in whole dollar amounts. Therefore, Langley has no way of reconciling the two. The only approach that is acceptable to Langley, unless requirements for reconciliation are changed, is for the NEMS files and the reports involved in the process be at the penny level. All other NEMS reports can remain whole dollars. Also to reconcile, Langley needs data to show the difference between the previous cost and the new cost for the month. On an input record, the adjustment amount is added to the cost and recorded as total amount. The adjusted cost is not captured. In order to establish a control between the prior months and the current month, a new field needs to be added to capture the adjusted cost (debits And credits). Langley has not reconciled the Equipment account with the General Ledger since February 1984. Problems with NEMS regular production runs cause concern. Production at Langley is run on the second and/or third shift. If a run(s) terminates and/or abends in a particular module, Langley must wait until the next day to resolve NEMS problems after consultation with Headquarters personnel. For a successful installation, Langley must have a good data base to convert to NEMS and users and the data processing staff must work together.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  20. The 1992 NASA Langley Measurement Technology Conference: Measurement Technology for Aerospace Applications in High-Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Editor); Antcliff, Richard R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An intensive 2-day conference to discuss the current status of measurement technology in the areas of temperature/heat flux, stress/strain, pressure, and flowfield diagnostics for high temperature aerospace applications was held at Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, on April 22 and 23, 1993. Complete texts of the papers presented at the Conference are included in these proceedings.

  1. Does Cloud Computing in the Atmospheric Sciences Make Sense? A case study of hybrid cloud computing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L.; Chee, T.; Minnis, P.; Spangenberg, D.; Ayers, J. K.; Palikonda, R.; Vakhnin, A.; Dubois, R.; Murphy, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The processing, storage and dissemination of satellite cloud and radiation products produced at NASA Langley Research Center are key activities for the Climate Science Branch. A constellation of systems operates in sync to accomplish these goals. Because of the complexity involved with operating such intricate systems, there are both high failure rates and high costs for hardware and system maintenance. Cloud computing has the potential to ameliorate cost and complexity issues. Over time, the cloud computing model has evolved and hybrid systems comprising off-site as well as on-site resources are now common. Towards our mission of providing the highest quality research products to the widest audience, we have explored the use of the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud and Storage and present a case study of our results and efforts. This project builds upon NASA Langley Cloud and Radiation Group's experience with operating large and complex computing infrastructures in a reliable and cost effective manner to explore novel ways to leverage cloud computing resources in the atmospheric science environment. Our case study presents the project requirements and then examines the fit of AWS with the LaRC computing model. We also discuss the evaluation metrics, feasibility, and outcomes and close the case study with the lessons we learned that would apply to others interested in exploring the implementation of the AWS system in their own atmospheric science computing environments.

  2. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  3. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  4. Vibration attenuation of the NASA Langley evolutionary structure experiment using H(sub infinity) and structured singular value (micron) robust multivariable control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The use is studied of active control to attenuate structural vibrations of the NASA Langley Phase Zero Evolutionary Structure due to external disturbance excitations. H sub infinity and structured singular value (mu) based control techniques are used to analyze and synthesize control laws for the NASA Langley Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) Evolutionary Model (CEM). The CEM structure experiment provides an excellent test bed to address control design issues for large space structures. Specifically, control design for structures with numerous lightly damped, coupled flexible modes, collocated and noncollocated sensors and actuators and stringent performance specifications. The performance objectives are to attenuate the vibration of the structure due to external disturbances, and minimize the actuator control force. The control design problem formulation for the CEM Structure uses a mathematical model developed with finite element techniques. A reduced order state space model for the control design is formulated from the finite element model. It is noted that there are significant variations between the design model and the experimentally derived transfer function data.

  5. Formative and summative evaluation efforts for the Teacher Enhancement Institute conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, summer 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Randal D.

    1994-01-01

    The Teacher Enhancement Institute (TEI) at NASA Langley Research Center was developed in response to Executive Order 12821 which mandates national laboratories to 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents, and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science. Such programs, to the maximum extent possible, shall involve partnerships with universities, state and local elementary and secondary school authorities, corporations and community based organizations'. The faculty worked closely with one another and the invited speakers to insure that the sessions supported the objectives. Speakers were informed of the objectives and given guidance concerning form and function for the session. Faculty members monitored sessions to assist speakers and to provide a quality control function. Faculty provided feedback to speakers concerning general objective accomplishment. Participant comments were also provided when applicable. Post TEI surveys asked for specific comments about each TEI session. During the second of the two, two week institutes, daily critiques were provided to the participants for their reflection. This seemed to provide much improved feedback to speakers and faculty because the sessions were fresh in each participant's mind. Between sessions one and two, some changes were made to the program as a result of the formative evaluation process. Those changes, though, were minor in nature and comprised what may be called 'fine tuning' a well conceived and implemented program. After the objectives were written, an assessment instrument was developed to test the accomplishment of the objectives. This instrument was actually two surveys, one given before the TEI and one given after the TEI. In using such a series, it was expected that changes in the participants induced by attendance at TEI may be

  6. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Evaluation of initial perforated configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Clukey, Patricia G.; Stack, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial evaluation of a large-chord, swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating an active laminar-flow-control (LFC) suction system with a perforated upper surface is documented in a chronological manner, and the deficiencies in the suction capability of the perforated panels as designed are described. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Also included is an evaluation of the influence of the proximity of the tunnel liner to the upper surface of the airfoil pressure distribution.

  7. HL-20 at Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center lifting body, called the HL-20, is shown here in front of the hangar. The HL-20 was one of two concepts considered by NASA as a type of Personnel Launch System (PLS). In essence, it would serve as a space taxi to and from the space station. The full scale engineering model is 29.5 feet long, and 23.5 feet across the wingspan.

  8. The Langley Fitness Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley recognizes the importance of healthy employees by committing itself to offering a complete fitness program. The scope of the program focuses on promoting overall health and wellness in an effort to reduce the risks of illness and disease and to increase productivity. This is accomplished through a comprehensive Health and Fitness Program offered to all NASA employees. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  9. Pressure distribution from high Reynolds number tests of a NASA SC(3)-0712(B) airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Eichmann, O.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a NASA 12-percent-thick, advanced-technology supercritical airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents another in the series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. Test temperature was varied from 220 K to 96 K at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 4.3 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.50 to 0.80. This investigation was designed to: (1) test a NASA advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight equivalent Reynolds numbers, (2) provide experience in cryogenic wind-tunnel model design and testing techniques, and (3) demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. All the test objectives were met. The pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated format and as plots of pressure coefficient versus position on the airfoil. This report was prepared for use in conjunction with the aerodynamic coefficient data published in NASA-TM-86371. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition. Also included are remarks on the model design and fabrication.

  10. The NASA Langley Laminar-Flow-Control Experiment on a Swept Supercritical Airfoil: Basic Results for Slotted Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Clukey, Patricia G.; Stack, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of Mach number and Reynolds number on the experimental surface pressure distributions and transition patterns for a large chord, swept supercritical airfoil incorporating an active Laminar Flow Control suction system with spanwise slots are presented. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 8 foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Also included is a discussion of the influence of model/tunnel liner interactions on the airfoil pressure distribution. Mach number was varied from 0.40 to 0.82 at two chord Reynolds numbers, 10 and 20 x 1,000,000, and Reynolds number was varied from 10 to 20 x 1,000,000 at the design Mach number.

  11. Langley's DEVELOP Team Applies NASA's Earth Observations to Address Environmental Issues Across the Country and Around the Globe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Lauren M.; Miller, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    The DEVELOP National Program was established over a decade ago to provide students with experience in the practical application of NASA Earth science research results. As part of NASA's Applied Sciences Program, DEVELOP focuses on bridging the gap between NASA technology and the public through projects that innovatively use NASA Earth science resources to address environmental issues. Cultivating a diverse and dynamic group of students and young professionals, the program conducts applied science research projects during three terms each year (spring, summer, and fall) that focus on topics ranging from water resource management to natural disasters.

  12. The NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel: Historical Overview, Facility Description, Calibration, Flow Characteristics, and Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Bangert, Linda S.; Asbury, Scott C.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Bare, E. Ann

    1995-01-01

    The Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel is a closed-circuit single-return atmospheric wind tunnel that has a slotted octagonal test section with continuous air exchange. The wind tunnel speed can be varied continuously over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 1.3. Test-section plenum suction is used for speeds above a Mach number of 1.05. Over a period of some 40 years, the wind tunnel has undergone many modifications. During the modifications completed in 1990, a new model support system that increased blockage, new fan blades, a catcher screen for the first set of turning vanes, and process controllers for tunnel speed, model attitude, and jet flow for powered models were installed. This report presents a complete description of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and auxiliary equipment, the calibration procedures, and the results of the 1977 and the 1990 wind tunnel calibration with test section air removal. Comparisons with previous calibrations showed that the modifications made to the wind tunnel had little or no effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tunnel. Information required for planning experimental investigations and the use of test hardware and model support systems is also provided.

  13. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing/Slat Model. [Research conducted at the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Jeff M.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper deals with detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made to understand, and to possibly predict and reduce, the noise from a wing leading edge slat configuration. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  14. Use of the updated NASA Langley radio-controlled drop-model technique for high-alpha studies of the X-29A configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, David J.; Croom, Mark A.; Nguyen, Luat T.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the radio-controlled drop-model technique used for low-speed flight dynamics research at the NASA Langley Research Center. The overall test methodology is reviewed and the major elements of the system are discussed including model construction and equipment, the closed-loop control system, and the flight test facility. To illustrate the capabilities of the technique, selected results from an ongoing program to study the high-angle-of-attack flight dynamics of the X-29A configuration are reviewed. Three research areas are highlighted: motion prediction, control system effects, and motion analysis and modeling. Finally, several current upgrades to the overall technique are discussed along with the enhanced test capability that they will provide.

  15. NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel: Background Noise and Flow Survey Results Prior to FY05 Construction of Facilities Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel is a premier facility for model-scale testing of jet noise reduction concepts at realistic flow conditions. However, flow inside the open jet test section is less than optimum. A Construction of Facilities project, scheduled for FY 05, will replace the flow collector with a new design intended to reduce recirculation in the open jet test section. The reduction of recirculation will reduce background noise levels measured by a microphone array impinged by the recirculation flow and will improve flow characteristics in the open jet tunnel flow. In order to assess the degree to which this modification is successful, background noise levels and tunnel flow are documented, in order to establish a baseline, in this report.

  16. Modification of NASA Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel to provide a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. N.; Wieting, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A planned modification of the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to make it a unique national research facility for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems is described, and some of the ongoing supporting research for that modification is discussed. The modification involves: (1) the addition of an oxygen-enrichment system which will allow the methane-air combustion-heated test stream to simulate air for propulsion testing; and (2) supplemental nozzles to expand the test simulation capability from the current nominal Mach number to 7.0 include Mach numbers 3.0, 4.5, and 5.0. Detailed design of the modifications is currently underway and the modified facility is scheduled to be available for tests of large scale propulsion systems by mid 1988.

  17. Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Heights Derived From NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Data Acquired During TexAQS/GoMACCS, CHAPS, and MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA Langley B-200 King Air aircraft in the Mexico City metropolitan area during the Mega-city Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March 2006; in the Houston metropolitan area during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) in August and September 2006; and in the Oklahoma City area during Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) in June 2007. The HSRL instrument measures profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter and depolarization. The height of the Planetary Boundary Layer was derived by identifying sharp gradients in the HSRL 532-nm aerosol backscatter signal profiles using an automated technique based on Brooks (2003) [I.M. Brooks, Finding Boundary Layer Top: Application of Wavelet Covariance Transform to Lidar Backscatter Profiles. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 20, 1092-1105, 2003]. The technique uses a Haar wavelet covariance transform with multiple wavelet dilation values to adapt to non-ideal conditions where there can be gradients in the background signals and the boundary layer can be ill defined. The technique also identifies the top and bottom of the transition (i.e. entrainment) zone. We have further modified the algorithm to find PBL heights using HSRL backscatter data acquired during GoMACCS and MILAGRO, where complex terrain and overlying aerosol layers further complicate identifying the boundary layer. In addition, PBL heights are derived from HSRL backscatter data acquired during the CHAPS campaign, in another urban environment where the terrain is not as complex. We will describe the algorithm modifications we have made and show boundary layer heights and transition zone thicknesses for HSRL measurements over the Oklahoma City, Houston, and Mexico City areas during CHAPS, TexAQS/GoMACCS, and MILAGRO.

  18. Evaluation of the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar extinction measurements during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Obland, M. D.; Burton, S. P.; Clarke, A. D.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA LaRC B-200 King Air aircraft and measured profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) Campaign in March 2006. The HSRL collected approximately 55 hours of data over 15 science flights, which were coordinated with the Sky Research J-31 aircraft (5 flights), the DOE G-1 aircraft (6 flights), and the NCAR C-130 aircraft (4 flights). This coordinated effort in MILAGRO provides the first opportunity to evaluate the HSRL aerosol extinction and optical thickness profiles with corresponding profiles derived from the other airborne measurements: 1) the 14 channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) on the J-31 and the in situ nephelometer measurements of aerosol scattering and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) measurements of aerosol absorption from the Hawaii Group for Environment and Atmospheric Research (HiGEAR) on the C-130. This study will include comparisons of aerosol extinction from these three techniques in cases where the HSRL flew directly over the AATS-14 and HiGEAR instruments while they measured aerosol extinction profiles. The results are used in assessing the uncertainty of the HSRL extinction profiles. Column aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from the HSRL measurements is also compared with AOD derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements acquired on the Terra and Aqua spacecraft and from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) ground-based Sun photometer measurements.

  19. Collaborative Study for Analysis of High Resolution Infrared Atmospheric Spectra Between NASA Langley Research Center and the University of Denver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Langley-D.U. collaboration on the analysis of high resolultion infrared atmospheric spectra covered a number of important studies of trace gases identification and quantification from field spectra, and spectral line parameters analysis. The collaborative work included: 1) Quantification and monitoring of trace gases from ground-based spectra available from various locations and seasons and from balloon flights; 2) Identification and preliminary quantification of several isotopic species, including oxygen and Sulfur isotopes; 3) Search for new species on the available spectra, including the use of selective coadding of ground-based spectra for high signal to noise; 4) Update of spectroscopic line parameters, by combining laboratory and atmospheric spectra with theoretical spectroscopy methods; 5) Study of trends and correlations of atmosphere trace constituents; and 6) Algorithms developments, retrievals intercomparisons and automatization of the analysis of NDSC spectra, for both column amounts and vertical profiles.

  20. Collaborative Study of Analysis of High Resolution Infrared Atmospheric Spectra Between NASA Langley Research Center and the University of Denver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Aaron

    1999-01-01

    The Langley-D.U. collaboration on the analysis of high resolution infrared atmospheric spectra covered a number of important studies of trace gases identification and quantification from field spectra, and spectral line parameters analysis. The collaborative work included: Quantification and monitoring of trace gases from ground-based spectra available from various locations and seasons and from balloon flights. Studies toward identification and quantification of isotopic species, mostly oxygen and Sulfur isotopes. Search for new species on the available spectra. Update of spectroscopic line parameters, by combining laboratory and atmospheric spectra with theoretical spectroscopy methods. Study of trends of atmosphere trace constituents. Algorithms developments, retrievals intercomparisons and automatization of the analysis of NDSC spectra, for both column amounts and vertical profiles.

  1. X-33 (Rev-F) Aeroheating Results of Test 6770 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Liechty, Derek S.

    1999-01-01

    Aeroheating characteristics of the X-33 Rev-F configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel (Test 6770). Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.013-scale model at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 4.9 million; and body-flap deflections of 10-deg and 20-deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, and location, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-33 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  2. Development of test methods for scale model simulation of aerial applications in the NASA Langley Vortex Research Facility. [agricultural aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, F. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    As part of basic research to improve aerial applications technology, methods were developed at the Langley Vortex Research Facility to simulate and measure deposition patterns of aerially-applied sprays and granular materials by means of tests with small-scale models of agricultural aircraft and dynamically-scaled test particles. Interactions between the aircraft wake and the dispersed particles are being studied with the objective of modifying wake characteristics and dispersal techniques to increase swath width, improve deposition pattern uniformity, and minimize drift. The particle scaling analysis, test methods for particle dispersal from the model aircraft, visualization of particle trajectories, and measurement and computer analysis of test deposition patterns are described. An experimental validation of the scaling analysis and test results that indicate improved control of chemical drift by use of winglets are presented to demonstrate test methods.

  3. The administration of the NASA space tracking system and the NASA space tracking system in Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollander, N.

    1973-01-01

    The international activities of the NASA space program were studied with emphasis on the development and maintenance of tracking stations in Australia. The history and administration of the tracking organization and the manning policies for the stations are discussed, and factors affecting station operation are appraised. A field study of the Australian tracking network is included.

  4. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1985 in Langley test facilities, are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research, are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1985 are described in Research and Technology-1985 Annual Report of the Langley Research Center.

  5. A study of NASA occupational injuries and property damage at Goddard Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of NASA's accident/injury/illness and health data was performed. The analysis included: (1) an on-site study of the existing data; (2) evaluation of the findings to develop criteria for the subsequent implementation of safety and health standards; (3) preparation of a graphical loss control assessment; and (4) recommendations to reduce accident rates.

  6. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  7. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during the calender year 1987 in Langley test facilites are illustrated. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining the U.S. leadership in aeronautic and space research are illustrated.

  8. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  9. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  10. Langley Research Center Strategic Plan for Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Sandra B.

    1994-01-01

    Research assignment centered on the preparation of final draft of the NASA Langley Strategic Plan for Education. Primary research activity consisted of data collection, through interviews with LaRC Office of Education and NASA Headquarters staff, university administrators and faculty, and school administrators / teachers; and documentary analysis. Pre-college and university programs were critically reviewed to assure effectiveness, support of NASA and Langley's mission and goals; National Education Goals; and educational reform strategies. In addition to these mandates, pre-college programs were reviewed to address present and future LaRC activities for teacher enhancement and preparation. University programs were reviewed with emphasis on student support and recruitment; faculty development and enhancement; and LaRC's role in promoting the utilization of educational technologies and distance learning. The LaRC Strategic Plan for Education will enable the Office of Education to provide a focused and well planned continuum of education programs for students, teachers and faculty. It will serve to direct and focus present activities and programs while simultaneously offering the flexibility to address new and emerging directions based on changing national, state, and agency trends.

  11. High-Speed On-Board Data Processing Platform for LIDAR Projects at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyon, J.; Ng, T. K.; Davis, M. J.; Adams, J. K.; Lin, B.

    2015-12-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program during April, 2012 - April, 2015. HOPS is an enabler for science missions with extremely high data processing rates. In this three-year effort of HOPS, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) and 3-D Winds were of interest in particular. As for ASCENDS, HOPS replaces time domain data processing with frequency domain processing while making the real-time on-board data processing possible. As for 3-D Winds, HOPS offers real-time high-resolution wind profiling with 4,096-point fast Fourier transform (FFT). HOPS is adaptable with quick turn-around time. Since HOPS offers reusable user-friendly computational elements, its FPGA IP Core can be modified for a shorter development period if the algorithm changes. The FPGA and memory bandwidth of HOPS is 20 GB/sec while the typical maximum processor-to-SDRAM bandwidth of the commercial radiation tolerant high-end processors is about 130-150 MB/sec. The inter-board communication bandwidth of HOPS is 4 GB/sec while the effective processor-to-cPCI bandwidth of commercial radiation tolerant high-end boards is about 50-75 MB/sec. Also, HOPS offers VHDL cores for the easy and efficient implementation of ASCENDS and 3-D Winds, and other similar algorithms. A general overview of the 3-year development of HOPS is the goal of this presentation.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

  13. Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS): A Collaborative Effort Between Nebraska EPSCoR and NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Implementing SATS in Nebraska will require a number of changes, both technical and administrative. SATS will require major improvements in the infrastructure of Nebraska airports. Improving airport infrastructure so that it can accommodate SATS is first and most obvious goal. A second goal is to make airports financially sustainable over the long term with limited federal assistance. A third goal, closely related to the second, is to link the implementation of SATS with anticipated local economic growth. This can leverage local funds without tax increases, enhance the equity of the finance approach, improve planning of facility size, and reduce long-term per unit cost. Many of these goals are national issues, and presumably federal policy will determine how these goals are addressed. This study examines several financing options and discusses their ease of application to Nebraska's airports.

  14. 75 FR 61519 - NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Technology and Innovation Committee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration announces a meeting of the Technology and Innovation Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The... innovation activities at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC). DATES: Thursday, October 21, 2010, 9:30...

  15. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  16. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin speaks at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin addresses the audience at the Apollo 11 anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7.

  17. First Lady Hillary Clinton is greeted by NASA Administrator Goldin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five- day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes.

  18. First Lady Hillary Clinton is greeted by NASA Administrator Goldin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Next to Gold are (from left) Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five- day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes.

  19. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin watches the STS-99 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (right) joins other spectators at the Banana Creek viewing site in cheering the successful launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-99. The perfect liftoff occurred at 12:43:40 p.m. EST. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the SRTM could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

  20. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin speaks at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (right) addresses the audience at the Apollo 11 anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex, with seating under an unused Saturn V rocket like those that powered the Apollo launches . This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7.

  1. Aerothermodynamic Testing of Protuberances and Penetrations on the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle Heat Shield in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel program is being conducted in support of an Agency wide effort to develop a replacement for the Space Shuttle and to support the NASA s long-term objective of returning to the moon and then on to Mars. This paper documents experimental measurements made on several scaled ceramic heat transfer models of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle. Global heat transfer images and heat transfer distributions obtained using phosphor thermography were used to infer interference heating on the Crew Exploration Vehicle Cycle 1 heat shield from local protuberances and penetrations for both laminar and turbulent heating conditions. Test parametrics included free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.0x10(exp 6)/ft to 7.25x10(exp 6)/ft in Mach 6 air at a fixed angle-of-attack. Single arrays of discrete boundary layer trips were used to trip the boundary layer approaching the protuberances/penetrations to a turbulent state. Also, the effects of three compression pad diameters, two radial locations of compression pad/tension tie location, compression pad geometry, and rotational position of compression pad/tension tie were examined. The experimental data highlighted in this paper are to be used to validate CFD tools that will be used to generate the flight aerothermodynamic database. Heat transfer measurements will also assist in the determination of the most appropriate engineering methods that will be used to assess local flight environments associated with protuberances/penetrations of the CEV thermal protection system.

  2. STS-79 NASA administrator Goldin greets crew after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (center, with box) greets STS-79 Commander William F. Readdy following the successful conclusion of Mission STS-79 with an end of mission landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Also climbing down from the Crew Transport Vehicle (CTV) are (from left) STS-79 Mission Specialists Carl E. Walz and Jay Apt, and Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt. To the right of Goldin are KSC Director Jay Honeycutt and Acting Associate Administrator for the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications Dr. Arnauld Nicogossian. Goldin is holding a box of m&m candy to give to U.S. astronaut Shannon W. Lucid, who returns to Earth after a record setting six month stay aboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The candy is a gift from President Bill Clinton for Lucid. M&M Mars has been supplying m&m candy to the U.S. space program for more than a decade; the gift candies for Lucid are red, white and blue to commemorate her historic flight.

  3. Marketing NASA Langley Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    A marketing tool was created to expand the knowledge of LaRC developed polymeric materials, in order to facilitate the technology transfer process and increase technology commercialization awareness among a non-technical audience. The created brochure features four materials, LaRC-CP, LaRC-RP46, LaRC-SI, and LaRC-IA, and highlights their competitive strengths in potential commercial applications. Excellent opportunities exist in the $40 million per year microelectronics market and the $6 billion adhesives market. It is hoped that the created brochure will generate inquiries regarding the use of the above materials in markets such as these.

  4. NASA Langley Open House 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Flight Research Hanger, building 1244: Aircraft on display included the B-757, T-34C, OV-10A, B-200, UH-1H, T-38A, SR-22, C-206H, Columbia 300, and the AGATE 1B. Aviatrix Elinor Smith was also at the hanger to sign autographs. In 1927 she was the youngest person to receive her pilot's license which was signed by Orville Wright. She knew many of the pioneer flyers such as Jimmy Doolittle, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart.

  5. NASA Langley Open House 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    LaRC's Gym, building 1222B. Children's activities included: Paper airplane designs, constructing Rotor Motors, building and launching straw rockets, creating kites, airplanes of the future, coloring activities, and digital pictures. There was also a demonstration of how a Wind Tunnel works.

  6. NASA Langley Open House 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic Research Lab, Aircraft Noise Research Facility, building 1208: Displays included video and flyover demos. There were also demos of passenger response to aircraft noise and acoustic phenomena, including children's activities.

  7. NASA Langley Open House 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Impact Dynamics Research Facility, building 1297: Displays included full-scale test article of fuselage section; crash test dummies, videos of recent crash tests, Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle. Children Activities included performing a crash test on a model of the gantry.

  8. Development and implementation of an electronic library tour for the NASA Langley Technical Library. M.S. Thesis, North Carolina Univ., Jul. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Nancy A.

    1994-01-01

    setting. The library featured in the electronic library tour is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Technical Library at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

  9. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  10. Pre-Test CFD for the Design and Execution of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Axdahl, Erik L.; Cabell, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing costs of physics experiments and simultaneous increase in availability and maturity of computational tools it is not surprising that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is playing an increasingly important role, not only in post-test investigations, but also in the early stages of experimental planning. This paper describes a CFD-based effort executed in close collaboration between computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists to develop a virtual experiment during the early planning stages of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing project at NASA Langley Research Center. This projects aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The purpose of the virtual experiment was to provide flow field data to aid in the design of the experimental apparatus and the in-stream rake probes, to verify the nonintrusive measurements based on NO-PLIF, and to perform pre-test analysis of quantities obtainable from the experiment and CFD. The approach also allowed for the joint team to develop common data processing and analysis tools, and to test research ideas. The virtual experiment consisted of a series of Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). These simulations included the facility nozzle, the experimental apparatus with a baseline strut injector, and the test cabin. Pure helium and helium-air mixtures were used to determine the efficacy of different inert gases to model hydrogen injection. The results of the simulations were analyzed by computing mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, and stream thrust potential. As the experimental effort progresses, the simulation results will be compared with the experimental data to calibrate the modeling constants present in the CFD and validate simulation fidelity. CFD will also be used to

  11. Langley aerospace test highlights - 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. This report highlights some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1986 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. The report illustrates both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  12. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1988 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  13. The STS-99 crew poses with NASA Administrator Dan Goldin.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Members of the STS-99 crew pose with NASA Administrator Dan Goldin underneath Space Shuttle Endeavour on KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Pilot Dominic Gorie, Goldin, and Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri. Not in the photo is Mission Specialist Janice Voss. Main gear touchdown was at 6:22:23 p.m. EST Feb. 22 , landing on orbit 181 of the mission. Nose gear touchdown was at 6:22:35 p.m.. EST, and wheel stop at 6:23:25 p.m. EST. The crew returned from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission after mapping more than 47 million square miles of the Earth's surface. This was the 97th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 14th for Endeavour, also marking the 50th landing at KSC, the 21st consecutive landing at KSC, and the 28th in the last 29 Shuttle flights.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Automated Information Security Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Automated Information Security Handbook provides NASA's overall approach to automated information systems security including discussions of such aspects as: program goals and objectives, assignment of responsibilities, risk assessment, foreign national access, contingency planning and disaster recovery, awareness training, procurement, certification, planning, and special considerations for microcomputers.

  15. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  16. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Angularity Effects of the NASA Langley UPWT on the Ares I DAC1 0.01-Scale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry C.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Onufer, Jeff T.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of the non-uniform flow angularity effects on the Ares I DAC-1 in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel are explored through simulations by OVERFLOW. Verification of the wind tunnel results are needed to ensure that the standard wind tunnel calibration procedures for large models are valid. The expectation is that the systematic error can be quantified, and thus be used to correct the wind tunnel data. The corrected wind tunnel data can then be used to quantify the CFD uncertainties.

  17. NASA's Orion Spacecraft Undergoes Water Landing Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 25, 2016, the Orion spacecraft underwent a water drop test at the Hydro Impact Basin at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Join host Eric Gillard, of NASA Langley, and g...

  18. Commission Fleshes Out Bush Administration's Space Exploration Agenda for NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2004-06-01

    A commission appointed by President George W. Bush has unanimously endorsed his plan to dramatically re-orient NASA to focus on space exploration and manned and robotic missions to the Moon, Mars, and other destinations. The 16 June report of the President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy finds that the new space agenda announced by Bush on 14 January will help the U.S. economy, security, and technological leadership, and provide educational opportunities. The report presents a series of recommendations for implementing the plan.

  19. NASA today, and a vision for tomorrow. [The NASA Administrator's Speech to the American Geophysical Union on 26 May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldin, Daniel S.

    1994-01-01

    Under the administration of Dan Goldin's leadership, NASA is reinventing itself. In the process, the agency is also searching for a vision to define its role, both as a US Government agency and as a leading force in humanity's exploration of space. An adaption of Goldin's speech to the American Geophysical Union on 26 May 1994 in which he proposes one possible unifying vision is presented.

  20. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original in Langley Research Center Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original in Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4496) AERIAL VIEW OF FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION; c. 1930. NOTE SEAPLANE TOWING CHANNEL STRUCTURE IN BACKGROUND. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  1. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4776) VIEW SOUTH THROUGH ENTRANCE CONE OF FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION, SEPTEMBER 12, 1930. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  2. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (NACA 4655) VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  3. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4933) VIEW NORTHWEST OF THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, c. 1932. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  4. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L5925) LOENING SCL-1 SEAPLANE IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, OCTOBER 1931. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  5. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L-9850) ANNUAL AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING CONFERENCE IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL; GROUP PHOTOGRAPH OF PARTICIPANTS, mAY 23, 1934. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L79-7343) AERIAL VIEW OF THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1979. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  7. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L89-07075) AERIAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1989. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L83-8341) VIEW OF FANS IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, c. 1960s. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  9. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L86-10235) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES IN 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (NACA 16900) DETAIL VIEW OF CONTROL/MONITORING STATION IN 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL, c. 1930s. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L64110) DIVING SUIT REQUIRED FOR WORKING IN 8- FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL; ROY H. WRIGHT, DESIGNER OF THE INNOVATIVE SLOTTED SECTION OF TUNNEL IS IN THE SUIT. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  12. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L79758) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES AND PERSONNEL IN THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  13. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L-90-2684) AERIAL VIEW OF THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED TUNNEL (FOREGROUND) AND THE 8-FOOT TRANSONIC PRESSURE TUNNEL (REAR). - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  14. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) AERIAL VIEW OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL IN FOREGROUND. NOTE COOLING TOWER AT LEFT CENTER. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  15. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L12000.1) ELEVATION OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL, c. 1935. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  16. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (LAL-12470) ELEVATION OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  17. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES AND PERSONNEL IN THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  18. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L86-10,257) DETAIL VIEW OF EXTERIOR OF COOLING TOWER FOR 8- FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  19. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L15337) DRAG-CLEANUP STUDIES OF THE BREWSTER BUFFALO IN THE FULL SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1938. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  20. 26. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L64792) ALBACORE SUBMARINE DRAG TESTS IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  1. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L6415) STUFFED SEAGULL ON CARRIAGE OF TOWING TANK - 1932; EXPERIMENT TO DETERMINE AERODYNAMIC QUALITIES OF BIRDS. - NASA Langley Research Center, Seaplane Towing Channel, 108 Andrews Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  2. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L27056) LOCKHEED YP-38 IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL; THIS WAS THE PROTOTYPE OF THE P-38 (LOCKHEED LIGHTNING); c. 1941. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  3. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  4. 14 CFR § 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  5. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  6. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  7. 14 CFR 1221.107 - Establishment of the NASA Administrator's, Deputy Administrator's, and Associate Deputy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... × 4 feet; (2) The Administrator's Flag has four stars; (3) The Deputy Administrator's Flag has three stars; and (4) The Associate Deputy Administrator's Flag has two stars. (b) Flags representing...

  8. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes JASON kids to NASA while handing out patches and pins. Tom Clausen and Donald James, Ames Education Office in background.

  9. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  10. Wall adjustment strategy software for use with the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel adaptive wall test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    The Wall Adjustment Strategy (WAS) software provides successful on-line control of the 2-D flexible walled test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This software package allows the level of operator intervention to be regulated as necessary for research and production type 2-D testing using and Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS). The software is designed to accept modification for future requirements, such as 3-D testing, with a minimum of complexity. The WAS software described is an attempt to provide a user friendly package which could be used to control any flexible walled AWTS. Control system constraints influence the details of data transfer, not the data type. Then this entire software package could be used in different control systems, if suitable interface software is available. A complete overview of the software highlights the data flow paths, the modular architecture of the software and the various operating and analysis modes available. A detailed description of the software modules includes listings of the code. A user's manual is provided to explain task generation, operating environment, user options and what to expect at execution.

  11. A Novel Approach to Generate Essential New CALIPSO-based Products: Biomass Burning Plume Injection Height Using CALIOP, MODIS and the NASA Langley Trajectory Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, M.; Soja, A. J.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Pouliot, G.

    2012-12-01

    There is a significant connection between biomass burning (BB) emissions, the terrestrial environment and the atmosphere, which has strong implications for feedbacks to Air Quality and to the climate system. BB has the potential to alter numerous land and atmospheric processes and their full influence to feedback to interactive systems is currently being exposed (i.e. black carbon on spring Arctic ice). The heights to which BB emissions are injected influence their transport, their interaction with clouds, which alters albedo, and their ability to modify patterns of precipitation. We are working with our applications partners, primarily the Environmental Protection Agency and regional partners, to generate BB plume injection height products using multiple platforms, sensors and models (CALIOP, MODIS, NOAA HMS, Langley Trajectory Model) that will provide value to national and international scientific and air quality communities, the CALIPSO science and algorithm teams, and to public land, fire, and air quality management and regulations communities. Specifically, we are: (1) developing mean statistics that link CALIOP air parcels and BB injection height to the variables that control these dynamics, which include ecosystems, fire-specific and meteorological variables; and (2) defining the daily evolution of smoke plumes for specific fires. Statistics that link fire behavior and weather to plume rise are crucial for verifying and enhancing plume rise parameterization in regional- and global-scale models used for air quality, chemical transport and climate.

  12. Vibration Attenuation of the NASA Langley Evolutionary Structure Experiment Using H(infinity) and Structured Singular Value (mu) Robust Multivariable Control Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Gary J.

    1996-01-01

    This final report summarizes the research results under NASA Contract NAG-1-1254 from May, 1991 - April, 1995. The main contribution of this research are in the areas of control of flexible structures, model validation, optimal control analysis and synthesis techniques, and use of shape memory alloys for structural damping.

  13. Research and Technology 1990, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The mission of NASA-Langley is to increase the knowledge and capability of the U.S. in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be executed by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other U.S. government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are presented of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activitives at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  14. Research and technology, 1989: Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year are presented. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  15. Research and technology, 1991. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are given of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology (R&T) activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  16. Comparison of options for reduction of noise in the test section of the NASA Langley 4x7m wind tunnel, including reduction of nozzle area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustically significant features of the NASA 4X7m wind tunnel and the Dutch-German DNW low speed tunnel are compared to illustrate the reasons for large differences in background noise in the open jet test sections of the two tunnels. Also introduced is the concept of reducing test section noise levels through fan and turning vane source reductions which can be brought about by reducing the nozzle cross sectional area, and thus the circuit mass flow for a particular exit velocity. The costs and benefits of treating sources, paths, and changing nozzle geometry are reviewed.

  17. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  18. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  19. The NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, J.C.; Butler, P.L.; Glassell, R.L.; Herndon, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Update of Ulysses FSAR results using updated NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-18

    The mission risk results reported in the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) issued on March 14, 1990, were based on initiating accident probabilities the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) on July 13, 1988. These probabilities were provided in terms of ranges; the geometric mean of these ranges were used in the development and presentation of the results in the FSAR for source terms, radiological consequences and risks. Subsequent to the issuance of the FSAR, DOE received a revised set of probabilities from NASA. These probabilities were presented in terms of distributions for each initiating accident and characterized by a mean and cumulative percentile values. NASA recommended that DOE use the updated probabilities to update the Ulysses FSAR results. Accordingly, at the request of DOE, this letter report has been prepared to evaluate the changes in the Ulysses FSAR results when the updated mean probabilities are used.

  1. Results for the hybrid laminar flow control experiment conducted in the NASA Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel on a 7-foot chord model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, Percy J.; Ferris, James C.; Harvey, William D.; Goradia, Suresh H.

    1992-01-01

    A description is given of the development of, and results from, the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) experiment conducted in the NASA LaRC 8 ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel on a 7 ft chord, 23 deg swept model. The methods/codes used to obtain the contours of the HLFC model surface and to define the suction requirements are outlined followed by a discussion of the model construction, suction system, instrumentation, and some example results from the wind tunnel tests. Included in the latter are the effects of Mach number, suction level, and the extent of suction. An assessment is also given of the effect of the wind tunnel environment on the suction requirements. The data show that, at or near the design Mach number, large extents of laminar flow can be achieved with suction mass flows over the first 25 percent, or less, of the chord. Top surface drag coefficients with suction extending from the near leading edge to 20 percent of the chord were approximately 40 percent lower than those obtained with no suction. The results indicate that HLFC can be designed for transonic speeds with lift and drag coefficients approaching those of LFC designs but with much smaller extents and levels of suction.

  2. Profile of software engineering within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Craig C.; Jeletic, Kellyann F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents findings of baselining activities being performed to characterize software practices within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It describes how such baseline findings might be used to focus software process improvement activities. Finally, based on the findings to date, it presents specific recommendations in focusing future NASA software process improvement efforts. The findings presented in this paper are based on data gathered and analyzed to date. As such, the quantitative data presented in this paper are preliminary in nature.

  3. Langley Medal awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  4. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Part of 81 cartons of Apollo 204 hardware and investigation data are seen in storage at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and the cartons occupy 3,300 cubic feet of Langley's storage space. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  5. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Apollo 204 command module is seen in storage at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of related hardware and investigative data occupy 3,300 cubic feet of Langley's storage space. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage at the site of all the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  6. Langley Laboratory Annual Picnic, Buckroe Beach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Wheelbarrow Race. Series of three photographs of barrel jousting competition. On the barrel to the left is Edward R. Ray Sharp, a future engineer in charge of the NACA's Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 417). Also published in in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 19).

  7. The impact of the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program on fellows' career choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Eva M.

    Maintaining diversity in the technical workforce and in higher education has been identified as one way to increase the outreach, recruitment and retention of students and other faculty from underrepresented, underserved and minority populations, especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses of study and careers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) is a professional development program targeting faculty at Minority Serving Institutions and NASA civil servant employees for a two year work-based professional development experience toward increasing the likelihood of retaining them in STEM careers and supporting the recruitment and retention of minority students in STEM courses of study. This evaluation links the activities of the fellowship program to the impact on fellows' career choices as a result of participation through a series of surveys and interviews. Fellows' personal and professional perceptions of themselves and colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about their professional capabilities as a result of selection and participation were also addressed as they related to career outcomes. The findings indicated that while there was no direct impact on fellows' choice of careers, the exposure, direction and focus offered through travel, mentoring, research and teaching had an impact their perceptions of their own capabilities and, their colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about them as professionals and researchers. The career outcomes reported were an increase in the number publications, promotions, change in career and an increased awareness of the culture of science and engineering.

  8. Langley's Space Shuttle Technology: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champine, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography documents most of the major publications, research reports, journal articles, presentations, and contractor reports, which have been published since the inception of the Space Shuttle Technology Task Group at the NASA Langley Reseach Center on July 11, 1969. This research work was performed in house by the Center staff or under contract, monitored by the Center staff. The report is arranged according to method of publication: (1) NASA Formal Reports; (2) Contractor Reports; and (3) Articles and Conferences. Disciplines covered are in the areas of aerothermodynamics, structures, dynamics and aeroelasticity, environmental, and materials. The publications are listed without abstracts for quick reference and planning.

  9. Electronic photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jack M.

    1994-01-01

    The field of photography began a metamorphosis several years ago which promises to fundamentally change how images are captured, transmitted, and output. At this time the metamorphosis is still in the early stages, but already new processes, hardware, and software are allowing many individuals and organizations to explore the entry of imaging into the information revolution. Exploration at this time is prerequisite to leading expertise in the future, and a number of branches at LaRC have ventured into electronic and digital imaging. Their progress until recently has been limited by two factors: the lack of an integrated approach and the lack of an electronic photographic capability. The purpose of the research conducted was to address these two items. In some respects, the lack of electronic photographs has prevented application of an integrated imaging approach. Since everything could not be electronic, the tendency was to work with hard copy. Over the summer, the Photographics Section has set up an Electronic Photography Laboratory. This laboratory now has the capability to scan film images, process the images, and output the images in a variety of forms. Future plans also include electronic capture capability. The current forms of image processing available include sharpening, noise reduction, dust removal, tone correction, color balancing, image editing, cropping, electronic separations, and halftoning. Output choices include customer specified electronic file formats which can be output on magnetic or optical disks or over the network, 4400 line photographic quality prints and transparencies to 8.5 by 11 inches, and 8000 line film negatives and transparencies to 4 by 5 inches. The problem of integrated imaging involves a number of branches at LaRC including Visual Imaging, Research Printing and Publishing, Data Visualization and Animation, Advanced Computing, and various research groups. These units must work together to develop common approaches to image processing and archiving. The ultimate goal is to be able to search for images using an on-line database and image catalog. These images could then be retrieved over the network as needed, along with information on the acquisition and processing prior to storage. For this goal to be realized, a number of standard processing protocols must be developed to allow the classification of images into categories. Standard series of processing algorithms can then be applied to each category (although many of these may be adaptive between images). Since the archived image files would be standardized, it should also be possible to develop standard output processing protocols for a number of output devices. If LaRC continues the research effort begun this summer, it may be one of the first organizations to develop an integrated approach to imaging. As such, it could serve as a model for other organizations in government and the private sector.

  10. The NASA Langley Multidisciplinary Uncertainty Quantification Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation of an uncertainty quantification challenge problem consisting of five subproblems. These problems focus on key aspects of uncertainty characterization, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation, extreme-case analysis, and robust design.

  11. Electronic photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Jack M.

    1994-12-01

    The field of photography began a metamorphosis several years ago which promises to fundamentally change how images are captured, transmitted, and output. At this time the metamorphosis is still in the early stages, but already new processes, hardware, and software are allowing many individuals and organizations to explore the entry of imaging into the information revolution. Exploration at this time is prerequisite to leading expertise in the future, and a number of branches at LaRC have ventured into electronic and digital imaging. Their progress until recently has been limited by two factors: the lack of an integrated approach and the lack of an electronic photographic capability. The purpose of the research conducted was to address these two items. In some respects, the lack of electronic photographs has prevented application of an integrated imaging approach. Since everything could not be electronic, the tendency was to work with hard copy. Over the summer, the Photographics Section has set up an Electronic Photography Laboratory. This laboratory now has the capability to scan film images, process the images, and output the images in a variety of forms. Future plans also include electronic capture capability. The current forms of image processing available include sharpening, noise reduction, dust removal, tone correction, color balancing, image editing, cropping, electronic separations, and halftoning. Output choices include customer specified electronic file formats which can be output on magnetic or optical disks or over the network, 4400 line photographic quality prints and transparencies to 8.5 by 11 inches, and 8000 line film negatives and transparencies to 4 by 5 inches. The problem of integrated imaging involves a number of branches at LaRC including Visual Imaging, Research Printing and Publishing, Data Visualization and Animation, Advanced Computing, and various research groups. These units must work together to develop common approaches to image processing and archiving. The ultimate goal is to be able to search for images using an on-line database and image catalog. These images could then be retrieved over the network as needed, along with information on the acquisition and processing prior to storage. For this goal to be realized, a number of standard processing protocols must be developed to allow the classification of images into categories. Standard series of processing algorithms can then be applied to each category (although many of these may be adaptive between images).

  12. NASA-Langley helicopter tower instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffel, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Background information is presented for the helicopter rotor test facility, in preface to a more detailed discussion of major subsystems equipment, including error considerations, frequency response, and display instrumentation.

  13. NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1993-01-01

    The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is a unique facility with the ability to test aircraft landing gear systems on actual runway surfaces at operational ground speeds and loading conditions. A brief historical overview of the original Landing Loads Track (LLT) is given, followed by a detailed description of the new ALDF systems and operational capabilities.

  14. Telerobotic research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy E.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of Automation Technology Branch facilities and research is presented. Manipulator research includes dual-arm coordination studies, space manipulator dynamics, end-effector controller development, automatic space structure assembly, and the development of a dual-arm master-slave telerobotic manipulator system. Sensor research includes gravity-compensated force control, real-time monovision techniques, and laser ranging. Artificial intelligence techniques are being explored for supervisory task control, collision avoidance, and connectionist system architectures. A high-fidelity dynamic simulation of robotic systems, ROBSIM, is being supported and extended. Cooperative efforts with Oak Ridge National Laboratory have verified the ability of teleoperators to perform complex structural assembly tasks, and have resulted in the definition of a new dual-arm master-slave telerobotic manipulator. A bibliography of research results and a list of technical contacts are included.

  15. NASA Administrator, U.S. Secretary of State watch STS-88 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At the Banana Creek Viewing Site, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left), U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright (center) and astronaut Michael Lopez-Alegria watch the launch of STS-88 from Launch Pad 39A at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. STS-88 is the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Lopez-Alegria is part of the STS-92 crew that is assigned to the fourth ISS assembly flight scheduled for launch on Oct. 28, 1999, aboard Discovery.

  16. NASA Now: Inflatable Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA senior research engineer Judith Watson is one of a team of engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center who are studying inflatable structures that might one day be used to establish an outpo...

  17. NASA RECON: Course development, administration, and evaluation. A research and development proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Roquemore, Leroy

    1984-01-01

    This proposal addresses the development, administration, and evaluation of a set of transportable, college-level courses to educate science and engineering students in the effective use of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems, and, in particular, in the use of the NASA RECON system. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction. Chapter 2 identifies general and specific objectives, i.e., needs analysis, course development, course administration, and course evaluation. Chapter 3 proposes the methodology to be used in successfully accomplishing these objectives. Chapter 4 highlights expected results and product deliverables, and Chapter 5 presents the project evaluation plan to be followed. Chapter 6 is a brief overview of the institutional resources available at the proposing institutions, i.e., at the University of Southwestern Louisiana and at Southern University to support the project. Chapter 7 proposes a budget, time schedule, and management plan. Chapter 8 is a summary of the foregoing.

  18. F-16: The Arrival of NASA 516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA 516, NASA Langley's F-16A Research Support Aircraft is shown on arrival at the center in late summer of 1991. Delivered from Eglin AFB, NASA 516 provided an advanced fighter capability for Langley research pilots in support of advanced Fighter Research Programs at the center.

  19. Mated aerodynamic characteristics investigation for the 0.04 scale model TE 1065 (Boeing 747-100) of the 747 CAM and the 0.0405 scale model (43-0) of the space shuttle orbiter in the NASA Langley V/STOL transition research wind tunnel (CA8), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic force data are presented in tables and graphs for the NASA Langley V/STOL Transition Research Wind Tunnel tests on a 0.04 scale model of the 747 with a 0.0405 scale Orbiter space shuttle. The investigation included the effects of flap setting, stabilizer angle, elevator angle, ground proximity, and Orbiter tailcone fairing. Data were obtained in the pitch plane only. The test was run at M = 0.15, with a dynamic pressure of 35 psf. Six static pressures were measured on each side of the 747 CAM nose to determine the effects of the Orbiter on the 747 airspeed and altitude indicators.

  20. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Apollo 204 command module is seen in storage at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of related hardware and investigative data occupy 3,300 cubic feet of warehouse storage space. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  1. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A warehouse holding Apollo 204 hardware and investigative data is seen at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of data and other related materials occupy 3,300 cubic feet. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  7. NASA Engineering and Technology Advancement Office: A proposal to the administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    NASA has continually had problems with cost, schedule, performance, reliability, quality, and safety aspects in programs. Past solutions have not provided the answers needed, and a major change is needed in the way of doing business. A new approach is presented for consideration. These problems are all engineering matters, and therefore, require engineering solutions. Proper engineering tools are needed to fix engineering problems. Headquarters is responsible for providing the management structure to support programs with appropriate engineering tools. A guide to define those tools and an approach for putting them into place is provided. Recommendations include establishing a new Engineering and Technology Advancement Office, requesting a review of this proposal by the Administrator since this subject requires a top level decision. There has been a wide peer review conducted by technical staff at Headquarters, the Field Installations, and others in industry as discussed.

  8. NASA Administrator Dan Goldin greets Neil Armstrong at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible, former Apollo astronaut Neil A. Armstrong (left) shakes the hand of Judy Goldin (center), wife of NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (right). The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7.

  9. NASA Administrator Goldin talks with STS-93 Commander Collins at the SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Shuttle Landing Facility, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (foreground) talks with STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins beside the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia following the successful completion of her mission. Marshall Space Flight Center Director Arthur G. Stephenson (far left) looks on. Landing occurred on runway 33 with main gear touchdown at 11:20:35 p.m. EDT on July 27. The mission's primary objective was to deploy the Chandra X- ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. This was the 95th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 26th for Columbia. The landing was the 19th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 12th night landing in Shuttle program history. On this mission, Collins became the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander.

  10. Structural mechanics research at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The contributions of NASA's Langley Research Center in areas of structural mechanics were traced from its NACA origins in 1917 to the present. The developments in structural mechanics technology since 1940 were emphasized. A brief review of some current research topics were discussed as well as anticipated near-term research projects.

  11. Reentry Body Stability Tests Conducted in Langley Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Reentry Body Stability Tests Conducted in Langley Spin Tunnel. Reentry body stability tests were conducted in an initial configuration, with a small drogue chute, with an extendable flare, and in an alternate configuration with a covered flare. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030957. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  13. Langley Research Highlights 1999: Advanced Aerospace Technology Clouds That Help Create the Ozone Hole Capturing Comet Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications made by NASA Langley Research Center and its university partners and industry colleagues during 1999. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. The Center's historic national role since 1917 continues in Aerospace Technology research with an additional major role in Earth Science research. Langley also partners closely with other NASA Centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Space Science and the Human Exploration and Development of Space. A color version is available at http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1999/. For further information, contact Dennis Bushnell, Senior Scientist, Mail Stop 110, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199, (757)-864-8987, e-mail address: d.m.bushnell@larc.nasa.gov.

  14. Automation of orbit determination functions for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardirossian, H.; Beri, A. C.; Doll, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides spacecraft trajectory determination for a wide variety of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions, using the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and Ground Spaceflight and Tracking Data Network (GSTDN). To take advantage of computerized decision making processes that can be used in spacecraft navigation, the Orbit Determination Automation System (ODAS) was designed, developed, and implemented as a prototype system to automate orbit determination (OD) and orbit quality assurance (QA) functions performed by orbit operations. Based on a machine-resident generic schedule and predetermined mission-dependent QA criteria, ODAS autonomously activates an interface with the existing trajectory determination system using a batch least-squares differential correction algorithm to perform the basic OD functions. The computational parameters determined during the OD are processed to make computerized decisions regarding QA, and a controlled recovery process is activated when the criteria are not satisfied. The complete cycle is autonomous and continuous. ODAS was extensively tested for performance under conditions resembling actual operational conditions and found to be effective and reliable for extended autonomous OD. Details of the system structure and function are discussed, and test results are presented.

  15. Automation of orbit determination functions for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardirossian, H.; Heuerman, K.; Beri, A.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides spacecraft trajectory determination for a wide variety of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-supported satellite missions, using the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and Ground Spaceflight and Tracking Data Network (GSTDN). To take advantage of computerized decision making processes that can be used in spacecraft navigation, the Orbit Determination Automation System (ODAS) was designed, developed, and implemented as a prototype system to automate orbit determination (OD) and orbit quality assurance (QA) functions performed by orbit operations. Based on a machine-resident generic schedule and predetermined mission-dependent QA criteria, ODAS autonomously activates an interface with the existing trajectory determination system using a batch least-squares differential correction algorithm to perform the basic OD functions. The computational parameters determined during the OD are processed to make computerized decisions regarding QA, and a controlled recovery process isactivated when the criteria are not satisfied. The complete cycle is autonomous and continuous. ODAS was extensively tested for performance under conditions resembling actual operational conditions and found to be effective and reliable for extended autonomous OD. Details of the system structure and function are discussed, and test results are presented.

  16. NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin greets Mme. Aline Chretien at launch of mission STS-96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left) greets Mme. Aline Chretien, wife of the Canadian Prime Minister, at the launch of STS-96. Looking on in the background (between them) is former astronaut Jean-Loup Chretien (no relation), who flew on STS-86. Mme. Chretien attended the launch because one of the STs-96 crew is Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency. Space Shuttle Discovery launched on time at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT to begin a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station. Along with such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment, Discovery carries about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission includes a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  17. STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk chats with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin shortly after

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine (NSAU), at left, chats with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin shortly after the landing of Columbia at Kennedy Space Center. Looking on is back-up Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, also of NSAU. STS-87 concluded its mission with a main gear touchdown at 7:20:04 a.m. EST Dec. 5, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33, drawing the 15-day, 16-hour and 34- minute-long mission of 6.5 million miles to a close. Also onboard the orbiter were Commander Kevin Kregel; Pilot Steven Lindsey; and Mission Specialists Winston Scott, Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan. During the 88th Space Shuttle mission, the crew performed experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 and pollinated plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment. This was the 12th landing for Columbia at KSC and the 41st KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program.

  18. Leadership in Space: Selected Speeches of NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, May 2005 - October 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Speech topics include: Leadership in Space; Space Exploration: Real and Acceptable Reasons; Why Explore Space?; Space Exploration: Filling up the Canvas; Continuing the Voyage: The Spirit of Endeavour; Incorporating Space into Our Economic Sphere of Influence; The Role of Space Exploration in the Global Economy; Partnership in Space Activities; International Space Cooperation; National Strategy and the Civil Space Program; What the Hubble Space Telescope Teaches Us about Ourselves; The Rocket Team; NASA's Direction; Science and NASA; Science Priorities and Program Management; NASA and the Commercial Space Industry; NASA and the Business of Space; American Competitiveness: NASA's Role & Everyone's Responsibility; Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration; The Next Generation of Engineers; System Engineering and the "Two Cultures" of Engineering; Generalship of Engineering; NASA and Engineering Integrity; The Constellation Architecture; Then and Now: Fifty Years in Space; The Reality of Tomorrow; and Human Space Exploration: The Next 50 Years.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  20. Survey of supersonic combustion ramjet research at Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Anderson, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The Hypersonic Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has maintained an active research program in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and high speed ramjet propulsion since the 1960s. The focus for this research has centered on propulsion for manned reuseable vehicles with cryogenic hydrogen fuel. This paper presents some highlights of this research. The design philosophy of the Langley fixed-geometry airframe-integrated modular scramjet is discussed. The component development and research programs that have supported the successful demonstration of the engine concept using subscale engine module hardware is reviewed and a brief summary of the engine tests presented. An extensive bibliography of research supported by the Langley program is also included.

  1. Guidelines for development of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) computer security training programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents guidance for the NASA Computer Security Program Manager and the NASA Center Computer Security Officials as they develop training requirements and implement computer security training programs. NASA audiences are categorized based on the computer security knowledge required to accomplish identified job functions. Training requirements, in terms of training subject areas, are presented for both computer security program management personnel and computer resource providers and users. Sources of computer security training are identified.

  2. Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Tanner, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has recently upgraded the Landing Loads Track (LLT) to improve the capability of low-cost testing of conventional and advanced landing gear systems. The unique feature of the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is the ability to test aircraft landing gear systems on actual runway surfaces at operational ground speeds and loading conditions. A historical overview of the original LLT is given, followed by a detailed description of the new ALDF systems and operational capabilities.

  3. Guidelines for health surveillance in the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) workplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The adequacy of biomedical data sheets used by the NASA medical staff for NASA employees and contractors was assessed. Procedures for developing medical histories, conducting medical examinations, and collecting toxicity data were reviewed. Recommendations for employee health maintenance and early detection of work-related abnormalities are given.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  5. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  6. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  7. NASA Earthdata Webinar: Improving Accessibility and Use of NASA Earth Science Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-05-08

    ... Webinar: Improving Accessibility and Use of NASA Earth Science Data Friday, May 8, 2015 Many of the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) ...

  8. Results of Aerothermodynamic and Boundary-Layer Transition Testing of 0.0362-Scale X-38 (Rev. 3.1) Vehicle in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Roback, V. Eric; Williams, George B., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The aeroheating characteristics of the X-38 Revision 3.1 lifting-body configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.0362-scale model of a proposed Space Station Crew Return Vehicle at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20 deg, 30 deg, and 40 deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 3.7 million; and body-flap deflections of O deg, 20 deg, 25 deg, and 30 deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements, which included trip height, location, size, and orientation, as well as multiple-trip parametrics, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-38 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  9. World wide web implementation of the Langley technical report server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    On January 14, 1993, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) made approximately 130 formal, 'unclassified, unlimited' technical reports available via the anonymous FTP Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). LaRC was the first organization to provide a significant number of aerospace technical reports for open electronic dissemination. LTRS has been successful in its first 18 months of operation, with over 11,000 reports distributed and has helped lay the foundation for electronic document distribution for NASA. The availability of World Wide Web (WWW) technology has revolutionized the Internet-based information community. This paper describes the transition of LTRS from a centralized FTP site to a distributed data model using the WWW, and suggests how the general model for LTRS can be applied to other similar systems.

  10. Langley's CSI evolutionary model: Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Belvin, W. Keith; Teter, John E.

    1995-01-01

    Phase 2 testbed is part of a sequence of laboratory models, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, to enhance our understanding on how to model, control, and design structures for space applications. A key problem with structures that must perform in space is the appearance of unwanted vibrations during operations. Instruments, design independently by different scientists, must share the same vehicle causing them to interact with each other. Once in space, these problems are difficult to correct and therefore, prediction via analysis design, and experiments is very important. Phase 2 laboratory model and its predecessors are designed to fill a gap between theory and practice and to aid in understanding important aspects in modeling, sensor and actuator technology, ground testing techniques, and control design issues. This document provides detailed information on the truss structure and its main components, control computer architecture, and structural models generated along with corresponding experimental results.

  11. Remote Measurement of Pollution - A 40-Year Langley Retrospective. Part 1; Temperature and Gaseous Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, Ellis E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) phased down its Apollo Moon Program after 1970 in favor of a partly reusable Space Shuttle vehicle that could be used to construct and supply a manned, Earth-orbiting Space Station. Applications programs were emphasized in response to the growing public concern about Earth's finite natural resources and the degradation of its environment. Shortly thereafter, a workshop was convened in Norfolk, Virginia, on Remote Measurement of Pollution (or RMOP), and its findings are in a NASA Special Publication (NASA SP-285). The three primary workshop panels and their chairmen were focused on trace gas species (Will Kellogg), atmospheric particulates or aerosols (Verner Suomi), and water pollution (Gifford Ewing). Many of the workshop participants were specialists in the techniques that might be employed for the regional to global-scale, remote measurements from an Earth-orbiting satellite. The findings and recommendations of the RMOP Report represent the genesis of and a blueprint for the satellite, atmospheric sensing programs within NASA for nearly two decades. This paper is a brief, 40-year retrospective of those instrument developments that were an outgrowth of the RMOP activity. Its focus is on satellite measurement capabilities for temperature and gaseous species that were demonstrated by atmospheric technologists at the Langley Research Center. Limb absorption by solar occultation, limb infrared radiometry, and gas filter correlation radiometry techniques provided significant science data, so they are emphasized in this review.

  12. Computer Science Research at Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S. J. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A workshop was held at Langley Research Center, November 2-5, 1981, to highlight ongoing computer science research at Langley and to identify additional areas of research based upon the computer user requirements. A panel discussion was held in each of nine application areas, and these are summarized in the proceedings. Slides presented by the invited speakers are also included. A survey of scientific, business, data reduction, and microprocessor computer users helped identify areas of focus for the workshop. Several areas of computer science which are of most concern to the Langley computer users were identified during the workshop discussions. These include graphics, distributed processing, programmer support systems and tools, database management, and numerical methods.

  13. Optics at langley research center.

    PubMed

    Crumbly, K H

    1970-02-01

    The specialized tools of optics have played an important part in Langley's history of aeronautical and space research. Schlieren systems for photographing aeronautics and space models in wind-tunnel investigations have contributed to the available knowledge of aerodynamics. Optics continues to be an important part of Langley's research program, including new techniques for measuring the sensitivity of photomultiplier tubes, spectrographic techniques for radiation measurements of wind-tunnel models, research into large orbiting telescopes, horizon definition by ir radiation measurements, spectra of natural and artificial meteors, measurement of clear air turbulence utilizing lasers, and many others. PMID:20076187

  14. Cost efficient operations: Challenge from NASA administrator and lessons learned from hunting sacred cows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Casasanta, Ralph; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Hawkins, Frederick J.; Burke, Eugene S., Jr.; Todd, Jacqueline E.; Bell, Jerome A.; Miller, Raymond E.; Willoughby, John K.; Gardner, Jo Anne

    1996-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations that resulted from NASA's Hunting Sacred Cows Workshop are summarized, where a sacred cow is a belief or assumption that is so well established that it appears to be unreasonably immune to criticism. A link was identified between increased complexity and increased costs, especially in relation to automation and autonomy. An identical link was identified for outsourcing and commercialization. The work of NASA's Cost Less team is reviewed. The following conclusions were stated by the Cost Less team and considered at the workshop: the way Nasa conducts business must change; NASA makes its best contributions to the public areas not addressed by other government organizations; the management tool used for the last 30 years is no longer suitable; the most important work on any program or project is carried out before the development or operations stages; automation should only be used to achieve autonomy if the reasons for automation are well understood, and NASA's most critical resources are its personnel.

  15. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  16. A Historical Perspective on Dynamics Testing at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Hanks, Brantley R.

    2000-01-01

    The experience and advancement of Structural dynamics testing for space system applications at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) over the past four decades is reviewed. This experience began in the 1960's with the development of a technology base using a variety of physical models to explore dynamic phenomena and to develop reliable analytical modeling capability for space systems. It continued through the 1970's and 80's with the development of rapid, computer-aided test techniques, the testing of low-natural frequency, gravity-sensitive systems, the testing of integrated structures with active flexible motion control, and orbital flight measurements, It extended into the 1990's where advanced computerized system identification methods were developed for estimating the dynamic states of complex, lightweight, flexible aerospace systems, The scope of discussion in this paper includes ground and flight tests and summarizes lessons learned in both successes and failures.

  17. NASA LIVE Creating a Global Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townes-Young, Katrina L.; Ewing, Virginia R.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes NASA LIVE (Learning through Interactive Videoconferencing Experiences), a free series of videoconferencing programs produced by NASA's Langley Center for Distance Learning in Hampton, Virginia. NASA LIVE is designed for K-12 educators and students, allowing teachers and students to interact with NASA experts in a virtual…

  18. Geared-elevator flutter study. [wind tunnel tests of transonic flutter effects on control surfaces of supersonic transport tail assemblies, conducted in a NASA-Langley transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Gregory, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was made of the transonic flutter characteristics of a supersonic transport tail assembly model having an all-movable, horizontal tail with a geared elevator. Two model configurations, namely, one with a gear-elevator (2.8 to 1.0 gear ratio) and one with locked-elevator (1.0 to 1.0 gear ratio), were flutter tested in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel with an empennage cantilever-mounted on a sting. The geared-elevator configuration fluttered experimentally at about 20% higher dynamic pressures than the locked-elevator configuration. The experimental flutter dynamic pressure boundaries for both configurations were nearly flat over a Mach number range from 0.9 to 1.1. Flutter calculations (mathematical models) were made for the geared-elevator configuration using three subsonic lifting-surface methods. In one method, the elevator was treated as a discrete surface, and in the other two methods, the stabilizer and elevator were treated as a single warped-surface with the primary difference between these two methods being in the mathematical implementation used. A comparison of the experimental and analytical results shows that the discrete-elevator method predicted best the experimental flutter dynamic pressure level. However, the single warped-surface methods predicts more closely the experimental flutter frequencies and Mach number trends.

  19. Risk management. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Interim rule adopted as final with changes.

    PubMed

    2000-11-22

    This is a final rule amending the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to emphasize considerations of risk management, including safety, security (including information technology security), health, export control, and damage to the environment, within the acquisition process. This final rule addresses risk management within the context of acquisition planning, selecting sources, choosing contract type, structuring award fee incentives, administering contracts, and conducting contractor surveillance.

  20. Guidelines for developing NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk management plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents guidance to NASA Computer security officials for developing ADP security risk management plans. The six components of the risk management process are identified and discussed. Guidance is presented on how to manage security risks that have been identified during a risk analysis performed at a data processing facility or during the security evaluation of an application system.

  1. Review of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA has planned a supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research since the mid-1970's. With the approval of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program as a FY 1984 new start, Congress requested an assessment of the program's objectives, projected short- and long-term uses, program design, computer architecture, user needs, and handling of proprietary and classified information. Specifically requested was an examination of the merits of proceeding with multiple high speed processor (HSP) systems contrasted with a single high speed processor system. The panel found NASA's objectives and projected uses sound and the projected distribution of users as realistic as possible at this stage. The multiple-HSP, whereby new, more powerful state-of-the-art HSP's would be integrated into a flexible network, was judged to present major advantages over any single HSP system.

  2. Guidelines for contingency planning NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk reduction decision studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Guidance is presented to NASA Computer Security Officials for determining the acceptability or unacceptability of ADP security risks based on the technical, operational and economic feasibility of potential safeguards. The risk management process is reviewed as a specialized application of the systems approach to problem solving and information systems analysis and design. Reporting the results of the risk reduction analysis to management is considered. Report formats for the risk reduction study are provided.

  3. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  4. Remote Measurement of Pollution-A 40-Year Langley Retrospective. Part 2; Aerosols and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, Ellis E.

    2012-01-01

    A workshop was convened in 1971 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on the Remote Measurement of Pollution (RMOP), and the findings and recommendations of its participants are in a NASA Special Publication (NASA SP-285). The three primary workshop panels and their chairmen were focused on trace gas species (Will Kellogg), atmospheric particulates or aerosols (Verner Suomi), and water pollution (Gifford Ewing). Many of the workshop participants were specialists in the techniques that might be employed for regional to global-scale, remote measurements of the atmospheric parameters from Earth-orbiting satellites. In 2011 the author published a 40-year retrospective (or Part I) of the instrumental developments that were an outgrowth of the RMOP panel headed by Will Kellogg, i.e., on atmospheric temperature and gaseous species. The current report (or Part II) is an analogous retrospective of the vision of the panel led by Verner Suomi for the measurement of particulates (or aerosols) and clouds and for their effects on Earth s radiation budget. The class of measurement techniques includes laser radar or lidar, solar occultation, limb emission and scattering, nadir-viewing photometry or radiometry, and aerosol polarimetry. In addition, the retrospective refers to the scientific imperatives that led to those instrument developments of 1971-2010. Contributions of the atmospheric technologists at the Langley Research Center are emphasized, and their progress is placed in the context of the parallel and complementary work from within the larger atmospheric science community.

  5. NASA Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Technology Utilization House, called Tech House, was designed and constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, to demonstrate new technology that is available or will be available in the next several years and how the application of aerospace technology could help advance the homebuilding industry. Solar energy use, energy and water conservation, safety, security, and cost were major considerations in adapting the aerospace technology to the construction of Tech House.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  7. The astrophysics program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Three broad themes characterize the goals of the Astrophysics Division at NASA. These are obtaining an understanding of the origin and evolution of the universe, the fundamental laws of physics, and the birth and evolutionary cycle of galaxies, stars, planets and life. These goals are pursued through contemporaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum with high sensitivity and resolution. The strategy to accomplish these goals is fourfold: the establishment of long term space based observatories implemented through the Great Observatories program; attainment of crucial bridging and supporting measurements visa missions of intermediate and small scope conducted within the Explorer, Spacelab, and Space Station Attached Payload Programs; enhancement of scientific access to results of space based research activities through an integrated data system; and development and maintenance of the scientific/technical base for space astrophysics programs through the research and analysis and suborbital programs. The near term activities supporting the first two objectives are discussed.

  8. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  10. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  11. The 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Plume Study. Volume 2: Data listings for NASA Cessna aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Lee, R. B., III; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The data reported are these measured onboard the NASA Langley chartered Cessna aircraft. Data include ozone, nitrogen oxides, light scattering coefficient, temperature, dewpoint, and aircraft altitude.

  12. Langley 16- Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Burkett, Cecil G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements on wind tunnel models. The system was developed and installed by PSP Team personnel of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch and the Advanced Measurement and Diagnostics Branch. A discussion of the results of the validation test follows a description of the system and a description of the test.

  13. Langley Research Center Metrology Program status for fiscal year 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the Langley Research Center's metrology program for fiscal year 1987 is presented. The NASA Metrology Information System, which was operational for the entire year, provided the majority of performance data describing work analysis, turnaround time, out-of-tolerance instrument data, and other instrument service data. Calibration system development, equipment replacing and updating, status of last year's planned objectives, and Reference Standard certification requirements are described. The status of the LaRC voltage and resistance measurement assurance program and the agency-wide resistance program are reviewed. Progress on fiscal year 1987 objectives is discussed and fiscal year 1988 objectives are stated.

  14. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of phase 4: Knowledge and attitudes survey, academic and industrial personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Glassman, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback from engineers and scientists in the academic and industrial community provided an assessment of the usage and perceived quality of NASA Langley generated STI and the familiarity and usage of selected NASA publications and services and identified ways to increase the accessibility of Langley STI. The questionnaire utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the seven objectives for Phase IV. From a contact list of nearly 1,200 active industrial and academic researchers, approximately 600 addresses were verified. The 497 persons who agreed to participate were mailed questionnaires. The 381 completed questionnaires received by the cutoff date were analyzed. Based on the survey findings, recommendations were made for increasing the familiarity with and use of NASA and Langley STI and selected NASA publications and services. In addition, recommendations were made for increasing the accessibility of Langley STI.

  15. NASA fills key positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe has named Shannon Lucid, a NASA astronaut and veteran of five Space Shuttle flights, to serve as the agency's chief scientist. Lucid replaces Kathie Olsen, whom President Bush has said he intends to nominate as associate administrator for science in the White Office of Science and Technology Policy.President Bush also has announced his intention to nominate former NASA astronaut and Assistant Deputy Administrator Major General Charles F. Bolden as NASA Deputy Administrator.

  16. A Historical Perspective on Dynamics Testing at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2000-01-01

    The history of structural dynamics testing research over the past four decades at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is reviewed. Beginning in the early sixties, Langley investigated several scale model and full-scale spacecraft including the NIMBUS and various concepts for Apollo and Viking landers. Langley engineers pioneered the use of scaled models to study the dynamics of launch vehicles including Saturn I, Saturn V, and Titan III. In the seventies, work emphasized the Space Shuttle and advanced test and data analysis methods. In the eighties, the possibility of delivering large structures to orbit by the Space Shuttle shifted focus towards understanding the interaction of flexible space structures with attitude control systems. Although Langley has maintained a tradition of laboratory-based research, some flight experiments were supported. This review emphasizes work that, in some way, advanced the state of knowledge at the time.

  17. Historical perspectives on thermostructural research at the NACA Langley Aeronautical Laboratory from 1948 to 1958

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenfels, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the early research on structural problems produced by aerodynamic heating, conducted at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics from 1948 to 1958 is described. That was the last decade of the NACA; in 1958 NACA became the nucleus of NASA. The NACA initially contracted for research but was aware that a well-equipped and suitably staffed laboratory was required to fulfill its obligations. Langley was established in 1920; the other listed were added during the NACA expansion in the World War II years. Some specific research activities are described, starting with calculation of the temperature of the structure.

  18. A historical overview of tiltrotor aeroelastic research at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    The Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey which is being developed for the U.S. Military is a tiltrotor aircraft combining the versatility of a helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop airplane. The V-22 represents a tiltrotor lineage which goes back over forty years, during which time contributions to the technology base needed for its development were made by both government and industry. NASA Langley Research Center has made substantial contributions to tiltrotor technology in several areas, in particular in the area of aeroelasticity. The purpose of this talk is to present a summary of the tiltrotor aeroelastic research conducted at Langley which has contributed to that technology.

  19. Status of advanced airfoil tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, C. L.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A joint NASA/U.S. industry program to test advanced technology airfoils in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Tunnel (TCT) was formulated under the Langley ACEE Project Office. The objectives include providing U.S. industry an opportunity to compare their most advanced airfoils to the latest NASA designs by means of high Reynolds number tests in the same facility. At the same time, industry would again experience in the design and construction of cryogenic test techniques. The status and details of the test program are presented. Typical aerodynamic results obtained, to date, are presented at chord Reynolds number up to 45 x 10(6) and are compared to results from other facilities and theory. Details of a joint agreement between NASA and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsantalt fur Luft- and Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR) for tests of two airfoils are also included. Results of these tests will be made available as soon as practical.

  20. NASA's Single-Pilot Operations Technical Interchange Meeting: Proceedings and Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comerford, Doreen; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel B.; Wu, Shu-Chieh; Mogford, Richard H.; Battiste, Vernol; Johnson, Walter W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center are jointly investigating issues associated with potential concepts, or configurations, in which a single pilot might operate under conditions that are currently reserved for a minimum of two pilots. As part of early efforts, NASA Ames Research Center hosted a technical interchange meeting in order to gain insight from members of the aviation community regarding single-pilot operations (SPO). The meeting was held on April 10-12, 2012 at NASA Ames Research Center. Professionals in the aviation domain were invited because their areas of expertise were deemed to be directly related to an exploration of SPO. NASA, in selecting prospective participants, attempted to represent various relevant sectors within the aviation domain. Approximately 70 people representing government, academia, and industry attended. A primary focus of this gathering was to consider how tasks and responsibilities might be re-allocated to allow for SPO.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1996. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague.

  2. Use of Convex supercomputers for flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1992-01-01

    The use of the Convex Computer Corporation supercomputers for flight simulation is discussed focusing on a real-time input/output system for supporting the flight simulation. The flight simulation computing system is based on two single processor control data corporation CYBER 175 computers, coupled through extended memory. The Advanced Real-Time Simulation System for digital data distribution and signal conversion is a state-of-the-art, high-speed fiber-optic-based, ring network system which is based on the computer automated measurement and control technology.

  3. Topics in landing gear dynamics research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. G., Jr.; Tanner, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Four topics in landing gear dynamics are discussed. Three of these topics are subjects of recent research: tilt steering phenomenon, water spray ingestion on flooded runways, and actively controlled landing gear. The fourth topic is a description of a major facility recently enhanced in capability.

  4. Evaluating of NASA-Langley Research Center explosion seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, H. E.; Wittman, R.

    1977-01-01

    An explosion bonding technique to meet current fabrication requirements was demonstrated. A test program was conducted on explosion bonded joints, compared to fusion joints in 6061-T6 aluminum. The comparison was made in required fixtures, non-destructive testing, static strength and fatigue strength.

  5. NASA. Langley Research Center dry powder towpreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Dry powder polymer impregnated carbon fiber tows were produced for preform weaving and composite materials molding applications. In the process, fluidized powder is deposited on spread tow bundles and melted on the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. Unit design theory and operating correlations were developed to provide the basis for scale up of the process to commercial operation. Special features of the operation are the pneumatic tow spreader, fluidized bed, resin feeder, and quality control system. Bench scale experiments, at tow speeds up to 50 cm/sec, demonstrated that process variables can be controlled to produce weavable LARC-TPI carbon fiber towpreg. The towpreg made by the dry powder process was formed into unidirectional fiber moldings and was woven and molded into preform material of good quality.

  6. Emerging CFD Capabilities and Outlook: A NASA Langley Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Pao, S. Paul; Thomas, James L.

    2004-01-01

    COMSAC goals include increasing the acceptance of CFD as a viable tool for S&C predictions, as well as to focus CFD development and improvement towards the needs of the S&C community. We view this as a symbiotic relationship, with increasing improvement of CFD promoting increasing acceptance by the S&C community, and increasing acceptance spurring further improvements. In this presentation we want to provide an overview for the non CFD expert of current CFD strengths and weaknesses, as well as to highlight a few emerging capabilities that we feel will lead toward increased usefulness in S&C applications.

  7. Airbreathing Hypersonic Systems Focus at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Rausch, Vincent L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vehicle design matrix, reflects on the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix and to focus/advance systems technology maturation. Priority is given to the design of the vision operational vehicles followed by flow-down requirements to flight demonstrator vehicles and their design for eventual consideration in the Future-X Program.

  8. Summary of NASA Langley's pilot scan behavior research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.; Harris, R. L., Sr.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the information acquired in a series of basic studies designed to obtain an understanding of the pilot's scanning behavior. In the studies, use was made of an oculometer system which operates by shining a beam of collimated infrared light at the subject's eyes. A number of oculometer software modifications have been made to make the oculometer user-friendly and versatile. Scanning is found to be a subconscious conditioned activity. The conditioned activity of scanning is different for each pilot. There are also slight variations between test runs for the same conditions for the same pilot. This indicates that scanning is situation dependent. Attention is given to the rate of information transfer, the possibility that scanning can be disrupted, the visual approach look-point, and workload sensitive measures.

  9. NASA Langley's Approach to the Sandia's Structural Dynamics Challenge Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis G.; Elliott, Kenny B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this challenge is to develop a data-based probabilistic model of uncertainty to predict the behavior of subsystems (payloads) by themselves and while coupled to a primary (target) system. Although this type of analysis is routinely performed and representative of issues faced in real-world system design and integration, there are still several key technical challenges that must be addressed when analyzing uncertain interconnected systems. For example, one key technical challenge is related to the fact that there is limited data on target configurations. Moreover, it is typical to have multiple data sets from experiments conducted at the subsystem level, but often samples sizes are not sufficient to compute high confidence statistics. In this challenge problem additional constraints are placed as ground rules for the participants. One such rule is that mathematical models of the subsystem are limited to linear approximations of the nonlinear physics of the problem at hand. Also, participants are constrained to use these models and the multiple data sets to make predictions about the target system response under completely different input conditions. Our approach involved initially the screening of several different methods. Three of the ones considered are presented herein. The first one is based on the transformation of the modal data to an orthogonal space where the mean and covariance of the data are matched by the model. The other two approaches worked solutions in physical space where the uncertain parameter set is made of masses, stiffnesses and damping coefficients; one matches confidence intervals of low order moments of the statistics via optimization while the second one uses a Kernel density estimation approach. The paper will touch on all the approaches, lessons learned, validation 1 metrics and their comparison, data quantity restriction, and assumptions/limitations of each approach. Keywords: Probabilistic modeling, model validation, uncertainty quantification, kernel density

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  11. NASA Conference on Aircraft Operating Problems: A Compilation of the Papers Presented

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This compilation includes papers presented at the NASA Conference on Aircraft Operating Problems held at the Langley Research Center on May 10 - 12, 1965. Contributions were made by representatives of the Ames Research Center, the Flight Research Center, end the Langley Research Center of NASA, as well as by representatives of the Federal Aviation Agency.

  12. Winds of Change: Expanding the Frontiers of Flight. Langley Research Center's 75 Years of Accomplishment, 1917-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, James

    1992-01-01

    This commemorative volume highlights in pictures and text seventy five years of accomplishments of the Langley Research Center. The introductory matter features wind tunnels and their contribution to the development of aeronautics. A chronological survey details four different periods in Langley's history. The first period, 1917-1939, is subtitled 'Perfecting the Plane' which details Langley's contribution to early aeronautics with examples from specific aircraft. The second period, 1940-1957, focuses on the development of military aircraft during and after World War II. The third period, 1958-1969, tells the story of Langley's involvement with NASA and the satellite and Apollo era. The fourth period, entitled 'Charting New Courses: 1970-1992 and Beyond', treats various new topics from aerospace planes to Mars landing, as well as older topics such as the Space Shuttle and research spinoffs.

  13. Survey of NASA research on crash dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. G.; Carden, H. D.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ten years of structural crash dynamics research activities conducted on general aviation aircraft by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are described. Thirty-two full-scale crash tests were performed at Langley Research Center, and pertinent data on airframe and seat behavior were obtained. Concurrent with the experimental program, analytical methods were developed to help predict structural behavior during impact. The effects of flight parameters at impact on cabin deceleration pulses at the seat/occupant interface, experimental and analytical correlation of data on load-limiting subfloor and seat configurations, airplane section test results for computer modeling validation, and data from emergency-locator-transmitter (ELT) investigations to determine probable cause of false alarms and nonactivations are assessed. Computer programs which provide designers with analytical methods for predicting accelerations, velocities, and displacements of collapsing structures are also discussed.

  14. 77 FR 67029 - NASA Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory... are local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Building 4200, Room P- 110,...

  15. NASA Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains several articles, primarily on International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and their activities, as well as the activities of NASA administrators. Other subjects covered in the articles include the investigation of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, activities at NASA centers, Mars exploration, a collision avoidance test on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The ISS articles cover landing in a Soyuz capsule, photography from the ISS, and the Expedition Seven crew.

  16. NASA Astronauts Fly Dream Chaser Simulations May 15-17

    NASA Video Gallery

    Jack Fischer was one of four NASA astronauts to fly approach and landing simulations of Sierra Nevada Corporation's Dream Chaser spacecraft at the agency's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. T...

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1994, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannerot, Richard; Sickorez, Donn G.

    1995-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to: (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1994.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are as follows: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993 is presented.